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Weekly Newsletter

September, 25 2017

Table of Contents

Calls for Papers, Participants, Scholarships, and Conferences

Call for Proposals: Take away the suit and what are you? “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON 2014

Funding/networking opportunity for students interested in young people/college students and mental health

ABF Summer Research Diversity Fellowship for Undergraduates: Applications Now Open!

News and Announcements

Interested in the Disability Studies Collection from Taylor and Francis eBooks?

Disability Related Articles

New Article: Entangled Ethnography: Imagining a Future for Young Adults with Learning Disabilities


Call for Papers, Participants, Scholarships, and Conferences

Call for Proposals: Take away the suit and what are you? “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON 2014

 
April 9 and 10, 2014
Syracuse University
Syracuse, NY
 
DEADLINE for Proposals:  January 13, 2014
 
Anyone can participate in “Cripping” the Comic Con.  Although some of the language in this Call for Proposals is decidedly “academic,” and some of the folks who participate may self-identify as “academics,” this symposium is really for everyone, and we mean it.  All are welcomed; please feel free to submit your ideas for consideration.  We seek to promote a culture of inclusion.
 
Michael Bérubé tells us that “every representation of disability has the potential to shape the way ‘disability’ is understood in general culture, and some of those representations can in fact do extraordinary powerful—or harmful—cultural and political work” (1997, p. B4).  These representations encourage audience members to come to an acceptance and understanding of the wide range of differences that exist among us.
 
The second annual symposium provides participants with the opportunity to engage in a broad array of reflective discussions about the representations of disability that exist “beneath the surface” and explicitly within mainstream popular cultures both nationally and internationally, particularly the popular culture phenomena that are comic books, graphic novels, and manga.
 
Submissions incorporating genres that do not typically receive sustained attention in mainstream scholarly spaces are encouraged. These include but are not limited to the following:
 
·         comix, anime, motion comics
·         films, movies, videos, television shows (including reality TV, animated TV)
·         advertising, newspapers, magazines
·         comic cons, dragon cons, geek cons, movie cons, cosplay, cult fandom, the “geek syndrome”
·         visual arts, painting, photography, deviantART, alternative and alternate art forms
·         poetry, expressive arts, popular fiction, imagetext, fanfic, slash, alternative and alternate forms of literacies
·         material culture, multimedia, social media, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube
·         websites, blogs, memes, zines
·         games, gaming, toys, action figures
As was the case with the first annual symposium, and will remain the case each year, henceforth, one of our primary goals as symposium organizers is to create opportunities for all participants—particularly students and emerging scholars—to share their work. 
 
Another of our primary goals is to assure that all information associated with the symposium is accessible and equitable.  The symposium organizers and the proposal review committee strongly support the notion that “academics have a responsibility to make their work relevant for the society they exist within” (Jurgenson, 2012), and this of course includes making disability studies relevant and accessible to the disability community (Ne’eman, 2012). 
 
Since representations in popular culture are generally created outside of academic environments, it is especially important for the general public and not just “academics” to engage in conversations about popular culture and disability.  Representations have the potential to affect everyone.  We all benefit from discussing and learning about disability and popular culture in ways that include and welcome everyone’s participation. 
 
This event is meant not only to address often unmet needs in scholarly spaces and beyond, but also to address these vital areas/concerns:
 
1.      Popular culture studies and literature do not pay consistent or adequate attention to disability; when this attention is paid, it is often via “special issues” of journals, etc. 
2.      Further, “Popular culture is…the discursive terrain on which larger social issues are played out, often unobtrusively and masked as entertainment–and this is precisely why pop culture needs to be examined even more closely...” (Nayar, 2011, p. 172).  These issues include not only our understandings of diverse minds and bodies, but representations of various social identities, including but not limited to gender expression, race, class, ethnicity, size, age, etc.
3.      Popular culture studies and literature continue to have a mixed reception within certain mainstream academic spaces.  Because popular culture is still sometimes not taken seriously within some of these spaces (even among some disability studies scholars and practitioners), its status remains, for some, “discounted” (at times, popular culture studies may even be perceived as “deviant”).  Consequently, this symposium’s organizers aim to:
a.       critique what is often described as “deviant”
b.      question and disrupt what “counts” as academic, mainstream, and normative
4.      The symposium will be consistent with values that underscore the disability rights movement: we seek to make collective investments in disability pride, identity, and cultures.  In “cripping” the status quo, we assert, purposefully, “Nothing about us without us.”  For more information on what we mean by “cripping,” please visit this page on the “Cripping” the Comic Con website:http://crippingthecon.com/more-on-what-cripping-means/.
5.      We especially welcome submissions based upon the variety of issues and strategies that were identified during our 2013 post-symposium session, “Disability Activism and Fandom: A Roundtable Strategizing on Fandom as a Target of/Resource for Activism,” including but not limited to the following topics and questions:
·         The relationship between disability rights activism and fandom
·         Accessibility of cons and fan-related spaces
·         How to engage fandom communities further in the disability rights movement
·         Have there been opportunities for change in how fandom communities approach disability? If so, how?
·         What are the discourses that are produced when “reboots” happen with comic characters?
·         How might we all participate most fully at events during which disability is or is not prevalent, especially when the events involve and in some cases privilege popular culture?
·         How and in what ways might cosplay choices be perceived and harnessed as forms of activism, from a disability cultural standpoint?
·         How might we take advantage of “teachable moments” in the context of addressing the intersections of disability, fandom, and popular culture?
·         The transformative potential of art, and considering ways for “creating representations on our own terms”
·         Being aware of the ways in which gatekeepers to traditional media and large independent media may prohibit access to disenfranchised populations, including people with disabilities
·         There are many ways to be Deaf, Blind, Autistic, etc., and diverse experiences need to be articulated and addressed by creators of comics, etc. What are some strategies that can be used to politicize the comics industry?
Submission Guidelines and Instructions
 
Proposal types and formats may include, among others:
1.      Individual presentation
2.      Panel presentation
3.      Discussion/workshop/roundtable
4.      Performance/video/film/art entry
5.      Poster session
Please note that other forms of proposals are fully welcomed, and the above list is not exhaustive.  If you have something particular in mind, please explain the details and parameters of what you imagine, via your proposal submission(s). You are also welcomed and encouraged to submit more than one proposal.
 
If your submission is a performance/video/film/art entry, you are responsible for securing permissions and rights for public viewing.  Videos and films should be open captioned and descriptions of any artwork will be required.  Audio descriptions of videos and films may also be required, depending upon the nature and style of the videos/films being submitted.
 
PROPOSAL SUBMISSION DEADLINE:  January 13, 2014
 
Each proposal must include:
1.      Name
2.      Affiliation (if applicable)
3.      Contact information (including email and phone/video phone)
a.       if there is more than one presenter, please indicate the main contact and lead presenter (if these are two different individuals, please indicate this information)
4.      Title of presentation/activity/etc. (15 words or less)
5.      Short description (50 words or less)
6.      Full description (1000 words or less)
How to submit your proposal(s) -- please choose one of the following options:
1.      Via email to cripcon@gmail.com.  Submissions can be sent as an attachment (Word, Word Perfect, Text, Rich Text Format or PDF) or with text pasted/embedded in the body of your message.  Please put CRIPCON SUBMISSION in the subject line.
2.      Via Fax: 315-443-4338.  Please indicate CRIPCON SUBMISSION on Fax cover sheet.
3.      Via regular mail:
“Cripping” the Comic Con 2014
c/o SU Disability Cultural Center
805 S Crouse Ave, 105 Hoople Bldg.
Syracuse, NY 13244-2280
Additional Information
 
Information and content produced as a result of this symposium will be published, with participant and presenter consent, via Beneath the SURFACE (BtS), an open source digital repository on disability and popular culture.  BtS is available to the academic community as well as to the general public, and includes an array of resources regarding disability and popular culture.
 
Each day of the symposium, there will be a designated time slot during which poster sessions will be offered concurrently with “open space.” 
 
Open space will be an opportunity for participants to create spontaneous and/or planned topical interactions with other participants—in other words, open space will be a venue for you to create your own symposium “sessions,” during specific times and in specific locations.  There will also be tables, art stations, and other opportunities for networking, gaming, etc. that will follow the thematic tracks of the symposium.  The particular tracks will be identified once all submissions have been reviewed by the proposal review committee.
 
All confirmed participants (whether presenting or not) will receive information on:
1.      Completing registration
2.      Requesting disability accommodations
3.      Expressing dietary preferences (some but not all meals will be included with registration)
All participants will be responsible for the cost of their own lodging and travel.
 
To keep informed, please visit us online!
 
Website for “Cripping” the Comic Con:  http://crippingthecon.com
 
“Cripping” the Comic Con on Twitter:  @cripcon
 
“Cripping” the Comic Con on Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/CrippingTheCon
 
References
 
Bérubé, M. (1997, May 30).  The cultural representation of people with disabilities affects us all.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, B4-B5.
 
Jurgenson, N. (2012, May 11).  Making our ideas more accessible. Washington, DC: Inside Higher Ed.  Retrieved September 19, 2012 from:http://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2012/05/11/scholars-must-make-their-work-more-available-and-accessible-essay
 
Nayar, P. K. (2011). Haunted knights in spandex: Self and othering in the superhero mythos. Mediterranean Journal of Humanities, 1/2, 171-183.
 
Ne’eman, A. (2012, May 14). Making Disability Studies accessible.  Washington, DC: Autistic Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN). Retrieved September 19, 2012 fromhttp://autisticadvocacy.org/2012/05/making-disability-studies-accessible/.
 
 
 
Diane R. Wiener, Ph.D., L.M.S.W.
Director, Disability Cultural Center (Division of Student Affairs)
Research Associate Professor (School of Education)
Syracuse University
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Avenue
Syracuse, NY 13244-2280
(315) 443-4486
FAX: (315) 443-0193
 
DCC email address: sudcc@syr.edu
DCC website: http://sudcc.syr.edu
DCC on Facebook: www.facebook.com/sudcc

Funding/networking opportunity for students interested in young people/college students and mental health

 
Active Minds - Emerging Scholars Program
 
Great opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students interested in completing a project addressing mental health among college students/young people.
 
 
 
 
Are you an undergraduate or graduate student? Are you looking to do research or a creative project in mental health? Apply today for the Active Minds Emerging Scholars Fellowshipat www.activeminds.org/scholars<http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.activeminds.org%2Fscholars&h=8AQERK-WgAQGdYtDK00kxDGgGJ-cgOMrMIYdL2bbpGG2SDw&s=1>. Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until Tuesday, December 20, 2013.
 
The Emerging Scholars program offers funding (up to $1000), facilitates mentorship and networking, including an expenses-paid trip to meet with other scholars and mentors. Preference will be given to early submissions. Please download the 2014 Call for Proposals online at www.activeminds.org/scholars
 
Questions? Contact Candace Daniels, Senior Program Manager, at
 

ABF Summer Research Diversity Fellowship for Undergraduates: Applications Now Open!

Applications for the American Bar Foundation’s 2014 Montgomery Summer Research Diversity Fellowships are now open! This is a truly unique opportunity for four highly qualified, diverse undergraduates to join us at our offices in Chicago, IL for 8 weeks to learn about how to break into the fields of law and social science. The American Bar Foundation has sponsored this program since 1988. Housing, transportation (local and to-and-from Chicago), and a living stipend are provided. The students attend field visits throughout the City of Chicago, meet with professionals who work in the field, attend a weekly seminar, and work one-on-one with a professor on a research project of the professor’s choosing. (Note well: students cannot choose their own research topic.) To apply, students must be current sophomores or juniors with at least a 3.0 GPA. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens or permanent residents and, most importantly, demonstrate diversity.
 
Please forward this message, distribute the attached flyer widely, and let the talented college sophomores and juniors in your life know about this great opportunity. You may visit the following link for more information, eligibility requirements, and to access the online application:http://www.americanbarfoundation.org/fellowships/Call_for_Summer_Research_Diversity_Fellows.html.  
 
Please feel free to call or write me (contact info in my signature) if you have any questions. The information on the flyer is also pasted below my signature for easy forwarding.
 
Regards,
 
Kathryn L. Harris
Program Manager
 
Montgomery Summer Research Diversity Fellowship
 
The American Bar Foundation
750 North Lake Shore Drive, 4th Floor | Chicago, IL 60611
phone (312) 988-6515 | fax (312) 988-6579
 
 
 
MSRDF Alumni Facebook Group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/abf.srdf/
 
Follow the ABF on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ABFResearch
 
2014 Montgomery Summer Research Diversity Fellowships in Law and Social Science for Undergraduate Students
 
Purpose
 
The American Bar Foundation sponsors an annual program of summer research fellowships to interest undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds in pursuing graduate study in the social sciences. The summer program is designed to introduce students to the rewards and demands of a research-oriented career in the field of law and social science. The program is supported in part by the Kenneth F. and Harle G. Montgomery Foundation, AT&T, and the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates.
 
Located in Chicago, Illinois, the American Bar Foundation is an independent nonprofit research institute dedicated to the study of law, legal institutions, and legal processes. The Foundation conducts empirically based research on a broad range of civil and criminal justice issues. Current research areas include: professionalism and the transformation of the legal profession in the United States and abroad; the dynamics of employment discrimination disputes; the impact of civil rights law on the economic progress of minorities; jury decision making; public interest lawyering and social reform; legal history; regulatory law; the role of law in racial relations; law and globalization; and comparative constitutional law. The Foundation’s research is conducted by a multidisciplinary resident research faculty with academic training in law, sociology, psychology, political science, economics, history, and anthropology. Many ABF Research Professors hold joint appointments at Chicago-area universities. Recognized as a major institution in the field of law and social science, the Foundation offers a rich environment to students considering an academic or research career.
 
Eligibility
 
Eligible are American citizens and lawful permanent residents including, but not limited to, persons who are African American, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, Native American, or Puerto Rican, as well as other individuals who will add diversity to the field of law and social science.
 
Applications will be considered only from sophomores and juniors, that is, students who have completed at least the sophomore year and who have not received a bachelor’s degree by the time the fellowship begins. Applicants must have a Grade Point Average of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and be moving toward an academic major in the social sciences or humanities.
 
Program, Tenure, and Stipend
 
Four (4) summer research fellowships will be awarded each year. Each student will be assigned to an American Bar Foundation Research Professor who will involve the student in the professor’s research project and who will act as a mentor during the student’s tenure. The students also will participate in a series of seminars and field visits to acquaint them with the many facets of sociolegal research and the legal system. The students will work at the American Bar Foundation’s offices in Chicago, Illinois for 35 hours a week for a period of 8 weeks. Each student will receive a stipend of $3,600.
 
Application Procedure
 
Applicants for the Summer Research Fellowships must provide the following:
 
--A brief essay on the topics indicated in the application form
 
--Official transcripts of all academic courses completed
 


News and Announcements

Interested in the Disability Studies Collection from Taylor and Francis eBooks?

Don't forget that you canrequest a free trial* of this collection...
Special Price available until 31st December 2013
Full Collection List Price = $1,710 - 
Special Price = $1,495**
The Disability Studies collection brings together 11 essential titles which look at key aspects of this important, and often controversial, area including law and ethics, right to life, hate crime and violence, education and psychology.
Including titles such as The Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies, edited by Nick Watson, Alan Roulstone and Carol Thomas, and Disabilty, Hate Crime and Violence (read the chapter International Perspectives on Disability Hate Crime here), this collection offers library users access to key research and information on this important area. 
Best wishes,
Cara Trevor
Marketing Executive
*Free trials of Taylor & Francis eBooks are available for qualifying academic and corporate institutions.
** The Special Price applies to purchases of the entire collection. Titles from this collection can also be purchased on a Pick & Mix basis with a 5% discount. The discounts contained in this email cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer, and only apply to eBooks purchased directly via Taylor & Francis.

Disability Related Articles

The following are recent news stories of interest to people with disabilities and those supporting and working with and for people with disabilities.
Dr. Nora's Top Articles: (7 out of 88)
1.   “Petaluma Doctor Fired for Reporting Patient Abuse Wins Lawsuit” --- A Petaluma physician fired 12 years ago from the Sonoma Developmental Center after reporting rampant patient abuse has received $1.3 million from a jury that ... --- Santa Rosa Press Democrat --- November 23, 2013  (CALIFORNIA)  http://is.gd/DUSN5q  
2.   “DeKalb Teacher Accused of Beating Special Needs Elementary Student with Stick” --- Action News has learned DeKalb County schools are investigating allegations an elementary teacher verbally and physically abused special needs ... --- WSB Atlanta --- November 22, 2013  (GEORGIA)  http://is.gd/JCSpH6  
3.   “Three Indicted for Abuse, Neglect at Somerset Home for Mentally Disabled” --- Three former workers at a Somerset facility for disabled adults have been indicted on charges of abuse and neglect. According to the Kentucky Attorney ... --- WKU Public Radio --- November 19, 2013  (KENTUCKY) http://is.gd/e9oB5n   
4.   “Grosse Pointe Park Police Investigated after Videos Circulate with Mentally Ill Man” --- A Grosse Pointe Park police officer is accused of humiliating and demeaning a mentally ill man , as seen in videos that are believed to have circulated amongst ... --- MyFox Detroit --- November 18, 2013  (MICHIGAN)  http://is.gd/J31asD  
5.   “Students Accused of Bullying & Beating Disabled Teen” --- Jacob Cramer is shy and won't talk much these days. He sits on the couch at home from school, because he's too ... --- CBS 11 --- November 19, 2013  (TEXAS)   http://is.gd/aLd5z8  
6.   “Freitag '14: The Broken Mental Health System” --- Mental health disorders remain one of the most widely stigmatized and misunderstood issues of our day. At Brown, nearly one in five students suffers from ... --- The Brown Daily Herald --- November 19, 2013  (RHODE ISLAND)  http://is.gd/ACJ5oO  
7.   “Disabled Victims of Hate Crimes Urged to Speak to Police” --- "If you are a disabled person you feel as though you are not going to be heard and even as though you are being targeted because you deserve it. "At the event ... --- This Is Sussex --- November 19, 2013  (ENGLAND)   http://is.gd/1wpalc

New Article: Entangled Ethnography: Imagining a Future for Young Adults with Learning Disabilities

Entangled Ethnography: Imagining a Future for Young Adults with Learning Disabilities
 
Faye Ginsburg and Rayna Rapp
 
Social Science & Medicine
 
Available online 21 November 2013
 
In Press, Accepted Manuscript
 
 
 
 
 
 
Abstract
 
Our article draws on one aspect of our multi-sited long-term ethnographic research in New York City on cultural innovation and Learning Disabilities (LD). We focus on our efforts to help create two innovative transition programs that also became sites for our study when we discovered that young adults with disabilities were too often “transitioning to nowhere” as they left high school. Because of our stakes in this process as parents of children with learning disabilities as well as anthropologists, we have come to think of our method as entangled ethnography, bringing the insights of both insider and outsider perspectives into productive dialogue.
 
 
 
Highlights
 
•Stigmatized diagnoses of children tracked for special education are increasingly being contested and reconfigured through the efforts of cultural innovators of all types in the U.S. How do more inclusive models of humanity get taken up in efforts to help young adults make the transition to life beyond school?
 
•This article shows how ethnographic methods are particularly well positioned to bring the insights of both insider and outsider perspectives on disability into productive dialogue, as part of a process that helps expand the public sphere to accommodate the broader range of human difference encompassed by the category of disability.


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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