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Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

INDEX

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  

Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Monday with your submission.

 

SU HAPPENINGS

Challenge Course Opportunities- Take your group to new heights!

Apply to be a Learning Community Peer Mentor

Clements Internship Award

Whites in Leadership: Partnering to Create Systemic Campus Change

Tickets available for the 31st Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration

Possible courses of interest offered: Spring 2016

SU NEWS

Syracuse University Launches Design Competition for National Veterans Resource Complex, Announces Members of Selection Committee

Pan Am 103 Victims to be Remembered at Dec 21 Service

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Call for Proposals: Deaf-initely Ironic…? “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON 2016

CFP open: The Humanities Center announces PLACE as the theme for Syracuse Symposium™ 2016-2017

Announcing the 2016 Critical Participatory Action Research Institutes

Youth in International Development and Foreign Affairs internship program

16th Annual Disability Studies in Education Conference

Fellowships in Disability Policy

Dissertation fellowships from The Center for Engaged Scholarship

Call for Applicants: The Graduate Institute in Philosophy of Education

The Point Foundation Scholarship

SUNY Cortland 7th Annual Student Conference for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Grab the World

Interdisciplinary Certificate in Disability and Diversity Studies

ACE's Graduate Research Associate Program - Now Accepting Applications

Call for Papers: Social Justice in Times of Crisis and Hope: Young People, Well-being and the Politics of Education

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

PDF Accessibility on Mobile Devices

New Resource Guide for Students with Hearing Impairments

College Support for Students with Disabilities

Job Posting of special interest to teacher candidates with concentration in Special Education

Sprout: film and travel programs related to the field of I/DD

Two positions at Colgate U (Educational Studies)

Spirituality, Religion, and Disability Resources from the Religion and Spirituality Division of the AAIDD

Disabilities Among Prison and Jail Inmates, 2011–12

Blog of interest: Autistic Hoya

Disability Scoop 12.18.15

New Documentary Short: Beyond Sacred Voices of Muslim Identity


SU HAPPENINGS

Challenge Course Opportunities- Take your group to new heights!

The Syracuse University Challenge Course offers a variety of teambuilding program options that will challenge your group to engage each other in a unique learning environment. In that environment, our facilitation staff will work with your group to help them build relationships, establish trust and camaraderie, as they move through their customized program.

To request a group reservation, or to learn more about the various program options visit our The Recreation Services website  or send us an e-mail!


 

Apply to be a Learning Community Peer Mentor

Do you know any students who are currently Learning Community (LC) residents?  

Encourage them to apply to become a 2016-2017 LC Mentor and assist first-year students' transition to SU!  

The application will be open November 30, 2015, to January 13, 2016, and the LC Office is filling positions in: Health and Exercise Science, International Relations, LEAD, Poets and STEM Forward LCs. Those interested can visit the Learning Community Peer Mentoring website for more information. 

Students with questions about the peer mentor positions and application process should contact Ebonish Lamar, 315-443-2560


 
 
 

Clements Internship Award

Apply for up to $6,000 to make your unique internship a reality. Apply by February 5 in OrangeLink. For more information, please email Chuck Reutlinger.


 

Whites in Leadership: Partnering to Create Systemic Campus Change 

Below you will find an opportunity facilitated by Kathy Obear and Paulette Dalpes called "Whites in Leadership: Partnering to Create Systemic Campus Change."  This event will take place on multiple dates, listed below and is accessible through Go-To-Meeting on your computer, tablet, and smartphone: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/481708581; Phone: 408 650 3123, Access Code: 481-708-581

Wednesday, January 13th: 4-5pm EST

Friday, January 29th: 2-3pm EST 

Whites in Leadership: Partnering to Create Systemic Campus Change ~ Meaningful Dialogue to Deepen Our Capacity

It is imperative that white leaders are active, visible change agents as campuses directly address and shift the current policies, practices and services that result in institutionalized racism. Yet, as white leaders we often struggle in the face of demands for immediate institutional transformation. 

These opportunities for conversation are intended to provide a space for white leaders to come together and discuss the challenges they face, explore dynamics of power, privilege and position, and strategize their next course of action. The call-in opportunity will allow participants the option to remain anonymous so they may share more candidly regarding their own personal learning edges as well as specific campus dilemmas.

The facilitators, Drs. Kathy Obear and Paulette Dalpes, have experience working on race and racism within all white groups and supporting white allies in effecting change. Our hope is these conversations may develop into a series of discussions where white leaders come together to find support and challenge in their intention to partner with their colleagues of color to effect sustainable strategic change on campus.

 

 

Tickets available for the 31st Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration

31st Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration.

Remember. | Celebrate. | Act.

Activism and Agency for the Future.

A night to engage with generations on activism and agency- past, present, and future.

Celebration speaker: Mark Lamont Hill.

Sunday, January 31st, 2016.

Carrier Dome, Syracuse University.

Doors open at 4:00 PM, dinner at 4:30 PM, program at 5:30 PM.

Tickets available at the Schine Box Office from 11/2 – 1/30.

General public: $30

Students: $15 at Schine Box Office (without a meal plan) or one meal swipe at the dining centers. Meals will be charged the week of January 25, 2016.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) and American Sign Language (ASL) will be provided.

Other accommodations can be requested. Contact Hendricks Chapel at 315-443-2901, gyerdon@syr.edu or visit mlk.syr.edu for more information.

BACK TO TOP
  

Possible courses of interest offered: Spring 2016 

*DSP 700 - M002: Critical Disability Studies and the Global South*

Thursdays 12:30-3:15 

Instructors: Alan Foley, PhD and Brent Elder, Doctoral Candidate 

Location: Huntington Hall 364

Course Description: 

This course provides an in-depth opportunity to explore critical disability studies (CDS), and examines the intersections of larger systems of oppression (e.g., post/neo/colonialism, capitalism, neoliberalism, globalization) that create and maintain exclusive practices that marginalize and exploit people with disabilities around the world. Specifically, this course focuses on the tensions created when exported Western practices are implanted in underdeveloped countries (e.g., “developing countries” and “the third world”). 

Course goals:

--Explore a range of disability experiences in transnational contexts and settings (including school, employment, social/political/cultural contexts, interpersonal relationships, family contexts);

--Critique causes of disability across the life span in underdeveloped countries, particularly at major points of intersection (e.g., disability, gender, sexuality, conflict, race, ethnicity, poverty);

--Critique the Western exportation and generalizability of inclusive practices related to disability and human rights in underdeveloped countries;

--Examine cross-cultural understandings of disability, including the intersections of social class, ethnicity, race, nation, and gender;

--Explore CDS literature and examine its real life applicability to underdeveloped country contexts;

--Discuss the causes of disability in underdeveloped countries and how those realities fit (or not) with Western perspectives of disability and disability studies discourse;

--Explore various ways of understanding disability (medical model, social model, charity model, civil/human rights model) and their generalizability to underdeveloped country contexts;

--Discuss negative social perceptions, ableism, stigma and discrimination experienced by individuals with disabilities across a variety of transnational contexts.


 

*Disability, Food & Health*

HTW 669

Are You Interested in the Health and Well-Being of People with Disabilities?

Take HTW 669: Disability, Food and Health

Through active discussions and hands-on opportunities to develop skills, students will learn about factors influencing the health and well-being of persons with disabilities including:

  • disability history and theory
  • health-related law and services
  • disparities in violence victimization, food security, healthcare, health
  • health promotion
  • emergency and disaster preparedness
  • ethics

People with disabilities are a large and diverse population experiencing significant health disparities. This course meets objectives of Healthy People 2020, and will prepare students to understand how promote health and well-being among people with disabilities from a Public Health perspective.

Wednesdays 2:15 – 5:05 pm

The Falk Complex: Room 201

Katherine McDonald, PhD

Falk College: Public Health, Food Studies & Nutrition

kemcdona@syr.edu

*Adaptive Sports and Empowerment as Effective Public Health*

SPM 300/DSP 300-M002/M001

Professor Bill Peace

Tues./Thurs. 2:00–3:30pm

306 Bowne Hall

Sports has always been an important part of American culture. Sports is of particular importance for People with Disabilities (PWDs) because participation in adaptive sports has often broken stereotypical barriers, led to greater opportunities in education, and advanced disability rights. 

As the number of PWDs participating in sports has increased, sports activity has resulted in better health and greater social integration.  Sports offer PWDs a way to demonstrate their capabilities and strengths.  While a few well-known athletes with disabilities have enjoyed success in professional sports (Casey Martin, Jim Abbott, Tom Dempsey, etc.), this course will focus on the burgeoning of adaptive sports.  Involvement in adaptive sports at any level demonstrates what PWDs can do and as a result represents a revolutionary way to advance civil rights and increase access to health care.

*Advanced Gender Communication*

CRS/WGS/QSX 400

Dr. Erin J. Rand

Tuesday & Thursday from 12:30–1:50pm

It seems like everyone is talking about issues of gender and sexuality today. But what does it all mean? Marriage equality is the law of the land and Fun Home won the Tony for Best Musical. Caitlyn Jenner has her own show. Debates rage over funding for Planned Parenthood, equal pay for women, and dress codes for girls. Trans women of color are routinely murdered, and black boys and girls are targeted by police. How can we make sense of these issues from a critical feminist and queer perspective?

This course examines the multiple, often contradictory ways that feminism, queerness, and gender and sexual difference manifest in popular discourses in the US. We will consider a variety of contemporary texts, ranging from scholarly essays to popular fiction and nonfiction, memoirs, graphic novels, and films. These texts will encourage a richly intersectional approach, emphasizing discourses of race and class and addressing themes of consent, reproduction, geography, privilege, embodiment, identity, and more.

This is a seminar style course designed for advanced undergraduates who have already taken an introductory course in gender and/or sexuality studies. Instructor consent required. Please email ejrand@syr.edu for more information and permission to register.

*"Eye Hand Body Mind"*

PTG 200

Susan D'Amato

Tues/Thur 3:30-6:00

Susan D'Amato is offering a new drawing course for Spring '16 titled "Eye Hand Body Mind".

Drawing lends itself as a holistic process and practice for mindful investigation and engagement with the visual, felt, and perceptive experiences of being alive in the world.

This course will integrate traditional and contemporary approaches, materials, and processes in drawing with mindfulness based contemplative practices including breath, voice, movement, yoga, sitting, walking and guided meditation. Structured and open problems will challenge and enrich students’ ability to perceive, create, and think with whole body-mind awareness.  

Working from observed, thought-based, and sensational experiences, students will cultivate a daily practice suited to their personal interests while developing a body of work reflective of their process.

 

*Intergroup Dialogue*

SOC 230/WGS 230 AND CFE 200

Intergroup Dialogue is an educational model that brings together students from diverse backgrounds to engage in deep and meaningful conversations across social identities towards a place of action.

Dialogue on Faith, Conflict, and Community

Monday 3:45-6:30pm

Co-Instructors : El-Java Abdul-Qadir and Diane Swords

Dialogue on Socio-Economic Inequality and Education

Wednesday 3:45-6:30 pm

Co-Instructors: Afua Boahene and Diane Romo

Intergroup Dialogue on Race and Ethnicity

Tuesdays 3:30-6:15 pm

Co-Instructors: Lynn Dew and Dellareese Jackson

IGD

Reflect. Connect. Act.

To register fill out the online application: intergroupdialogue.syr.edu

For more information contact Intergroup Dialogue at 315-443-4555

 
 
 


SU NEWS

Syracuse University Launches Design Competition for National Veterans Resource Complex, Announces Members of Selection Committee


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Call for Proposals: Deaf-initely Ironic…? “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON 2016 

April 1, 2016

Syracuse University

DEADLINE for Proposals:  February 8, 2016

Join us for our fourth annual “Cripping” the Comic Con, where “con” means conference and comics convention.  This year’s main themes are irony, humor, and Deaf cultural pride.  We wish to explore the ways in which irony and humor reflect and create understandings and interpretations of disability in popular culture.  

Each year, the symposium provides participants with the opportunity to engage in a broad array of reflective discussions about the representations of disability that exist “beneath the surface” and explicitly within mainstream popular cultures both nationally and internationally, particularly the popular culture phenomena that are comic books, graphic novels, and manga. 

In No Respect (1989), an aptly titled foundational text underscoring the ways in which popular culture is oftentimes perceived as “low culture” and therefore undeserving of scholarly (and popular) attention, author Andrew Ross “…argues that the making of ‘taste’ is hardly an aesthetic activity, but rather an exercise in cultural power, policing and carefully redefining social relations between classes” (Routledge, 2015).  Irony frequently serves a parallel function in highlighting power dynamics and issues of marginalization.  There are many theories that seek to explain the meaning and purposes of humor.  

Rather than taking on only one of many philosophical approaches – the aggression and hostility hypothesis, the catharsis explanation, etc. – we are more interested in examining how humor and irony serve to critique, amplify, and disrupt popular cultural understandings of disability by and about People with Disabilities (PWDs) and our allies and friends.  Social critique via humor is famously present in myriad d/Deaf spaces.  Many d/Deaf individuals do not identify as PWDs, but as members of a cultural group and community, and/or as a linguistic minority.  Some d/Deaf people identify in numerous ways, simultaneously, or depending upon context. 

What do humor and irony imply and what emotional labor do they accomplish when considering daily quality of life perceptions, family dynamics, and so on?  How are these vital subjects portrayed in numerous facets of popular culture?  What new imaginings are possible? 

From comic strips to graphic novels to films to games that include and, in some cases, feature characters with disabilities, humor remains a vibrant and creative focus for establishing connections and imagining strategies in the lives of PWDs and allies.  In what ways do humor and irony counter, deepen, and complicate issues of stigma and isolation?  There are many ways to be Deaf, Blind, Autistic, etc., and diverse experiences need to be addressed by creators of comics, film, and other media.  What are some strategies that can be used to politicize the comics and film industries?  Aspects of these ideas and questions were articulated during our 2013 post-symposium session, “Disability Activism and Fandom: A Roundtable Strategizing on Fandom as a Target of/Resource for Activism,” 

Anyone can participate in “Cripping” the Comic Con.  Although some of the language in this Call for Proposals is decidedly “academic,” and some of the folks who participate may self-identify as “academics,” this symposium is really for everyone, and we mean it.  All are welcomed; please feel free to submit your ideas for consideration.  We seek to promote a culture of inclusion. 

Michael Bérubé tells us that “every representation of disability has the potential to shape the way ‘disability’ is understood in general culture, and some of those representations can in fact do extraordinary powerful—or harmful—cultural and political work” (1997, p. B4).  These representations encourage audience members to come to an acceptance and understanding of the wide range of differences that exist among us. 

Submissions incorporating genres that do not typically receive sustained attention in mainstream scholarly spaces are encouraged. These include but are not limited to the following: 

  • films, movies, videos, television shows (including reality TV, animated TV)
  • advertising, newspapers, magazines
  • comic cons, dragon cons, geek cons, movie cons, cosplay, cult fandom, the “geek syndrome”
  • games, gaming, toys, action figures comix, anime, motion comics
  • digital media and digital effects
  • visual arts, painting, photography, deviantART, alternative and alternate art forms
  • poetry, expressive arts, popular fiction, imagetext, fanfic, slash, alternative and alternate forms of literacies
  • material culture, multimedia, social media, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube
  • websites, blogs, memes, zines

One of our primary goals as symposium organizers is to create opportunities for all participants—particularly students and emerging scholars—to share their work. 

Another of our primary goals is to assure that all information associated with the symposium is accessible and equitable.  The symposium organizers and the proposal review committee strongly support the notion that “academics have a responsibility to make their work relevant for the society they exist within” (Jurgenson, 2012); this premise includes making Disability Studies relevant and accessible to members of disability communities (Ne’eman, 2012).  

Since representations in popular culture are generally created outside of academic environments, it is especially important for the general public and not just “academics” to engage in conversations about popular culture and disability.  Representations have the potential to affect everyone.  We all benefit from discussing and learning about disability and popular culture in ways that include and welcome everyone’s participation.  

This event is meant not only to address often unmet needs in scholarly spaces and beyond, but also to address these vital areas/concerns: 

  1. Popular culture studies and literature do not pay consistent or adequate attention to disability; when this attention is paid, it is often via “special issues” of journals, etc. 
  2. Further, “Popular culture is…the discursive terrain on which larger social issues are played out, often unobtrusively and masked as entertainment–and this is precisely why pop culture needs to be examined even more closely...” (Nayar, 2011, p. 172).  These issues include not only our understandings of diverse minds and bodies, but representations and intersections of identities, including but not limited to gender expression, sexual orientation, race, class, ethnicity, size, age, veteran’s status, etc.
  3. Popular culture studies and literature continue to have a mixed reception within certain mainstream academic spaces.  Because popular culture is still sometimes not taken seriously within some of these spaces (even among some Disability Studies scholars and practitioners), its status remains, for some, “discounted” (at times, popular culture studies may even be perceived as “deviant”).  Consequently, this symposium’s organizers aim to:
    1. critique what is often described as “deviant”
    2. question and disrupt what “counts” as academic, mainstream, and normative
    3. The symposium will be consistent with values that underscore the disability rights movement: we seek to make collective investments in disability pride, identity, and cultures.  In “cripping” the status quo, we assert, purposefully, “Nothing about us without us.”  For more information on what we mean by “cripping,” please visit this page on the “Cripping” the Comic Con website: http://crippingthecon.com/more-on-what-cripping-means/.
    4. We will always welcome submissions based upon the variety of issues and strategies that were identified during our 2013 post-symposium session, “Disability Activism and Fandom: A Roundtable Strategizing on Fandom as a Target of/Resource for Activism,” including but not limited to the following topics and questions:
  • The relationship between disability rights activism and fandom
  • Accessibility of cons and fan-related spaces
  • How to engage fandom communities further in the disability rights movement
  • Have there been opportunities for change in how fandom communities approach disability? If so, how?
  • What are the discourses that are produced when “reboots” happen with comic characters?
  • How might we all participate most fully at events during which disability is or is not prevalent, especially when the events involve and in some cases privilege popular culture?
  • How and in what ways might cosplay choices be perceived and harnessed as forms of activism, from a disability cultural standpoint?
  • How might we take advantage of “teachable moments” in the context of addressing the intersections of disability, fandom, and popular culture?
  • The transformative potential of art, and considering ways for “creating representations on our own terms”
  • Being aware of the ways in which gatekeepers to traditional media and large independent media may prohibit access to disenfranchised populations, including People with Disabilities

Submission Guidelines and Instructions 

Proposal types and formats may include, among others:

  1. Individual presentation
  2. Panel presentation
  3. Discussion/workshop/roundtable
  4. Performance/video/film/art entry
  5. Poster session

Please note that other forms of proposals are fully welcomed, and the above list is not exhaustive.  If you have something particular in mind, please explain the details and parameters of what you imagine, via your proposal submission(s). You are also welcomed and encouraged to submit more than one proposal.  

If your submission is a performance/video/film/art entry, you are responsible for securing permissions and rights for public viewing.  Videos and films should be open captioned and descriptions of any artwork or other images will be required.  Audio descriptions of videos and films may also be required, depending upon the nature and style of the videos/films being submitted. 

PROPOSAL SUBMISSION DEADLINE:  February 8, 2016 

Each proposal must include:

  1. Name
  2. Affiliation (if applicable)
  3. Contact information (including email and phone/video phone)
  • If there is more than one presenter, please indicate the main contact and lead presenter (if these are two or more individuals, please indicate this information).
  1. Title of presentation/activity/etc. (15 words or less)
  2. Short description (50 words or less)
  3. Full description (1000 words or less)

How to submit your proposal(s) -- please choose one of the following options:

  1. Via our symposium website: http://crippingthecon.com/submissions
  2. Via Fax: 315-443-4338.  Please indicate CRIPCON SUBMISSION on Fax cover sheet.
  3. Via regular mail:

“Cripping” the Comic Con 2016
c/o SU Disability Cultural Center
805 S Crouse Ave, 105 Hoople Bldg.
Syracuse, NY 13244-2280

Additional Information 

Information and content produced as a result of this symposium may be published, with participant and presenter consent, via Beneath the SURFACE (BtS), an open source digital repository on disability and popular culture.  BtS is available to the academic community as well as to the general public, and includes an array of resources regarding disability and popular culture.  

We will provide a designated time and area for “Open Space.”  Open Space is an opportunity for participants to create spontaneous and/or planned topical interactions with each other: a way for you to create your own symposium “sessions.”  There will also be vending and exhibition tables, art stations, and other opportunities for networking, gaming, etc. that will follow the thematic tracks of the symposium.  The particular tracks will be identified once all submissions have been reviewed by the proposal review committee. 

All confirmed participants (whether presenting or not) will receive information on:

  1. Completing registration
  2. Requesting accommodations
  3. Expressing dietary preferences (some but not all meals will be included with registration)

All participants will be responsible for the cost of their own lodging and travel.  

To keep informed, please visit us online! 

Website for “Cripping” the Comic Con:  http://crippingthecon.com 

“Cripping” the Comic Con on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CrippingTheCon 

“Cripping” the Comic Con on Twitter: @cripcon

 References  

Bérubé, M. (1997, May 30). The cultural representation of people with disabilities affects us all.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, B4-B5. 

Jurgenson, N. (2012, May 11). Making our ideas more accessible. Washington, DC: Inside Higher Ed.  Retrieved September 19, 2012 from: http://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2012/05/11/scholars-must-make-their-work-more-available-and-accessible-essay.  

Nayar, P. K. (2011). Haunted knights in spandex: Self and othering in the superhero mythos. Mediterranean Journal of Humanities, 1/2, 171-183. 

Ne’eman, A. (2012, May 14). Making disability studies accessible.  Washington, DC: Autistic Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN). Retrieved September 19, 2012 from http://autisticadvocacy.org/2012/05/making-disability-studies-accessible/

Ross, A. (1989). No respect: Intellectuals and popular culture. New York and London: Routledge. 

Routledge. (2015). About the book: No respect. Retrieved December 4, 2015 from

https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415900379.

CFP open: The Humanities Center announces PLACE as the theme for Syracuse Symposium™ 2016-2017

The Syracuse University Humanities Center, in the College of Arts and Sciences, announces PLACE as the theme for Syracuse Symposium™ 2016-2017.

The Humanities Center welcomes 2016-2017 proposals for Place. We are especially interested in proposals that: explore the humanities as public good; engage the digital humanities; highlight how the humanities can deepen our understanding of enduring questions; and illustrate how the humanities can help address pressing issues of our time. Next year, for the first time, Syracuse Symposium™ will span the full academic calendar (Fall 2016-Spring 2017).
There is a "place" in Syracuse Symposium™ for a wide range of conversations; how will you contribute?​  As a concept, Place opens doors to many interpretations. It can reference the real or the imagined. Place can be about inclusion or exclusion, community or solitude.  As a verb, it can mean to arrange, categorize, or locate.  Please see the full description for Place below. 
Syracuse Symposium™ engages wider publics with innovative, interdisciplinary work in the humanities by renowned scholars, artists, authors, and performers. Examples of engagement include public performances, lectures, readings, exhibits, mini-seminars, and/or workshops.
 
You can download the Syracuse Symposium™ proposal form here.  Please complete all sections and submit it as an email attachment to humcenter@syr.edu on or before March 4, 2016.  Thank you for your interest and involvement in the Humanities Center!

 
Syracuse Symposium™ 2016-2017 - PLACE​
Place is inherently social, cultural, physical, imaginative, and affective. It references schematics, physical environs, imagined communities, fictional settings, aesthetic constructs, and fluid processes. It can signal perception – how we see (and don’t see) others, how memory works (or forgetting operates). Place can be about inclusion and exclusion, commodification as well as communalism, conquest and settler logics, but also decolonization and sovereignty. Place references home – as a dwelling or habitat, but also the politics of “home” and homeplace. Place pinpoints roles, as in the place of emotion in everyday life. It refers to substitution – take the place of, supercession – the old gives place to the new, or dislocation – being out of place or losing one’s place. As a verb, it can mean to order, arrange, situate, categorize, locate, and identify. It can highlight how social dynamics and power inequities are enforced and resisted, as in “knowing one’s place” but also “refusing one’s place.” Thinking about place, then, entails questions of cementing, contesting, and crossing boundaries, devising frameworks yet also disrupting them, setting and upsetting expectations. 

 

Announcing the 2016 Critical Participatory Action Research Institutes

Critical PAR Institutes held by the Public Science Project at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Applications are due by January 15th.

https://www.smore.com/qcs4s-2016-critical-par-institutes?ref=email

http://publicscienceproject.org/


 

Youth in International Development and Foreign Affairs internship program 

The U.S. International Council on Disabilities (USICD) has coordinated our Youth in International Development and Foreign Affairs internship program since 2013.  USICD is a member of the Greater Washington Internship CoalitionWe are open for applications for the summer 2016 program until January 12, 2016.  

The summer 2016 Youth in International Development and Foreign Affairs internship program is still open for applications until January 12, 2016! 

The United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) launched its internship program in 2013.  The program focuses on U.S. citizen youth with disabilities who intend to pursue careers in international development or foreign affairs.    

The summer 2016 internship program will bring a group of talented graduate students, recent graduates, and rising college juniors and seniors with disabilities from across the U.S. to Washington, DC, for nine weeks.  This will include a one-week training and orientation program followed by an eight-week internship at an international organization in the Washington, DC, area.  USICD will cover the cost of accessible housing during the program, reimburse travel expenses to and from DC, and provide a frugal stipend.  It is anticipated that the program will run from May 29 to July 30, 2016. These dates may be subject to change.   

To learn more, please visit http://usicd.org/template/page.cfm?id=257

USICD thanks the Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation for their support for this initiative. 

The application deadline for USICD's summer 2016 internship program is January 12, 2016. 

USICD works to promote the rights and full participation of persons with disabilities through global engagement and United States foreign affairs. Learn more about our work at http://www.usicd.org.


 
16th Annual Disability Studies in Education Conference

Advocating for Access: The Right to Inclusion, The Right to Communication

June 27 & 28, 2016

University of Northern Iowa, Des Moines, IA

http://www.vpaf.uni.edu/events/inclusion/


 

Fellowships in Disability Policy

Applications Being Accepted for Two DRC Fellowship Opportunities

Mathematica's Center for Studying Disability Policy is accepting applications for two DRC fellowships: the Dissertation Fellowship Program and the Summer Fellowship Program. The former is a new opportunity for graduate students that offers them a $28,000 stipend to support their doctoral dissertation research at their home colleges and universities. The DRC's Summer Fellowship Program offers students in master's programs or early doctoral programs (pre-dissertation phase) an opportunity to spend the summer of 2016 at Mathematica's Washington, D.C., office to learn more about conducting an independent research project related to disability policy.

Applications for both fellowships are due February 12, 2016. Click here for more information about the eligibility requirements and application process.


  

Dissertation fellowships from The Center for Engaged Scholarship

The Center for Engaged Scholarship, a new entity that is committed to progressive scholarship, will award two or three dissertation fellowships of $25,000 each for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Full information, including the online application portal, will be available at the website, www.Cescholar.org.

The application portal will be available on November 30th 2015. The application deadline is January 31, 2016.

Students working on a dissertation in the social sciences or related interdisciplinary fields at a U.S. university are eligible regardless of citizenship status.

The Center has been created to promote and support scholarship that can move us to a society that is more egalitarian, more democratic, and committed to environmental sustainability.

Fellowship applications will be evaluated both for their scholarly merit and for their ability to contribute to progressive change. In this first fellowship competition, preference will be given to candidates who will be writing the dissertation during the fellowship year.




  

Call for Applicants: The Graduate Institute in Philosophy of Education

The Graduate Institute in Philosophy of Education aims to support and cultivate new scholars with knowledge and skills for future philosophical engagement with education. The institute will focus the themes of justice and higher education and the democratic aims of education.

Program Details • 10-day intensive summer course in Chicago, June 13-24, 2016 • Two workshops in 2017: 1) American Philosophical Association’s Central Division conference (March 1-March 4 in Kansas City) 2) American Educational Research Association (April 27 –May 1 in San Antonio) • Participants will be supported in developing a new paper in, or related to, philosophy of education. • Students admitted into the program will have all travel, accommodations and most meals paid for at all events. Applicants for the program should be graduate students from schools of education or philosophy departments interested in pursuing questions of policy and practice in education.

For more details visit the CEE website at ethicsandeducation.wceruw.org/grad-programming.html or contact Paula McAvoy at pjmcavoy@wisc.edu Graduate Institute in Philosophy of Education June 13-24, 2016 Application Deadline March 25, 2016 Sponsored by the Center for Ethics and Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison Institute

Instructors Harry Brighouse UW- Madison Paula McAvoy UW-Madison Tony Laden University of Illinois-Chicago

Visiting Scholars Michele Moses (UC Boulder) and Daniel Weinstock (McGill)


  

 

The Point Foundation Scholarship

The Point Foundation Scholarship

https://www.pointfoundation.org/point-apply/apply-now/


  

 

SUNY Cortland 7th Annual Student Conference for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Grab the World

The Multicultural Life and Diversity Office and our Conference Committee would like to invite all students, faculty, staff, and alumni of Syracuse University to our 7th Annual Student Conference for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Grab the World. This academic conference will be held on Saturday, April 9th, 2016 in Corey Union on the Cortland Campus. The purpose of this conference is to give students an academic conference experience that is directly connected to diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice as it intersects with their discipline. Faculty and staff are asked to mentor their students through the CFP and presentation processes. This conference is one of the ways that we, at the Multicultural Life and Diversity Office, fulfill one of the missions of our office: to promote and explore all aspects of diversity, especially as it relates to each students discipline.

Registration is now open!!!

Please Click Here for Individual Registration 

Please Click Here for Group Registration 

Deadline to register is March 25, 2016.

Call for Papers/Presentations (CFP)

Please Click Here to see CFP 

A committee will review the first round of proposals on February 1, 2016. Proposals received after this date will be reviewed on a rolling basis.  

If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to send an email to jacquelynn.akins@cortland.edu 


  

Interdisciplinary Certificate in Disability and Diversity Studies

The University of Hawaii at Manoa offers the Interdisciplinary Certificate in Disability and Diversity Studies, a 15 credit graduate level (master’s, doctoral, and post-doctoral) program sponsored by the Center on Disability Studies (CDS) in the College of Education. CDS also offers both graduate and undergraduate level Disability Studies Courses that can be taken as electives.
All courses are offered through distance education. Non-residents (international and out of state students) may apply for DDS courses through Outreach College and pay in-state tuition rates 

Five Exciting Courses for Spring!

Undergraduate 

Disability and Diversity (DIS 380)

Accessible Learning Technology (DIS 382)

Disability Culture and History (DIS 383) 

Graduate 

Advanced Seminar in Disability and Diversity Studies (DIS 687) Interdisciplinary Team Development (DIS 684) 

For questions about our certificate or courses, please check out the FAQ page or contact program coordinator Megan Conway at mconway@hawaii.edu  

www.cds.hawaii.edu/certificates

 

ACE's Graduate Research Associate Program - Now Accepting Applications

 

The American Council on Education’s Center for Policy Research and Strategy is now accepting applications from talented graduate students for participation in its Graduate Research Associate Program for both the 2016 Summer and the 2016-2017 Academic Year cohorts. Graduate Research Associates at ACE conduct policy research, contribute to advocacy efforts, attend briefings, and meet with staff from across the Council as well as across the DC higher education community. The program is meant to provide students with experience conducting, communicating, and disseminating policy research in the fast-paced DC setting. 

More information about the Graduate Research Associate Program, including application information, can also be found here: https://www.acenet.edu/news-room/Pages/CPRS-Research-Associate-Program.aspx.

Deadlines:

The deadline to apply for the summer program is January 15, 2016.

The deadline to apply for the academic year program is March 15, 2016. 


 

Call for Papers: Social Justice in Times of Crisis and Hope: Young People, Well-being and the Politics of Education

 

RMIT University’s Centre For Education, Training and Work in the Asian Century and Lancaster University’s Centre for Social Justice and Wellbeing in Education are jointly hosting a conference: 

Social Justice in Times of Crisis and Hope: Young People, Well-being and the Politics of Education

Wednesday 6th – Friday 8th July 2016, Barcelona, Spain

The 21st Century has so far been characterised by conflict, displacement, growing economic insecurity and austerity. Increasing social polarisation has meant that contemporary societies are becoming more unequal with smaller segments of the population having access to the most wealth. Recent years have seen large numbers of young people involved in social movements aimed at creating socially just societies. The ongoing conflicts around the world and the recent refugee crisis in Europe has only intensified calls for justice, equity, compassion and understanding. We live in times of despair and conflict, but also times of hope and action.

This three-day conference (including a half-day networking event) asks delegates to explore the role of social justice in times of crisis and hope. We ask for papers that examine the role of young people in contemporary social movements, with the kinds of demands that are being made by the world’s young people, and with the spaces within which they are making such demands. In addition we encourage papers that engage with the notion of well-being, with what this means in the contemporary moment and for whom. Finally we wish to interrogate the politics of education, to think about the limits and possibilities, and the challenges and opportunities for social justice through education.

Conference themes:

What is social justice?

Social justice in the age of Digital Media

The roles of informal and formal education (early childhood, primary, secondary, higher), teacher education/identities

Global problems, global perspectives

Global Financial Crisis, sovereign debt, austerity

Conflict, war, terror

New and enduring forms of marginalisation, exclusion, disadvantage

Migrants, refugees, asylum seekers

Indigenous populations

Disabilities

Class, economies

Genders, sexualities

Geography and context

Recognising, working with/for/across difference(s)

Conference fee: £100

Abstracts must be received by Monday 4th January 2016.  For more information see: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/social-justice-crisis-hope/


 

       


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

 
 
  

New Resource Guide for Students with Hearing Impairments 

We've just published our new resource guide for students with hearing impairments.

You can check it out here: http://www.accreditedschoolsonline.org/resources/students-with-hearing-impairments/

As you know, deaf or hard of hearing students face a host of unique challenges in the classroom and on campus.  With this guide, we've attempted to highlight those struggles as well as provide helpful advice and showcase resources which may aid the student. Some key elements of the guide include:

 - Tech tools for students with hearing impairments
 - How schools create more audible environments
 - Scholarships for students with hearing impairments

Please visit us here: http://www.accreditedschoolsonline.org

  


 

College Support for Students with Disabilities

According to the U.S. Department of Education, over 10% of undergraduates report having a disability. Regardless of their unique challenges, these students are entitled to the same quality of education as their peers. For this reason, our team of experts at OnlineColleges.net published a guide for students with disabilities. In it we provide an overview of the following information:

  • The legal rights of students with physical and/or learning disabilities
  • Transitioning into college life, including how to find and access resources
  • Additional tech resources for students affected by specific disabilities


The complete guide can be found here: http://www.onlinecolleges.net/for-students/students-with-disabilities/

For more information contact Kevin Decker 

kevindecker@onlinecolleges.net | OnlineColleges.net

  



Job Posting of special interest to teacher candidates with concentration in Special Education

Seeking an innovative and enthusiastic individual to work as a one to one mentor with an active young autistic woman. 

This creative young woman is very actively involved in her community, including a variety of studio painting and ceramic classes, weekly volunteer commitments, regular knitting circles, and many physical fitness pursuits.  She is looking to work with someone who has patience and can guide her in developing the skills she needs to be more independent.  Her ideal candidate is reliable, energetic, and comfortable working with people with special needs. 

In addition to hourly wage, a mileage reimbursement for providing transportation is included.  This position is through Advocates Incorporated and will require fingerprinting and a background check.

Please respond with a resume to Michelle Bellemare at mbellemare@advocatesincorporated.org

  

 
 

Sprout: film and travel programs related to the field of I/DD

Sprout Update

Film

In 2015 over 40 agencies ran a Sprout Touring Film Festival  (STFF) in their community.  The STFF enables you to custom design a local film festival of films featuring people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. For more info and to see the three options available please visit our site: www.SproutTouringFilmFestival.org

The dates for the 14th Annual Sprout Film Festival in NYC are set: Saturday May 21 – Sunday May 22, 2016

We will be returning to the beautiful SVA theatre on West 23rd Street for two days of memorable, entertaining and enlightening films featuring people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  The Call for Entries is Now Open!

Sproutflix is the only distributor of films exclusively featuring people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Sproutflix offers streams, downloads, DVD’s and playlists to be purchased for institutional and educational use. We believe film can inspire, inform and spark change. If you are thinking about incorporating film into a class, training or event, we welcome you to browse our ever-growing selection.

If you would like to see the latest news regarding our film programs – please like us on our Sprout Film Festival facebook page: www.facebook.com/sproutfilmfestival

Please contact Abdool Laltaprasad, Sprout’s Film Program Coordinator with any questions related to our film programs at Abdool@gosprout.org  888-222-9575

Travel

2016 Vacation Program – our 37th year of running vacations for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. We are currently working on our latest brochure and will be mailing them out in January – we will also be posting a virtual brochure on our website.

Sprout’s Custom Design Program is the perfect way to accommodate your group’s specific vacation needs, from budgetary concerns to enhanced care requirements.

  • You pick the dates, length and destination of the trip.
  • We pick up your group, wherever you are.
  • Our staff will work with you to design a trip to suit your group’s specific interests and abilities.
  • Sprout will provide all staffing needs during the trip.

If you would like to see the latest news regarding our vacation program – please like us on Sprout’s facebook page:  www.facebook.com/gosprout.org

Please contact Andy Lee, Sprout’s Program Director with any questions related to our travel programs at Andy@gosprout.org  888-222-9575


Two positions at Colgate U (Educational Studies) 

1) Foundations of Education: Open Rank, Tenure Stream

The Department of Educational Studies at Colgate University invites applications for a tenure- stream position in Foundations of Education with responsibilities in Social Studies/English Secondary Education, open rank, beginning fall semester 2016. Completion of Ph.D. or Ed.D is expected prior to or shortly after the date of hire.

All our faculty are committed to providing a breadth of course offerings to students interested in studying education broadly, including students who are interested in gaining a critical understanding of larger educational phenomena and students planning a career in teaching. The ideal candidate will have a strong interdisciplinary background and will be able to teach our introductory class, The American School, and upper-level courses on their research interests. In particular, we encourage applicants with demonstrated interests in the following subfields: Decolonial Studies in Education, Critical Art and Aesthetic Pedagogies, and Alternative/Community-Based Education.

The hired faculty member will also be responsible for working with students enrolled in our Secondary Social Studies/English Teacher Preparation Program (TPP). The faculty member will work directly with the Director of Teacher Preparation Programs, especially during the Professional Semester (Student Teaching).

The successful candidate will teach an annual five-course load. One of the five courses is a curriculum and instruction methods course in Social Studies/English that includes observing student teachers in the field and mentoring students in the TPP.

Classroom teaching experience in public schools is desired and work in identified high needs schools (urban or rural) is preferred. Candidates should note their history of developing constructive relationships with K-12 teachers, principals, community members, families, and students as well as any previous experience working in TPPs.

All Colgate faculty are also expected to participate in all-university programs, including the Liberal Arts Core Curriculum. Please see the website for more information: http://www.colgate.edu/distinctly-colgate/intellectual-engagement/core-curriculum


Colgate is a highly-selective liberal arts university of 2800 students situated in central New York. Colgate faculty are committed to excellence in both teaching and scholarship. Further information about the Educational Studies department can be found at http://www.colgate.edu/academics/departments-and-programs/educational-studies.

Colgate strives to be a community supportive of diverse perspectives and identities. Candidates should describe in their cover letter [or other statement] their approach to teaching and/or
scholarship in a diverse and inclusive educational environment. Within this statement, we would like to see evidence of carrying out this approach in their teaching, scholarship, and/or service to the community. Colgate University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer; women and candidates from historically underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to apply.
A letter of application that addresses the requirements outlined above, a scholarly writing sample, current vita, a brief statement of a teaching philosophy, and at least three reference letters must be submitted throughhttps://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/xxx.

Review of applications will begin January 31, 2016 and continue until the position is filled.

2) Director of Teacher Preparation Program/Senior Lecturer Foundations of Education

The Department of Educational Studies at Colgate University invites applications for a full- time Director of the Teacher Preparation Program that will hold the rank of Senior Lecturer. The Director is responsible for managing the Teacher Preparation Program as well as offering foundations courses in both the program and the department.

All our faculty are committed to providing a breadth of course offerings to students interested in studying education broadly, including students who are interested in gaining a critical understanding of larger educational phenomena and students planning a career in teaching. The ideal candidate will have a strong interdisciplinary background in Foundations of Education. The Director will teach a total of three courses per academic year – 1) Seminar on Curriculum and Instruction in Math/Science (Methods), 2) Supervision of Secondary Student Teachers, and 3) Introduction to Foundations of Education course and/or area of specialty. The Director will have access to Faculty Development Grants, conference travel funding, and the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research to improve on the curriculum, pedagogy and possible research in these courses.

The Director will manage the Teacher Preparation Program (TPP) and work closely with the Chair of the Department of Educational Studies. This will entail working directly with our TPP students at both the Undergraduate and MAT levels and connecting with New York State Department of Education (NYSED), our accreditors TEAC/CAEP, developing relationships with the local schools, working with the Department of Educational Studies faculty, and developing relationships with chairs and faculty in the departments of Math, Science, Sociology and Anthropology, and History.
Candidates must hold a Ph.D./Ed.D that is expected prior to or shortly thereafter the time of hire, and possess teacher certification at the secondary level in Math or Science. We are interested in candidates with a history of successful and relevant teaching experience at the secondary level. Candidates should note previous leadership experience in Teacher Education programs at the university level and familiarity with the accreditation process, edTPA, state requirements for TPPs, and the TEACH website. We will recognize administrative experience at the K-12, university level, or state department of education. Last, we are seeking candidates that have leadership experience in developing constructive relationships with K-12 teachers, principals, community members, families, and students. Experience in identified high needs schools (urban or rural) is also preferred.

Colgate is a highly-selective liberal arts university of 2800 students situated in central New York. Further information about the Educational Studies department can be found at http://www.colgate.edu/academics/departments-and-programs/educational-studies

Colgate strives to be a community supportive of diverse perspectives, identities, and ways of life. Candidates should describe in their cover letter [or other statement] their approach to teaching and/or scholarship in a diverse and inclusive educational environment. Within this statement, we would like to see evidence of carrying out this approach in their teaching, scholarship, and/or service to the community. Colgate University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer; women and candidates from historically underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to apply.

A letter of application that addresses the requirements outlined above, unofficial graduate school transcripts, current vita, brief statement of a teaching philosophy, evidence of good teaching, and at least three reference letters must be submitted through must be submitted through https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/xxx.

Review of applications will begin February 21, 2016 and continue until the position is filled.

Please contact John Palmer, Chair of Educational Studies, with any questions:jpalmer@colgate.edu

  
  

Spirituality, Religion, and Disability Resources from the Religion and Spirituality Division of the AAIDD 


Disabilities Among Prison and Jail Inmates, 2011–12

Disabilities Among Prison and Jail Inmates, 2011–12

http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/dpji1112.pdf

New Documentary Short: Beyond Sacred Voices of Muslim Identity  

Now more than ever the arts can, and must, be a catalyst for dialogue, inclusion, and understanding. 

We are proud to share with you this short documentary that follows the creation process of Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity.

Beyond Sacred, originally commissioned by LaGuardia Performing Arts Center, explores the diverse experiences of Muslims in the U.S. The five young participants vary in many ways, but share the common experience of coming of age in a post-9/11 New York City, in a time of rising Islamophobia. Beyond Sacred uses the arts to increase community dialogue around difference and fosters greater understanding among Muslim and non-Muslim communities.


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS