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Weekly Newsletter

September, 25 2017

INDEX

SU NEWS

Cold weather reminder

DCC's Diane Wiener interview in Ability Magazine!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Annual Blanket Drive

CRIPPING THE CON IN SU NEWS

SU HAPPENINGS

Rainbow Banquet

Orange Circle Award Nominations

Lecture: Elizabeth Barnes

College of Law Events Calendar

Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI classes offered

Career Week Events

A PLACE AT THE TABLE

Mark your calendars for an upcoming talk by Jasbir Puar (more details to follow)

SYRACUSE AND REGIONAL EVENTS

Vera Houses White Ribbon Campaign

Cynthia Leibrock Presentation "Universal Design for Health and Longevity"

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

7th Global Conference: Making Sense of: Madness

Mental Health Anthology Seeks Essays about "Profound Psychiatric Challenges"

Dispute Resolution in Special Education Symposium

12th International Conference on Education and Information Systems, Technologies and Applications: EISTA 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR THEME ISSUE OF LITERATURE AND MEDICINE:

Disability, Race, and Slavery in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Disabling Normalcy Symposium

CHP: Corpus/Persona/Communitas

Disability & Travel Study: First Brazilian National Survey

Alert: National Call on the Disability Treaty on January 28th!

Call for Proposals: The AERA-MET Dissertation Fellowship Program deadline is March 3, 2014

Call for Papers: PSFG/ATHE 2014 Emerging Scholars Panel*

2014 Call for Papers about Asexuality

CHP: Disability & Critical Embodiment

Graduate-level fellowships at NACCHO Health and Disability Project

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

LERN Publishes First Report on National Survey of Peer-run Organizations, and Launches Support Groups for Undergrads with Lived Experience

PBATS, USBLN® Partner in Disability Employment Initiative

Human Rights and Disability Rights

The latest issue of *Family Relations * -- Special Issue on Disability:

Disability and Abuse Project Update

Article: Context Matters: Disability, the End of Life, and Why the Conversation is Still so Difficult

Wisconsin passes mental health bills with bipartisan support

"The Production Bunch" video project (no captioning)

Recent NPR story about people with psychiatric disabilities and incarceration:


SU NEWS

Cold weather reminder

 
The National Weather Service is calling for an extended period of cold weather beginning Tuesday and running through Sunday.  During this time period, daytime temperatures are expected to be in the single digits, with overnight lows well below zero. The SU Health Services Office, along with the Emergency Management Office, reminds all students, faculty, and staff that persistent sub-freezing temperatures increase the risk of frostbite, hypothermia, and other cold weather injuries.  Signs of frostbite include dull, whitish skin and impaired sensation. If frostbite occurs, move immediately into a warm environment and remove and replace wet clothing. Seek medical attention as necessary. Do not massage affected areas.  Signs of hypothermia include shivering, shallow breathing, confusion and memory loss, slurred or mumbled speech, loss of coordination, or a slow weak pulse.  If you or someone you know is suffering from these cold weather related symptoms, it’s important to contact SU Health Services immediately at (315) 443-4299.
 
For a fact sheet on cold weather injuries, visit: 
 

DCC's Diane Wiener interview in Ability Magazine!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Annual Blanket Drive

Help keep people in Syracuse warm this winter. Donations are being accepted for new blankets, or 4 yards of fleece, or 7” x 9” crocheted/knitted rectangles to create blankets to donate to local organizations. Drop off at the Office of Engagement Programs or the Dean’s Suite in the lower level of Hendricks Chapel.

Cut and Tie Blanket-Making Party: February 21 from 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. in the Noble Room. Lunch and blanket-making using donated materials.


Questions, email 
engagesu@syr.edu


SU HAPPENINGS

Rainbow Banquet

Save the Date!

2014 Rainbow Banquet

April 24, 2014

5:30PM

SU Sheraton Hotel

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Orange Circle Award Nominations

Now is the time to nominate someone you know for the Orange Circle Award! The Orange Circle Award honors individuals and groups who go above and beyond in their daily lives and who possess a deep responsibility for extraordinary philanthropic acts. These are not limited to financial support, but also include volunteerism—those acts that better society through contributions of time and talent. Find more information here: Orange Circle Award Info

Lecture: Elizabeth Barnes

The Department of Philosophy

at Syracuse University

is pleased to announce a talk by

Elizabeth Barnes

University of Leeds

“Constructing Disability”

Monday, January 27, 2014

7:00 p.m.

207 Hall of Languages

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College of Law Events Calendar  

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Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI classes offered

We’ve added two days of classes for “Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI” Friday, February 14 (Link Hall room 110) and Thursday, February 27 (ECM Training Center at 621 Skytop Road)There will be two classes each day, 8:30-noon and 1:30-5pm. Details in previous email, below.
If you have any questions, please send an email toaccessibility@syr.edu.
Thanks!
____________________________________________
From: ITS Communications

Subject: Register Now! Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI
You’re invited! And bring your colleagues.
Information Technology and Services (ITS) is pleased to announce that registrations are being accepted for a new training course,  “Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI”.
This course was developed in partnership with New Horizons Computer Learning Centers of Syracuse in response to demand from across campus for face-to-face training to build faculty and staff awareness of and competency with using technology to ensure the accessibility of course materials, presentations, events, documents, web sites, and online resources.  Thanks to the personnel from numerous SU schools, colleges and departments whose participation, insights and expertise helped shape this program. See the course overview, below.
The first four training classes will be held on Thursday, 1/16/14, and Tuesday, 1/28/14. There will be two classes each day, 8:30-noon and 1:30-5pm.  Each class will have twelve participants and be held in the ECM Training Center at 621 Skytop Road (parking is available). 
Seating is limited, so register early! We expect high demand for this training, so registration is on a first submitted, first enrolled basis.
Please share this invitation as appropriate with others in your organization, particularly personnel involved with organizational, employee and student communications, event planning/management, and IT support.
We will schedule and inform you of additional classes very soon.
If you have any questions, please send them in an email toaccessibility@syr.edu.
 
 
Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI
Course Overview
This 3-hour workshop is designed to provide a fundamental overview of creating accessible documents in Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI. At successful course completion students will be able to:
·         Explain and demonstrate the importance of creating accessible documents
·         Understand basic concepts for creating accessible documents including:
o   Reading order
o   Alternative text
o   Styles
o   Heading structure
o   Titles
o   Tags
·         Understand best practices for creating accessible Office and Acrobat documents
·         Remediate legacy Office and Acrobat documents to make them accessible
·         Utilize the Office accessibility checker
·         Specify common accessibility errors
·         Utilize Adobe Acrobat XI’s accessibility checker
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Career Week Events

  • Resumania: January 31 & February 7, 11:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., 235 Schine
  • iSchool iCareer Day: February 10, 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., School of Information Studies
  • Whitman Spring Career Fair: February 10, 12:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Goldstein Auditorium, Schine
  • Syracuse University Spring Career Fair: February 11, 12:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Goldstein Auditorium, Schine
  • Diversity in the Workplace: February 11, 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Panasci Lounge, Schine
  • LCS Engineering Career Connections Fair Spring 2014: February 12, 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., Panasci Lounge, Schine
*Local Internship Apply-A-Thon kicks off on January 25. Students have until January 31 to apply for the positions posted (spring and summer available).

A PLACE AT THE TABLE

 
So You (or Someone You Know) Has Celiac. Now What?
 
A Panel Discussion on Surviving and Thriving With Celiac
 
Date: Friday, January 31st
 
Time: 12:00-1:30PM
 
Location: Schine 228B
 
American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and gluten free food will be provided. Please indicate any accommodation requests by 1/24/2014 to sudcc@syr.edu by email or 443-4486 by phone. Sponsors: Disability Cultural Center, Lisa Thomas at SU Health Services, and the Disability Student Union
 
A Place at the Table: Food is an incredibly important part of many cultures around the world. In what ways do cultures shape our relationships with food? What happens when dietary restrictions, allergies, disabilities, ethics, values, principals, religion, and preferences collide with the cultural norms about food and eating? This ongoing luncheon series will explore these questions while also providing a more normalized eating environment for those routinely left out of food culture. In other words, everyone has a place at the table.

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Mark your calendars for an upcoming talk by Jasbir Puar (more details to follow)

 
This lecture will take place on April 24, 2014 (Location and time TBA but will make sure that it takes place in accessible room). The title is "Disabled Diaspora, Rehabilitating the State: The Queer Politics of Reproduction in Israel/Palestine." Here is the lecture's abstract:
 
This paper situates the intersections of sex, disability, and reproductive politics within the history of homonationalism in Israel/Palestine. I focus specifically on the use of disability-especially as the Israeli state was founded on a narrative of rehabilitating dispersed, traumatized diasporas into bodily health and national wholeness--as part of a biopolitical assemblage of control that instrumentalizes a spectrum of capacities and debilities for the use of the Israeli occupation of Palestine.  Thus I seek to rearticulate sexual rights and the debates on "pinkwashing" within biopolitical frames by linking them to the slow rise of disability rights platforms in Israel, the convergence of eugenic selective abortion practices on the one hand and the pro-natalist attitudes of the state, supported by its stellar Assisted Reproductive Technology industry, on the other, and the growing population of LGBT parents and families in Israel.
 
Jasbir K. Puar is Associate Professor of Women’s & Gender Studies at Rutgers University.  She has also been a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Performance Studies at NYU and a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Cultural Inquiry in Berlin. She received her Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from the University of California at Berkeley in 1999 and an M.A. from the University of York, England, in Women’s Studies in 1993. Her research interests include gender, sexuality, globalization; postcolonial and diaspora studies; South Asian cultural studies; and theories of assemblage and affect. Puar is the author of Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times (Duke University Press 2007), which won the 2007 Cultural Studies Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies and has also been translated into French as Homonationalisme. Politiques queers après le 11 Septembre, (Editions Amsterdam, 2012). Puar’s edited volumes include “Queer Tourism: Geographies of Globalization” (GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies); and co-edited volumes on “Sexuality and Space” (Society and Space); “Interspecies” (Social Text); “Viral” (Women’s Studies Quarterly). Her articles appear in Gender, Place, and CultureRadical History ReviewSocialist ReviewFeminist Legal StudiesAntipode: A Radical Journal of GeographyFeminist Studies, and Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society


Syracuse and Regional Events

Vera Houses White Ribbon Campaign

Save the Date!
 
Vera House’s 20th Annual White Ribbon Campaign begins soon! From March 28th – April 6th, thousands of Central New Yorkers will be wearing a white ribbon or white wristband to raise awareness about domestic and sexual violence. Wearing a white ribbon or wristband is an important statement. It means you will not commit, condone, or remain silent about domestic or sexual violence.
 
For more information, visit Vera House’s website: Vera House's White Ribbon Campaign

Cynthia Leibrock Presentation "Universal Design for Health and Longevity"

F.O.C.U.S. Greater Syracuse is currently conducting an “Age-Friendly CNY” project, to identify what keeps retiring boomers and others in CNY and what lures them away. Universal Design in housing and in public places plays a role in keeping people living, shopping, recreating and aging in place. On Thursday, January 30th, F.O.C.U.S., the Syracuse University Aging Studies Institute and the College for Visual and Performing Arts are co-hosting a presentation by CYNTHIA LEIBROCK, a national expert, on “Universal Design for Health and Longevity,” from 12noon to 1:15p at the Atrium, City Hall Commons, 201 E. Washington St, SyracuseLiebrock’s mission is to improve the lives of people of all abilities by encouraging all products and the built environment be aesthetic and usable by everyone, regardless of age, ability, or status in life. Anyone who designs, builds, operates or lives in private or public spaces in CNY will benefit from hearing how Universal Design can be implemented inexpensively, both before and after initial construction. A box lunch will be available at 11.30. Liebrock’s presentation (limited to 100 attendees) will be followed by an hour-long small group conversation with the expert (limited to 30 people). The program is all free and open to the public, but reservations are required: focus@syrgov.net


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

7th Global Conference: Making Sense of: Madness


Sunday 7th September - Tuesday 9th September 2014
Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom

Call for Presentations:
Madness: what is it? Why does it exist? Where and when does it happen? How does it happen, and to whom? Like otherness to identity, madness might have always been used to define its opposite, or defined by what it is not. Madness or its absence are intrinsically linked to everything we do and do not, to all we aspire and escape. It could even be linked to our origins and fate. This international, inter-disciplinary conference seeks to explore issues of madness across historical periods and within cultural, political and social contexts. We are interested as well in exploring the place of madness in persons and interpersonal relationships and across a range of critical perspectives. Seeking to encourage innovative inter, multi and post disciplinary dialogues, we warmly welcome papers from all disciplines, professions and vocations which struggle to understand the place of madness in the constitution of persons, relationships and the complex interlacing of self and other. In t! he six previous conferences we had the participation of people who have experienced forms of madness in their personal lives, and their presentations have always been not only welcome, but also moving and illuminating for all: Such contributions based on the actual experience of madness from within have been an essential part of our conferences and this year we encourage again the submission of abstracts based on first hand experience.

In particular presentations, papers, workshops, performances and exhibitions are invited on any of the following themes:

1. The Value of Madness or Why is it that We Need Madness?
- Critical explorations: beyond madness/sanity/insanity
- Continuity and difference: always with us yet never quite the same
- Repetition and novelty: the incessant emergence and re-emergence of madness
- Profound attraction and desire; fear of the abyss and the radical unknown
- Naming, defining and understanding the elusive

2. The Passion of Madness or Madness and the Emotions
- Love as madness; uncontrollable passion; unrestrainable love
- Passion and love as a remaking of life and self
- Gender and madness; the feminine and the masculine
- Anger, resentment, revenge, hate, evil
- I would rather vomit, thank you; revulsion, badness and refusing to comply

3. The Boundaries of Madness or Resisting Normality
- Madness, sanity and the insane
- Being out of your mind, crazy, deranged... yet, perfectly sane
- Deviating from the normal; defining the self against the normal
- Control, self-control and the pull of the abyss
- When the insane becomes normal; when evil reins social life

4. Lunatics and the Asylum or Power and the Politics of Madness
- The social allure and fear of madness; the institutions of confining mad people
- Servicing normality by castigating the insane and marginalizing lunatics
- Medicine, psychiatry, psychology, law and the constructions of madness; madness as illness
- Contributions of the social sciences to the making and the critique of the making of madness
- Representations, explanations and the critique of madness from the humanities and the arts

5. Creativity, Critique and Cutting Edge
- Madness as genius, outstanding, out of the ordinary, spectacularly brilliant
- The art of madness; the science of madness
- Music, painting, dance, theater: it is crazy to think of art without madness
- The language and communication of madness: who can translate?
- Creation as an unfolding of madness
- Madness as an unfolding of creativity

6. Unrestrained and Boundless or The Liberating Promise of Madness
- Metaphors of feeling free, unrestrained, capable, lifted from reality
- Madness as clear-sightedness, as opening up possibilities, as re-visioning of the world
- The future, the prophetic, the unknown; the epic, the heroic and the tragic
- The unreachable and untouchable knowledge of madness
- The insanity of not loving madness

7. Lessons for Self and Other or Lessons for Life about and from Madness
- Cultural and social constructions of madness; images of the mad, crazy, insane, lunatic, abnormal
- What is real? Who defines reality? Learning from madness how to cope with reality
- Recognising madness in oneself; relativising madness in others
- Love, intimacy, care and the small spaces of madness
- Critical and ethical implosions of normality and normalness; sane in insane places and insane in sane places

Presentations will be accepted which deal with related areas and themes.

In order to support and encourage interdisciplinary engagement, it is our intention to create the possibility of starting dialogues between the parallel events running during this conference. Delegates are welcome to attend up to two sessions in each of the concurrent conferences. We also propose to produce cross-over sessions between these groups – and we welcome proposals which deal with the relationship between Time, Space and Body and Madness and Empathy.

What to Send:
300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th April 2014. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 11th July 2014. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation as you would like it to appear in programme, c) email address, d) title of proposal, e) body of proposal, f) up to 10 keywords.
E-mails should be entitled: MADNESS7 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs
Gonzalo Araoz: gon@inter-disciplinary.net
Rob Fisher: mad7@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the 'Making Sense Of:' series of research projects. The aim of the conference is to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting. All proposals accepted for and presented at the conference must be in English and will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected proposals may be developed for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s). All publications from the conference will require editors, to be chosen from interested delegates from the conference.

Inter-Disciplinary.Net believes it is a mark of personal courtesy and professional respect to your colleagues that all delegates should attend for the full duration of the meeting. If you are unable to make this commitment, please do not submit an abstract for presentation.

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/madness/call-for-papers/

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Mental Health Anthology Seeks Essays about "Profound Psychiatric Challenges"  


For an upcoming anthology, In Fact Books is soliciting essays "by writers with insight into the nature and experience of profound psychiatric challenges" as users and/or providers of mental health services. The editors are seeking "well-written, true narratives about the enigmatic, creative, frustrating and triumphant moments of the recovery process and the therapeutic journey." For further information and guidelines, see the source below. Essays may be submitted online or by regular mail; the postmark deadline is March 1, 2014.
 
Source: https://www.creativenonfiction.org/submissions/mental-health-anthology<http://cts.vresp.com/c/?NationalMentalHealth/76ecc9a026/81a66705fc/cc317f5f2e>

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Dispute Resolution in Special Education Symposium

 February 27 & 28, 2014
 
The Moritz College of Law, The Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio
 
Free & Open To The Public*
 
About the Symposium 
The law of Special Education has an utilizes an unusual range of dispute resolution processes.   This symposium will focus on the history and effectiveness of many of these processes within a discussion of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (“Section 504”).
 
Presented by The Moritz College of Law at The Ohio State University this two day event will feature Special Education Professors and practitioners from around the country.  Many of the papers will be published in the Ohio State Journal on Dispute Resolution, one of the leading dispute resolution journal in the United States. The symposium is co-sponsored by the Center for Interdisciplinary Law and Policy Studies, the Journal on Dispute Resolution, and the ADA Coordinator’s Office at the Ohio State University
 
For details on sessions and presenter please visit the symposium’s web site at:   http://moritzlaw.osu.edu/students/groups/osjdr/symposium-2/
 
*The conference sessions are free but Registration is encouraged, Meals are NOT included.  Conference attendees may purchase meals in advance by contacting Nick Uzl or Carolyn Cole at osujdrsymposium2014@gmail.com
 
 
Note: CLE credit will be available for this conference.
The conference facilities are wheelchair accessible and real time captioning will be provided for the presentations.  If have questions about access or wish to request other accommodations please describe on the registration form or contact L. Scott Lissner, lissner.2@osu.edu
 
 
SCHEDULE
Thursday , February 27, 2014 - Barrister’s Club: 25 West 11th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio
2:00-5:00 p.m. – State Practices Roundtable:  Lawyers from various states will discuss their experience with their state’s special education, dispute resolution system.
 
7:00 – 9:00 p.m. – Dinner at Folio: 3712 Riverside Drive, Upper Arlington, 43221
Conference attendees may purchase dinner in advance for $40 per person by contacting Nick Uzl or Carolyn Cole at osujdrsymposium2014@gmail.com
 
Friday, February 28, 2014 – U.S. Bank Conference Theater, The Ohio Union, 1739 N. High Street, Columbus, Ohio
8:00 – 9:00 a.m. – Coffee and Registration
 
9:00 – 10:00 a.m. – Child Find
 
10:15 – 12:00 p.m. – Dispute Resolution Design
 
12:00 – 1:45 p.m. – Lunch at the Barrister’s Club: 25 West 11th Avenue (across the street from the conference site).  Conference attendees may purchase lunch in advance for $25 by contacting Nick Uzl or Carolyn Cole at osujdrsymposium2014@gmail.com
 
2:00 – 4:00 p.m. – Section 504 and IDEA Enforcement Mechanisms

12th International Conference on Education and Information Systems, Technologies and Applications: EISTA 2014

(www.iiisconferences2014.org/eista), being organized in the context of the 8th International Multi-Conference on Society, Cybernetics, and Informatics: IMSCI 2014 (www.iiisconferences2014.org/Imsci), to be held on July 15 - 18, 2014, in Orlando, Florida, USA.

****************************************************
The submissions deadline for this 2nd Call for Papers is *FEBRUARY 6, 2014*. The other deadlines can be found at the respective conference web site.
****************************************************

Submissions for face-to-face and virtual presentation (via asynchronous communication) are accepted.

Collocated events and possible extensions in the deadlines can be found at http://www.iiisconferences2014.org/current-deadlines.asp

Details regarding the following issues can be found at the respective web sites provided above:

*   Technical keynote speakers will be selected from early submissions because this selection requires an additional evaluation according to the quality of the paper, assessed by its reviewers, the authors' CV and the paper's topic.
*   Submitted papers/abstracts will go through at least two reviewing processes: (1) double-blind (at least three reviewers), (2) non-blind, and/or (3) participative peer reviews.
*   Authors of accepted papers who registered in the conference can have access to the evaluations and possible feedback provided by the reviewers who recommended the acceptance of their papers/abstracts, so they can accordingly improve the final version of their papers. Non-registered authors will not have access to the reviews of their respective submissions.
*   Authors of the best 20%-25% of the papers presented at the conference (included those virtually presented) will be invited to adapt their papers for their publication in the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Best regards,

EISTA 2014 Organizing Committee

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR THEME ISSUE OF LITERATURE AND MEDICINE:

 
 
33.2  Fall 2015: LITERATURE AND BIOETHICS
 
 
We invite manuscripts that examine the meanings of "literature" and "bioethics" and explore relationships between these two fields.
 
Strong submissions that do not fit into the theme issue as it takes shape will also be considered for inclusion in general issues of the journal.
 
Deadline for submission: July 31, 2014.
Address inquiries to Catherine Belling, executive editor, Literature and Medicine:  c-belling@northwestern.edu  
Additional information for authors is below.
 
Call for Papers and Guidelines for Contributors
Literature and Medicine is a peer-reviewed journal publishing scholarship that explores representational and cultural practices concerning health care and the body. Areas of interest include disease, illness, and health; the cultures of biomedical science and technology and of the clinic; disability; and violence, trauma, and power relations as these are represented and interpreted in broadly-defined archives of verbal, visual, and material texts. Literature and Medicine features one thematic and one general issue each year. Past theme issues have explored identity and difference; contagion and infection; cancer pathography; the representations of genomics; and the narration of pain.
 
Literature and Medicine is published semiannually. Theme issues are announced in calls for papers in the journal and on the journal website. Literature and Medicine editors will consider essay clusters devoted to a particular topic or written on a specific occasion. Submissions on any aspect of literature and medicine will be considered, but the journal rarely publishes short notes, personal essays, or creative writing. Authors are advised to look carefully at past issues of the journal (available on the journal website) before submitting their work. We welcome submissions by graduate students, but encourage authors to rework term papers into publishable manuscripts (as one does in turning dissertation into book) before submission.
Manuscripts should be between 5,000 and 9,000 words in length. Please include an abstract of 100 – 150 words, and 3 - 5 keywords.
All submissions should have text, end notes, and bibliography double-spaced and prepared according to guidelines in The Chicago Manual of Style, current edition. Authors will be responsible for securing permission to include visual images, figures, or verbal quotations that exceed fair use.
Literature and Medicine is a peer-reviewed journal. Authors' names should appear only on a cover sheet, and any identifiers in the text should be masked so manuscripts can be reviewed anonymously. Literature and Medicine reviews only unpublished manuscripts that are not simultaneously under review for publication elsewhere.
Manuscripts must be submitted in digital form (.doc, .docx, or .rtf) through our website:http://lam.expressacademic.org/login.php
 

Disability, Race, and Slavery in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Dear all,

Here is the CFP for a special session on disability, race, and slavery in
the nineteenth century for the 2015 MLA convention in Vancouver.


Disability, Race, and Slavery in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Disabled slaves figure repeatedly in American literature. What do their
representations tell us about disability, race, slavery in the long
19th-century? 250 word abstracts/CV by 10 March 2014; George Gordon-Smith
(george.gordon-smith@emory.edu) and Heather Chacon (heather.chacon@uky.edu). 

Please check mla.org for conference details, or contact me directly with
questions.
And please consider submitting a proposal!

All best,

George Gordon-Smith
Doctoral Candidate
Emory University
Department of English 
george.gordon-smith@emory.edu

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Disabling Normalcy Symposium


We're having the first-ever disability studies symposium at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville on Friday, Feb. 28, 2014.  Keynote speakers will be Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and Michael Berube.

All events are free and open to the public; no registration required. If you're in the area, please consider joining us!

http://www.virginia.edu/humanities/initiatives-events-courses/disabling-normalcy/

==========
Disabling Normalcy symposium
Friday, Feb. 28, 2014
 
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
 
9:30 Welcoming remarks, Dr. Marcus Martin, VP and Chief Officer for Diversity and Equity
 
9:45 Disability studies and U.Va., Christopher Krentz, English & ASL
 
10:00 Keynote I: What We Gain from Disability, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson
 
10:45-11:00 Coffee Break
 
11:00 Panel I: Disability Across Disciplines (Fred Maus, Music, presiding)
 
•Listening, Bonnie Gordon, Music
 •The Presumption of Competence, Vikram Jaswal, Psychology
 •Tom Thumb’s America at War, Jean Franzino, Ph.D candidate, English
 •Selected Poems: A Reading, Paul Guest, English – Creative Writing
 
12:00-1:30 Lunch (on your own)
 
1:30 Panel II: Global Disability (Denise Walsh, Politics & WGS, presiding)
 
•The Global Deaf Community: Language Minority or Disability Group? Khadijat Rashid (Gallaudet University)
 •Disability and Human Rights, Michael Smith, Politics
 •Architecture and Disability in India and China, Phoebe Crisman, Architecture
 
2:25 Panel III: Disability in Law and Medicine (James Childress, Ethics & Religious Studies, presiding)
 
•Disability and Identity, Sahar Aktar, Bioethics & Philosophy
 •Those Who Think Differently, Marcia Day Childress, Medicine
 •What Can Race Law Learn from Disability Law? Kim Forde-Mazrui, Law
 
3:15-3:30 Coffee Break
 
3:30 Keynote II: The Ubiquity of Disability Michael Bérubé
 
4:10 Concluding Q and A (Michael Levenson, English, moderating)
 
4:30-5:30 Closing reception
 
 
 
Co-sponsors:
 Disability Access Committee
 Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
 Office of the Vice President and Chief Officer for Diversity and Equity
 Office of the Provost and of the Vice Provost for the Arts
 Office of the Dean of the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
 Department of English
 Corcoran Department of History
 Department of Politics
 School of Law
 Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life
 American Sign Language Program
 Bioethics Program
 American Studies Program

=========
Christopher Krentz
Associate Professor 
Department of English and American Sign Language Program
University of Virginia

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CHP: Corpus/Persona/Communitas


http://hum.leiden.edu/lucas/news-events/legal-bodies-corpus-persona-communitas.html

Call for Papers: Corpus/Persona/Communitas


15-17 May 2014 Leiden, the Netherlands



LUCAS (the Leiden University Centre for the Arts in Society) will host a three-day conference on the various ways in which literary and artistic texts have represented, interrogated or challenged juridical notions of ‘personhood’. The conference will take place from 15 until 17 May 2014.



The guiding assumption behind our conference is that ‘personhood’ is not a (biologically) given, stable property of human beings (which precedes their interaction with the law), but that ‘personhood’ is assigned to selected (and historically varying) ‘bodies’ by discursive regimes, such as those of law, medicine, politics, religion, and education. During the conference we will study how literature, art and culture form domains in which the implications and scope of legal, political or medical conceptualizations of personhood can be dramatized and thought through, and in which alternative understandings of personhood can be proposed and disseminated.



The symposium broaches the question of personhood on three different levels: those of the body, the individual and the community. Questions to be addressed include (but are not limited to), firstly:



>From which discourses did notions of bodily integrity historically emerge? Which social, political and medical developments are currently challenging these notions?

How do artistic, cultural and socio-political phenomena (such as bio-art, body horror, the right-to-die movement, etc.) invite us to rethink our notion of the human body?



Second, what literary and rhetorical figures made it possible to think of legal personhood in antiquity, the middle ages and the modern era? What is the legal status of ‘not-quite persons,’ such as children, illegal immigrants, the mentally disabled, the unborn and the undead? What could ‘animal personhood’ entail?



Finally: how do collective bodies acquire personhood? How did art and literature represent legal entities such as the medieval city, the seventeenth century trade company or the nineteenth century corporation? Or what is the legally defined status of sects, networks, conspiracies, and resistance movements?



Organisation and contact



The conference is organised in cooperation with NICA (the Netherlands Institute for Cultural Analysis) and is made possible by LUCAS, the Leiden University Fund and NICA.



400-word proposals for 20-minute papers can be send to Frans-Willem Korsten, Nanne Timmer and Yasco Horsman (LUCAS, Leiden) at legalbodies@hum.leidenuniv.nl<mailto:legalbodies@hum.leidenuniv.nl>.



Deadline: 14 February 2014

Disability & Travel Study: First Brazilian National Survey

        
Dear Colleagues,  

I am pleased to announce the translation into English of the first national Brazlian study of the travel behavior and preferences of persons with disabilities. It will appear in the January 2014 issue of Design for All - India as  "Brazilian Study of the Profile of Tourists with Disabilities" (pp. 
25-27.)  The original title in Portuguese: "Estudo do Perfil de Turistas - Pessoas com Deficiência."

Scott Rains
http://independent.academia.edu/ScottRains

Destinations For All World Summit, 19-22 October 2014, Montreal, Canadahttp://www.destinationsforall2014.com/en/index

Alert: National Call on the Disability Treaty on January 28th!

 
Dear disability rights advocates:
 
Yesterday, I emailed you in regard to a national teleconference call for people who support U.S. ratification of the “Disability Treaty” (Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, CRPD). I am writing to clarify that there are actually TWO separate national teleconference calls for CRPD supporters on the same day, next Tuesday January 28th.  I am asking you to try to attend BOTH, if you are able The CRPD ratification campaign is at a critical phase.  We urgently need your passion and fire, your dedication—and your participation.  Please do join both calls if you are able as they will complement and build on each other for you and your activities!
 
1.       The first call is for ALL people in the U.S. who want the U.S. Senate to ratify the Disability Treaty (CRPD)!  This call will be a rallying call to discuss a wider national strategy for calling Senators back to the negotiation table so we can move forward toward ratification.  There will be hundreds from around the country on the call and speaker will be national leaders in this process. This call is at 1 pm EST (Noon Central Time, 10am Pacific Time).  Read the email further below for more details Click here to RSVP for the general CRPD call.
2.      The second call is targeted for YOU, university students and other university personnel who want to help mobilize their campus community in support of the Disability Treaty (CRPD).  This will have a smaller group of participants with more opportunity to exchange news and concrete ideas for taking action at your campus. It will be personalized to you and much of the information from the earlier call may not be repeated. The student/campus leader call is at 4 pm EST (3 pm Central Time, 1pm Pacific Time).  This call will be facilitated by Rhonda Neuhaus from the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund (DREDF).  She will be joined by Andrea Shettle at the U.S. International Council on Disabilities.  If you need dial-in details and/or the web link to the on-line CART (live transcription) for the call, please contact me at ashettle@usicd.org.
 
Whether you are able to join both calls or just one, we are always grateful for your enthused involvement.
 
Thanks for all that you do!
Andrea (Shettle)

Call for Proposals: The AERA-MET Dissertation Fellowship Program deadline is March 3, 2014.

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) with funding support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is pleased to announce a dissertation fellowship program to support graduate students in education research to conduct secondary data analysis using the Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) Longitudinal Database. The AERA-MET Dissertation Fellowship Program provides funding and professional development and training to dissertation stage graduate students who use the MET data to address research questions and examine issues that will contribute to knowledge about teaching and learning. The program supports high-quality science undertaken by the education research field through dissertation research on topics related to teaching and instruction, the effects of the classroom and school climate, student achievement, children and youth, and other educational issues.
 
Eligibility
Eligible graduate students for the AERA-MET Dissertation Fellowship Program will be at the dissertation stage in an accredited graduate program in education research or another social or behavioral science disciplinary or interdisciplinary field, such as sociology, economics, psychology, or political science. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents enrolled in a doctoral program. Underrepresented racial and ethnic minority researchers and women are strongly encouraged to apply. Applicants should be familiar with the principles and framework of the MET study and the instruments and methods used to collect the data. For further information about the MET project visit: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/METLDB/ and www.metproject.org.
 
For general information visit: www.aera.net/AERAfundingopportunities
 
Questions: Please address any questions to fellowships@aera.net or 202-238-3200.

Call for Papers: PSFG/ATHE 2014 Emerging Scholars Panel*




The Performance Studies Focus Group (PSFG) of the Association of Theater in
Higher Education (ATHE) conference invites submissions of papers for its
Emerging Scholars Panel. The theme of this year’s conference, which will
take place in Scottsdale, Arizona, July 24-27, is *Dream Acts: Performance
as Refuge, Resistance, and Renewal. *



The PSFG Emerging Scholars Panel is an opportunity for researchers to
present their work at a major international conference at the outset of
their career. All scholars who have not yet presented at a national
conference are eligible to apply. Selected emerging scholars will be paired
with a mentor from the field of Performance Studies who will offer critical
feedback on papers in preparation for the conference. *Successful
applicants will receive a $100 stipend as well as complimentary
registration to the ATHE PSFG pre-conference. *The PSFG will also award an
Honorable Mention to an additional emerging scholar, who will be invited to
attend the conference and join the focus group.



Located at the boundaries and intersections of scholarly and artistic
practice, Performance Studies theorizes and analyzes embodied practices and
events, and explores the ways in which performance creates meaning and
shapes social life. Assembling in a desert resort with Arizona as our
stage, this year’s PSFG will focus on the promise performance holds for
dreamers and actors of all kinds. How does performance allow us to
reconfigure existing relationships between dreaming and action? How are
such dreams/acts affectively produced through desertion and abandonment?
What performance forms are local to desert ecologies, and what role have
deserts played in the history of performance?



Submissions to the PSFG Emerging Scholars panel may engage these questions
generated by the conference theme, or may address issues raised by
Performance Studies more broadly. *Papers across performance modes and
historical periods are welcome. Topics may include:*



·      Contested boundaries between performance, theater, and other art
forms/disciplines

·      Performance as a modality of (historical) knowledge

·      Historiographical approaches to performance

·      Negotiating and building identity through performance

·      The role of performance in shifting configurations of power and
resistance

·      Performative strategies of the avant-garde

·      Conflict, confrontation, and dissensus in the performance encounter

·      Intersections of performance and philosophy

·      Performance within postcolonial and neocolonial contexts

·      Performativity and theatricality

·      Embodiment and technological culture

·      Complexity, ambiguity, and paradox in performance



Papers for the PSFG Emerging Scholars Panel should be 8-10 double-spaced
pages in length. *The deadline for submission is Monday, February 10, 2014.
*Please send completed papers (as attachments in Microsoft Word) along with
a current CV to Patrick McKelvey at patrick_mckelvey@brown.edu. Successful
applicants will be notified in late March 2014.

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2014 Call for Papers about Asexuality



Asexuality Studies Interest Group

National Women's Studies Association (NWSA)

November 13-16, 2014, San Juan, Puerto Rico

The NWSA Asexuality Studies Interest Group welcomes papers for the
2014 NWSA annual conference. These asexuality-related themes are
orientated towards the full NWSA 2014 CFP which can be found here:
http://www.nwsa.org/files/NWSA%202014%20CFP_Final.pdf

If you are interested in being a part of the 2014 Asexuality Studies
Interest Group panels at NWSA, please send the following information
to the designated panel organizer (listed under each theme) by
Thursday, February 6, 2014:

*Name, Institutional Affiliation, Mailing Address, Email, Phone

*NWSA Theme your paper fits under

*Title for your talk

*50-100 word abstract

We will try to accommodate as many qualified papers as possible, but
panels are limited to 3-4 presenters. NWSA will make the final
decision about which panels are accepted. Presenters accepted into the
conference program must become members of NWSA in addition to
registering for the conference.



Sponsored Session: Asexualities and Issues of Race


For our sponsored session, we wish to think through the ways that
race, ethnicity, and nation intersect with asexuality studies. We are
interested in academic scholarship that focuses on these
intersections, personal experiences of asexual people of color, as
well as pedagogical approaches to teaching about asexuality through
the lens of critical race studies and women of color feminism. Some
questions we want to raise are:

* What difference does race, ethnicity, and nation make in the lives
of asexual-identified people?

* How does asexual-identification predicated on low levels of sexual
attraction and/or desire interact with racist assumptions that people
of color are hypersexual?

* In what ways does asexuality help us think through histories of
race-making and racism?

* How is racism experienced in the asexual community?

* How do online asexual communities work to make asexual people of
color visible or invisible?

* How can we make asexuality studies be more attentive to issues of
race and white privilege?


Please submit materials for the sponsored session to organizer Regina
Wright at wrightrm@indiana.edu



Co-Sponsored Session with NWSA Fat Studies Interest Group


Fatness and asexuality provide useful frameworks for understanding how
subjects are produced and disciplined within the context of the
nation: positioned as unhealthy, deviant, pathological and
unproductive--both fatness and asexuality are perceived as threats to
the state's normal functioning. While the growing activist and
academic movements pertaining to fatness and asexuality both expose
and problematize the disciplinary techniques of the nation, fatness
and asexuality are only ever positioned together negatively. Fat
empowerment politics, for example, involves critiquing the dominant
ideology that fat bodies are either hypersexualized, fetishized or
desexualized, and by this emphasis, can overlook the experiences of
people who identify as both fat and asexual. This co-sponsored session
wishes to place fat studies and asexuality studies in dialogue with
each other and seeks papers that address questions including, but not
limited to:

* What are points of encounter between asexuality studies and fat studies?

* In what ways can the intersections of fat studies and asexuality
studies serve as a productive platform from which to critique ideas
about labor, the economy, and the nation-state?

* How do marginalized fat and asexual bodies continue to foil the
nation-state's desire for fixity?

* How can fat asexuality be re-imagined as a form of empowerment and not stigma?

* How might the increasing use of social media as a mode of resistance
to oppressive state regimes present a useful point of departure within
fat and asexual politics?


Please submit materials for the sponsored session to organizer
Danielle Cooper at cooperd4@yorku.ca

Theme 1: Rethinking the Nation

* In what ways does an avid investment in sex, sexuality, and the
sexual imperative shape the formation of colonial nation-states and
the making of empires?

* How does gender, race, class, ability, and sexuality interact with
the sexual imperative to make mandatory certain ways of inhabiting and
enacting national belonging and citizenship?

* Through what ways can we develop an asexual analytic to puncture the
normativizing structures at work in the making of empires, nations,
and neoliberal economies?

* In what ways does "asexuality" as an identification either collude
with or challenge the grounding elements of nation-making, in and
beyond the Occidental empires?

* Can asexual perspectives work in concord with critical race theories
and feminist theories of race-making to demolish global hierarchies
and the production of whiteness and white privilege?

* How is asexuality integral to the future of feminist critiques of
the role of sexuality in nation-making?

Please submit materials to theme organizer Ela Przybylo at przybylo@yorku.ca


Theme 2: Trans- Feminisms

* What does it mean to be both trans* and asexual? How do trans*
members of the asexual community negotiate these two identities?

* How might these intersecting identities help us redefine feminist
and asexual politics and epistemologies?

 * What is the intersection between the human and the non-human in
asexual communities? How might the encounter between the human and
non-human species be productive in terms of transspecies critiques and
participation in ecofeminist or cyborgian narratives?

 * In what ways do cultural and socio-political locations create space
or challenge asexual identities?  * Why are some ethnicities,
nationalities, and races only minimally represented in online asexual
communities?

 * How do the hierarchical relationships among regions across
North/South and other hegemonic borders figure into asexual studies?

 * How might asexual communities and identities help generate
transnational and transcultural feminist alliances?

 * How might transgenerational feminist perspectives in asexual
studies intersect with or challenge foundational concepts in women's
and gender studies? What are the dynamics among the members of the
multi-generational asexual community?


Please submit materials to theme organizer LaChelle Schilling at
lache2380@gmail.com


Theme 3: Technologizing Futures


Contemporary asexual identities and communities have largely developed
online (and in some cases have subsequently moved "off-line"). This
theme will explore this relationship between contemporary asexualities
and the Internet and might address any of the following questions, or
other relevant questions:


* What is the relationship between the Internet and contemporary
asexual identities and communities? How has the fact that these
identities and communities were first developed online shaped the form
of these identities and communities?

* What forms of asexual activism have been enabled by the online
nature of asexual identities and communities? Has the online nature of
these identities and communities augmented and/or limited their
ability to effect social change?

* What role do bodies play in online asexual communities? How has the
online nature of these communities affected the ways in which other
social categories have manifested in these communities (such as race,
class, gender, and ability)?

* What happens when asexual communities and identities move "off-line"?

* Has the online nature of asexual communities enabled the formation
of transnational connections? Do global inequalities remain
unaddressed in asexual communities?

* What can the "case study" of asexual identities and communities
contribute to scholarship on digital communities? To scholarship on
sexual identity formation?

Please submit materials to theme organizer Kristina Gupta at
kag24@georgetown.edu


Theme 4: Love and Labor


One can look at the larger project of asexualities as a relatively
recent series of actions by individuals, groups and disciplines
laboring privately and publicly to come to terms with different
approaches to our definitions of love. Through radically redefining
sexuality, identity, bodies and desire in a heteronormative society,
it becomes possible to further imagine an openness to contingency and
experiments within and between communities. This panel addresses some
of the ways in which feminist, queer and performance studies can
inform and build upon one another within the context of activating
various perspectives on asexualities, through the following areas of
inquiry:


* How do we construct new networks in innovative ways that link
theoretical inquiries to the socioeconomic and racial realities of
asexual communities?

* To what extent can we employ trust, creativity and imagination in
the exploration and construction of asexual identities and space
through an everyday performativity?

* How would shared social and cultural rituals of a small community
translate into larger, networked activism?

* In what ways, do we enable and enrich the writing of future
histories of asexualities within the context of this
interdisciplinarity?

Please submit materials to theme organizer Anna Lise Jensen at aaaonyc@gmail.com



Theme 5: Creating Justice

* In what ways are asexual identities marginalized/oppressed? What
structures, discourses, and modes of power refute, obstruct, and/or
censor asexual legitimacy?

* In what ways does the struggle for legitimacy resemble prior
movements toward justice, such as those for women's rights, minority
voices, and queer communities? What can a campaign for asexual justice
take and learn from those movements? In what ways is the asexual
movement different?

* What can be learned from the proliferation of asexual spaces online
and how can that knowledge be put into practice in a campaign for
legitimacy and justice offline?

* What is asexual justice? How can it be achieved in theory and practice?

* In what discourses and institutions is asexuality currently allowed
(wholly or partially) to operate?

* How do specific cultures and languages reshape, challenge, or aid
the campaign for asexual justice?

* How does this campaign for justice change when considered outside of
the dominant contexts of the United States and Europe?

Please submit materials to theme organizer Nathan Erro at nmerro@gmail.com

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CHP: Disability & Critical Embodiment


Dear all,

Here is the call for papers for a guaranteed session sponsored by the  
Disability Studies Division Executive Committee of the Modern Language  
Association.

The MLA convention will be held Jan 8-11, 2015 in Vancouver.

Disability & Critical Embodiment

Disability Studies approaches to ?critical embodiment? articulate an  
alternative ethics about why disabled lives matter and how pwds  
re-invent narrow normative practices and beliefs. 250 word proposals,  
short cv. Contact: Susan Antebi <susan.antebi@utoronto.ca> or
David Mitchell dtmitchel@gwu.edu

Please check mla.org for conference details.
And please consider submitting a proposal!

Graduate-level fellowships at NACCHO Health and Disability Project

 
NACCHO is seeking applications for two paid graduate-level fellowships to work as a part of our Health and Disability Project. 
Fellows will work under the guidance of the Health and Disability Staff at NACCHO's Headquarters in Washington, DC. Fellows will work with NACCHO staff members to meet the following objectives: 
1.    Increasing the number of states thoughtfully including people with disabilities into mainstream public health promotion activities; 
2.    Educating public health workforce on the inclusion of people with disabilities into program activities and interventions; and 
3.    Conducting a study on current levels of funding, staffing, and programmatic activities at state and local health departments focusing on the health of people with disabilities. 
As a part of their fellowship, fellows will receive mentorship and guidance from NACCHO's experienced health and disability staff. Fellows will: 
1.    Receive guidance on development and execution of project deliverables; 
2.    Be introduced to local-, state-, and national-level disability and health partners through meetings and conferences; and 
3.    Be evaluated on their awareness and knowledge of health and disability issues through administration of a pre- and post-assessment. 
Graduate students (Masters or PhD students) in public health, health education, or related field preferred. Students currently in school and who recently completed school will be considered. Prefer students with background or interest in disability/disability studies. Students with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.
 


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

LERN Publishes First Report on National Survey of Peer-run Organizations, and Launches Support Groups for Undergrads with Lived Experience

  The Lived Experience Research Network (LERN) has published a report on the role peer-run organizations are playing in the mental health system. Three hundred eighty peer-run programs participated. The report is available by clicking here<http://cts.vresp.com/c/?NationalMentalHealth/76ecc9a026/81a66705fc/3b31840c05>. In addition, LERN recently announced a support group for undergraduates "who identify as consumers, current/former service users, and/or survivors." "We welcome those who are currently enrolled, who are about to be enrolled, or who plan on returning to an undergraduate program in the near future," they write. LERN additionally runs support groups for current graduate and post-graduate students. For more information or to join any of these groups, click here<http://cts.vresp.com/c/?NationalMentalHealth/76ecc9a026/81a66705fc/624e46dd7d>.
 
Source: http://www.lernetwork.org/<http://cts.vresp.com/c/?NationalMentalHealth/76ecc9a026/81a66705fc/a92c5f8b1b
>

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PBATS, USBLN® Partner in Disability Employment Initiative

Organizations to Promote Inclusion through Groundbreaking PBATS Program
For Immediate Release
January 21, 2014
Contact: Sam Radbil
Cell: 414-614-9909

sam@theromanogroup.com
WASHINGTON, DC (January 21, 2014) - The Professional Baseball Athletic Trainers Society (PBATS) and The US Business Leadership Network® (USBLN®) announced today that they will be partnering in an effort to promote disability employment.
The USBLN® will be joining with PBATS in their groundbreaking "Ability Transcends Challenges" program (ATC).
PBATS and the USBLN® believe people with disabilities have an important role to play in America. Using illustrations from baseball, the "Ability Transcends Challenges" program (ATC) demonstrates that people with disabilities can be a significant engine in the life of our country, if given the opportunity.
Mark O'Neal, President of PBATS - an organization that primarily concerns itself with health issues - is extremely excited about the partnership and is delighted to be working with one of the premiere business related organizations in the United States.
"Using baseball's tremendous platform, this program is designed to educate the American people about the role that people with disabilities have played throughout baseball's history, while speaking to the important lessons of inclusion and the need to harness this valuable source of American manpower. Our ultimate goal is to do nothing less than change America's perception about the value of people with disabilities, by demonstrating that truth using baseball, and partnering with the USBLN® will have great impact on our ability to do so," O'Neal said.
Jill Houghton, Executive Director, USBLN® said, "Baseball has an absolutely striking and long history of giving players an opportunity at the highest level to show what they can do, rather than focusing what they cannot do. Our partnership with PBATS is especially exciting because nothing can promote the 'can do' spirit of people with disabilities better than the game of baseball."
The USBLN® will play an important role in this partnership by promoting these messages of inclusion to businesses across the United States. In addition, the USBLN® is offering its member organizations an opportunity to be a part of the ATC program and help in this national initiative, while giving each business the chance to demonstrate their commitment to the employment of people with disabilities - all while having the opportunity to be a part of the historic game of baseball.
Keith Wiedenkeller, Chair, USBLN® said, "We know of no other sport that can surpass major league baseball's disability inclusive history. The USBLN® Board and members are excited about the powerful message that this program will bring to the world on what people with disabilities can do."
For more information regarding PBATS, the USBLN® and their partnership in conjunction with the ATC program, please visit - www.pbats.com or www.usbln.org.
About the US Business Leadership Network® (USBLN®)
The US Business Leadership Network® (USBLN®) is a national non-profit that helps business drive performance by leveraging disability inclusion in the workplace, supply chain, and marketplace. The USBLN® serves as the collective voice of nearly 50 Business Leadership Network affiliates across the United States, representing over 5,000 businesses. Additionally, the USBLN® Disability Supplier Diversity Program® (DSDP) is the nation's leading third party certification program for disability-owned businesses, including businesses owned by service-disabled veterans. www.usbln.org
About the Professional Baseball Athletic Trainers Society (PBATS)
The mission of the Professional Baseball Athletic Trainers Society (PBATS) is to serve as an educational resource for the Major League and Minor League Baseball athletic trainers. www.pbats.com

This email was sent from US Business Leadership Network (USBLN) to clreutli@syr.edu.

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Human Rights and Disability Rights

Welcome once again to the new and exciting 2014.
 This year we are talking disability and the right to talk.  Looking forward to sharing more news and information on human and disability rights as the first articles. As the start of the year, it surfaces to say that the International day was not celebrated last year; hence it has been postponed to sometime in January. We hope it shall take place with the involvement and participation of people living with disabilities. This year’s focus will be the rights of people living with disabilities, and also covering what will be happening year round. The rights shall be discussed in depth, looking at all the articles in the Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
You may ask yourself what Human Rights are? Human rights are entitlements held by all people. They are universal, which means that they apply equally to everyone. Human rights help us respect each other and live with each other. These rights are not only rights to be requested or demanded but rights to be respected and they go hand in hand with responsibilities. 
Improvement
Human rights can be divided into four. This includes the social rights, economic rights, cultural rights as well as the civil and political rights. When we are talking about the social rights, it is the improvement of the well being and standard of living of all members of society. They give people security as they live together in families, schools and communities. The social rights include the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. The right to adequate housing, food and sanitation as well as inclusive and accessible education.
The economic rights deal with income-generating activities or supports that allow people to have the necessities of life. This includes the right to own property, the right to social security, the right to earn a living from work which is entitlement to employment. The right to equal pay for equal work that is freely chosen and the right to access technical and vocational training programmes which are suitable to the type of disability and to what that person is capable of doing.
Deal
Cultural rights deal with protecting, developing and enjoying one’s cultural identity. This includes the right to participate in mainstream culture, arts, recreation, leisure and sports. The right to create unique disability culture like the deaf culture. The right to cultural materials in accessible formats and the right to access places of cultural performances.
The civil and political rights allow people to have equal citizenship which includes the right to life, liberty and security of persons. The right to freedom of opinion, the right to protection from torture and violence and the right to vote and run for political office. 
Challenges
Are people living with disabilities enjoying all these rights entitled to all human beings? There are a lot of challenges which hinders the enjoyment due to the following barriers such as inaccessibility, discrimination and not being given the opportunity to explore one’s capability due to service provision where everything is done for them, disempowerment and discrimination to name a few. Thinking about disability from a human rights approach has meant a shift from seeing persons with disabilities as people who receive charity to people who hold rights, forgetting that they are also entitled to the same rights as everybody else. 

The latest issue of *Family Relations * -- Special Issue on Disability:



http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/fare.2014.63.issue-1/issuetoc

Disability and Abuse Project Update

It has recently come to my attention that not everyone of you knows the people who are working here at the Disability and Abuse Project! Those of you who have been with us over the years, have seen the updates and upgrades, but may not be familiar with how it all happens and who is doing what!!
PROJECT HISTORY AND WHO WE ARE
The project began in the early 1990’s under the auspices of Spectrum Institute. At that time it was called the Disability, Abuse and Personal Rights Project, to look at issues of abuse as well as balancing the importance of supporting civil and social rights. Under "DAPR" we received a grant from CalOES and hosted the first California Think Tank on Abuse of People with Developmental Disabilities. Many products were created and lectures were presented, as well as providing consultation to agencies around the country.
In 1999 we collaborated with Jim Stream at the Arc of Riverside County when we received another grant from CalOES which lead to six years of close association. We hired Tom Hanna (of LifeNet in New York) to build and manage a website, and re-named the project the CAN DO Project, The Child Abuse and Neglect Disability Outreach Project. The project ended in 2005. Tom Hanna has moved on to other endeavors and no longer works with the Disability and Abuse Project.
I (Nora) continued doing the work of the project on my own along with Jim Stream until 2007 when Tom Coleman (Los Angeles) joined the effort. As an attorney he had a long history of advocating for civil and human rights, and recognized the disenfranchisement of people with developmental disabilities. (To learn more about Tom Coleman, read his book "The Domino Effect" available at www.dominoeffectbook.com). Because of our close association as friends and the fact he had been aware of all of my work over the decades (as Executive Director of Spectrum Institute of which I was President of the Board), he was aware of the problems and discrimination experienced by people with I/DD. However, he also became more involved in the legal work I was doing (expert witness in cases across the country), and now is our Legal Director and Projects Manager. A few years ago, he created the website for the Disability and Abuse Project. The old website for CAN DO is archived on our website now, so the work completed by Tom Hanna is still available. Tom Coleman is a visionary, and many of his ideas become projects that we develop.
Jim Stream, also a visionary, is our Senior Consultant. He oversaw the 8th, 9th and 10th National Conferences on Abuse and Disability and hosted them in Riverside. He oversaw the First National Online Conference on Abuse and Disability (which we will make available again this year online.)  He also oversaw the development and production of the law enforcement training DVD’s and curriculum for First Responders. With me and Jim leading the effort, the Think Tank was re-convened in 2000 and continued through 2006, but in it's last year under the administration of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. Members of the Think Tank agreed with me and Jim that a survey on abuse would be an important endeavor.  However, development and dissemination of the survey did not happen under the SCDD leadership. In 2012, Jim recommended that we recreate the survey and disseminate it nationally. We did that in consultation with our Consultant Board, releasing it on May Day and closing it in mid November with 7,289 responses. Tom Coleman took on the job of calculating and analyzing the survey responses, as well as authoring the First Report on the National Survey on Abuse of People with Disabilities.
Anne Kincaid is our expert consultant for the Newsfeed. Residing in Denver, she had produced the newsfeed for the National Association of Adult Protective Services Administrators (NAPSA) for over seven years, and when their grant ended, joined the Disability and Abuse Project. Each week she collects and organizes all articles published in the U.S. and abroad on the topic of abuse and people with disabilities. This is a huge task, and she is considered a "treasure" for her commitment and excellent work. The newsfeed is sent to Tom Coleman and Nora, where "highlights" for the week are culled and disseminated under "Dr. Nora’s Picks" with a link to the balance of the articles for the week. Usually there are 80-100 articles, which shows how pervasive and ongoing the problems are. All newsfeeds are archived on the website by Tom Coleman.
Although we are unable to take on individual cases, we often provide consultation to individuals, agencies and governmental agencies.
Our current projects include:
1. 2012 National Survey on Abuse of People with Disabilities:
    Ongoing dissemination of the First Report
    Hosted first Roundtable Conference on Survey Recommendations:
        Conducting follow up to the conference (quarterly)
        Creating a blueprint for other communities/states to host Roundtable conferences
        Creating a DVD of the proceedings
        Creating a transcript of the proceedings
        Supporting other communities in hosting Roundtables (California, GA & WV)
2. Providing consultation to other States and Agencies in CA, WV, GA, and DE.
3. Creating a support system for adult conservatees to be assured that they retain their constitutional right of association, so they can accept or decline visits with parents or other family members. No "forced visitation" is the concept.
4. Maintaining the weekly or bi-weekly emailing of the Newsfeed
5. Writing monthly or occasional blogs, including those submitted by Listserv members.
6. Continuing to produce and keep up to date our Resources webpage
7. Developing and presenting Webinars periodically with our team as host/presenters as well as guest presenters.
8. Continuing to seek funding for our Project
9.  Nora will continue to work on the Companion Workbooks for the Risk Reduction Workbook for Parents and Service Agencies.  The Companion Workbooks are designed for individuals with developmental disabilities and intellectual disabilities to use, and design their part of the overall Individual Response Plan (IRP).  She will also continue the development and implementation of a new curriculum on group therapy for abuse survivors (in collaboration with DDS in Delaware).  And, we are very much looking forward to a very likely funding of research on the Risk Reduction strategies!  
10. There are other projects that are in their infancy, yet these are plenty and keep us very busy everyday. 
Please let us know if this is helpful for you to be more deeply aware of the Disability and Abuse Project operations.

Article: Context Matters: Disability, the End of Life, and Why the Conversation is Still so Difficult


Wisconsin passes mental health bills with bipartisan support

 

"The Production Bunch" video project (no captioning)

Greetings DS community,

I just wanted to let everyone one about a design endeavor I am embarking on
this year.  Let me introduce you to "The Production Bunch" a truly diverse
company.  Not only do they have yours truly, the one legged wonder, as
their production/costume designer, they founded by a performer with a
disability and we have extended our performer/staff to include many other
talented individuals with disabilities.

This year we are making a feature film in 52 weeks, from writing the script
to the editing room.  So watching out for more post and please join us on
Facebook for updates.  I think this film is going to be ground breaking.

https://www.facebook.com/productionbunch

Just a little taste, here is our last video interview with me!  Check it out

http://theproductionbunch.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/video-interview-with-costume-designer-mallory/


Also check out some of our projects from last year.

http://www.youtube.com/user/TheProductionBunch?feature=watch

Thanks Everyone for reading,

Mallory
-- 
Mallory Kay Nelson
Costume Design/ Crafts/ Advocate
(617)840-0692
www.mallorykaynelson.com
malloryk@gmail.com

Recent NPR story about people with psychiatric disabilities and incarceration:

 


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS