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Disability Cultural Center

Issue 06 | February 22, 2019

Index

SU HAPPENINGS!:

Stories We Are Told, Stories We Tell: Explorations in Ethnographic Methods - Tuesday, February 26th

Interfaith Dialogue Dinner - Thursday, February 28th

Disability Day of Mourning (DDoM) Syracuse Vigil - Friday, March 1st

Chicago & The Black Arts Movement - Wednesday, March 20th

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Public Affairs Lecture - Monday, April 15th

 

SU NEWS!:

New CFAC Exhibit to Honor Black History and Women’s History Months 

 

CALLS FOR PARTICIPANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND CONFERENCES!:

CFP: The Essay Film Form and Animation: Intersectionality in Motion - Deadline: Friday, March 15th

Call for submissions: Pregnancy and the Media - Deadline: April 26th

 

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS!:

Syracuse Stage; “We Are Proud to Present A Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known As South West Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika Between the Years 1884-1915”; February 22 – March 3

Special Screening of “End of Life” Movie - Sunday, March 3rd

Calling All Towns: Shovel Your Crappy Snow Covered Curbs| Rooted in Rights 

Chronically Academic: ‘Not What I Paid For’: Ableism, Evaluations and the Academic Life 

New Book about Students With Intellectual Disabilities in Higher Ed 



SU HAPPENINGS!

Stories We Are Told, Stories We Tell: Explorations in Ethnographic Methods - Tuesday, February 26th

In recognition of the careers of Susan S. Wadley and Ann Grodzins Gold, the Departments of Anthropology and Religion will host a panel of renowned scholar-storytellers who work on religion, gender, and history in and beyond India. This moderated conversation highlights the ways stories are woven throughout their work. Part of the 2018-19 Syracuse Symposium exploring the theme of “Stories,” this event features Kirin Narayan (Australian National University), Joyce Flueckiger (Emory University), Corrine Dempsey (Nazareth College), and moderator Priti Ramamurthy (University of Washington).

 

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

7-9 pm

Strasser Legacy Room (220 Eggers)

For more information or to request accessibility arrangements, please contact Emera Bridger Wilson at elbridge@syr.edu.

 

Communication Access Real-time Translation (CART) services will be provided.

 

SU News story: https://news.syr.edu/blog/2019/02/18/syracuse-symposium-to-recognize-careers-of-professors-wadley-gold-feb-26/.



Interfaith Dialogue Dinner - Thursday, February 28th

“On Disability, Forgiveness, Animals, and Faith”. 6 to 8 pm in the Noble Room of Hendricks Chapel. Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m. Steve Kuusisto, University Professor and director of interdisciplinary programs and outreach in the Burton Blatt Institute, will facilitate the discussion. Among many other written works, Kuusisto is the author of “Have Dog, Will Travel: A Poet’s Journey” (Simon & Schuster, 2018). 

https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Have-Dog-Will-Travel/Stephen-Kuusisto/9781451689792

 

SU News Story on the Interfaith Dialogue

https://news.syr.edu/blog/2019/02/20/interfaith-dialogue-series-continues-feb-28-with-discussion-on-disability-forgiveness-animals-and-faith/



Disability Day of Mourning (DDoM) Syracuse Vigil - Friday, March 1st

TRIGGER WARNING: filicide, murder, death

 

People with disabilities are twice as likely as non-disabled people to be victims of violent crime. Every year, the national media covers dozens of stories about murders of people with disabilities by family members or caregivers, and much more go unnoticed. Too often, the coverage focuses on sympathy for the murderer, because they had to live with or care for a person with a disability. The message to the public is that our lives—not our deaths—are the tragedy.

On March 1st, join the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, SU Disability Student Union, the SU Disability Cultural Center, and other SU organizations, in remembering people with disabilities who lost their lives at the hands of family members or caregivers. This year's in-person vigil will be held at the Schine Student Center, in Jaberwocky Cafe, from 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm. Light refreshments will be provided, with vegetarian and gluten-free options available. You don't have to stay for the whole thing; just come in when you can.

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and Communication Access Real-time Translation (CART) will be provided. Please refrain from wearing cologne or perfume as it may overwhelm some attendees. If you need any other accommodations, please contact Priya Penner at ppenner@syr.edu by February 22, 2019.

We hold the Day of Mourning vigils to draw attention to these injustices, to commemorate the lives of victims, and demand justice and equal protection under the law for all people with disabilities. We will not forget those we have lost and will remind the world that these disabled lives had value.



Chicago & The Black Arts Movement - Wednesday, March 20th

Wednesday, March 20th

Time: 5:00 PM-7:15 PM

Peter Graham Commons, Bird Library, Room 114

 

Chicago & The Black Arts Movement; John L. Johnson Lecture. Dr. Thabiti Lewis, associate professor of English and African American Literature at Washington State University will discuss Chicago as a cultural arts center for Black art and visual culture during the Black Arts Movement (1965-1975).

 

Q & A will follow and light refreshments will be served. For more information contact Dr. Casarae Gibson at clgib100@syr.edu.



Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Public Affairs Lecture - Monday, April 15th

Watson Theatre

 

The Department of African American Studies Presents: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Public  Affairs Lecture. Celebrating 50 years of Black Studies as a core discipline and field. With Carole Henderson PhD, Jared A. Ball, PhD, Dana A. Williams, PhD. We invite you to celebrate with the Department of African American Studies a half-century of critical thought and inquiry in studying African heritage in the United States and abroad. This year’s lecture will feature a panel of leading scholars in the fields of Africana Studies across disciplines. Each will discuss the impact and importance of celebrating 50 years of Black Studies in our current political and social climate. Q & A will follow and light refreshments will be served. This is a commemorative event that you do not want to miss! For more information contact Dr. Casarae Gibson at clgib100@syr.edu.



SU NEWS!

New CFAC Exhibit to Honor Black History and Women’s History Months

https://news.syr.edu/blog/2019/02/19/new-cfac-exhibit-to-honor-black-history-womens-history-months/

CALLS FOR PARTICPANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND CONFERENCES!

CFP: The Essay Film Form and Animation: Intersectionality in Motion - Deadline: Friday, March 15th

https://essayfilmformandanimationintersectionalityinmotion.com/2019/02/01/call-for-papers/

 

12-13 June 2019. Derek Jarman Lab, London.

 

The conference explores the ways in which animated form mobilises or challenges ideas of the essay film. We, therefore, encourage submissions that engage with how animation represents complex and intersecting social issues and power relations. Major axes of social division in a given society at a given time operate not “as discrete and mutually exclusive entities, but build on each other and work together” (Collings and Bilge, 2016, p. 4). It is very challenging to convincingly visualise and configure these phenomena and how they intersect. But animation seems perfectly placed to rise to this challenge, due to its hybrid, metamorphic and pervasive tendencies.

 

Focussing on the relationship between the essay film form and animation, the conference explores animation as a set of communicative techniques which give voice to resistance to social discrimination and inequality, effectively addressing a range of human issues in all their complexity.

Looking at the intersectionality of race, class, gender and ethnicity, as part of our engagement in the understanding of diversity in contemporary societies and historically, we aim to highlight the importance of the animated essay form to communicate these messages, and to ask questions.

 

Deadline: 15 March 2019. Please e-mail abstracts (250-300 words) plus author bios (100 words) to Dr. Romana Turina rturina@aub.ac.uk  Conference organisers: Professor Paul Ward, Dr. Romana Turina and Dr. Bartek Dziadosz.



Call for submissions: Pregnancy and the Media - Deadline: April 26th

FEMINIST MEDIA STUDIES

 

Commentary and Criticism

 

19.5 PREGNANCY AND THE MEDIA

 

The broad expansion of the post-feminist media landscape of the past couple of decades brought about an increased visibility of spectacularised and idealised ideas of pregnancy – a romanticised “new momism” (Douglas and Michaels, 2004). Alongside these romanticised discourses, though, exist numerous examples of mediated pregnancies that sit outside of such glamorised and perfect representations of pregnancy.

This context has also opened up new networked spaces for people to seek and offer support online in relation to pregnancy, as well as spaces to search for or share (self-)representations of pregnancy. The editors of Commentary and Criticism invite short essays that critically consider pregnancy and contemporary media. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:

 

  • Media representations of pregnancy

 

  • Pregnancy in the media industries

 

  • Online users and communities’ uses of digital media related to pregnancy

 

  • Celebrity pregnancies

 

  • Mediated pregnancy in relation to diverse intersectionalities

including LGBTQ+, age, race, class, ability

 

  • Audiences’ consumption of mediated pregnancy

 

  • Pregnancy in the context of health communication or health policy in the media

 

  • Onscreen pregnancy and genre

 

  • Neoliberalism, pregnancy and media

 

The Commentary and Criticism section of /Feminist Media Studies/ aims to publish brief (~1000 words), timely responses to current issues in feminist media culture, for an international readership. Submissions may pose a provocation, describe work in progress, or propose areas for future study. We will also consider book and event reviews, as well as contributions that depart from traditional academic formats. We encourage all submissions to strategically mobilise critique to also offer a productive contribution to both feminist politics and media studies. Submissions must go beyond mere description in order to be considered for publication in Commentary and Criticism.

 

Please submit contributions by 26 April 2019, via email to both Melanie Kennedy (mjk29@le.ac.uk) and Safiya Noble (safiya.noble@usc.edu ). We also welcome questions and expressions of interest in advance of the deadline.

 

Submissions for Commentary and Criticism will not be correctly processed if submitted through via the /Feminist Media Studies/ site, and should be emailed directly to Drs Kennedy and Noble using the email addresses above.

 

Please be sure to follow the /Feminist Media Studies/ style and referencing guides, which can be found herehttps://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=rfms20



NEWS & ANNOUNCEMENTS!

Syracuse Stage; “We Are Proud to Present A Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known As South West Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika Between the Years 1884-1915”; February 22 – March 3

By Jackie Sibblies Drury | Directed by Gilbert McCauley | Opening Night: February 23

 

Ever wonder what it would be like to be in the rehearsal room when actors are digging ferociously into their psyches to discover a moment of revelation, or arguing heatedly over a character’s motivation? In We Are Proud to Present …, a company of six actors gathers in a rehearsal room to tell the little-known story of the first genocide of the 20th century—the extinction of the Herero tribe at the hands of their German colonizers. Along the way, they test the limits of empathy as their own stories, subjectivities, assumptions and prejudices catalyze their theatrical process. Eventually, the full force of a horrific past crashes into the good intentions of the present, and what seemed a faraway place and time comes all too close to home in this exceptional play about the sensitivities and difficulties inherent in the act of storytelling itself. Syracuse Stage has live captioning.



Special Screening of “End of Life” Movie; March 3

A film by John Bruce and Paweł Wojtasik

  

End of Life

  

Sunday, March 3, 2019

2 pm

  

Upstate Medical University

New Academic Building, Weiskotten Hall

Room NAB 4414B

766 Irving Avenue

Syracuse

  

AFTER THE FILM:

  

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion and reception with the filmmakers, Paweł Wojtasik and John Bruce; and will include members of the Syracuse-area hospice, medical, spiritual and social justice communities. The event is free and open to the public. Free parking will be available in the Irving Ave Garage and the Hillside lot. Visit http://parking.syr.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Pad-Map-North-Master-September-2018.pdf

for a parking map that also identifies the location of Weiskotten Hall.

  

The film is closed captioned. American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided for the panel discussion and the reception. For accommodations requests or other questions, please contact Bonnie Shoultz at 315-492-6341.

  

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/endoflifemovie  

  

Co-sponsors for this event include the Zen Center of Syracuse, Upstate Medical University's Spiritual Care Center, the Consortium for Culture and Medicine, Syracuse University’s Aging Studies Institute, Hendricks Chapel, the Contemplative Collaborative, and the Burton Blatt Institute’s Office of Interdisciplinary Programs and Outreach.

  

“This radiant film takes a respectful and serenely composed look at the very activity, the actual work, of dying for five individuals: Sarah Grossman, the spiritual teacher Ram Dass, Carol Virostek, Doris Johnson, and the artist, writer, and performer Matt Freedman. This is not a film of rhetoric but of concentrated and sustained attention to an area of experience at which we all arrive but from which the living flinch.”

-NY Film Fest

  

More about the film at: www.endoflifeproject.com  



Calling All Towns: Shovel Your Crappy Snow Covered Curbs| Rooted in Rights

https://rootedinrights.org/calling-all-towns-shovel-your-crappy-snow-covered-curbs/



Chronically Academic: ‘Not What I Paid For’: Ableism, Evaluations and the Academic Life

https://chronicallyacademic.blogspot.com/2018/06/not-what-i-paid-for-ableism-evaluations.html?m=1  

New Book about Students With Intellectual Disabilities in Higher Ed

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_1_30?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=people+with+intellectual+disability+experiencing+university+life&sprefix=people+with+disabilities+exper%2Caps%2C167&crid=LRO4YR3VTFGC&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Apeople+with+intellectual+disability+experiencing+university+life

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, the Syracuse University Division of Enrollment and the Student Experience, or Syracuse University. The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization. Additionally, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions. Please emailsudcc@syr.edu by 9:00 AM each Monday with your submission.

Contact

230 Schine Student Center 

303 University Place, Syracuse, NY 13244

Phone: 315-443-4486 | Fax: 315-443-0193 | E-mail: sudcc@syr.edu