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Weekly Newsletter

March, 27 2017

INDEX

SU EVENTS

From Broken Bones to Healing Hearts: My Journey with Sarah Baartman

Women's and Gender Studies Fall 2014 Events!

Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival (this week!)

La Casita Cultural Center Events

Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series

Alice Dreger visits SU on Friday, Sept. 19

 

SU NEWS

We Mourn a Loss in the Disability Rights Community

A Sad Farewell to a Friend and Colleague

Searching for an apartment off campus?

TRIBUTE TO SARI

 

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Disabled and Proud: Dare to Dream

PhD Scholarship - Disability on Television: Access, representation and reception

2014 AUTISM INSTITUTE

Call for Proposals: "Law, Religion and Disability"

Call for Proposals: 8th Annual Conference on Equity and Social Justice

Accessibility App. Call for Reviewers

Call for Research Participants

Call for Participants-Any college student

Call for Abstracts: Social Philosophy Conference

Events coming at the University of Sheffield, UK

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

UC Berkeley Disability Studies Part-Time Lecturer Job Pool and Spring '15 Opening

Human Rights & Communications Associate

Online Resources for Disabled Students

Dis/ability Studies Theorising disablism and ableism

Move5k Run/Walk/Roll October 4th in Syracuse

Opportunity for Student Writers

Volleyball League

Welcome Back to School Promo!

Reading and Book Signing with ELLIOTT DELINE

Access to Independence Annual Employment Conference 

DisAbused: Rethinking the Presumption of Caregiver Benevolence


SU HAPPENINGS

From Broken Bones to Healing Hearts: My Journey with Sarah Baartman

Monday September 29, 2014
5pm – 7pm

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons
Diana Ferrus is an internationally-acclaimed South African poet, activist, and storyteller.  Her poem “I’ve come to take you home” for Sarah Baartman, a Khoi Khoi woman who was paraded in freak shows in 19th century Europe inspired the French Senate to vote unanimously to return Baartman’s remains to South Africa.   The poem is published in the French Law, a landmark in French history.  At her performance lecture, Diana Ferrus will trace the genealogy of her poem to Sarah Baartman, linking it to colonialism, apartheid, and the roots of the designation “Coloured” in South Africa.  She will read from her book I’ve come to take you home and discuss the significant impact the return of Sarah Baartman’s remains had on the people of South Africa. 
CO-SPONSORS: Departments of Women's & Gender Studies, Cultural Foundations of Education, African American Studies, Languages, Literatures and Lingustics, and The Writing Program
Lecture is free and open to the public. Please see attached flyer and circulate widely. Contact Mary Rose Go (315-443-8750 or mmgo@syr.edu) if you require accommodations.

Women's and Gender Studies Fall 2014 Events!

Dear Colleagues,

As the new Chair of Women's & Gender Studies, I am delighted to announce an engaging and wide range of events this fall (please see text, below).
 
I especially want to highlight our exciting colloquium on Friday October 24 (12:30-6:00pm), "Negotiating Feminist Perspectives: Intersectionality, Transnationality, and Decoloniality" (a Syracuse Symposium event convened in collaboration with the SU Humanities Center). CART will be provided and a reception will follow at the Faculty Center.
 
This event brings together María Lugones, Rita Kaur Dhamoon, and Sirma Bilge to present from their latest research. Writings from each scholar will be made available prior to the Colloquium: more details are below (and attached).  Please mark your calendars and plan to attend!
 
I look forward to seeing you on October 24th, and at many other events across the semester.
 
All best wishes,
Vivian
 
Vivian M. May, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chair

Women's & Gender Studies Department

208 Bowne Hall

Syracuse University

Syracuse, NY 13244-1200
 
WOMEN'S & GENDER STUDIES DEPARTMENT FALL 2014 EVENTS
 
 
Women or Persons? The Naming Debate in Reproductive Freedom Campaigns
Wendy Brown, September 15 – 4:00pm, Maxwell Auditorium
 
Brown explores broader concerns in contemporary social theory and social movements posited when transgender activists petitioned Planned Parenthood and NARAL to rename their health clinics and reproductive justice campaigns to remove references to gender. Activists argue that a focus on "women's health" and "women's control over their bodies" excludes transgender people who do not identify as women yet need reproductive services and advocacy. Planned Parenthood, while wanting to be LGBTQ inclusive, has been reluctant to surrender its focus on women because of the link between women's historical lack of control over reproduction and women's social and economic status.
 
Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Wendy Brown is a distinguished feminist scholar at UC Berkeley, specializing in political theory and critical theory.
Cosponsored with Phi Beta Kappa and the Renée Crown Honors Program: http://honors.syr.edu/blog/2014/09/03/wendy-brown-is-visiting-phi-beta-kappa-scholar/
 
 
A Precarious Middle Class: Gender and Migration in the New Economy
Raka Ray, September 16 –12:30pm, 341 Eggers Hall
 
With rapid changes in the economies of urban India, young men and women face new possibilities of work and life-worlds. Ray will explore the stories of young men and women who migrate to Bombay in search of jobs in the entertainment industry and draw out the different challenges they face as they seek new lives. In particular she will discuss the nature of new middle class migration, draw attention to the gendered conceptualization of precarity, and examine the effects of the discursive focus on the rise of Indian women. 
 
Raka Ray is Chair of Department of Sociology at UC Berkeley 
Cosponsored with the South Asia Center at the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs and Department of Sociology.
 
 
The Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival
September 18 – 20: Go to  http://suhrff.syr.edu/ for show times & locations.
 
The Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival celebrates its 12th year with an outstanding line-up of award-winning films addressing social justice issues around the globe. Films include Through A Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a PeopleLakshmiAmerican VagabondReturn to Homs, and The Missing Picture.
 
The festival is part of Syracuse Symposium 2014: Perspective and is presented by the SU Humanities Center in the College of Arts & Sciences and The Newhouse School.
 
 
The Nature of the Complaint: In the Court of the Goddess in South India
Kalpana Ram, September 24– 4:00pm, 204 Maxwell Hall
 
In his final work, Maurice Merleau-Ponty develops the image of a chiasm or fold, through which we and the world are intertwined in a carnal embrace. Based on ethnographic work in Tamil Nadu, Ram argues that this vision gives us a way of understanding deep seated notions of justice that underlie the complaints of suffering brought to the goddess, particularly by women. While not denying the need for multiple visions of justice, this presentation will reverse the usual direction of questions and ask: how does the justice meted out by the goddess help us address the blind spots in modern political traditions?
 
Kalpana Ram is Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Macquarie University, Australia
Cosponsored with the South Asia Center at the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs and Anthropology.
 
 
From Broken Bones to Healing Hearts: My Journey with Sarah Baartman
Diana Ferrus, September 29 – 5:00pm, Peter Graham Commons
 
Ferrus's poem "I've come to take you home" for Sarah Baartman, a Khoi Khoi woman who was paraded in freak shows in 19th century Europe inspired the French Senate to vote unanimously to return Baartman's remains to South Africa. The poem is published in the French Law, a landmark in French history.  Diana Ferrus will trace the genealogy of her poem to Sarah Baartman, linking it to colonialism, apartheid, and the roots of the designation "Coloured" in South Africa.  She will read from her book I've come to take you home and discuss the significant impact the return of Sarah Baartman's remains had on the people of South Africa.
 
Diana Ferrus is an internationally-acclaimed South African poet, activist, and storyteller. 
 
Democratizing Knowledge Project event: http://democratizingknowledge.syr.edu/Events.html,
Co-Sponsores: Cultural Foundation of Education, African American Studies, the Writing Program, Languages, Literatures & Linguistics, Women's & Gender Studies.
 
 
 
Calaca Catwalks, Testimonio Painting, Undocumented Flower Crossings and Other U.S. Latina/o Art Happenings
October 8, 12:00pm (Location TBA)
 
Laura Elisa Pérez is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at UC, Berkeley: she is also a core faculty member in Performance Studies and affiliated faculty in Women's Studies and Latin American Studies. 
 
Latina/o-Hispanic Heritage Month Featured Event
Conveners: Women's and Gender Studies  and the Office of Multicultural Affairs
Co-Sponsors: Religion, Latino and Latin American Studies, LGBT Studies, LALUCHA, and La Casita Cultural Center.
 
 
 
Crafting a Politics of Theory & Methodology in 'Ero-Ideologies:
Writings on Art, Spirituality, and the Decolonial'
 
Laura Elisa Pérez, October 15 – 12:00pm (Location TBA)
 
Pérez presents from her forthcoming book, Ero-Ideologies. She has done groundbreaking research on syncretic spiritualities and the queer, anti-patriarchal, and decolonial politics that have been pursued in creative contexts, including painting, performance, and multimedia installations.
 
Laura Elisa Pérez is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at UC, Berkeley: she is also core faculty in Performance Studies and affiliated faculty in Women's Studies and Latin American Studies. 
 
Convener: Department of Women's and Gender Studies
Co-sponsors: Office of Multicultural Affairs, Religion, Latino and Latin American Studies, LGBT Studies, LALUCHA, La Casita Cultural Center.
 
 
In the Body of Justice
Eve Ensler, October 15 – 7:30pm, Hendrick's Chapel
 
Ensler will speak about her efforts to stop violence and create a planet in which women and girls are free to thrive, rather than merely survive. Her well-known work "The Vagina Monologues" inspired her to create V-Day, a global activist movement to stop violence against women and girls that raises funds and awareness through benefit productions and other artistic works. One of Ensler's latest efforts, City of Joy, was launched in 2011 in the Democratic Republic of Congo to help women survivors of violence.
 
Eve Ensler is a Tony Award-winning playwright, performer, and activist.
 
This lecture is sponsored in cooperation with the Pulse performing arts series, the LGBT Resource Center, the Humanities Center as part of the 2014 Syracuse Symposium, the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, and the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.
 
 
The Cha Cha Files: A Chapina Poética
Maya Chinchila, October 20 – 6:00pm, Peter Graham Commons
 
Chinchilla's spoken word performance makes visible Central American-Guatemalan diaspora and disentangles the myths from the mayhem of civil wars, urban wars, and the wars raging in young hearts. Part memory, part queer imaginary, the Cha Cha Files honors Central American feministas, Long Beach roqueras, families divided by war, lovers separated by borders, and celebrates the pleasure and heartbreak of femmes, machas, y mariconadas. Her poems, stories, and snapshots traverse California coastlines and southern borderlines, cut across tense multi-culti high-school hallways, sing Solidarity Movement songs, mosh through tribal slam pits, and find home in the vibrant Bay Area where radical activists and lovers alike come of age.
 
Maya Chinchilla, a Chapina (Guatemalan-American) who grew up in southern California, is an artist whose portfolio includes poetry books, spoken word, and short films. 
 
Convener: Department of Women's and Gender Studies
Co-Sponsored with Latino and Latin American Studies, LGBT Studies, La Casita Cultural Center.
 
 
Why I Am a Bioconservative
Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, October 23 – 7:00 pm, Watson Theatre
 
This lecture has two interrelated purposes. First, it broadly suggests ways that principles, logics, guidelines, and rules of religious bioethics can serve effectively in situations and for populations outside of the particular religious tradition that generates them. Second, it offers the term bioconservative to describe my own ethical position as a disability bioethicist. To do this, I lay out a position between the concepts of conservation and liberal social politics to bridge religious and nonreligious belief communities. Because the term conservative is associated with the politics of the right, I bring forward a rationale for what is accomplished by invoking the term conservative and conservation for a disability equality and human rights-based perspective in bioethics. In the service of these larger aims, and most specifically, this talk draws from religious bioethics to explicate dignity as it pertains to quality-of-life judgments used in biomedical decision-making for life ending medical treatments.
 
Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, a renowned scholar of feminist disability studies, is Professor of Women's Studies and English at Emory University.
 
Sponsored by The 2014 Central New York Humanities Corridor "Humanities, Health, and Disability Studies Invited Scholar Lecture and Luncheon" Cosponsored with the Disability Studies Program, the Disability Law and Policy Program, the Center on Human Policy, Law, and Disability Studies, and the Disability Student Union
 
 
 
Negotiating Feminist Perspectives:
Intersectionality, Transnationality, and Decoloniality
 
Women's & Gender Studies Department Colloquium
 
October 24, Schine 304 A/B/C: 12:30-6:00, Reception to follow at the Faculty Center
 
This Colloquium is a Syracuse Symposium 2014: Perspective event,
organized in collaboration with the SU Humanities Center
 
CART transcription will be provided
 
Intersectionality, transnationalism, and decoloniality are ways of knowing generated to contest subjugation. Crafted in contexts of resistance, each draws from political outlooks, lived experiences, and knowledges produced alongside hegemony. Yet, critical uptake of these perspectives in contemporary feminist scholarship can distort or depoliticize: analyses of decolonial feminisms can slip into Orientalist or settler colonial logics; debates about transnational feminisms can reify an imperial gaze justifying rescue narratives; and treatments of intersectionality can animate single-axis logics and white solipsism in the name of gender. This colloquium engages each perspective, on its own terms and relationally, to cultivate their radically different possibilities.
 
María Lugones is renowned for her scholarship on decolonial feminist praxis and theorizing coalition against multiple oppression. She is a founding member of Escuela Popular Norteña, a collective for radical education and organizing, and Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture at Binghamton University. Lugones has authored numerous influential articles and Pilgrimages/Peregrinajes: Theorizing Resistance against Multiple Oppressions.
 
Rita Kaur Dhamoon is Assistant Professor in Political Science, at the University of Victoria, the territory of the Lekwungen peoples, Canada. Her research interests include multiculturalism, nation-building, and race-making; gender and feminist politics; critical race and anti-colonial politics; and settler colonialism. Among other publications, she is author of Identity/Difference Politics (2009). Her work is grounded in anti-racist feminist action.
 
Sirma Bilge is Associate Professor of Sociology, at l'Université de Montréal, and Associate Editor of the Journal of Intercultural Studies. Her research examines sexual nationalism, intersectionality's whitening, racialized governmentality of immigration, coalition politics, and academia's incorporation of minority knowledges. Bilge founded and directed the Intersectionality Research Unit in Montréal (2005-2010). With co-author Patricia Hill Collins, she is working on a manuscript on intersectionality.
 
Cosponsors: African American Studies, Cultural Foundations of Education, the Democratizing Knowledge Project, LGBT Studies, English, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, the South Asia Center, and the Writing Program.
 
 
 
Swinging into Sixty: A Woman Ponders the Future
Carrie Mae Weems, October 28 – 7:30pm, Hendrick's Chapel
 
Over the past 25 years, Carrie Mae Weems has worked toward developing a complex body of art that has at various times employed photographs, text, fabric, audio, digital images, installation and video. She has investigated family relationships, gender roles, the histories of racism, sexism, class and various political systems. "Despite the variety of my explorations, throughout it all it has been my contention that my responsibility as an artist is to work, to sing for my supper, to make art, beautiful and powerful, that adds and reveals; to beautify the mess of a messy world, to heal the sick and feed the helpless; to shout bravely from the roof-tops and storm barricaded doors and voice the specifics of our historic moment," she says.
 
Carrie Mae Weems is an artist and storyteller. Presented by University Lectures.
 
 
 
Breaking The Frame with
Carolee Schneemann and Marielle Nitoslawska
 
November 17, 7:00pm, Eggers 010 (tentative)
 
Breaking The Frame is a feature–length documentary portrait made with and about the New York artist Carolee Schneemann by Canadian filmmaker Marielle Nitoslawska. A pioneer of performance and body art as well as avant-garde cinema, Schneemann has been breaking the frames of the art world for five decades, in a variety of mediums, challenging assumptions of feminism, gender, sexuality, and identity. Nitoslawska has made numerous film essays, both feature length and short form, on ground-breaking movements and artists such as Domingo Cisneros, Szczepan Mucha, and Jozef Robakowsk, and teaches film production at Concordia University in Montreal.
Cosponsored with the English Department, Departments of Transmedia and Music and Art Histories, and the Humanities Center.

Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival (this week!)

 

La Casita Cultural Center Events


Artist Lecture by Pepón Osorio Tuesday, Sept. 9 / 6:30 p.m.

Balcón Criollo, Exhibit Opening Friday, Sept. 19 / 6-8 p.m.

The Borinqueneers documentary Saturday, Sept. 20 / 7 p.m.

Nuestro Sabor, A Taste of Latin America: Saturday, Sept. 27 / 1- 4 p.m.

Rebel documentary

Friday, Oct. 3 / 7 p.m.

Domino Tournament Saturday, Oct. 4 / 3–7 p.m.

Bomba & Plena Festival

Friday, Oct. 10 / 6–8 p.m.

La Casita Cultural Center

presents:

SHEMIN AUDITORIUM, SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

Puerto Rican artist Pepón Osorio, whose work inspired the Balcón Criollo will present his lecture: Where the Me becomes We

A production of La Casita and Point of Contact, with the support of the Visual Arts Lecture Series, and Syracuse University’s Art Education and Latino-Latin American Studies programs.

Milonga

Saturday, Sept. 13 / 9 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.

Traditional Argentine tango dancing.

Admission $10, includes refreshments

Hispanic Heritage Month inaugural event marks the opening of La Casita’s signature exhibition program. This year’s show pays tribute the contribution of Latinos in the US Armed Forces.

Historic account of the Puerto Rican 65th Infantry Regiment, the only all-Hispanic unit in the history of the US Army. Screening followed by discussion with writer/director,

Noemí Figueroa, and honored Borinqueneer, Korea War veteran Eugenio Quevedo.

Traditional Caribbean cuisine for all to taste!

Historic account of a Cuban woman who fought in the American Civil War. Screening followed by discussion with writer/director María Agui Carter.

Sponsored by University College

Co-produced with CNY Latino.

A colorful festival marks the closing of Hispanic Heritage Month at La Casita. Lively Caribbean rhythms by Edgar Pagán and performance by La Casita’s and SU’s Raíces dance troupes.

BACK TO TOP


Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series

Punitive Social Control, the Youth Control Complex, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline: Dignity Enhancement and Restorative Approaches as Antidotes
with Professor Victor Rios
Wednesday, September 24
4:00 pm

Maxwell Auditorium

Syracuse University Campus

Alice Dreger visits SU on Friday, Sept. 19

 
Alice Dreger, the well-known bioethicist and author of multiple texts on intersex, bioethics, sports and gender, will be on campus this Friday. She will give a talk between 1 and 2 pm in Bowne hall room 105.
 
“Why Not Change Minds Instead of Bodies? When Medicine Goes Too Far in Pursuit of ‘Normality’”

Doctors are often quick to offer “normalizing” interventions when a child has a body that challenges social norms. Surgeons offer their services to “fix” children born with atypical genitals and to separate children born conjoined. Endocrinologists offer growth hormone to healthy children who are short. What’s wrong with that approach? This talk will answer that question and will suggest that what would work better is attention to outcomes data (to know what really “works” for these children) and attempts at changing society. The speaker will draw on her background as an historian of medicine and patient advocate.
 
 
Below is detailed information about Dreger's work.
 
Alice Dreger, PhD
Medical Humanities & Bioethics Program
Feinberg School of Medicine
Northwestern University
Chicago
 
Represented by:
Betsy Lerner
Dunow, Carlson & Lerner Literary Agency
New York City
 
 
Alice Dreger is an historian of medicine and science, a sex researcher, a mainstream writer, and an (im)patient advocate. An award-winning scholar and writer, Dreger holds the position of Professor of Clinical Medical Humanities and Bioethics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Since earning her PhD in History and Philosophy of Science from Indiana University, Dreger has published two books with Harvard University Press, including Hermaphrodites and the Medical Invention of Sex and One of Us: Conjoined Twins and the Future of Normal. Her work has received much praise in the mainstream and scholarly literature, with One of Us earning positive reviews in The New Yorker and New England Journal of Medicine. In 2015, Penguin Press will publish her new book, Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science, based on work supported by a Guggenheim Fellowship.
 
Dreger embodies the idea of “the public intellectual,” publishing widely-cited major original work in scholarly journals while simultaneously working as a high-visibility mainstream writer. As a freelance essayist for The New York Times, Dreger has contributed essays to Health, Science, and Sports sections. Dreger has also served as a regular writer for the health section of The AtlanticPacific Standard, and for the blog of Psychology Today, and her op-eds have appeared in numerous other venues including The Washington Post, the Chicago TribuneNewsday, and the Wall Street Journal. In 2009, Norton selected Dreger’s essay “Lavish Dwarf Entertainment” for its annual Best Creative Non-Fiction. Her investigatory histories of contemporary scientific controversies—including recently over the anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon—are regularly covered in such venues as The New York TimesScience magazine, New Scientist, and Slate.
 
Besides functioning as an historian and writer, in the medical world Dreger has served as a patient advocate and as a consultant to pediatric specialists undertaking clinical reform, particularly in the treatment of children born with norm-challenging body types, including intersex, conjoined twinning, facial anomalies, and short stature. Starting in 1998, Dreger served for five years as the Chair of the Board of Directors of the Intersex Society of North America (ISNA), and later as ISNA’s Director of Medical Education. Dreger coordinated and edited the first two national medical consensus documents on the care of children born with sex anomalies, texts now widely cited in the medical literature. In 2011, UTNE Reader named Dreger a visionary for her work on intersex. The same year, TED released her talk, “Is Anatomy Destiny?” in the Sex, Secrets, & Love Netflix compilation that also included John Hodgman and Mary Roach. At the TED site, Dreger’s lecture has been viewed over 880,000 times. She has also appeared as a guest expert on Oprah, Savage Love, Good Morning America, and NPR, and in many original documentaries, including for A&E, ABC, Discovery, PBS, and HBO    


SU NEWS

We Mourn a Loss in the Disability Rights Community

 
A long-time friend of the SU Disability Studies program and of the Center on Human Policy, Dr. Mayer Shevin advocated for people with disabilities for more than three decades.  Mayer passed away this week.    
 
Bio of Dr. Shevin, adapted from the SU School of Education’s website:
 
Mayer Shevin received his Ph.D. in Psycholinguistics from the University of Rochester in 1976. In that setting, he worked with non-talking children and their families. He worked as a psychologist at the Central Wisconsin Center; a faculty member in Special Education at Cleveland State University; and a teacher in the areas of non-punitive behavior management, advocacy, and communication development at the Grafton Developmental Center and elsewhere in North Dakota. From 1989-1991, he directed the "Home-made Futures Project, "developing person-centered planning resources in North Dakota and Minnesota. In 1990-1991, he founded and edited Talking/Politics, a newsletter focusing on the political implications of communication rights.

From 1991 until recently, Dr. Shevin had been part of the Institute on Communication and Inclusion's training, research and resource development.  He edited the institute's newsletter, The Facilitated Communication Digest, for its ten years of publication. In addition to his work in the area of Facilitated Communication, Mayer was a consultant in private practice, working with individuals with disabilities and the people, communities and organizations in their lives. He helped people who were seeking to establish circles of support, and those organizations seeking to foster such circles. He consulted directly with individuals seeking to progress toward personal goals despite their challenging behaviors, with their families, and with the schools and agencies which support these individuals. Mayer facilitated planning and strategy sessions with disability-related agencies and organizations seeking to put their ideals into practice.
 
Rest in peace, Mayer.

A Sad Farewell to a Friend and Colleague

 
Dr. Sari Knopp Biklen passed away on September 16, 2014, after an illness.   Our condolences are extended in particular to our friend and colleague, Dean Doug Biklen, and to all of Doug and Sari’s family and friends.  A memorial service is being planned for later this fall.
 
Personal reflection from Diane Wiener, DCC Director: “I remember being at graduation in May of 2014 and standing directly behind Doug and Sari as they stood when the Chancellor announced that Faculty Emeriti would be recognized.  I had a lump in my throat as I thought about the life that Doug and Sari had shared, and how they would continue to enjoy each other’s company, and their family, having now retired.  I join the SU community in grieving for this vibrant and significant professor, scholar, and advocate.”
 
Bio of Dr. Sari Knopp Biklen, adapted from the SU School of Education’s website:
 
Dr. Sari Knopp Biklen, Laura and Douglas Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence in Cultural Foundations of Education, was a specialist in popular culture, qualitative research methods, and youth culture. She directed the Institute on Popular Culture and Education at Syracuse University. As a University Scholar for the American Association of University Women, Biklen researched the culture of university life for college women investigating how college women talk about race, and how their consumer practices impact their educational careers. In 1996 she won Syracuse University's Outstanding Teacher Award. In 1999 she was Rio Tinto-LaTrobe University Distinguished Visiting Fellow, Melbourne, Australia. In 2009 she was awarded the Chancellor’s Citation for Faculty Excellence and Scholarly Distinction. Her books included: A Practical Guide to the Qualitative Dissertation (with Ronnie Casella, Teachers College Press, 2007), Qualitative Research for Education (with Robert Bogdan; Allyn & Bacon, fifth edition, 2006), School Work: Gender and the Cultural Construction of Teaching (Teachers College Press, 1995),Gender and Education (with Diane Pollard, National Society for the Study of Education Yearbook, 1993), Women as Radicals and Conservators(with Joyce Antler) and Women and Educational Leadership (with Marilyn Brannigan). Her articles appeared in numerous journals includingTeachers College RecordQualitative InquiryPhi Delta Kappan, and History of Education. Dr. Knopp Biklen served on the editorial board of Critical Inquiry in Language Studies.
 
Rest in Peace, Sari.

Searching for an apartment off campus?

 
Are you moving off campus next year?   Are you and your friends ready to start searching for an apartment?  Are you about to sign a lease for the 2015-2016 academic year?   If you have answered yes to any of these questions, please consider attending a workshop sponsored by Off Campus and Commuter Services and learn the answers to these questions.  If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to Alexa Kline at alkline@syr.edu.
 
·         Wednesday 9/24/14 –
o   School of Ed  @ 4:00 PM
§  111 Waverly, suite 230
o   Parent Webinar @ 7:00 PM
§  754 Ostrom
·         Friday 9/26/14 –
o   Ischool @ 1:00 PM
§  120 Hinds
o   Arts & Sciences @ 4:00 PM
§  HL 201
·         Tuesday 9/30/14 –
o   Engineering @ 7:00 PM
§  Link 101
 
Also please be aware if your parents have questions about the apartment search process we are offering a webinar to give out information and answers questions just for them.
The Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services will offer a webinar on this topic on Wednesday, September 24 at 7 p.m.
The webinar will cover: devising a budget, finding the right location, determining the right apartment, looking for roommates, and signing your lease. Please join us if you have questions about this process or if your student has already started searching.
More information will be available next week at http://offcampus.syr.edu/ or on Parents Office social media.


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Disabled and Proud: Dare to Dream

 
October 18 - 19, 2014
Syracuse University Campus
 
Disabled and Proud is a FREE national conference for current and future college students with disabilities - the next generation of leaders on campus and BEYOND!
 
Conference highlights include:
- Keynotes include star of FOX's Glee Lauren Potter, musician Keith Jones, and a panel of current and graduated college students (and advocates) with disabilities on Presuming Competence.
- Activism on Campus - knowing your rights, fighting back, and creating change on campus
- Tools and Resources - getting what you need in college, grad school, and the work force
- Knowing Yourself - disability identity and the social side of higher education
- Strand of sessions for parents and families - supporting your Disabled and Proud Student during college and transitions, including an opening keynote by award-winning filmmaker Dan Habib
- "Disability Cafe" with local performance poets, comedians, and acting troupes - and, during the open mic, YOU!
- All meals are included in your FREE registration
 
Disabled and Proud will provide opportunities for students to connect, educate, and motivate each other to pursue their academic and social goals with intention and direction. Attendees will be encouraged to build more inclusive environments in their schools and on their campuses.
 
Learn more about Disabled and Proud, featured speakers, view the schedule, and
 
Presented by:
The Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University
DREAM Disability Rights, Education Activism, and Mentoring

PhD Scholarship - Disability on Television: Access, representation and reception


Department of Internet Studies

Curtin University is looking for an outstanding scholar for a full-time PhD scholarship to work on a large-scale study of disability and television. The study aims to assess the mutually important areas of accessibility and representation to explore the importance of digital televisions to the social inclusion of Australians with disability. Using an innovative multimodal research programme the project leverages participatory media to gain new user centred insights. The project will also offer insights regarding newer forms of television through a usability analysis of the range of web-capable devices that can be used to access TV to discover whether they are more or less enabling for people across a diverse range of disabilities.


The successful applicant will be a full team member of an Australian Research Council grant that asks, 'How does digital television create a social space for people with disability, when impairment makes watching television challenging and social stigma against disability is perpetuated through representation?' Possible areas of research include:
*         Television accessibility
*         The representation of disability on contemporary forms of television such as online streaming platforms
*         The intersections between television representation and online discussion
*         Employment of people with disabilities in television industries

The successful applicant will work with Dr Katie Ellis. Applicants with disciplinary backgrounds in media studies, disability studies, communications or the digital humanities are encouraged to apply. The award is to commence in 2015.

Value and benefits

The successful candidate will receive a stipend of $25,392 ( 2014 value) tax-free per annum which will be indexed annually for the duration of the award

Eligibility criteria

To be eligible for the scholarship, applicants should be enrolling full-time and possess the following:
*         A first class Honours degree, research Masters degree or equivalent
*         Strong research skills
*         Experience working with people with disabilities

How to apply

See: https://scholarships.curtin.edu.au/scholarships/scholarship.cfm?id=1996

Further information

Please contact Dr Katie Ellis via email Katie.ellis@curtin.edu.au<mailto:Katie.ellis@curtin.edu.au>

Applications Close: 5pm Friday 17 October 2014

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2014 AUTISM INSTITUTE

Transition to Employment
Featuring Speakers:
REGISTER NOW!
kelbermancenter.org
Conference Fee - $45 per person
REGISTER EARLY AS THIS EVENT WILL SELL OUT FAST!
Fees include attendance, continental breakfast and
lunch, as well as snacks and all registration materials.
Registration is on a fi rst-come, fi rst-serve basis, attendance
is limited; please visit kelbermancenter.org to register.
REGISTRATION DEADLINE/CANCELLATIONS
Registrations must be received by 9/24/14.
A limited number of scholarships are available.
For more information, or to register by phone, contact the
Kelberman Center at (315) 797-6241 ext. 284.
Join us at the 2014 Autism Institute, where attendees
will leave with a expanded knowledge of national
best practices related to transition to adulthood and
employment. National experts will present on their highly
successfully employment programs and higher education
models. This is a rare opportunity to hear from multiple
national experts from: Virginia Commonwealth University,
Syracuse University, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital,
and leadership from New York’s Offi ce of Person’s with
Developmental Disabilities. Each presenter will showcase
highly successful employment and higher education
models for persons with developmental disabilities
including autism. This conference is for parents, family
members, individuals with autism, teachers, job coaches
and other professionals.
Thursday, October 2, 2014 | 8:00am - 4:00pm
Vernon Downs Conference Center, 4229 Stuhlman Road, Vernon, NY

Call for Proposals: "Law, Religion and Disability"




Special Issue of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies

The relationship of law, religion and disability is complex, emerging and still in development as a research area.  Scholarship on religion and disability has included feminist reflections regarding religion and disability (e.g. Minister 2013) and analysis of the physical isolation that can result in congregations where accommodations are made but without reflection on the communal aspects of integration (Eiesland 1994).  Further, health care providers working with disabled individuals negotiate and navigate their own religious identities in their professional sphere (Bray, Egan and Beagan 2012).  Legal advancement within the disability movement has produced results such as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.  Public and policy challenges remain highly contested and disability advocates reflect on the limitations of existing policy as well as the challenge of the application of these policies (e.g. Prince 2012; Johner 2013).  

We are seeking articles that articulate the diverse perspectives of disability studies as it relates both to law and religion.  There are multiple ways the religion, law and disability intersect with one another.  The special issue intends to explore overlapping themes in dialogue to reflect on the current discourse about disability, disabled identities and its interconnections with law and religion.
Possible topics can include, but are not limited to:
What social, cultural or religious norms have created exclusive or inclusive environments?  E.g. What constraints might the Quebec Charter of Values have created for individuals at the intersection of religion and disabled identities?
Religious individuals and organizations face challenges regarding the theological debates regarding inclusivity versus exclusivity in the accommodation of disabled individuals.  What are some of the challenges of negotiating theological doctrine and what are the nuances made possible through theology regarding disability?
How is disability taught or not taught, in schools or within religious institutions?  What are the policies in the education system regarding disability and what challenges are ongoing regarding education and disability?
How do religious organizations and law respond to disability within a health framework?  What challenges are faced by healthcare workers who are religiously identified or disabled?  In what ways are religion, law and disability or disabled identities negotiated?
We welcome submissions from across the disciplines of law, religious studies and disability studies, as well as submissions from outside those fields.  Proposals should be no more than 2 pages in length (single spaced) and should include: theoretical and methodological approach; central thesis or argument; and data used within article (i.e. legislation, doctrine).  Proposals must be submitted to Ravi Malhotra (Ravi.Malhotra@uottawa.ca) and Heather Shipley (hshipley@uottawa.ca) by September 30, 2014.   Notifications will be sent out by November 15, 2014 and final submissions will be due January 30, 2015.  Full articles should be between 6,000-7,000 words, using the Turabian style guide (16th Edition) or another recognized citation style.  All final articles will be subject to the peer-review process. Publication is conditional on reviewer reports. As per Canadian Journal of Disability Studies policies, all methods and methodologies and disciplines are welcome, as are submissions in French or English.  This CFP additionally invites perspectives on religion from across traditions, and legal perspectives from outside of Canada or North America. 

Call for Proposals: 8th Annual Conference on Equity and Social Justice

(Buffalo State, featuring keynotes Lois Weis and Wayne Au)

Accessibility App. Call for Reviewers

AbleRoad - the website and smartphone app that connects people with accessible places is looking for 100 enthusiastic reviewers from the United States interested in telling others about their positive and negative accessibility experiences at restaurants, stores, theaters, hotels, airports, sports facilities, professional offices, and just about any place.
If you're interested in sharing information about the accessibility of your community or places you travel with wheelchair users and others with disabilities while advocating for more access and exposing wrongdoing with the possibility of a financial reward, email AbleRoad's CEO Kevin McGuire at kmcguire@mcguireassociatesinc.com.
Imagine a reliable source for access information before you step out your door.
  • Financial rewards are available to those who care about access to public facilities
  • AbleRoad is website and app which posts your reviews on the accessibility of any public space or business
  • The app is available is available for iPhone, iPad, Android and Kindle
  • AbleRoad makes Yelp and AbleRoad ratings available on the same screen
Kevin McGuire, a wheelchair user himself, wants you to help him help others with disabilities by acknowledging businesses that provide excellent service and access and alerts you to those that don't.
Sincerely,
James Weisman 
EVP & General Counsel 

United Spinal Association
 

Call for Research Participants

 
A graduate student in psychology at DePaul University is conducting an IRB-approved (#DA013014) study to examine LGBT people’s perceptions of job ads.  Participants are asked to imagine that they are applying for a job, read a job ad, and complete a series of questions.  If you are a member of the LGBT community, please feel free to complete the survey:  Take the survey
 
Please contact Dan Abben with any questions.

Call for Participants-Any college student

Attention all students (including graduate students)!
My colleagues and I at the University of Georgia's Center for Latino Achievement and Success in Education (CLASE) are conducting a research study focused on the cultural adaptation and identity development of college students (in particular college students of color).
We invite all who are currently enrolled in a university program and are over 18 years of age to complete the attached survey. It should only take 20-30 minutes, and completion will enter you in a raffle for a $100 gift card.
Participation in this survey is also a way in which you can personally influence the current literature on college students and their experiences, particularly with regard to race. Let your voice be heard!
 
 
 
Best,
 
Rolf Straubhaar, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Center for Latino Achievement and Success in Education (CLASE)
University of Georgia

Call for Abstracts: Social Philosophy Conference

 
 
Thirty-Second International Social Philosophy Conference
Sponsored by the North American Society for Social Philosophy
 
July 16-18, 2015
William Jewell College,
Liberty, Missouri, USA
 
Proposals in all areas of social philosophy are welcome, but special attention will be devoted to the theme:
 
Education and Social Justice
 
Some possible paper topics include:
·      Education and moral psychology
·      The public and private goods of education
·      Education, meritocracy and equality of opportunity
·      Teachers, students and power in the classroom
·      The academy and epistemic injustice
·      The politics of learning
·      Segregation and education
·      Education and parental partiality
·      Histories of education philosophy
·      The epistemology of testing
·      Education and epistemologies of privilege and ignorance
·      Intersectionality and education
 
 
We welcome submissions from both members and non-members, but we require that all presenters join the North American Society for Social Philosophy if their papers are accepted and if they present at the conference.
 
Please submit a 300 - 500 word abstract here:
[submission link]
 
Submission Deadline:  February 1, 2015
 
 
The Program Committee:
Professor Matt Silliman of Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (Chair),
 
Members of the Program Committee may be reached at: nassp2014@gmail.com
 
NASSP Support for International Presenters
The NASSP will waive fees for conference registration and for the banquet for those participants traveling from outside of the United States and Canada.

NASSP Conference Awards for Graduate Students

The North American Society for Social Philosophy has established the NASSP Awards for Best Graduate Student Papers to promote new scholarship in social philosophy and to encourage student participation in our Conference.
 
The winners of the annual prizes each receive $300. The prizes are awarded only to conference attendees, though there is no obligation to use the money for conference-related costs. Any graduate student enrolled in a program towards a degree beyond the B.A. or first university diploma is eligible.
 
The paper may address any topic in social philosophy. Papers should be no more than 3,000 words (include a word count with submission), and they should conform to the requirements set out by the APA for colloquium submissions to annual Divisional meetings.
 
Those who want to be considered for this award should send their full papers to nassp2014@gmail.com – and they should also submit their abstracts at bit.ly/nassp2014 – by February 1, 2015

Events coming at the University of Sheffield, UK

 
For your information:
 
September:
 
Symposium – Time for a Posthuman disability Studies?
What does it mean to be human in the 21st Century and in what ways does disability enhance these meanings? In addressing this question we seek to work through entangled connections of nature, society, technology, medicine, biopower and culture to consider the extent to which the human might be an outdated phenomenon, replaced by the posthuman condition (Braidotti, 2013). We know that disability is a political category and an identity but might it also provide a moment of relational ethics? Are disability studies already at ease with the posthuman because disability has always contravened the traditional classical humanist conception of what it means to be human? What aspects of the ‘humanist human’ would we want to keep hold of in a time of austerity and increasing inequality? Could we bring together politicized disability studies with posthuman activism to enhance and complicate one another in ways that raise important questions about the kinds of life and death that we value? Might a posthuman disability studies respond directly to contemporary complexities around the human whilst celebrating moments of difference and disruption? This symposium seeks to bring together those we are interested in sharing and engaging with these debates.
Date: 10.00am – 5.00pm 24th September 2014
Location: Room IC-127, Information Commons, University of Sheffield, 44 Leavygreave Rd, Sheffield, South Yorkshire S3 7RD
November:
iHuman: This is what it means to be human …
We are bringing together young people and researchers to share our ideas about what it means to be human. We are living in an age marked by the rapid growth in knowledge about the human body and brain. These include the development of powerful new technologies with the potential to augment our bodies (and modify behaviour) and diagnostics for the early detection of disease, drugs to aid cognition, and devices to extend physical capabilities. And many more of us, so it seems, are endlessly plugged in to our smartphones, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat. Our lives are lived in the virtual. How are these developments changing how we understand what it means to be human?
Sessions will be accessible, visually led, interactive, always focused on maintaining understanding and connection. We expect the audience to include young people, their families, other researchers and key community members from the creative industries as well as the disability and education sectors.
Location: Jessops West Exhibition Space, University of Sheffield
Date/time: 10am to 4pm, Saturday 1st November 2014
Activism, Ambition, Action…and Austerity? Disabled Young People 
Speak Out
The aim of this event is to instigate critical dialogues concerning disability, youth, ambition, action and activism in the context of an increasingly precarious environment for disabled people politically, culturally, legally, and economically in Britain. These dialogues are vital to all of us as social scientists, but are particularly pertinent to young disabled people who have become the subjects/object of severe austerity measures set out by the Coalition Government.
Thus far, these have targeted their Access to Work, their right to live independently/interdependently and contribute to their own communities, and most recently, their access to higher education through proposed cuts to the Disabled Students Allowance (DSA). We invite disabled, D/deaf, Mad, learning disabled and neurodiverse people (hereby young people) and their organisations as activists, students, self/advocates, artists, academics and attendees.
Excitingly, we have confirmed well-known and well-loved activist, campaigner and
(neurodiverse) artist, Touretteshero, as our keynote speaker for the day

(
touretteshero.com).
Date: Wednesday 5th November 2014 10.00 - 4.00 
Location: Venue TBC, but will be at the University of Sheffield
Please see the Disability Studies at the University of Sheffield Wordpress site for more information, and for details of how to register for these events: http://disabilityuos.wordpress.com/events/


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

UC Berkeley Disability Studies Part-Time Lecturer Job Pool and Spring '15 Opening



(Shared with permission of Prof. Sue Schweik)

Hi, all, in addition to our full-time tenure-track senior faculty 
position (search still in process) and future full-time tenure-track 
 junior faculty position (search sometime down the road), we have for 
the first time in many years a little more funding-- for one more 
upper division elective course in Sp 15, maybe more in the future, in 
the Disability Studies minor program at UC Berkeley. The lecturer job 
 search pool will be open for two years, but the immediate deadline 
 for applying for Spring 2015 teaching is Oct. 15. The link is below.
 "The Disability Studies Program seeks a pool of qualified temporary 
 instructors to teach upper division undergraduate courses in 
 Disability Studies should openings arise. The pool will remain in 
place for two calendar years; those interested in remaining in the 
pool beyond that time must reapply. Positions will be part-time, 
renewable, non-tenure track beginning as early as January 13, 2015 
for the spring 2015 semester. The number of positions varies from 
semester to semester, and appointments may be renewable based on need, funding and performance."

 https://aprecruit.berkeley.edu/apply/JPF00538

 Susan Schweik

 Professor of English
Associate Dean of Arts and Humanities College of Letters and Sciences 
Office of the Deans UC Berkeley sschweik@berkeley.edu

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Human Rights & Communications Associate

 
Disability Rights International is the world’s leading international human rights organization dedicated to the protection and community integration of people with disabilities. DRI documents human rights violations, conducts international media campaigns, and supports the development of a disability rights advocacy movement around the world.  Our Worldwide Campaign to End Institutionalization of Children is educating the public about the dangers of orphanages and the need to support community integration for all children. DRI has offices in Washington, DC, the Balkans, Latin America, and Ukraine. 
The Human Rights & Communications Associate, based in the DC office, will support the work of professional staff to implement DRI’s advocacy, communications, and development programs.  The Assistant will contribute to DRI human rights projects, assist with development and outreach, and enhance the organization’s ability to communicate our message and fulfill our mission via our website and e-communications.
We need you to -
·         assist human rights advocacy staff with research and writing projects (this may include participation in international investigations);
·         create and update web content and social media outreach;
·         assist with preparation of videos and advocacy material;
·         maintain our donor database and assist with funder correspondence;
·         help research and prepare grant proposals, donor appeals and foundation reports;
·         proof-read, edit, and help with citations on publications;
·         maintain a calendar of proposal and reporting deadlines;
·         provide administrative support as needed.
 
You need to be -
·         a good communicator – strong and persuasive writing skills are essential;
·         an excellent researcher
·         capable of attention to detail, numbers, and effective presentation;
·         flexible and supportive to all staff, enthusiastic and willing to take on any kind of project;
·         a self-starter who can work independently;
·         easy to get along with and a team player;
·         passionate about the work we do, trustworthy, and dependable;
·         experienced using Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites and able to update a  website;
·         able to edit video (can learn on the job, though knowledge and experience are a plus);
·         capable of juggling multiple projects and meeting deadlines.
Hours & Salary: Full time (35 hours/week), $35,000/year plus full benefits.  We are asking for a minimum one year commitment. 
Application:  Please send cover letter and resume to Laurie Ahern (lahern@DRIadvocacy.org).  Short (no more than three page) writing sample helpful.  People with disabilities are especially encouraged to apply.

Online Resources for Disabled Students

 

Dis/ability Studies Theorising disablism and ableism

By Dan Goodley

In this ground-breaking new work, Dan Goodley makes the case for a novel, distinct, intellectual, and political project – dis/ability studies – an orientation that might encourage us to think again about the phenomena of disability and ability.
Drawing on a range of interdisciplinary areas, including sociology, psychology, education, policy and cultural studies, this much needed text takes the most topical and important issues in critical disability theory, and pushes them into new theoretical territory. Goodley argues that we are entering a time of dis/ability studies, when both categories of disability and ability require expanding upon as a response to the global politics of neoliberal capitalism. 
Dis/ability Studies provides much needed depth, texture and analysis in this emerging discipline. This accessible text will appeal to students and researchers of disability across a range of disciplines, as well as disability activists, policymakers, and practitioners working directly with disabled people.

Learn more...

Move5k Run/Walk/Roll October 4th in Syracuse

 
From: Eddie Zaremba
 
Note from Diane Wiener: This event is during Yom Kippur, and information being shared is not an endorsement. 
 
Please join us and spread the word widely. This year the location has been changed to a venue where participants can move together, on the same course! Proceeds to benefit Move Along, Inc, a small, Syracuse-based not-for-profit organization [501(c)(3)] that promotes and provides opportunities to engage in adaptive athletics and recreation.
Text below, flyer attached.
Thanks!
Eddie
---------------------------------------------------------
 
Help us raise awareness so that all who wish to participate in athletic
events can, and all who can participate choose to do so!
 
Move 5K– 4th Annual 5K Run / Roll / Walk
Saturday, October 4th, 2014
Onondaga Lake Park, East Shore Trail, Liverpool, NY 13088
 
Race day registration starts at 8am.
5k run, walk, and roll starts at 10am.
 
Post-race expo and food at the finish line!!!
 
Move Along: Enhancing Abilities!

Opportunity for Student Writers

A local publication, The Peace Newsletter, a small peace and justice publication, is seeking student writers to pen an 800 word piece about trans* liberation for their October issue. For more information, contact [slade0153@gmail.com]Nikeeta Slade.

Volleyball League

Interested in joining the Syracuse Volleyballers, a local lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans*, and straight alliance volleyball league? The season lasts for 25 weeks. Games are played on Tuesday nights at the Magnarelli Community Center off of Grant Boulevard. The participation fee for the season is $120, which can be paid up front or in installments. Opening sign up night is Tuesday, September 23rd at 7:15 PM.
Please email the Syracuse Volleyballers for more information!

Welcome Back to School Promo!



Use discount code SCHOOL at checkout and receive 15% off!

Applies to both The Collector of Bedford Street and Body & Soul: Diana and Kathy (DVD and streaming!)

       We are excited to share with you two valuable short films from Welcome Change Productions. Our films focus on people with disabilities who make enormous impacts on their communities. These unique films are trusted learning tools at higher education centers, and can be used for training or Continuing Education Units. These films can also be used for fundraising or outreach in an economy that demands creative marketing. We hope you find these stories as engaging as we do!
 
Diana Braun has Down Syndrome and Kathy Conour has Cerebral Palsy and is non-verbal. The two women met at a sheltered workshop in Illinois three decades ago and vowed to live independent, non-institutionalized lives together. They are tireless self-advocates who expand our vision of human capability. Body & Soul: Diana & Kathymoves beyond disability and activism to a story of a profound, creative friendship. This PBS award-winning documentary was most recently the foundation of a new online course launched by the College of Direct Support, called "Film for Thought." Watch Diana and Kathy discuss advocacy and independent living:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lk0HZkVbuJA.
 
Streaming link: http://www.newdaydigital.com/The-Collector-of-Bedford-Street.html
Nominated for an Academy Award, this film features community activist Larry Selman, a man with an intellectual disability who collects money for a variety of charities. When his last surviving relative's health begins to fail, Larry's community sets up a Supplemental Needs trust to ensure he is able to live independently in the future. This neighborly generosity is in large part due to Larry's positive impact on his Manhattan neighborhood. To date, Larry has raised half a million dollars and was a recipient of the 2009 Caring Award, alongside Colin Powell!
 
 
We hope you will take a moment to learn about these films, which include people with a variety of abilities in every setting. Please take a look at our website atwww.welcomechange.org to learn more!
 
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Reading and Book Signing with ELLIOTT DELINE

October 17th, 7:30 PM

The Westcott Community Center

826 Euclid Ave, Syracuse, NY 13210

Transgender author Elliott DeLine reads from his new book Show Trans: A nonfiction novel about the

struggle to find love, connection, and self-actualization as a non-binary trans person.

Free event with coffee + chance to win a signed copy!

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Access to Independence Annual Employment Conference 

 
2014 Annual Employment Conference
Wednesday, October 22nd
9:00  am – 3:30 pm
 
Located at:
 
Cortland Works Career Center
99 Main Street
Cortland, NY 13045

Sept 23 - DisAbused: Rethinking the Presumption of Caregiver Benevolence

 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Tuesday 23 September 2014
6:00pm to 7:30pm
 
Lecture & Performance Series on Disability Justice
DisAbused: Rethinking the Presumption of Caregiver Benevolence
A Talk with Autistic Activist Kassiane A. Sibley
 
Sponsored by the Georgetown University Lecture Fund
 
Georgetown University
Washington, D.C. 
Specific Location TBD
 
 
Much of the conversation about disability centers not around Disabled people, but around the caregivers & family members of disabled individuals. The narrative paints caregivers as universally benevolent, kind, patient saints on earth. This presentation explores the unsettling realities of abuse of disabled people by family and professional caregivers, how we came to this place, and what we can do to reverse the trend.
 
Kassiane A. Sibley was diagnosed Autistic in 1986 and began advocating for Autistic people in 1999, progressing to broader neurodiversity & Disability Rights activism as the years go by & the scope of the problem becomes more clear. Kassiane has presented on a wide variety of issues at local, national, and international autism events and writes fiery passionate harsh truth on the Radical Neurodivergence Speaking blog. In addition to securing civil rights for all people, Ms. Sibley is working towards a neuroscience degree with the goal of doing respectful quality of life research & introducing researchers to the neurodiversity paradigm.
 
 
Inquiries about disability access and reasonable accommodation should be addressed to the contact below. Access information will be provided in a separate email (with specific room information) and posted to the Facebook event page.
 
Contact: Lydia Brown
(202) 618-0187 [voice or text]


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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