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Weekly Newsletter

September, 25 2017

INDEX

SU HAPPENINGS

A PLACE AT THE TABLE

Human Rights Law Making Unplugged –Reflections on the Drafting of the UN Disability Treaty

Family Weekend 2014 Brings Families to SU Campus this Friday through Sunday

Creating a Website with WordPress

Reminder for RSVP'd Attendees: Welcome Reception for Paula Possenti-Perez

SU NEWS

Spring 2015 LGBT Studies course offerings

Spring 2015 Disability and Higher Education Course

SPRING 2015 UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OF INTEREST (with Diane Wiener)

SU Daily Orange story about student with deaf brothers: "Senior Honors Brothers, Pays Tribute to Uncle" 

Laverne Cox speaks at SU about hardships, experiences as a trans* woman

Syracuse University Martin Luther King Jr. 2015 Celebration YOUTH UNSUNG HERO NOMINATIONS

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Canadian Disability Studies Association – Association Canadienne des Études sur l’Incapacité 2015 Conference "Capital Ideas"

Academic fellowship in disability law at the University of Leeds

FOR SU FACULTY AND STAFF You're Invited: Live virtual conference: "Accessing Higher Ground"

Conference on Equity and Social Justice

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

AHEAD Call for Proposals deadline extended to November 12th!

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Western developing disability studies class

Living With Schizophrenia: Coffee and Friends

Voting Rights of People with Disabilities in NYS at risk

Festival of Dyslexic Culture in the UK

Blog Post of Interest: Because It Makes Us Feel Something

DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: October 13-24, 2014

Studying Disability Arts and Culture: Sample Chapter

Disability Rights International files

Unveiling the Updated Bookshare Website

A Note From a Colleague, on Inclusive Trick-or-Treating: The Teal Pumpkin Project


SU HAPPENINGS

A PLACE AT THE TABLE

 
Perfect Bodies...? 
A Discussion on Disability, Body Image, and Body Modification
with Lisa Thomas and Bill Peace
 
Date: Friday, November 7th
Time: 12:00-1:30PM
Location: Hoople 106
 
Lisa Thomas is a Registered Dietitian at Syracuse University Health Services.
Bill Peace is Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Honors Program at Syracuse University.
 
American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and gluten free food will be provided.
Please indicate any accommodation requests by 10/31/2014 to sudcc@syr.edu by email or 443-4486 by phone.
 
Sponsors: Disability Cultural Center, Lisa Thomas at SU Health Services, and the Disability Student Union.
 
This event is made possible through the Co-Curricular Departmental Initiatives program within the Division of Student Affairs.
 
A Place at the Table: Food is an incredibly important part of many cultures around the world. In what ways do cultures shape our relationships with food? What happens when dietary restrictions, allergies, disabilities, ethics, values, principals, religion, and preferences collide with the cultural norms about food and eating? This ongoing luncheon series will explore these questions while also providing a more normalized eating environment for those routinely left out of food culture. In other words, everyone has a place at the table

Human Rights Law Making Unplugged –Reflections on the Drafting of the UN Disability Treaty

 
Janet Lord
 
Tuesday, November 4th, 2014
12:30PM
341 Eggers Hall
 
Janet Lord is Senior Vice President for Human Rights and Inclusive Development, Syracuse University’s Burton Blatt Institute, and Senior Researcher, Harvard Law School Project on Disability
 
Janet Lord is an international human rights lawyer who specializes in international disability law and policy and inclusive development for marginalized groups and provides technical assistance to governments.  Lord will speak from her experience in human rights treaty negotiations to explore the influence of NGOs in human rights law making, reflecting on her experience throughout the drafting of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and participation in other treaty processes. In particular, she will apply insights from both international relations and international legal theory to explore who exercises power in international standard setting, how such power is sustained and how normative structures can work to support (or constrain) dialogue among engaged actors.
 
ASL Certified Interpreters will be present for the event
 
If you require accommodations for this event, please contact Carlo Abuyuan at ckabuyua@syr.edu by 10/30/2014

Family Weekend 2014 Brings Families to SU Campus this Friday through Sunday


Creating a Website with WordPress

Beginner and advanced workshops
Create and manage a web site for yourself or your organization – beautifully! WordPress is a cutting-edge blogging and online content management system that allows you to create your own web site, and incorporate social media and analytics so you and your organization can really benefit.
Syracuse University’s TEDCenter is offering two 2-hour, instructor-led workshops to teach you how to use WordPress to your advantage. SU web specialist Devin Kerr provides personalized instruction in small class sessions. Each session is $99.
Creating a Web Site with WordPress –The Basics 
Wednesday, November 5, 6-8 p.m. 

at University College, 700 University Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13244
Learn and practice:
• Setting up your WordPress account
• Walking through the WordPress dashboard

• Choosing a theme and basic plugins

• Basic blog structure – Pages, Sidebars, Menus

• Writing your first post or page
Creating a Web Site with WordPress – Advanced 
Wednesday, November 19, 6-8 p.m.

at University College, 700 University Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13244
Learn and practice:
• Organization and enhanced site structure

• Additional plugin and theme options

• Incorporating Social Media

• Tracking Site Visits / Metrics

• SEO Techniques with WordPress

• Q&A
Register now! Visit the TEDCenter class web site for details.  


SU NEWS

Spring 2015 LGBT Studies course offerings

 
QSX 112 Sexualities, Genders, Bodies
Stephanie Clare
MoWe 3.45-5.05pm, HL207
 
WGS/QSX/MES 453: Gender, Sexualities and Human Rights in Middle Eastern Societies Dana Olwan
TuTh 11.00am-12.30pm, Hoople 106
 
HST/QSX 362 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
Laurie Marhoefer
TuTh 11.00am-12.20pm, Watson Theater
 
CRS/WGS/QSX 400 Advanced Gender Communication
Erin Rand
MoWe 12:45-2:05pm, Sims 131
 
LIT/QSX 300 Love and Friendship in Antiquity
Matthieu van der Meer
MoWe 12.45-2.05pm, HBC 213A
 
REL/WGS 300 Christianity and Sexuality
Virginia Burrus
TuTh 2.00-3.20pm, HL 115
 
GRADUATE COURSES
 
CRS 746 Queer Rhetorics
Erin Rand
Tu 5:15-8:00pm, Sims 123
Instructor permission required
 
CFE 600 Trans* Identities: Embodiments and Institutions
Chase Catalano
Th 4.00-7.00pm, Huntington 056 Instructor permission required
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies
Spring 2015 Courses
For more information on the
minor in LGBT Studies, please contact Program Director, Roger Hallas at rhallas@syr.edu

 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
QSX 112 Sexualities, Genders, Bodies
Stephanie Clare
MW 3.45-5.05pm, HL207
This introductory course in LGBT Studies analyzes cultural practices that articulate and give meaning to bodies, identities, and desires. We draw on a range of sources:from theory, autobiography, and film to oral history, photography, and science writing. We consider how people have creatively struggled to give name to the enormousrange of experiences and embodiments that get connected to gender and sexuality; we reflect on how people celebrate, refuse, and understand the stories of sexuality andgender that we inhabit and that constitute us. Questions we ask include: How do our bodies get classified in ways that may or may not coincide with the ways weexperience them? How do we contest classifications and why? How do gender and sexuality intersect with race, class, ability, and national identity? In what ways do weexperience privilege, and in what ways do we experience marginalization and violence? Alongside addressing these         questions, the course introduces students to keyconcepts in LGBT studies and debates that have taken form around these concepts: sexuality, sex and gender, intersectionality, social constructionism, transnational, and“queer.”
 
WGS/QSX/MES 453: Gender, Sexualities and Human Rights in Middle Eastern Societies
Dana Olwan
TTH 11.00am-12.30pm, Hoople 106
Middle Eastern societies are routinely described as oppressive towards gender minorities and in particular women and queers. Their human rights records are cited asevidence of the area’s cultural, political, and social backwardness. This upper level course is designed to address these assumptions through a focus on feministmovements in Middle Eastern societies. In particular, the course will map women’s rights movements, LGBTQ mobilizations, and minority activisms across a variety ofsocial, political, and geographic scales. The course brings attention to the centrality of gender and sexuality to the politics of everyday life in the Middle East.
 
HST/QSX 362 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
Laurie Marhoefer
TTH 11.00am-12.20pm, Watson Theater
In 1933 a fascist political party took power in Germany, partly through a democratic process.  Once in power, the Nazis dismantled democracy and built a dictatorship. TheNazi State was quite popular with some Germans, but unpopular with others, especially those considered enemies of the state, including German Jews, Roma (Gypsies),communists, Afro-Germans, gay men, and people with mental and physical disabilities. After years of Nazi rule, Germany started a world war and eventually orchestrated avast program of mass murder in pursuit of a vision of racial purity. Refusing to surrender, the Nazi State fell only in the final days of World War II in Europe, when theUSSR captured Berlin in a bloody urban battle. This class will move chronologically, investigating Nazi Germany according to four major lines of inquiry. The first has to dowith history prior to 1933: What was German fascism, where did it come from, and how did it come to power? The second covers the period 1933 to 1939, when the Nazisruled Germany in peacetime: What was the Nazi State? What was daily life like for those who lived under it? The third has to do with war and genocide: How did WorldWar II begin and end? Why did the Nazis undertake mass murder? Why were they relatively successful? A final section of the course expands the temporal andgeographical view: How have Germans and others addressed the history of Nazi Germany since 1945?
 
CRS/WGS/QSX 400 Advanced Gender Communication
Erin Rand
MW 12:45-2:05pm, Sims 131
This course examines the multiple and often contradictory ways that feminism, queerness, and gender and sexual dierence manifest in popular discourses in the UnitedStates.  We will consider a wide variety of contemporary texts, ranging from scholarly essays to popular fiction and nonfiction, memoirs, graphic novels, and films.  Thethemes that emerge from these texts will encourage a richly intersectional approach, emphasizing discourses of race and class and also addressing issues of consent,reproduction, geography, privilege, embodiment, identity, and more.  This is a seminar style course designed for advanced undergraduates who have already taken anintroductory course in gender and/or sexuality studies.  Instructor consent required. Please contact Dr. Rand ejrand@syr.edu for permission to register.

LIT/QSX 300 Love and Friendship in Antiquity
Matthieu van der Meer
MW 12.45-2.05pm, HBC 213A
To what extent can friendships be voluntary, informal and personal and to what extent do they function within the constraints of class, gender, age, ethnicity and geography?Is friendship solely a matter of choice? Many contemporary writers in the west tend to present friendship as private, voluntary, and happening between autonomousindividuals. This diers in key respects from views on love and friendship developed in antiquity. The course explores a number of descriptions of love (incl. same-sex love)and friendship found in works of literature and philosophy from ancient Greece and Rome, concluding with an excursion into the Middle Ages. Three topics in particular willbe studied. The first is the connection between friendship, justice, and politics that is asserted in a number of ancient works. The second is the presentation of erotic love asa form of divine madness that can be both dangerous and beneficial. The third is the assessment of love and friendship in the context of religious discourses. Some authorsto be read include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Catullus, Augustine and Abelard and Heloise.
 
REL/WGS 300 Christianity and Sexuality
Virginia Burrus
TTH 2.00-3.20pm, HL 115
This course undertakes a critical exploration of how Christian texts and traditions have constructed—and contested—sex, desire, and erotic pleasure in dierent historicalmoments and contexts.  The approach will not be dogmatic but inquisitive. What is sexuality? What, for that matter, is (“true”) Christianity, and who gets to say?  DoesChristianity have a distinctive understanding of sexuality? Is it consistent or coherent?  What role does biblical authority and interpretation play? Why were early Christiansso attracted to celibacy? Is virginity or asceticism an erotic practice and/or sexual identity?  How have figures of vice—the sodomite, the whore, the homosexual, themasturbator, etc.— haunted the Christian sexual imagination, and to what eect? What does Christian theology say about marriage and family life? Does pleasure or joyplay any positive role in Christian thought and practice?
 
GRADUATE COURSES
 
CRS 746 Queer Rhetorics
Erin Rand
Tues 5:15-8:00pm, Sims 123
This course traces some of the most vexing and fruitful issues facing contemporary queer studies. Blending a few of queer theory’s “canonical” texts with the new andprovocative voices of today, we will explore topics such as the aective implications of gay pride and queer shame, queer im/migration and race, queer memory and archivalpractices, trans* embodiment and citizenship, and rural and urban queer spaces. Our inquiries will highlight the relationships assumed, forged, and/or disputed among queerscholarship, queer activism, queer politics, and queer lives. Although our approach will be interdisciplinary, we will pay special attention to the recent rhetorical studiesscholarship that is queering the traditions of the discipline. Undergraduate seniors and graduate students outside Communication and Rhetorical Studies need to contact Dr.Rand  ejrand@syr.edu for permission to register.
 
CFE 600 Trans* Identities: Embodiments and Institutions
Chase Catalano
TH 4.00-7.00pm, Huntington 056
This course will examine the histories and contemporary iterations of trans* identities, conceptualizations of embodiments, and experiences navigating institutions (medicalindustrial complex, prison industrial complex, and higher education). Students will explore literature disaggregating and conflating of the intersections of gender, sex,sexuality, as well as the historical intertwining of trans* politics and gay, lesbian, and bisexual movements. Under examination will be the impact the “wrong body” narrative,discourse focused on bio- medical transitioning, and the role of the Standards of Care. This course will also address how higher education attends to trans* inclusion in areassuch as policies, practices, and education strategies.
Undergraduate seniors and graduate students outside the School of Education need to contact Dr. Catalano  djcatala@syr.edu for permission to register.
 

Spring 2015 Disability and Higher Education Course

 
 
DSP/HED 700 – Disability in Higher Education (Instructor: Wendy Harbour)
Spring semester, Wednesdays 4-7 in 056 HH
 
Over the past 20 years, more students with disabilities have been entering the U.S. higher education system, and they are an increasingly diverse population.  This trend is occurring at a time when higher education is also experiencing greater numbers of college faculty and staff with disabilities, more federal involvement in disability-related postsecondary issues, and the rise of disability studies as an academic field.  Distinctly different from the K-12 special education system, disability-related issues in higher education often connect to broader questions about academic integrity, diversity, the purpose of a college education, and the ways postsecondary education acts as a gatekeeper for society and professional fields.  The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the many ways disability is constructed in higher education at the individual, institutional, state, and national levels.  Disability studies models and theories, including ableism and universal design, will serve as primary frameworks for inquiry.  This course is highly interdisciplinary and assumes no prior knowledge of disability, disability studies, or higher education.  Students with a personal interest in the topic are welcome; the course is especially appropriate for those with an interest in postsecondary administration or student affairs, disability studies, educational law and policy, transition services in grades 7-12, or postsecondary disability services.
 
 
Wendy S. Harbour, Ed.D. 
Lawrence B. Taishoff Professor of Inclusive Education
Executive Director, Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education 
Syracuse University | School of Education

101 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Avenue
Syracuse, New York 13244-2280

t 315.443.1288 f 315.443.4338 
e wharbour@syr.edu url www.taishoffcenter.syr.edu

Reminder for RSVP'd Attendees: Welcome Reception for Paula Possenti-Perez

 
You Are Invited To a Welcome Reception for Paula Possenti-Perez, Director, Office of Disability Services
 
When:       Tuesday, November 4, 2014
Where:      Schine Student Center
                  Rooms 304-A-B-C
Time:        5:00 to 7:30 pm
 
 
For accommodation requests, contact Andréa Carter at agomezca@syr.edu or 315-443-4018
 
Hosted by Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, Disability Cultural Center, and Equal Opportunity, Inclusion & Resolution Services
 
 
 
Best,
Cynthia Maxwell Curtin, Esq.
Associate VP, HCD and Chief Officer for Equal Opportunity, Inclusion and Resolution Services
Title IX Coordinator and interim 503/504/ADA Coordinator
315.443.1520

SPRING 2015 UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OF INTEREST (with Diane Wiener)

 
Introduction to Disability Studies (DSP 200)
Spring 2015
Monday and Wednesday, 12:45 to 2:05 p.m.
070B Huntington Hall
Professor Diane R. Wiener
 
Course Description
 
This foundational course in disability studies provides students (studying in the Disability Studies Minor, or taking the course for other reasons)with a broad interdisciplinary introduction to the field.   Drawing upon a wide range of multimedia materials from cultural theory, the humanities,the social sciences, education, the arts, and other areas of inquiry, the course takes as a premise the idea that disabilities are social andcultural, and thus environmental as well as individual.  Disabilities and disability identities, as aspects of human diversity, are underscored asvital facets of an intersectional tapestry of experiences on our campus, and throughout our world.  Students will enhance their critical reflectionand writing skills, read literary and media texts via a disability theory set of “lenses,” imagine and experience maximally inclusive highereducational settings, have the opportunity to interact with an array of disability studies scholars and activists from across the S.U. communityand beyond,  consider the relationships between disability and other identity variables (including race, class, gender, and sexuality), and articulate their own roles within longstanding and continuing local, regional, national, and international disability rights movements.
 
For more information, contact the instructor at dwiener@syr.edu

SU Daily Orange story about student with deaf brothers: "Senior Honors Brothers, Pays Tribute to Uncle" 


Laverne Cox speaks at SU about hardships, experiences as a trans* woman


Syracuse University Martin Luther King Jr. 2015 Celebration YOUTH UNSUNG HERO NOMINATIONS

The Syracuse University Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Committee in collaboration with Say Yes to Education-Syracuse is looking for students who have made a positive difference in the lives of others in their schools, and exemplify the teaching of Dr. King. The award will be presented during the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Celebration to be held Saturday, January 17, 2015 at Fowler High School (227 Magnolia Street, Syracuse, NY 13204) from 12 PM - 4 PM.

Eligibility An exemplary student (K-12) who exemplifies the spirit, life, and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  Past recipients have been recognized for their leadership, scholarship, advocating for peace and justice, building bridges between students, raising funds or awareness for a cause, etc.

We seek your schools help in identifying recipients for this award. We are looking for youth who have made a positive difference in the lives of others.

Nominations can be submitted online here or emailed to mlwill07@syr.edu

THE DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING NOMINATIONS IS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014.

Awards

One student from each school will receive: 

- Framed certificate

- Special book related to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

- Recognized at the Community Celebration held on January 17, 2015; and your name will be printed in the program of the Dr. King Dinner Celebration held at the Dome on Sunday, January 18, 2015.                                                                   

Thank you for your time and contributions that enable the University to recognize outstanding members of the Central New York community. 


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Canadian Disability Studies Association – Association Canadienne des Études sur l’Incapacité 2015 Conference "Capital Ideas"

2015 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Tuesday, June 2 – Thursday, June 4, 2015


Consult the CDSA-ACEI website for conference information and the CFP in English and French
http://www.cdsa-acei.ca/conference.html

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS: December 15, 2014

“There is no longer, there never was, a single capital, nor a single capitalism, only capitalisms—state or private, real or symbolic, always linked to spectral forces—capitalizations whose antagonisms are irreducible.”[1]

Capital has many different meanings. The meanings of capital range from the most important place in a region, to a place associated with an activity or product, to wealth and the people who possess wealth, or a valuable resource of a particular kind, to characteristics of significance, excellence, and expanse. Capital can also be understood as an adjective that expresses approval, satisfaction or delight.

This year’s conference explores capital, capitalisms, capitalizations and the “spectral forces”— the social, cultural, political, historical and economic conditions—that have informed the development of “capital ideas” regarding disability and disability studies. The Canadian Disability Studies Association-Association Canadienne des Études sur l’Incapacité (CDSA-ACEI) invites abstracts that explicate the many meanings of capital as made to appear in relation with disability; that consider what is and is not capitalized (or treated as important) within disability studies and fields that study disability; and that trace the institutions and processes involved in the materialization of privileged ways of knowing, communicating, doing, being and feeling. CDSA-ACEI calls for works that examine the following question:

WHAT IDEAS, PRACTICES AND APPROACHES HAVE SHAPED HOW DISABILITY IS UNDERSTOOD?

Prospective presenters may want to consider the following questions: What disability ideas, approaches and paradigms are centred and celebrated as innovative? What breaks, disruptions and antagonisms have shaped what is treated as important within the field of disability studies? What ideas get circulated, and how are they circulated? How do academic disciplines get capitalized (and marginalized) within the university? Which bodies, minds, senses, emotions and names are capitalized as timely and worthy of attention? What role do diagnostic and bureaucratic forms of expertise play in their capitalization? What spaces and places take priority in work within disability studies research, education, art and activism? What (and whose) futures are imagined as capital futures, and what values and assumptions are capitalized in their pursuit?

CDSA-ACEI invites abstract submissions for papers to be presented at the 12th annual conference to be held at University of Ottawa. Our CDSA-ACEI meeting is part of the Congress 2015 of the Humanities and Social Sciences. Works and works in progress may take the form of reflections, empirical studies, statistical analyses, theorizing, cultural critique, methodological developments, professional or pedagogical interventions, and artistic, activist and performance pieces.

CDSA-ACEI’s 2015 conference theme “Capital Ideas” reflects the overall Congress theme. All abstracts that reflect disability studies, Deaf studies and mad studies perspectives are welcomed, and abstracts that demonstrate a connection to the theme “Capital Ideas” will be given special consideration. This year’s conference will directly address the development of disability studies as a scholarly field, an assemblage of artistic and activist interventions, and professional pursuits as well as a space that supports disabled people in realizing aspirations outside of the field itself. Questions of knowledge, education, training, professional development and employment will be addressed in featured panels in the conference program.

This call for abstracts also extends a special invitation to community members and undergraduate students to submit abstracts for works and works in progress. Instructors, professors and community leaders are encouraged to share the call with their students, colleagues and comrades, and co-submit where appropriate. Submissions are peer-reviewed by panels composed of university and college faculty and students and community members.

CDSA-ACEI is pleased to announce that as part of the conference program, Dr. Jay Dolmage, University of Waterloo, will deliver a keynote presentation titled, "Capital Ideas: Disabling Studies, Disability Studied, Disability Studies."
 
All submissions must identify which of the following thematic streams their abstract falls into:
 
1. OPEN CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
Abstracts that share explorations within the fields of disability studies, Deaf studies and mad studies or that adopt these perspectives but may not directly relate to the overarching conference theme of “Capital Ideas.”
 
2. Capitalized Ideas and Institutions
This subtheme broadly explores the ideas and institutions that shape how disability is understood. We welcome submissions exploring:
  • Disability and the law
  • Disability and the family
  • Disability and education
  • Disability at work  (e.g., employment, workplace accommodations, educational, skills and professional development programs for disabled workers)
  • Disability and religion/spirituality
  • Disability and institutionalization/incarceration and deinstitutionalization/decarceration (e.g., custodial, residential and community-based long term care)
3. Capital Investments
This subtheme broadly explores currencies of belonging and becoming. We welcome submissions exploring:
  • Cultural currencies and counterfeits (e.g., passing)
  • Disability and social capital/cultural capital
  • Disability and affect
  • Disability and language
  • Disability, race and ethnicity
  • Disability, gender and sexuality
  • Disability and age/ing/ism
  • Disability and fashion/fitness/style
  • Disability and sport
4. Capital Centres, Peripheries and Flows 
This subtheme broadly explores how disability is located and dis/dys/re-located. We welcome submissions exploring disability as made to appear within the context of:
  • Capital technologies and flows of communication
  • Processes of knowledge integration/exchange/translation/mobilization
  • (Trans)nationalism/cosmopolitanism
  • Diasporas, colonial continuums and post-/anti-colonial critiques
  • Transportation/travel/tourism
  • Environmental sustainability/sustainable development
  • Futurity, Utopias and/or dis/dystopias
5. Capital Regimes
This subtheme broadly explores how disability is both capitalized and resisted in and by various structures, systems and knowledge regimes. We welcome submissions exploring:
  • Disability and social and/or health policy and recommended practices
  • Disability as it relates to processes of securitization and/or militarization
  • Disability, imperialism, financialization and privatization
  • Disability and neoliberalism
  • Disability and humanitarianism/social activism
  • Disability research and/or (bio)ethics
 
Submission Guidelines Available on the CFP posted on the Conference Website. 
 
For more information email cdsa.acei[at]gmail.com
 
 
 Derrida, J. (1993). Specters of Marx: The state of the debt, the work of mourning & the new international (pp. 101-102). Paris: Éditions Galileé.

Academic fellowship in disability law at the University of Leeds

 

The University of Leeds is  currently advertising an opportunity for a post-doctoral researcher to work with colleagues in the interdisciplinary Centre for Disability Studies. It is a five year fellowship with an expectation  of progression to a permanent academic position as Associate Professor.  This is part of a wider University of Leeds investment in 250 new academic fellowships<http://250greatminds.leeds.ac.uk/>.

More details about the post and contact details can be found here
https://jobs.leeds.ac.uk/vacancy.aspx?ref=ESLLW1001

Closing date 16 November.

FOR SU FACULTY AND STAFF You're Invited: Live virtual conference: "Accessing Higher Ground"

 
Greetings!
 
All SU faculty and staff are invited to the virtual version of "Accessing Higher Ground," a live, web-based conference focused on Accessible Media, Web and Technology, presented by the Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD). The 17th annual conference will be held Monday – Friday, November 17 – 21, 2014 and be hosted on the SU campus in Rooms 2-202, 1-218 and 0-213 in the Center for Science and Technology.  Registration is free; please register at http://its.syr.edu/aheadreg by November 10 if you plan to attend any sessions. Once registered, you may attend any of the virtual sessions.
 
Accessing Higher Ground (AHG) focuses on the implementation and benefits of Accessible Media, Universal Design and Assistive Technology in the university, business and public setting. There is a strong focus on campus accommodation. Other topic areas cover legal and policy issues, including ADA and 508 compliance. The creation of accessible media and information resources, including Web pages and library resources are a particular focus of the event.
 
Presentation of this conference on the SU campus is jointly sponsored by the Office of Faculty Development, the Office of Disability Services, the Disability Cultural Center, SU Libraries, and Information Technology and Services.
 
Who should attend?
This conference is intended for individuals who need to design or provide accessible Web, media, information resources and technology in the academic and business environment. In the past, audiences have included Web designers, assistive technologists, ADA coordinators, human resource personnel, persons with disabilities, disability specialists, faculty, media specialists and programmers interested in accessibility and incorporating Universal Design into curriculum.
 
About the virtual conference
AHG will stream sessions live from all 5 days of the conference, one track during the pre-conference and two tracks during the main conference. For complete information, including session abstracts and schedule, visit the virtual conference website
 
NOTE: ITS has arranged for group tickets, each of which covers presentation of all virtual conference sessions at a single site on the SU campus. DO NOT register for the virtual conference on the AHG website, unless you want to participate as an individual, or from another location. Also note that the times shown on the virtual conference website are Mountain Time. Events will be presented here on campus two hours later than shown on the conference website.
 
Questions? Send an email to Information Technology and Services at accessibility@syr.edu and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.  Please include your name and phone number in your email.
 
Hope to see you there!

Conference on Equity and Social Justice

 
This year is the 8th Annual Conference on Equity and Social Justice. Held at Buffalo State this coming March, the year’s theme is Meaningful Change: Transforming Communities of Practice. It celebrates the fundament dialectic that interweaves theory and action, critique and transformation, creativity and learning, critical consciousness and praxis.
 
We are looking for potential presenters who seek to address issues of equity and social justice in the practice of teaching and learning. ESJ is open to students, faculty, staff, and community members. People can submit either papers or panels. 
 
Would you be able to reach out to the CFE program and distribute the information about the Conference and its presentation opportunities? Attached are documents that can be distributed.  
 
For more information, please go to: http://adulteducation.buffalostate.edu/esj
 
I appreciate your time and assistance. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact me.
 
McKenzie Paterson   mbpaters@syr.edu
Say Yes To Education SAT Prep Coordinator Assistant
ESJ Conference Outreach Coordinator
International Relations | Public Relations
Maxwell School | Newhouse School
Syracuse University ‘15

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Interdisciplinary Graduate Disabilities Conference - April 10-11, 2014
full name / name of organization: 
Vanderbilt University - Vanderbilt Advocates for Disabilities Education and Research
contact email: 
We invite graduate and professional students, academics, professionals, and qualified undergraduate students to participate in Vanderbilt Advocates for Disabilities Education and Research's first Interdisciplinary Graduate Disabilities Conference. We are seeking proposals for papers that focus specifically on how particular fields of study intersect with disability issues. Our primary objective to create a multi-disciplinary dialogue that informs practice and understanding, such as Law students mutually informing Nursing students or Management students mutually informing Divinity students. Additionally, this is a chance for the graduate students of Vanderbilt and beyond to refine their professional development. This conference will take place on April 10 and 11th on Vanderbilt's campus.
Fields of interest include, but are not limited to:
- Law
- Divinity and Theology
- Nursing
- Medicine
- Business
- Literature, Language Studies, & Linguistics
- Anthropology and Sociology
- History
- Theory
Please send your proposals (100-300 word abstracts) to Lucas Wilson or Topher Endress by January 15th.
We look forward to reading your proposals!
cfp categories: 
african-american
american
childrens_literature
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
general_announcements
graduate_conferences
humanities_computing_and_the_internet
interdisciplinary
international_conferences
modernist studies
poetry
popular_culture
postcolonial
professional_topics
religion
rhetoric_and_composition
science_and_culture
theatre
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond
 

AHEAD Call for Proposals deadline extended to November 12th!


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Western developing disability studies class


Living With Schizophrenia: Coffee and Friends



Getting to trust people well enough to call them a friend takes a lot of work. It’s especially hard when you are living with schizophrenia and think everyone is making fun of you.

http://nyti.ms/1pEyIK9

Voting Rights of People with Disabilities in NYS at risk

 
NOTE: Copies of Election Law, Section 7-202 and Chapter 273 of the Laws of 2014 are available, if requested (sudcc@syr.edu). 
Below is an invitation from the New York State Board of Elections to submit a position paper expressing the impact of bringing back lever machines to village, town, school board and fire district elections will have on people with disabilities and the community as a whole.  You may or not may be aware that in June the legislature passed and the Governor signed a bill bringing back the lever machines for non federal elections for a one  year period of time..
 
This law, for people who care about Equal Access to the Vote a terrible step backward.  Many people have fought for many years to get rid of the lever machines because they are very inaccessible to so many people such as people who are blind, visually impaired, are in  a wheel chair, have limited or no use of their hands, have learning disabilities, cannot read English or cannot read. That is why new accessible ballot marking devices were  purchased.
 
This opportunity to respond through comments and position papers is CRUCIAL.  The New York State Board of Elections has expressed to me their dissatisfaction with the new law-but unless people impacted by this terrible law fight back and get their voices heard-this law can pass every year. Please do not let your  possible cynicism keep you from responding to this email.
 
The dead line in November 17th to submit our positions.  Let our response be loud and clear-No More  Lever Machines for Any Elections.
 
Please distribute this email to all of your contacts.
 
Thank You,
 
Susan Cohen
New Yorkers for Accessible Voting (NYFAV) and Voting Access Solutions
 
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Svizzero, Anna (ELECTIONS) <Anna.Svizzero@elections.ny.gov>
Date: Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 4:07 PM
Subject: FW: Use of Compliant Voting Systems
Open Invitation  to  Contribute:
Good morning all.  As you may know, the State Board of Elections is charged with the responsibility to prepare a report, as follows: 
On or before January 31, 2015, the state board of elections shall submit a report to the governor,  speaker  of  the  assembly,  temporary president of the senate and the chairs of the committees on election law of  the  senate  and  the  assembly  concerning  the  administration  of elections   by  villages,  school  districts,  fire  districts,  library districts and other municipal corporations required to  hold  elections.  The report shall include recommendations and guidance for such villages, districts  and  municipal  corporations  to migrate to the use of voting systems which are compliant with section 7-202 of the election  law  and applicable  state  board  of elections rules and regulations. The report shall also include an analysis of the cost and fiscal impact to such villages, districts and municipal corporations for transitioning to voting systems that comply with section 7-202 of the election law. Prior to preparing and issuing the report, the state board of elections  shall solicit,  and take into consideration, recommendations from stakeholders including, but not necessarily limited to, the NY state department of education, the NY  school  boards  association,  the  NY conference of mayors and the NY state association of counties.
Please accept this correspondence as an opportunity to contribute to our production of this report, by providing us with position papers, fiscal impact reports, statistics, press releases, or other reports of any nature, that you would like the State Board to consider.  Please provide any such materials to the State Board via e-mail no later than November 17, 2014, at election_ops@elections.ny.gov.    If hard copies are your choice of transmission, please mail same to us at 40 North Pearl Street, Suite 5, Albany, New York  12207. 
 If you have any questions or desire clarification regarding this invitation, please feel free to e-mail us at election_ops@elections.ny.gov
We thank you in advance for your participation in this project.
NEW YORK STATE BOARD OF ELECTIONS
ELECTION OPERATIONS UNIT

Festival of Dyslexic Culture in the UK

 

Blog Post of Interest: Because It Makes Us Feel Something


http://suactiveminds.wordpress.com/2014/10/23/because-it-makes-us-feel-something/


DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: October 13-24, 2014

DREAM: Disability Rights, Education, Activism, and Mentoring
Sponsored by the Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University
 -------------------------------
Weekly Email Update on Issues Related to Disability and Higher Education 
Week of October 13-24, 2014
** DOUBLE ISSUE THIS WEEK – WE WERE CELEBRATING THE “DISABLED AND PROUD 2014” CONFERENCE LAST FRIDAY! **
-------------------------------
 Disability and higher education in the news (in no particular order):
* Bullying doesn’t go away after high school, and many of the bullied students have disabilities: http://college.usatoday.com/2014/10/21/bullying-not-a-thing-of-the-past-for-college-students/
 
* SUNY Plattsburg has installed new disability parking signs across campus: http://www.wafb.com/story/26719073/ny-college-gets-new-kind-of-disabled-parking-sign
 
* BBC Ouch in the UK is continuing to profile college students with disabilities. 
·         Their weekly series focuses on Molly, who has Usher’s syndrome: http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-ouch-29687034
·         Read about college graduates with disabilities who are looking for employment: http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-ouch-29602906
 
* A call for better sign language interpreter training programs is happening, particularly at four-year colleges and universities:http://www.streetleverage.com/2014/10/sign-language-interpreter-education-time-for-a-national-call-to-action/
 
* As Australia’s student loan legislation opens up more doors, more homeless people and people with disabilities are being exploited, including students with intellectual disabilities -- Aspire College is returning tuition to at least one student who was offered a second diploma after failing to complete basic coursework due to his disability: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-10-18/private-training-colleges-target-the-homeless-disabled/5819756
 
* One doctor who stutters discusses a few of her own experiences in medical school, and the need to include training about disabilities in medical education: http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/33/10/1868.full.html
 
* Musharaf Asghar, a reality TV star in the UK, discusses stuttering in elementary and secondary (high school) levels, trying to get speech pathology training in college, and his experiences as a British Muslim Pakistani in an era of “Islamaphobia:” http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2014/oct/14/musharaf-asghar-stammer-educating-yorkshire-mushy-tears-speech-islamophobia?CMP=fb_gu
 
* The federal government is asking for public comments about draft accreditation standards for programs serving college students with intellectual disabilities – learn more and offer your thoughts at the Think College website: http://www.thinkcollege.net/topics/draft-accreditation-standards
 
* Asian American and Pacific Islanders discuss the “model minority” myth and how it affects students, including those with anxiety or mental and emotional health conditions: http://college.usatoday.com/2014/10/15/students-reject-the-model-minority-myth/
 
* London Metropolitan University hosted a Festival of Dyslexic Culture: http://www.festival-of-dyslexic-culture.org.uk/
 
* Amy Cohen Efron created a video called “Big. F***in. Problem” about unintended consequences of ASL courses like those taught at colleges and universities, with Deaf instructors being pushed out by less-qualified hearing instructors, and many people learning ASL to exploit Deaf people financially (only the first part is captioned for non-signers; no audio description) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObY28hEiUs0
 
And a few related items of possible interest to college students:
* U.S. students can now receive free college tuition in Germany colleges and universities – while it’s not clear how accommodations may be provided under the new legislation, the offer extends to students with disabilities, as well:  http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/10/10/1335669/-Germany-offers-free-college-tuition-to-U-S-and-international-students?detail=facebook
 
* If you need decorations for your dorm or apartment, YO! Has created a new poster for disability history week:http://yodisabledproud.org/organize/disability-history.php
 
* The Raw Beauty Project celebrates women with physical disabilities (video is not captioned or audio described): http://www.today.com/health/raw-beauty-project-photos-showcase-empowerment-sensuality-disabled-women-2D80204322
 
* Ed Roberts introduced UC-Berkeley to access, disability, and new definitions of independence in the 1960’s – a new video features rare video clips of him (captions do not work, and there is no audio description):  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivaJsJ-mnm8
 
* More and more college-age young people and teens are ending up in nursing homes because of their disabilities:http://www.npr.org/2010/12/09/131912529/a-new-nursing-home-population-the-young
 
* Gaming for blind people?  There are some games that work: http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/oct/13/video-games-that-let-blind-people-play
 
* Check out the new PSAs on disability and employment (with subtitles but no audio description): http://vimeo.com/108810703
 
* The New Yorker has an article on emotional support animals, but it focuses on scams and lax laws, mocking what comfort animals do:  http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/10/20/pets-allowed
 
* Oscar Pistorius is found guilty and due to his prosthetics, will serve his time in South African prison’s hospital wing:http://www.latimes.com/world/africa/la-fg-pistorius-first-day-prison-20141022-story.html
 
* A new tablet case recognizes ASL and translates it into English: http://www.wired.com/2014/10/motionsavvy/
 
* Are you a college professional who is also a little person?  There’s a new line of professional clothing out: http://www.kathydwoodsstore.com/Default.asp
 
* A few Black LGBT youth with disabilities are trying to set up a new group called SWAG: http://nationalyouthprideservices.org/2012/09/26/have-we-forgotten-our-black-lgbt-youth-with-disabilities/
 
* Texas Democratic candidate for governor Wendy Davis gets in trouble after releasing an ad about her opponent using a wheelchair (video has no captions or audio description): http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/wp/2014/10/19/greg-abbott-disappointed-by-wendy-daviss-wheelchair-ad/
 
* Students at Chapman University have created a website about disability studies in education: http://www.chapmandisabilitystudies.com/
 
For more information about DREAM or the Taishoff Center, contact:
Wendy Harbour (wharbour@syr.edu)
Or check out the DREAM website at http://dream.syr.edu
To subscribe or unsubscribe to the DREAM email list, fill out the form at http://dream.syr.edu/contact-us.html and ask to join or leave the listserv.
 
By the way, please don't presume DREAM, the Taishoff Center, or Syracuse University agree with everything in these links we send out - we're just passing along the information so you can form your own opinions.  Thanks.

Studying Disability Arts and Culture: Sample Chapter


Dear Friends,
my new study guide, Studying Disability Arts and Culture, is coming out within a month from Palgrave, and I know that many teachers' book orders are due soon. My publishers just put up the extended content list and a short sample chapter (on setting up the classroom), so you can see how the book is organized. There are questions, exercises, short sections from other writers, a few session-length activity options. I hope you enjoy the book, and can use it with your students in your classroom.
The book comes out simultaneously as an EPub, EPDF, paperback and hardback.
Link: http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/studying-disability-arts-and-culture-petra-kuppers/?K=9781137413468

Direct link to sample chapter:
http://www.palgrave.com/resources/sample-chapters/9781137413468_sample.pdf
All best,
Petra

Blurb: In this accessible introduction to the study of Disability Arts and Culture, Petra Kuppers foregrounds themes, artists and theoretical concepts in this diverse field. Complete with case studies, exercises and questions for further study, the book introduces students to the work of disabled artists and their allies, and explores artful responses to living with physical, cognitive, emotional or sensory difference.

Engaging readers as cultural producers, Kuppers provides useful frameworks for critical analysis and encourages students to explore their own positioning within the frames of gender, race, sexuality, class and disability.

Comprehensive and accessible, this is an essential handbook for undergraduate students or anyone interested in disabled bodies and minds in theatre, performance, creative writing, art and dance.

'Petra Kuppers draws on two decades experience developing inclusive learning environments to create a handbook for artists, scholars and students coming into this critical field of cultural work. Readable, relatable and above all practical, Studying  Disability Arts & Culture provides a comprehensive account of pedagogical strategies Kuppers has deployed with success in classroom, community and artistic contexts of all sorts. For students and those adapting their own arts, cultural and teaching practices to make them accessible for diverse communities, it will be a fantastic new resource.' - Bree Hadley, Queensland University of Technology, Australia


Petra Kuppers
Professor
English, Art and Design, Theatre, Women's Studies University of Michigan Artistic Director of The Olimpias: www.olimpias.org New Book October 2014: Studying Disability Arts and Culture: An Introduction (Palgrave).
http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/?sf1=id_product&st1=747250
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Disability Rights International files

 
International case to protect children and adults detained in Guatemala's dangerous Federico Mora institution

Unveiling the Updated Bookshare Website

 

A Note From a Colleague, on Inclusive Trick-or-Treating: The Teal Pumpkin Project

 
“A teal pumpkin at your front door means that you have allergy friendly or non-food treats to promote an inclusive and less scary Halloween for kiddos with food allergies.  If you do offer allergy friendly and/or non-food treats in addition to other candy, please remember to put safe treats in a separate bowl/container.” 
 


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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