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Weekly Newsletter

November, 17 2017

INDEX

SU HAPPENINGS

A Place at the Table – Oh! The Places You’ll Go: Living with Crohn’s, Colitis, IBS, IBD and more

STOP Bias T-shirt Day, April 24th

“Changing Sports, Changing Lives” documentary

Wellness Week Events Starting April 21st

Earth Week Festival 

Feinstone Grant Reception

Warrior Run

Easter Vigil

Moses had a speech impediment: April 19

SU NEWS

Volunteers needed for the DSA program

Daily Orange Article about "Cripping the Comic Con"

Course Announcement: Feminist Narratives

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Conference: The Greatest Changes in the ADA in 20 years! The New Baseline for Compliance

Webinar for Social Security Disability Beneficiaries Interested in Becoming Self-Employed - April 23

EASI Webinar April 24: Why is color important for accessibility?

 April 25 Deadline for ProposalsAccessing Higher Ground: Accessible Media, Web & Technology Conference   

Three FREE webinars on 4/16, 4/30 & 5/14 centered around Human Development and Leadership.

ASA Section on Disability and Society News 4/4/2014

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Job: Institute on Disability at UNH

OPPORTUNITIES RE: TASH

Department of Justice files Statement of Interest in title III lawsuit involving point-of-sale devices

Senior Brunch and Forum: Aging Issues and Services for Elders in Onondaga County

NPR PODCAST OF INTEREST

Disability Related Articles for the week

All 'Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies' content free in April

AUCD Legislative News

Chapman Disabilities Studies


SU HAPPENINGS


A Place at the Table – Oh! The Places You’ll Go: Living with Crohn’s, Colitis, IBS, IBD and more

Noon – 1:30 p.m.
Schine 228B
Register in advance here
There is a great deal of stigma and embarrassment associated with digestive disorders. Andrea Meyer from the Great Bowel Movement will be coming in to raise awareness and give much needed support to people with digestive disorders and their friends, families, partners, and allies. We will also be discussing humor and honesty as methods of solidarity and activism. The event will include gluten free food, kosher food, and ASL will be available at the event.
Sponsored by the Disability Cultural Center, the Disability Student Union, and Health Services
 

STOP Bias T-shirt Day, April 24th

 
 
DO YOU HAVE A STOP Bias t-shirt?  Then, please wear your STOP Bias t-shirt on April 24 as a reminder of our campus community’s commitment to create an inclusive environment that respects and values diversity. If you *don't* have a STOP Bias t-shirt, wear t-shirts with diversity-positive images or statements. Student organizations who would like to support the t-shirt day and our commitment, should contact Radell Roberts at rrober02@syr.edu by Sunday, 4/20, to be listed as a co-sponsor.

“Changing Sports, Changing Lives” documentary


world premiere at SU April 28
Falk College tradition of sports research documentaries
continues with new film focused on athletes with disabilities
Students enrolled in SPM 300—The History of Sport have spent the 2013-14 academic year focusing their
research efforts on sports that have been adapted to transform and enrich the lives of athletes with physical
disabilities. In the fall semester, students worked as a research team, each one taking a specific assignment
that became their final projects. In the spring semester, these projects have provided the collected body of
research to produce a documentary film entitled Changing Sports, Changing Lives.
The film’s world premiere will be held on the Syracuse University campus, Watson Theater, at 4 p.m. April
28. The one-hour film will include a follow-up question-and-answer session and reception. Teaching the
course and directing the film is professor of practice, Dennis Deninger, a three-time Emmy Award winner.
To date, 65 people have been interviewed at several locations as the project explores a wide range of topics.
The documentary will cover the role of early innovators, such as Dr. Tim Nugent, in the development of
wheelchair sports for soldiers who were disabled in World War II. Nugent, who coached his first wheelchair
sports at the University of Illinois 66 years ago, was interviewed and will be featured in the documentary.
Other topics include:
 Origins of adapted sports, including the founding of the International Paralympic Games as the
Stoke-Mandeville Games in England 1948;
 Development of equipment that makes these sports possible;
 The growth of collegiate and high school adapted sports programs;
 Adaptive sports’ impact on wounded Veterans returning from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
 Effects of the Americans with Disabilities Act and other recent U.S. government initiatives, and;
 The newest adapted sports and how they are broadening reach, appeal and participation.

Deninger explains, “Changing Sports, Changing Lives is giving our students the opportunity to learn about the
remarkable power of sports and to be part of a unique research project, as it helps us build an archive of
scholarly work that will expand in each coming year.”
Each semester, SPM 300 pinpoints a single topic for students to conduct original research and interviews and
explore multiple subject facets. Lacrosse was selected for the course’s inaugural year because of its ancient
origins and cultural connections in Central New York. Deninger and his students produced the first Falk
College research documentary, America’s First Sport, on the history, culture and growth of lacrosse in North
America. It premiered in Syracuse in April 2013, and was presented nationwide on ESPNU. For more
information, contact the Department of Sport Management at (315) 443-9881.

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Wellness Week Events Starting April 21st

Check out this year's list of events taking place during Wellness Week 2014. There is something for everyone. #SUWellnessWeek
 
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Earth Week Festival 

Celebrate Earth Week from April 21-23 with a unique festival along the Connective Corridor, among other planned events. Read more and share with students.

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Feinstone Grant Reception: April 24

 
You're invited to attend a reception recognizing exemplary SU student leaders at the Chancellor's Feinstone Grants for Multicultural Initiatives.

Thursday, April 24 in Schine Student Center 304s, from 3-5 p.m. 
RSVP to Marissaby April 22.
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Warrior Run

At Labrador Mountain on April 26 from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. $50.00 for all SU/ESF ID Card Holders
 

Price includes the race registration fee, which is normally $60, and round-trip transportation to and from SU’s College Place to Labrador Mountain. Register 
today

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 Easter Vigil

Come experience an ecumenical multimedia celebration of God’s great acts of salvation culminating in the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. 

Hendricks Chapel on Saturday, April 19th at 6 p.m.


Dean Steinwart will be preaching. Chaplains and students will be sharing contemporary themes expressing ancient texts. 
Share me

Moses had a speech impediment: April 19

 
Join in on the discussion, "Moses Had a Speech Impediment: Disabilities in Judaism!"
 

Moses, the hero of the Passover story had a speech impediment. Join Rabbi Fellman, PNEI Intern Jordan Max Feldman, and former HJSU Engagement VP Leah Nussbaum (both Disability Student Union Officers) to discuss how Judaism approaches persons with disabilities.

 

Saturday, April 19th from 1-2 p.m. at the Winnick Hillel Center for Jewish Life, 102 Walnut Place.

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SU NEWS

Volunteers needed for the DSA programs

 
(1) APRIL 25: MAYFEST: 15 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Two shifts are available: 12:15 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. or 3 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
 
Please send an email to Bill Longcore at wjlongco@syr.edu indicating the shift(s) for which you are available. Please respond by Wednesday, April 16. In addition, please provide your t-shirt size. Volunteers need to be able to arrive promptly at the start of their shift. An orientation meeting for volunteers will take place on Thursday, April 24 at 11 a.m. Location TBA. 

(2) APRIL 25: BE WISE AT BLOCK PARTY: 8-10 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Volunteers will hand out waters inside the Dome for Block Party. 6:00-8:00 p.m. on April 25th. Meet at 306 Steele Hall 306 by 6 p.m. Dinner provided to volunteers at 5 p.m. 


Please contact Tess Stoops at 
tstoops@syr.edu.
 
(3) APRIL 30-MAY 12: TEN TONS OF LOVE: VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Volunteers will help to collect items at various locations on campus and load them on the truck to bring them down to the First English Lutheran Church on James St. in Syracuse. 

8:30 a.m. meeting in Hendricks Chapel in the Chaplain's Suite. Most shifts finish by 12 p.m. on campus. We are also in need of Team Captains. 

 

Sign up 
here. Questions, contact Elin Riggs at eriggs@syr.edu.
 
(4) MAY 8: SENIOR CELEBRATION: 40 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
From 9 p.m.-1 a.m. on Thursday, May 8. A volunteer dinner will be provided. Location TBD. 


Please contact Sarah Ross Cappella at 
cappella@syr.edu.

Daily Orange Article about "Cripping the Comic Con"

 

Course Announcement: Feminist Narratives

Communication & Rhetorical Studies 760 / Women & Gender Studies 700
Feminist Narratives: Theory & Practice

Minnie Bruce Pratt

Tuesday, 9:30 – 12:15, Huntington Beard Crouse 020
Course Description: The poet Muriel Rukeyser said: "What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life? The world would split open." We'll look at some of the possibilities and limits of that idea as we read and write narratives. Students will read feminist research that uses narrative as an effective way to theorize and question "the truth" about women's and gendered lives. And students will write, intensively, using narrative to explore their own research questions in relation to themes of language, memory, history, "knowing," economics/work, and social and political relations.


CALLS FOR PAPERS, PARTICIPANTS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS

Conference: The Greatest Changes in the ADA in 20 years! The New Baseline for Compliance

A May 2 conference in Boston of possible interest, about new compliance issues and the ADAAA in higher education:
 
 

Webinar for Social Security Disability Beneficiaries Interested in Becoming Self-Employed - April 23

If you receive Social Security disability benefits and want to make money by working, the Social Security Administration's Ticket to Work (TTW) program can help. Register for this free Work Incentives Seminar Event (WISE) that will be held on April 23, 2014 from 3 - 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time. You'll learn about the TTW and other work incentive programs, as well as information that can help you on your path to becoming self-employed. Register online or call 1-866-968-7842 (TTY: 1-866-833-2967).

EASI Webinar April 24: Why is color important for accessibility?


EASI Free Webinar Explaining the Importance of Color Accessibility This Webinar will be on Thursday April 24
11 Pacific noon Mountain, 1 Central and 2 PM Eastern Greg Kraus from North Carolina will explain why color is important because it relates to several different disability groups. He will also demonstrate some tools that assist in evaluating color accessability.

Note, registration for this webinar will be available on April 15 and later http://easi.cc/clinic.htm

-----------------------
Check out EASI's New Synchronous Clinics:
http://easi.cc/clinic.htm

EASI Home Page http://www.rit.edu/~easi
Online Courses and Clinics http://easi.cc/workshop.htm To sign off this list send e-mail to listserv@listserv.icors.org saying signoff itd-jnl


 April 25 Deadline for ProposalsAccessing Higher Ground: Accessible Media, Web & Technology Conference   

November 17 - 21, 2014

 
 
Accessing Higher Ground 2014 is now accepting proposals for its 17th Annual Conference in Westminster, Colorado.   
 
 
AHG focuses on accessible media, universal design, best practices for Web & media design, accessible curriculum, alternate format and other topics related to accessibility in higher education and other environments.  
 
 
Proposal Form 
The speaker proposal form can be found at: http://accessinghigherground.org/wp/proposalform2014.php.
 
 
Range of Topics 
View last year's sessions to get a sense of the typical agenda and range of topics.
 
 
More Info 
If you have any questions about proposal submission, contact Howard Kramer at 303-492-8672 or at the email below.
 
 
*If needed, a second round RFP will be announced shortly after the April 25 first-round deadline. Note: there is no guaranty that there will be a second round opportunity.

Three FREE webinars on 4/16, 4/30 & 5/14 centered around Human Development and Leadership.

You can attend all three, as they will slightly build upon each other, or just one. Registration required. 
  • Each webinar will last 60 minutes, including a 12-minute question period at the end.
  • Start at 7:00 p.m. EST
Series overview
This 3-part webinar series provides participants a toolbox of methods and skills for creativity and innovation that are instantly transferable to their work. Using a mixture of TRIZ inventive problem solving, creative problem solving and brain-based leadership models, participants will find solutions to existing organizational situations that change how they think about a particular product/service and organizational process.


Learn more and register 
here.

ASA Section on Disability and Society News 4/4/2014


Contents

1. Call for Papers

    a. Research in Social Science and Disability

    b. Disability Studies Quarterly

2. Ethel Louise Armstrong Post-Doctoral Fellowship



I.     Call for Papers

A. Research in Social Science and Disability, Volume 9, "Sociology and Disability:  What Did we Know and When Did We Know It?" Edited by Sara Green and Sharon Barnartt

        Current research in Sociology of Disability and in Disability Studies [as in many other fields] has a tendency to assume that there was very little written in this area until the last 20 or so years.  However, it occurs quite often that someone [usually, but not always, older] will say of work done by someone [usually, but not always, younger], “That is not new.  So-and-so wrote about that a long time ago.”  In part the lack of awareness of older writing occurs because of the ease of computerized searching for recent references or a sense that newer is better.  It also reflects the assumption that Sociology as a field has ignored either disability as a social phenomenon or treated it solely as a medical phenomenon as well as the fact that these writings tend to be widely scattered and not found just in sociology journals or books.

         While it is true that theorists and introductory textbooks tended [and still tend] to ignore disability as a non-medical phenomenon and especially as a structured source of inequality, that does not mean that no attention was paid to disability in the earlier years of sociological thinking.  Rather, interest in disability from a sociological point of view exists in the literature as early as the late 1800s, and some very profound articles were written in the mid- 20th century.

         The purpose of this volume is to explore that literature, with an eye towards encouraging current scholars not to ask “the same old” questions but to be able to use the older writings as a basis for revolutionary as well as evolutionary thinking.  What do the older writings tell us about what questions we should be asking, and what research we should be doing, today.

    This call for papers is seeking articles which review and evaluate literature in sociology which explicitly viewed disability through a non-medical, sociological lens.  There are several ways in which an author might frame the questions we are asking here, although these are not mutually exclusive and very well might overlap:

1)       A paper might focus on how specific sociological questions or concepts were applied to the general area of disability.  These concepts could include identity, interaction patterns, social structures, cultural issues, roles, status attainment, minority group, and social movement.  A paper would review and evaluate that literature.

2)       A paper might focus on sociological aspects of specific impairments.  It would explore how topics such as those listed above, or similar topics, are affected by, or affect, specific impairments.  Examples could be blindness and interaction patterns, deafness and culture, social movement mobilizations among parents of children with developmental disabilities, status attainment patterns of blind workers, or the social structure of the deaf community.

3)      A paper might be based upon the work of a specific person, such as Harriet Martineau, Saad Nagi, Constantina Safilios-Rothschild,  Irving Zola, Gary Albrecht, Mary Jo Deegan, Paul Higgins, Jeff Nash, etc.  This type of paper would summarize and evaluate that person’s work and their contribution to later sociological issues.

4)      A paper might look at the sociological writing which appeared during a specific time period, such as after WWII.  Such a paper might analyze the relationship of the time period to what was being written about disability in sociology.

We are seeking expressions of interest and commitments to write a paper on an appropriate topic.  The due date for us to receive such statements is April 30, 2014.  The completed paper will be due in January, 2015.  The completed manuscripts, revised after peer review, will be due at the beginning of June, 2015.  This volume will be published at the end of 2015.

Please send all communications to Sara Green [sagreen@usf.edu] and Sharon Barnartt [sharon.barnartt@gallaudet.edu].





B. 2015 Special Issue of Disability Studies Quarterly on the Americans with Disabilities Act
        In 2015, Disability Studies Quarterly will publish a Special Issue to mark the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA has been a watershed in American disability policy, with far-reaching effects on the status of Americans with disabilities, but has fallen far short of the expectations for social transformation with which it was enacted in 1990.  The Special Issue will commemorate the ADA’s 25th anniversary with both a look back at how the ADA has affected the disability community and the larger society, and an assessment of future prospects for attaining the ADA’s goals of inclusion and empowerment.
    Papers that are related (broadly) to the ADA are invited from scholars from any academic or professional discipline, disability policy professionals and advocates, and from disability activists.  The issue will strive to incorporate a diverse variety of perspectives within disability studies. Priority for selection will be given to manuscripts that are broadly framed and advance our understanding of the direct and indirect consequences of the ADA for people with disabilities, rather than those which focus on narrow legal, policy, or technical aspects of the Act.
    All submitted papers will be subject to peer review, and revisions may be requested for inclusion in the Special Issue.  The deadline for submission of papers is June 1, 2014.  We anticipate that peer review and editing would be completed, and the complete issue will be submitted to DSQ before the end of 2014. Proposals or questions about the Special Issue may be directed to Richard Scotch, Special Issue Editor, at <richard.scotch@utdallas.edu>.



II. Ethel Louise Armstrong Post-Doctoral Fellowship The deadline for applications for the below postdoc has now been extended to Friday 11th April.

        Established in 1999, the School of Disability Studies at Ryerson University was the first in Canada to offer degree education rooted solely in a disability studies perspective. We are currently welcoming applications for the Ethel Louise Armstrong Post-Doctoral Fellowship.
        With a gift from the Ethel Louise Armstrong (ELA) Foundation, the ELA Post-doctoral Fellowship was established to further the scholarly contributions of disabled women. It is intended for a disabled woman who has completed doctoral studies within the past five (5) years in any discipline that advances scholarship related to Disability Studies.
        Based in the School of Disability Studies at Ryerson, the incumbent will be expected to:

• Enhance and expand the interdisciplinary scholarship of the School; • Implement a relevant program of study; • Seek opportunities for collaborative research and publication; • Deliver an annual public lecture on her research.
• Engage with and contribute to the collegial life in and around the School.

The fellowship awards a starting salary of $45,000 plus benefits.

How and When to Apply

  *   To apply, please send the following:
A letter of application that includes an articulation of how you are situated in relation to disability scholarship;
  *   A program of study that demonstrates how your research will advance Disability Studies through interdisciplinary scholarship;
  *   A statement indicating opportunities for collaborative research and publication within your own discipline as well as more broadly within the academic community of Ryerson University;
  *   A current C.V.
  *   A writing sample

The starting date for the fellowship is September 1, 2014; some flexibility may be negotiated.

Please send your application materials via email to:
Dr. Kathryn Church
Director, School of Disability Studies
Ryerson University
350 Victoria Street,
Toronto, ON M5B 2K4
k3church@ryerson.ca<mailto:k3church@ryerson.ca>
Ph: 416.979.5000 ext. 4592<tel:416.979.5000%20ext.%204592>


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Job: Institute on Disability at UNH

Below is the description for an exciting job opportunity with the SWIFT Schools project, at the Institute on Disability at UNH. I have pasted most of the info in the email, but the official posting can be found on UNH's hiring website, located here:
https://jobs.usnh.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/position/JobDetails_css.jsp
University System of New Hampshire Employment Site : Welcome
null
 
Applications will be accepted until April 25, 2014. Any questions, please contact Michael McSheehan at (Michael.McSheehan@unh.edu)
 
Please distribute far and wide!
 
Summary of Position
A national technical assistance center is researching fully integrating and coordinating systems of supports and services to implement and sustain inclusionary schoolwide reform, resulting in the benefit of all students academically, socially, and behaviorally. In line with this effort, the Schoolwide Integrated Framework for Transformation (SWIFT) Center seeks a NH technical assistance provider to lead implementation in mostly low-income, urban, and rural schools by developing and guiding/monitoring of a data-based action plan and providing direct evidence-based support to schools, districts and states in a concentrated geographical area (for example: one state to include four districts, with four schools within each district). Interested applicants must have the ability to travel to schools and districts within New Hampshire as well as some additional travel to meetings and conferences. Regional technical assistance providers would seek to build capacity within the district and state to sustain and further scale up SWIFT practices in other schools and districts over time. The Regional Technical Assistance Providers will serve as liaison between the SWIFT Center and state, district, and school teams. Additionally, the position will conduct work duties as assigned by the NH Department of Education.  
Acceptable Minimum Qualifications
Required: (must be able to tell by written materials-vita and cover letter) 
-EDD, PhD (or ABD) in Education, Special Education, Psychology or OR - Masters level training (e.g., MS, MA) in Education, Special Education, Psychology or other similar highly related field and: 

-At least 2 years of experience working with students who have diverse learning needs 

-At least 5 yrs. experience working with State Education Agencies and Institutions of Higher Education, including project management and cross-agency collaboration. 

-A proven track record of influencing teacher preparation through publications and professional conference presentations. 

-At least 5 yrs. experience supporting school or district teams to implement behavior multi-tiered systems of support or response to intervention. 

-At least 5 yrs. experience providing professional development to schools or districts around inclusive practice. 

-At least 5 years of experience working with students who have diverse learning needs Ability to travel to schools and districts within the state implementing SWIFT. 

-Ability to travel to schools and districts within the state implementing SWIFT.  
Additional Desirable Qualifications:
-Education or experience in school reform, sustainability, and scale up practices preferably in urban or rural schools and districts. 
-Additional education or experience in UDL, curriculum, positive behavior support, policy, family and community engagement. 

-At least 2 years experience utilizing a problem solving process using data to make decisions at the school or district level and/or experience supporting educators how to utilize data to guide decision making. 

-At least 2 yrs experience teaching regular or special education at the K-8 level, including students with very high needs academically and/or behaviorally. 

-At least 2 years experience developing/facilitating/maintaining communities of practice 

-Experience collaborating across local, district, and state levels 

-Ability to establish effective working relations in multi-cultural, educational team environments 

-Displays cultural, gender, religion, race, nationality and age sensitivity and adaptability 

-Excellent leadership, interpersonal, teamwork, and verbal and written communication skills

OPPORTUNITIES RE: TASH

 
We have recently re-established a NY Chapter of TASH. You are listed as a member from NY, and we would like to invite you to join us. We are casting a wide net throughout the state, so if you have already received an email about this, I apologize.
 
We welcome (and need!) your participation and expertise in shaping and strengthening our statewide and local efforts to fulfill the TASH mission of equity, opportunity, and inclusion. Many, if not all of you, are familiar with the mission of TASH, but if not (or as a reminder), a brief description of the mission and scope of work can be found at the end of this email.
 
We are just starting to plan activities and work in New York State around the TASH mission and we invite you (and anyone to whom you would like to forward this email) to join us in the creation and implementation of a robust advocacy action plan.
 
Your national TASH membership includes membership to the New York Chapter. So please renew your membership through the TASH.org website. And please email any one of the New York State TASH Board Members below to let us know that you would like to participate in our NY Chapter. Here are some ways to contribute time andtalent.
 
• Are you a social networker? Recruit membership! Organize political action!
 
• Are you a party planner? Host a “TASH Night Out” to raise funds!
 
• Are you technologically/social media savvy? Facilitate/Create and manage the TASH NY Website! Get the word out about advocacy and action through Twitter and Facebook!
 
• Are you a writer? Contribute to (and maybe even edit!) the Newsletter!
 
Thank you for being a part of TASH! We have a Wiggio (a closed organization) website, which serves as a repository for all things NY TASH and as a central communications hub. If you would like to be added to this site, please contact Julia White atjwhite@warner.rochester.edu
 
Sincerely,
 
The TASH New York State Board
 
Katrina Arndt
 
 
Judy K. C. Bentley
 
Robin M. Smith
 
Terri Ward
 
Julia White
 
 
Mission
 
TASH is an international advocacy association of people with disabilities, their family members, other advocates, and people who work in the disability field, all working toward a society in which inclusion of all people in all aspects of society is the norm.   Becoming aTASH Chapter allows your group to affiliate itself with the most progressive ideas regarding equity, diversity, and quality of life.
 
Scope:
 
TASH has a national advocacy agenda, comprised of the following 5 strands:
 
INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: Transform school communities based on social justice principles in which all students (a) are presumed competent, (b) are welcomed as valued members of all general education classes and extra-curricular activities in their local schools, (c) fully participate and learn alongside their same age peers in general education instruction based on the general education curriculum, and (d) experience reciprocal social relationships.
 
COMMUNITY LIVING: Expandthe provision of person-centered, long term supports and individualized choice for community living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in every state.
 
EMPLOYMENT: Increase theemployment rate for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and eliminate federally sanctioned sub-minimum wages.
 
DIVERSITY & CULTURAL COMPETENCY: Expand the participation rates of people of color who have disabilities in advocacy efforts and every aspect of life.
 
HUMAN RIGHTS: Eliminate the use of aversive interventions as an acceptable strategy for behavior modification or control, and promote positive and proactive strategies to prevent dangeroussituations.

Department of Justice files Statement of Interest in title III lawsuit involving point-of-sale devices

 
The Justice Department has filed a Statement of Interest in private litigation pending in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida, David New v. Lucky Brand Jeans.  In that case, plaintiff has alleged an ADA violation based on Lucky Brand Jeans’ use of touch-screen point-of-sale devices that do not allow individuals who are blind to independently enter their private personal identification number when making an in-store purchase using a debit card.  Among other things, the Department's Statement of Interest addresses the proper framework for evaluating the title III ADA claim at issue in this case.
To find out more about the ADA or statement of interest, call the Justice Department’s toll-free ADA Information Line at 800-514-0301 or 800-514-0383 (TDD), or access its ADA.gov website.
 

Senior Brunch and Forum: Aging Issues and Services for Elders in Onondaga County

April 25, 10AM to 12 noon
Plymouth Church, Syracuse
 
The Ida Benderson Seniors Action Group and the SU Student Council on Family Relations are pleased to invite you to a Senior Brunch and Forum, Friday April 25, 10AM to noon, in Plymouth Church Memorial Hall, 232 E Onondaga St, Syracuse, NY 13202.  All older adults, family members and those interested in senior concerns and services are welcome and encouraged to attend. 
 
Speakers will include Lisa Alford, Commissioner of Aging and Youth of Onondaga County, as well as representatives of SAGE Upstate, FOCUS Syracuse, and Catholic Charities of Onondaga County. Nader Maroun of Syracuse Common Council will moderate. We will leave plenty of time for questions and discussion, so please come and share your concerns, hopes and vision for a more senior-friendly community! 
 
Brunch will be catered by the Mission Restaurant. This event is supported by a grant from the Gifford Foundation. No charge to attend, but space is limited. Please RSVP to Denise Nepveux at 315-223-2480 or dmnepveu@utica.edu to reserve your seat.  

NPR PODCAST OF INTEREST

“23 Weeks & 6 Days”

Disability Related Articles for the week

Dr. Nora's Top Articles (6 of 73 news articles)
1.   “Sheriff: Owner of Tucson-area Care Home Arrested” --- The owner of a Tucson-area adult care home has been arrested as authorities investigate abuse allegations at the home. The Pima County ... --- MyFox Phoenix --- April 8, 2014  (ARIZONA)  http://is.gd/8Ktvnl
2.   “Judge Says Pepper-spraying, Isolation Violate Rights of Mentally Ill Inmates in California” --- The mental health lawsuit, along with a separate lawsuit over poor medical care, prompted the state to spend billions of dollars for improvements while ... --- Daily Journal --- April 10, 2014  (CALIFORNIA)  http://is.gd/ICNKHH
3.   “Attempted Murder Charges Filed against 2 Teens Accused of Beating Man Unconscious in Boulder” --- Prosecutors have filed attempted murder charges against two teenagers accused of beating a 30-year-old developmentally ... --- Daily Journal --- April 7, 2014  (COLORADO)  http://is.gd/HAcs1R
4.   “Kalamazoo Man, Who Impregnated Mentally Challenged Teen, Sentenced to Prison” --- A Kalamazoo man, who sexually assaulted a 15-year-old girl, has been sentenced to prison. Curtis Warren Edwards, 37, was ... --- Mlive Kalamazoo --- April 7, 2014  (MICHIGAN)  http://is.gd/sATbuD
5.   “Disabled Girl Targeted, Communication Device Stolen” --- In the case of a 12-year-old disabled girl, what was stolen was the one thing that allows her to interact with other people. Sarah Johnson's iPad was ... --- WKRC TV Cincinnati --- April 10, 2014  (OHIO)  http://is.gd/FMRuPx
6.   “Official: Disabled Children 'Sexually Harassed' in Saudi Schools” --- Students with Down's Syndrome are being sexually harassed by other students, an official has said. --- Al-Arabiya --- April 7, 2014  (SAUDI ARABIA) http://is.gd/nn2M36

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All 'Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies' content free in April


Dear colleagues

Liverpool University Press<http://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=175:liverpool-university-press-is-ten-115-years-old&catid=2:archived-news&Itemid=18> is one of the UK's oldest scholarly publishers and one of its youngest, being both 115 years old and 10 years old in April 2014.

The latter anniversary marks the relaunch and rebirth of the Press, an event that it is celebrating by making all of its journal content, including Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, available for free online during the month of April.

Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies (JLCDS)<http://liverpool.metapress.com/content/121628/> focuses on cultural and especially literary representations of disability, and publishes a wide variety of textual analyses that are informed by disability theory and, by extension, experiences of disability. It is essential reading for scholars whose work concentrates on the portrayal of disability in literature; more broadly, it is instrumental in the interdisciplinarity of literary studies, cultural studies, and disability studies.

Content is available now simply by visiting our http://liverpool.metapress.com site, with no further setup required. Please feel free to share this information with colleagues, your institutional library contact, or any other interested parties.

Kindest regards

Jonathan

AUCD Legislative News

Congressional Schedule
Both the House and Senate are in recess this week and next for the Passover/Easter holiday.
6 by 15 Campaign
During a Monday-night reception at the Disability Policy Seminar, Senator Harkin officially announced the start of the 6 by 15 campaign - an national effort to work on six national goals by the end of 2015, the year that marks the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and 40th anniversary of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The campaign builds on Senator Harkin's goal to have 6 million working-age adults with disabilities participating in the workforce by 2015 and adds goals on community living, education, transition, healthy living, and early childhood. More information is available at http://sixbyfifteen.org and on Twitter at #6by15. AUCD is an original partner on the goals, with the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities, National Disability Rights Network, US Business Leadership Network, Special Olympics, and National Council on Independent Living.  
Budget and Appropriations
Budget Resolution
The House of Representatives approved the budget resolution drafted by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) by a 219-205 vote. AUCD and other disability advocacy groups strongly oppose the budget that would block-grant Medicaid and cut other critical programs and services. For more information, see last week's In Brief. The budget is largely symbolic; Senate Budget Committee Chairman Patty Murray (D-WA) has announced that she will not write a budget this year (meaning that there will be no Senate Budget to reconcile with the House Budget and no joint budget resolution) and House and Senate appropriators have already begun work on FY15 spending using the levels set in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 negotiated by Murray and Ryan last year.
Appropriations Hearings
Both the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittee for Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education held hearings to discuss the Labor-HHS-Education. Secretary of Education Arnie Duncan testified about the FY 2015 budget for the Department of Education before the House subcommittee on April 8. Secretary of Labor Tom Perez testified about the FY 2015 budget request for the Department of Labor on April 9. Videos of both the House and Senate hearings are archived on the committee websites.
The Senate Finance Committee held a hearing on April 10 to discuss the FY 2015 budget proposal from the Department of Health and Human Services. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius testified about the department's proposed budget and the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. A video of the hearing is archived on the committee website.
Combating Autism Act
Lead staff of Sen. Menendez (D-NJ) and Rep. Smith (R-NJ) addressed participants of the Disability Policy Seminar on Tuesday reported that they are working on a bipartisan bills to reauthorize the Combatting Autism Act (CAA) and are hoping to introduce the bills soon. Each of these lead sponsors are also interested in adding provisions to address transition needs of youth with developmental disabilities. However, it is still unclear if the sponsors can garner enough support to pass a bill with changes. The reauthorization of CAA was one of the top issues highlighted at the Seminar.
Health and Human Services
Last week, President Obama accepted the resignation of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and immediately announced that he would nominate Sylvia Mathews Burwell - current director of the Office on Management and Budget (OMB) - to replace her. Ms. Burwell served in a variety of positions during the Clinton administration. She was confirmed by a 96-to-0 Senate vote to head OMB and led the agency through the sequester cuts and 15-day partial government shutdown, the management of which OMB was largely responsible. According to the White House, Secretary Sebelius had decided to resign once the first Affordable Care Act open enrollment period ended on March 31. The President made the official announcement in the Rose Garden of the White House on Friday; video of the announcement is available on the White House Blog. Senate confirmation hearings for Ms. Burwell are likely to focus on the Affordable Care Act, but it appears she will be confirmed once the Senate returns in two weeks.
Affordable Care Act
The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) - the nonpartisan arm of Congress that provides budgetary and economic analysis of current policies and proposed legislation - released a new report updating their estimates of the effects of the Affordable Care Act on health insurance coverage. The CBO and Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) project that about 12 million more people will have health insurance in 2014 than would have had it without the ACA, increasing the proportion of the nonelderly population with insurance from roughly 80% without the ACA to 84% with the ACA in 2014. CBO and JCT continue to estimate that through calendar-year 2014 about 6 million people will be covered by insurance through the exchanges. They also emphasize that this estimate cannot be compared directly with the number of people who have been enrolled through the exchanges at any given date (which HHS recently announced to be about 7.5 million).
Military Health Care
Last week, Autism Speaks hosted congressional briefings in the House and Senate regarding health care for children of military families that have autism and other developmental disabilities. The Senate briefing was sponsored by Senators Patty Murray (D-WA), Roy Blunt (R-MO), and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) who champion AUCD-supported legislation to expand access to behavioral health services for children with developmental disabilities through the military TRICARE health plan.
The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development is hosting a two-day conference on today and tomorrow called Military Connected Children with Special Health Care Needs and Their Families.  The purpose of the conference is to educate participants knowledge and awareness of military connected children with special health care needs and to identify areas where more research and expanded services are needed.
Employment
The Department of Justice and State of Rhode Island have reached an agreement regarding segregated sheltered workshop and adult day programs. The agreement resolves the findings of the Civil Rights Division investigation that the state's day activity service system over-relies on segregated settings, including sheltered workshops and facility-based day programs. According to the settlement, Rhode Island will provide supported employment placements to approximately 2,000 people, including 700 people currently in sheltered workshops, 950 people currently attending facility-based non-work programs, and 350 students leaving high school. The Rhode Island University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), the Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilities at Rhode Island College was involved in the case and settlement.
Civil Rights and Aversive Treatment
The Food and Drug Administration has announced that the Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee will meet on April 24 to discuss "the safety and effectiveness of aversive conditioning devices that are intended to deliver a noxious electrical stimulus to a patient to modify undesirable behavioral characteristics". The agency is considering whether to ban these aversive conditioning devices and seeking scientific data and information. AUCD signed on to aletter with the Alliance to Prevent Restraint, Aversive Intervention, and Seclusion (APRAIS) supporting a ban on the use of electric shock for behavior modification. Written comments to the panel are due today, April 14. Kim Musheno, Director of Public Policy, will participate in the meeting.
National Council on Disability
President Obama has appointed Royal Walker - Executive Director of the Mississippi University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), the Institute for Disability Studies at the University of Southern Mississippi - to the National Council on Disability. He is a past AUCD president and  has served on the board of directors of the American Task Force for the Homeless, the Governor's Interagency Coordinating Council for Children with Special Needs, the Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Mississippi March of Dimes. AUCD congratulates Dr. Walker on the appointment.
Early Childhood Education
On Thursday, April 10, the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions held ahearing on early childhood education and a bill introduced by Senator Harkin in November of last year (S. 1697) the Strong Start for America's Children Act. The bill would provide grants to states to provide full-day prekindergarten programs for children from low-income families. Grants would be allocated to states based on the proportion of children age four who are from families with incomes at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. Witnesses included the Dr. W. Steven Barnett, Director of the Institute for Early Education Research, and Dr. Grover "Russ" Whitehurst, Director of the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution. The bill mirrors the proposal made by President Obama in the 2013 State of the Union address to make early childhood education universally accessible to all children. Chairman Harkin announced that he expects to markup the bill next month. AUCD supports this legislation.
Civil Rights Event at BLJ Library
Last week, the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas held a Civil Rights Summit to mark the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The summit featured President Obama and former Presidents Carter, Clinton, and Bush. Disability leader Lex Frieden spoke at the event on a panel on Social Justice in the 21st Century. Videos from the event and more details are available atwww.civilrightssummit.org and on YouTube.
Disability Policy Seminar
Over 700 people attended the Disability Policy Seminar in Washington, DC last week to learn about current issues in disability policy and advocate on the hill, including over 150 . Fact sheets and PowerPoint presentations are available on www.disabilitypolicyseminar.org. Participants are strongly encouraged to complete the evaluation form to help us improve the seminar in coming years and Legislative Contact Report to help policy staff follow up on the connections and answer any questions. For those who were not able to participate in DC, please use the resources available atwww.disabilitypolicyseminar.org to visit your members of Congress at home in their district offices.
Follow AUCD on Facebook and Twitter 
Follow our Executive Director @AndyAUCD and policy staff @kmusheno and @racheljpat
For definitions of terms used in In Brief, please see AUCD's Glossary of Legislative Terms
For copies of this and previous issues of Legislative News In Brief please visit the Public Policy Page of the AUCD website:
 http://www.aucd.org/template/page.cfm?id=164

Chapman Disabilities Studies

>Dear Colleagues,
>
>This past summer some doctoral students at Chapman put together a 
>website containing modules intended to inform teachers and teacher 
>educators about Disability Studies. As teachers themselves, they had 
>never heard of DS until they started the doc program at Chapman. They 
>felt that an accessible website with information about DS may be 
>helpful in "getting the word out". We are looking for pre-service and 
>in-service teachers, as well as teacher education faculty to view the 
>modules and provide some general feedback. This includes feedback on 
>the accessibility of the website. I encourage you to take a look and 
>provide some feedback via the survey link on each website. We would 
>also love for you to encourage your students in your classes to take a 
>look and provide some feedback as well. Please 
>visithttp://www.chapmandisabilitystudies.com/
>
>We would appreciate it if you would forward this out to friends and 
>colleagues.
>Best,
>Meghan
>
>--
>Meghan Cosier, Ph.D.
>Educational Consultant
>
>Assistant Professor
>School of Education
>Trinity Washington University
>125 Michigan Avenue NE
>Washington, DC 20017
>mecosier@gmail.com<mailto:mecosier@gmail.com>
>(917) 627-5757


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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