Syracuse University
FacebookTumblrYoutube
Disability Cultural Center

Issue 14 | December 5, 2018

Index

SU HAPPENINGS!:

English Conversation Group

Holigays and Saying Goodbye to 750 Ostrom Ave – Friday, Dec. 6

 

SU NEWS!:

LGBT Resource Center Hosts Annual HoliGay, Celebrates Move to Schine

SU NEWS: Chancellor Syverud Appoints Members of Search Committee for Chief Diversity Officer

Semester Break Housing

FREE SHUTTLES for Winter Break

Undergraduates: Winter Break Employment Opportunity

The Intergroup Dialogue Program for the Spring 2019 semester

 

CALLS FOR PARTICIPANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND CONFERENCES!:

Survey Launched: Prevention of Abuse of People with Developmental Disabilities in NYS

Call for ICA 2019 Pre-Conference - Mediated Recognition: Identity, Justice and Activism – Deadline January 10th

 

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS!:

Addiction, Recovery, and the ADA

Free, Captioned, and Available Now! The New Intelligent Lives Film: Garrett Shows: I’m In Charge

Disabled in Graduate School: Mentorship, Complicated | GradHacker

Institute on Disability and Public Policy: New White Paper

Microsoft PowerPoint and Skype are getting real-time captions and subtitles

Life Without the Possibility of Parole and Disability

Greeks, Spears, and Disability in Higher Ed

Watch "Being Disabled" on YouTube (captioned)

Southeast ADA Center - ADA & Access Matters: Nov 21 - Nov 28

NYTimes.com: Trump’s New Wall to Keep Out the Disabled



SU HAPPENINGS!

English Conversation Group

If you would like to take part in the winter meetings of the ECG, you’re welcome to come every Thursday at 12:00 pm to the Slutzker Center for International Services. The meetings will be held on December 13, 20 and January 3, 10.

 

If you’re away or too busy and would like to come back to the ECG in the spring, please complete this form. We will try to have the groups start meeting as soon as classes begin (the week of January 14) therefore, the earlier you register, the sooner we can assign you to a group (some schedule adjustments may be necessary).

 

Contact Clara Vesterman if you have any questions or suggestions (cvesterm@syr.edu).



Holigays and Saying Goodbye to 750 Ostrom Ave – Friday, Dec. 6

The Syracuse University LGBT Resource Center announces our temporary relocation to the fifth floor of Bird Library beginning in 2019.

 

We are excited about the opportunities the new space will allow, including increased student traffic, improved physical accessibility, and closer to the center of campus and our partner offices in the Division of Enrollment and the Student Experience.

 

This relocation precedes the plans for our new space as part of the Schine Student Center renovation, which will offer the same exciting opportunities right in the hub of student life. (More information about Schine renovation here: https://news.syr.edu/blog/2018/11/12/progress-on-campus-framework-schine-student-center-renovation-to-commence-may-2019/ )

 

There are several ways you can help provide our old home a proper send off! 

 

1) View a slideshow of photos and remembrances about the house at 750 Ostrom Ave on our new "alumnx engagement" portal at lgbt.syr.edu/alumnx

 

2) All faculty, staff, student and community members are welcome to join us for our final official event, our annual "HoliGays" party on Thursday, December 6, 7-10 pm at 750 Ostrom ave. HoliGays offers a casual kick-off to SU's winter break with good food and even better company.

 

3) If you cannot join us in person, share your pictures of good times at the on our Facebook page, mention us on Twitter (@SULGBTRC), or Instagram (lgbt_su), too!

SU NEWS!

LGBT Resource Center Hosts Annual HoliGay, Celebrates Move to Schine

https://news.syr.edu/blog/2018/12/03/lgbt-resource-center-hosts-annual-holigay-celebrates-move-to-schine/



SU NEWS: Chancellor Syverud Appoints Members of Search Committee for Chief Diversity Officer

https://news.syr.edu/blog/2018/11/30/chancellor-syverud-appoints-members-of-search-committee-for-chief-diversity-officer 



Semester Break Housing

All residence halls will close for semester break. If you are currently living in a residence hall and will need housing December 14th – January 11th the University has arranged a few options. If you are interested in learning more, contact the University Housing and Food Services office (housing@syr.edu  or 315.443.2720).



FREE SHUTTLES for Winter Break

Accessible Bus Service to the Airport and Regional Transportation Center (RTC)

Airlines, Amtrak, Greyhound/Trailways and Megabus.

 

Full schedule:

https://gallery.mailchimp.com/b7e6e59aea8d812aa83b59e81/files/6f7a76ce-5b76-44d5-834a-512870029612/Winter_Break_RTC_Airport_Shuttle_2018_19.pdf



Undergraduates: Winter Break Employment Opportunity

A position for an undergraduate worker is available over Winter Break in a laboratory in the Biology department that studies neuronal development, primarily using zebrafish embryos. Positions are available primarily to help with the maintenance of the zebrafish facility. Tasks will involve feeding and caring for fish, and general cleaning.  

      Hours: minimum 10 hours a week; maximum 20 hours a week.

 

Please email Ginny Grieb(gmgrieb@syr.edu) with the subject line “UG work” and the following information:

  1. Electronic CV/resume and contact details (email and telephone) of at least two previous employers.
  2. What year you are currently in (Sophomore, Junior etc.)
  3. Hours that you are available to work during the week, as well as the maximum number of hours that you would like to work per week. (Morning shifts are usually 9-10.30 or 9-11 – they must start at 9 am prompt. Lunch-time and late afternoon shifts can sometimes be a little bit more flexible)
  4. Whether you would be interested in also working next semester and/or summer.


The Intergroup Dialogue Program for the Spring 2019 semester

We are offering several sections of the race & ethnicity course – Intergroup Dialogue, SOC 230/WGS 230/CFE 200 – our courses require students to submit an online placement form: http://intergroupdialogue.syr.edu/placement. To learn more about The Intergroup Dialogue Program, feel free to access our website here: http://intergroupdialogue.syr.edu/

SOC 230/WGS 230/CFE 200: Dialogue on Race and Ethnicity

Section 1:

Meets: MONDAYS 3:45 – 6:30PM

Location: 113 Euclid Avenue, Room 105

Section 2:

Meets: TUESDAYS 3:30 – 6:15PM

Location: 113 Euclid Avenue, Room 105

Section 3:

Meets: WEDNESDAYS 3:45 – 6:30PM

Location: 113 Euclid Avenue, Room 105

New York Times Columnist Charles Blow (2014) writes “race is weaponized construct used to dive and deny” (p. 1). From Ferguson to anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies of today, the significance of race and ethnicity in U.S. society is undeniable. In this intergroup dialogue course, you will engage in meaningful face-to-face conversations around issues on race and other social identities, and examine how those social identities have affected your personal story. Dialogue on Race and Ethnicity will examine racial narratives that shape the American landscape, explore historical and social processes of racial/ethnic formation, and analyze the role of social structures in reproducing racial and ethnic inequality.



CALLS FOR PARTICPANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND CONFERENCES!

Survey Launched: Prevention of Abuse of People with Developmental Disabilities in NYS

The NYS Disabilities Association and Network (NYS DAAN) is conducting a community-wide needs and gaps survey as part of the comprehensive research study being funded by the NYS Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC). The study will be used to develop a statewide strategic plan for the DDPC on the Prevention of Abuse and Neglect of People with Developmental Disabilities.

 

  • All survey respondents are expected to be over 21 and live in NYS.
  • All surveys are anonymous, and responses are encrypted for additional safety.
  • The online survey can be completed partially or in phases over time and submitted when completed. A special identification code is provided for each respondent.
  • The survey is designed to be broad based and inclusive to all segments of our statewide community. There are many opportunities for respondents to contribute additional information or ideas in addition to what is covered in the questions. 
  • Accommodations are available upon request (e.g. responses taken by phone, paper surveys)  
  • The same computer can be used for more than one survey to allow agencies an opportunity to offer their constituents a way to participate at their sites or in community-based sites and libraries. 
  • The survey will remain open until we receive our target number of responses from each of the respondent groups or December 28, 2018, whichever comes first.

 

The survey can be accessed by clicking the link: Survey: Prevention of Abuse of People with Developmental Disabilities In NYS

or  https://app.surveymethods.com/EndUser.aspx?CBEF839BC28B9C91CC 

 

This survey link can be shared with others via e-mail and posted on websites as well. 

 

Questions? Contact:

 

Kathryn Cappella

NYS DAAN

585-533-1154

585-355-8509 - cell

585-533-1362 - fax

kcappella@supportcenteronline.org 



Call for ICA 2019 Pre-Conference - Mediated Recognition: Identity, Justice and Activism – Deadline January 10th

CfP for chapters on disability, bodies, media and representation in Asia

 

Call for ICA 2019 Pre-Conference - Mediated Recognition: Identity, Justice and Activism

 

Event date: 24 May 2019, 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Washington D.C., USA

 

Venue: Main Conference Hotel

 

Deadline for proposals: 10 January 2018 (300-500 words abstract)

 

Organizers: Olivier Driessens (University of Copenhagen) and Torgeir Uberg Nærland (University of Bergen)

 

Recognition plays a crucial role in cross-boundary identity formation of individuals and groups and it is a central feature in social struggles. Charles Taylor's (1994) politics of recognition explains recognition's role in multiculturalism and cultural diversity, whereas Axel Honneth (1995) stresses the need of mutual recognition for self-actualisation, while providing an important alternative for Marxist analyses of social struggle by stressing the role of respect and esteem instead of class

conflict. Taylor and Honneth agree that liberal politics of equal rights are insufficient for a just society and that justice requires social solidarity that includes recognition of every individual's contribution

to society (McBride 2013). What their social theories overlook though is the role of media, technology and communication in crossing the boundaries between social and cultural groups, in the constitution and change of recognition and in the pursuit of social justice. Consequently, this pre-conference has two central aims: (1) to update social theories of recognition by acknowledging its mediated nature; (2) to advance post-disciplinary debates on the role of media, technology and communication in the politics of and struggles for recognition. As such, the pre-conference will contribute to a better understanding of processes of identity formation, social conflict, (mis)representation, social justice, media(ted) activism and politics. It will address these issues by bringing together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars.

 

We welcome theoretical and/or empirical contributions on questions including:

 

  1. a) mediated recognition: How does a social theory of mediated recognition look like? To what extent do media, technology and communication alter the conditions for recognition and social justice?
  2. b) identity and representation: Building on important work on recognition and the media by Cottle (2007) and Maia (2014), further work on media as sites of struggle is necessary. How can individuals and

groups gain agency in mediated recognition processes? In what ways can activist or community media influence the recognition of marginalised, minority or discriminated groups across boundaries? How does mediated recognition fuel or intersect with politics?

 

  1. c) datafication of recognition: What are the consequences for individuals, groups and their social fields when esteem is increasingly metricised and datafied, such as in Uber ratings or the Chinese Social

Credit? What do cross-national or -cultural comparative analyses teach us about the (dis)similarities of data-related recognition struggles?

  1. d) social justice: How do recognition theories shed new light on questions of media- and data-related misrecognition, non-recognition or injustice? How are social movements responding to inequalities and

(feelings of) injustice rooted in mediated and datafied misrecognition? Responses to the contributions will be given by Tanja Thomas (University of Tuebingen), Peter Lunt (University of Leicester), Maia Rousiley (Federal University of Minas Gerais) and Tanja Dreher (University of New South Wales).

 

Please email a 300-500 words proposal to Torgeir Uberg Nærland (torgeir.narland@uib.no ) by January 10, 2018.

Authors will be notified of their acceptance before January 31, 2018.

 

Please direct any questions to: Olivier Driessens (olivier@hum.ku.dk ) or Torgeir Uberg Nærland (torgeir.narland@uib.no )

 

 

We are specifically interested in chapters that focus on Asia and its different countries in relation to the themes of the book.**

 

Possible themes include but are not limited to:

  • Affective labour of bodies ·Auto-ethnographic accounts of the body in / through digital media · Celebrity bodies and the spectacles of transformation · Cinema and disability · Contemporary coverage of disability in print/online/television/radio ·  De-colonizing and de-westernising the mediated body · Disability and advertising · Disability and race ·  Disability and the media: historical perspectives ·      (Dis)Empowerments of the disabled body · Journalism and practices of othering the body · Neoliberalism, policy and austerity politics · Reality television and the body · Representing wounds and scars ·         Researching bodies and the media: frameworks and methodologies · Stigma and the body - Posthumanist and non-representational frameworks · The abject body · The body and trauma · The mediated body as spectacle · The medicalised body in the media · The objectification of the disabled body in the media

 

We invite submissions of 200-250 words chapter proposals. Deadline:

Friday, 21 December 2018

 

Submissions should also include:

  1. a)            Title of chapter
  2. b)            Author name/s, institutional details
  3. c)            Corresponding author’s email address
  4. d)            Keywords (no more than 5)
  5. e)            A short bio

 

Please send chapters to diana.garrisi@xjtlu.edu.cn  and j.johanssen@westminster.ac.uk

Commissioned chapters are around 5,000 words. The fact that an abstract is accepted does not guarantee publication of the final manuscript. All chapters submitted will be judged on the basis of a double-blind reviewing process.

NEWS & ANNOUNCEMENTS!

Addiction, Recovery, and the ADA

The NIDILRR-funded New England ADA Regional Center https://www.newenglandada.org/ has released a new publication, Addiction, Recovery, and the ADA https://www.newenglandada.org/addiction-recovery-and-ada. The publication provides information on how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to individuals in recovery from addiction to alcohol or other substances, how the ADA addresses the illegal use of drugs, and how it applies to persons who become addicted while using legally prescribed pain management drugs. The publication includes an overview of the ADA and clarifies the rights and responsibilities of individuals, employers, state and local governments, and public accommodations.

 

PDF: https://ne-ada.s3.amazonaws.com/s3fs-public/Addiction%2C%20Recovery%20and%20the%20ADA%20for%20WEB%2010.30.18_1.pdf

 

From Wendy Harbour: The US Dept of Health and Human Services’ Office of Civil Rights has set up a “one-stop shop” for the public, with links to resources about opioid use:https://www.hhs.gov/civil-rights/for-individuals/special-topics/opioids/index.html .  Please note that this page also contains a fact sheet (“Fact Sheet 2”) about drug addiction and federal disability rights laws.  While HHS doesn’t cover education, I found this fact sheet very helpful in summarizing information about an extremely complex topic.



Free, Captioned, and Available Now! The New Intelligent Lives Film: Garrett Shows: I’m In Charge

From Dan Habib: Can full inclusion happen in high school? Yes!! Garrett shows you what inclusion and self-determination look like in the new, FREE film from the INTELLIGENT LIVES Project: “Garrett Shows: I’m in Charge.” Garrett leads his own IEP meetings, interns at the middle school, works part-time, plays Unified Sports, and is focused on earning his high school diploma and attending college.

 

Share this 16-minute film with your school, organization, workplace, or family during Inclusive Schools Week (December 3-7). You can also view three other short documentaries that will open doors to college and careers for students with disabilities in your community. The film is captioned.

 

https://intelligentlives.org/transitionfilms…



Disabled in Graduate School: Mentorship, Complicated | GradHacker

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/gradhacker/disabled-graduate-school-mentorship-complicated?utm_source=Inside+Higher+Ed&utm_campaign=7ecf161916-DNU_WO20181203_PREV_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1fcbc04421-7ecf161916-197632649&mc_cid=7ecf161916&mc_eid=380f80e351



Institute on Disability and Public Policy: New White Paper

New IDPP White Paper: Accessibility in Global Governance” The (In)visibility of Persons With Disabilities. Barriers to Effective participation and Recommended Solutions.

 

Persons with disabilities still lack full access to many United Nations programs, despite the landmark Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the organization’s mandate of inclusiveness and support for human rights.

 

A study by American University’s Institute on Disability and Public Policy (IDPP), with support from The Nippon Foundation https://www.nippon-foundation.or.jp/en/ , is the first systematic attempt to examine accessibility barriers in global governance.

 

Entitled “Accessibility in Global Governance: The (In)visibility of Persons with Disabilities,”https://static1.squarespace.com/static/56b51714c6fc084aa9cd4f8b/t/5c047cf00ebbe834fbcf2c56/1543798001864/Accessibility+in+Global+Governance+Report_IDPP_December+3%2C+2018.pdf the study combines interviews with several subject matter experts with a global survey of disability rights advocates to examine the reasons behind the low levels of participation in international policy-making forums among persons with disabilities and their organizations.

 

The study highlights the social, political, economic, and technological factors that inhibit the participation of persons with disabilities. It recommends immediate actions modeled on pioneering interventions at recent U.N. and other decision-making forums and programs, which can empower more than one billion people around the world to effectively participate in global governance processes.

 

Read the full story here

http://www.idppglobal.org/news/2018/12/2/idpp-publishes-study-on-accessibility-barriers-at-united-nations-and-other-global-decision-making-forums   

 

Download the full report here  https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e5e50b39520d802638c6b3573/files/fe78274f-1e0c-4502-b8bb-f1c4a5a00ba7/Accessibility_in_Global_Governance_Report_IDPP_December_3_2018.pdf



Microsoft PowerPoint and Skype are getting real-time captions and subtitles

https://www.theverge.com/2018/12/3/18123475/microsoft-powerpoint-captions-subtitles-real-time-feature

 

https://techcrunch.com/2018/12/03/skype-launches-real-time-captions-and-subtitles/



Life Without the Possibility of Parole and Disability

DCC Coordinator Kate’s latest blog:

 

https://petroleusesletter.wordpress.com/2018/11/28/life-without-the-possibility-of-parole-and-disability/



Greeks, Spears, and Disability in Higher Ed

From Professor Kuusisto!

 

https://stephenkuusisto.com/2018/12/02/greeks-spears-and-disability-in-higher-ed/



Watch "Being Disabled" on YouTube (captioned)

https://youtu.be/PtG0DwC_6T8



Southeast ADA Center - ADA & Access Matters: Nov 21 - Nov 28

http://www.adasoutheast.org/publications/headlineTemplate.php



NYTimes.com: Trump’s New Wall to Keep Out the Disabled

From The New York Times:

 

Trump’s New Wall to Keep Out the Disabled

 

Americans have until Dec. 10 to voice their opposition to the president's “public charge” proposal.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/29/opinion/trumps-disability-public-charge.html





The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, the Syracuse University Division of Enrollment and the Student Experience, or Syracuse University. The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization. Additionally, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions. Please emailsudcc@syr.edu by 9:00 AM each Monday with your submission.

Contact

230 Schine Student Center 

303 University Place, Syracuse, NY 13244

Phone: 315-443-4486 | Fax: 315-443-0193 | E-mail: sudcc@syr.edu