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Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

SU HAPPENINGS

Interdisciplinary Writing and Research Workshop for Graduate Students: Deadline October 15

Talk Friday on Food Justice in Syracuse

Mindful Eating

Disability Showcase: Syracuse International Film Festival

Why I am a Bioconservative

Fit In Conference

Cold Cases and Voting Rights: The Life and Murder of Vernon DahmerAn Evening with Ellie and Bettie Dahme

JAN 2014/2015 Webcast Training Schedule - FREE Registration

Campus Community Encouraged to Save the Date for Student-University Forum

SU NEWS

For SU Faculty and Graduate Students

Add Your Name to the You Are Not Alone List!

Syracuse University Martin Luther King Jr. 2015 Celebration Unsung Heroes Award

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, PARTICIPANTS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Addressing Critical Needs: Cultivating Alliances and Committing to a Culture of Racial and Ethnic Inclusion in Legal Education

About the AERA Minority Dissertation Fellowship in Education Research

The AHEAD Information Services Project: Next opportunity for input

Call for Papers, Special Issue of the journal Intersectionalities on Mad Studies

Upcoming conference of interest (featuring Peter Breggin and Robert Whitaker!)

Resident Advisor “Diversity Drive-In” Presentation Opportunity

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Update on Japan's "Disability and Development" Webpage

Possible opportunity of interest, looking at disability and television at Curtin University in Australia:

Indigenous Persons with Disabilities Advocate for Inclusion

Op-Ed: Audio Describer donates her voice to help those with disabilities

Reminder - Applications for JPED Executive Editor Due October 1st

International News: Disability in the Arts and Culture

GSK Joins the Disability Equality Index as a Founding Partner

AHEAD's Letter

COLLIDESCOPE - A NEW WORK BY PING CHONG AND TALVIN WILKS PREMIERES AT UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND IN NOVEMBER 


SU HAPPENINGS

Interdisciplinary Writing and Research Workshop for Graduate Students: Deadline October 15

 
Interdisciplinary Writing and Research Workshop for Graduate Students
 
You are invited to join a research and writing group with Visiting Professor Gesa E. Kirsch from Bentley University, spring 2015. 
 
Gesa E. Kirsch is Professor of English and Director of the Valente Center for the Arts and Sciences at Bentley University in Waltham, MA.  Her research interests include feminist rhetorical studies, ethics and social responsibility, qualitative research methodology, archival research, and environmental rhetoric. She has published eight books and more than thirty articles. She has won the James Braddock Award for the best article in College Composition and Communication, and in 2013 she won the Excellence in Scholarship Award from Bentley University in recognition of her accumulated record of scholarly productivity and leadership in the discipline. Currently she is conducting research on the rhetorical practices, social networks, and civic activism of 19th-century women physicians.  
 
Come and join us if you want to
·      get feedback on your work in progress,
·      learn about the work of your peers,
·      write a grant proposal, conference proposal, or book proposal,
·      enjoy the camaraderie of a supportive writing group.
 
We will have six meetings during the spring semester 2015, share work in progress, learn from each other, share common readings, and work on conference and grant proposals. Gesa will also share her work in progress (time permitting) and sample proposals. 
 
The workshop will include a number of shared readings on feminist, rhetorical, ethical, and methodological research questions (depending on participants’ interests). Graduate students writing seminar papers, conference presentations, dissertation prospectuses, will be able to present their work to their peers. The workshop will conclude with culminating events, such as an interdisciplinary graduate student symposium.
 
Open to graduate students in the humanities at all levels, from first-year students to dissertation writers.
 
If interested, please submit one to two paragraphs on your current work and interests by October 15, 2014 to Patrick Berry, pwberry@syr.edu, and Gesa Kirsch,gkirsch2001@yahoo.com
 
For questions, feel free to email Patrick pwberry@syr.edu or Gesa at gkirsch2001@yahoo.com.
 
 
This opportunity is made possible by the SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY HUMANITIES CENTER.
 
CO-SPONSORS: THE WRITING PROGRM, THE DEPARTMENTS OF COMMUNICATION AND RHETORICAL STUDIES, AND WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, HENDRICKS CHAPEL AND ITS WELLNESS CENTER.

Talk Friday on Food Justice in Syracuse


Dear Geographers and Friends:

Please join us on Friday for the Geography Department Colloquium. This talk will also serve as the keynote address for the Nature-Society Geography Workshop. Please note that this talk begins at 4:00pm, (rather than the usual 3:00pm), and will be held in Eggers Hall 010.


“Confronting contradictions:

Activist research and food justice in Syracuse, New York”


Jonnell Robinson, Department of Geography, Syracuse University

Evan Weissman, Department of Public Health, Food Studies and Nutrition, Syracuse University

Department of Geography Colloquium Series

& Keynote address of the Nature-Society Geography Workshop


Friday, September 26

4:00pm

Eggers Hall, Rm. 010


Rebecca Garden, PhD
Associate Professor of Bioethics & Humanities

Mindful Eating

Fridays: October 10, 17, 24, and 31

(Please plan to attend all 4 days.) 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Hinds Hall, Room 018

Open to SU/ESF students. No cost. Light refreshments provided. Space is limited. To reserve your spot and request accommodations, please contact Lisa Thomas at lgthom01@syr.edu by Friday, October 3, 2014.

Join Nicole Christina, LCSW, local psychotherapist and Mindful Eating Educator and Registered Dietitian Lisa Thomas, RD, for a four-part series to learn about and practice nutritious and mindful eating.

Participants will learn:

• Health-enhancing ways to improve your relationship with food, based on the latest mind/body research

• How to understand and interpret your own unique body cues related to hunger and satisfaction

• Foundations of balanced nutrition, based on the latest science


Disability Showcase: Syracuse International Film Festival

 
All films are subtitled (in English).
 
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12 at 1 P.M.
Watson Auditorium, Syracuse University
Tickets: $12 (Students are free with SU ID)
IMAGING DISABILITY IN FILM:
Presented by: Syracuse University School of Education Disabilities Studies Program, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
page18image13512

 
LITTLE WORLD (2012) 83 minutes, by Marcel Barrena (Spain), documentary, starring Albert Casals, Anna Socias, and Alex Casals
This inspiring documentary from Spain, winner of the Youth Jury Prize at a prestigious documentary film festival, will be screened for the first time
in the United States. The movie celebrates the buoyant spirit of Albert Casals, a 20-year-old from Spain. A prolific world traveler and free spirit, Albert decides that he and his girlfriend, Anna, will travel from their home in Barcelona literally halfway around the world to East Cape, New Zealand, and to do so with only 20 euros in their pockets. The fact that Albert uses a wheelchair is but one more aspect of life. His mobility is as unrestricted as his sense of freedom and adventure.
FIXING LUKA (2010) 11 minutes/animation, by Jessica Ashman (Scotland)
Rubber ducks lined up perfectly in a row. A thousand stamps stuck to a bedroom wall. A pyramid of thimbles knocked to the floor. These are just some of Luka’s obsessive routines, a daily performance played out under the anxious gaze of his sister, Lucy. She thinks Luka needs fixing
as every time she disturbs his routine, Luka falls apart. Literally.
One evening – battered by his springs and rejections – Lucy finally loses her patience and runs away. Stumbling in the forest, she discovers a clockwork soldier in a shack. When she manages to fix his head, Lucy thinks she’s found the solution to her problems at home.
MY BROTHER NAVNEET (2013) 1 minute, by Wings and Oars Media Comm, Hyderabad (India)
A simple and emotional depiction of the way children look at life without prejudice. 
 
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12 at 4 P.M.
Landmark Theatre
IMAGING DISABILITY IN FILM: FOCUS ON INDIA
Presented by: Syracuse University School of Education Disabilities Studies Program and William Pelley, MHA, Upstate Medical University
ANAND GANDHI’S film Ship of Theseus was cited when in April 2013, top critics from the Critics’ Circle (UK) were invited to select and introduce a screening of “the film that changed their life” to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the organization. The list of 15 films, selected by the critics, included 400 Blows, Annie Hall, Raging Bull, The Battle of Algiers and HamletShip of Theseus was the only film made in the last two decades on that list.
Anand Gandhi is a filmmaker, playwright, and artist, deeply interested in philosophy, evolutionary psychology, and science fiction. His work in theater, television, and short cinema has won him several pres- tigious awards in the past decade. Both his films Continuum (2006) andRight Here Right Now (2003) were screened in past Syracuse International Film Festivals
Ship of Theseus, his first feature, premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, where it was touted “the hidden gem of the year.” The film has received accolades the world over. Gandhi is now engaged in producing cutting-edge, contemporary world cinema under his banner Recyclewala Films.In addition to writing, directing, and producing his films, Gandhi illustrates, writes songs, plays chess, and attempts to invent new events as a magic enthusiast.
Once in a while comes a film like this one, which along with shaking your core, also manages to make you grateful for being a humble part of the audience. Ship of Theseus is one such rare film. (Mid-day, 2013)
Leaving aside the astounding artistry of Gandhi, Ship of Theseus is noteworthy in one other aspect: it has introduced to us an actor the likes of whom hasn’t been seen in Indian cinema for decades – Sohum Shah. If the film deserves five stars, then this man deserves at least a constellation. Or better, let a constellation be named in his honour so other actors can look up and admire his brilliance from time to time.
(News Laundry, 2013)
Sophisticated... Intelligent... Unexpected grandeur. The film demonstrates an assured grasp of philosophy as well as the intricacies of cinematic language. (Variety, 2013)
Contemplative and densely layered. Gandhi and cinematographer Pankaj Kumar’s breathtaking visual poetry gives us a sense of Mumbai as an entity unto itself, further blurring the line between the individual and the environment. (The Hollywood Reporter, 2013)yracuse University and Le Moyne College students
page20image34792
SHIP OF THESEUS (2013) 140 minutes, by Anand Gandhi, starring Aida El-Kashef, Neeraj Kabi, and Sohum Shah
If the parts of a ship are replaced, bit by bit, is it still the same ship?
A blind photographer, celebrated for her intuitive work, successfully
captures the essence of her experience in her photography. However, she also struggles with insecurities over authorship in the context of larger questions about subjectivity and intent in art.
An erudite monk, who is an ideologue and practitioner of nonviolence, and involved in animal rights activism, is forced to make a choice between death and medicine - medicine that is either derived from or tested on animals.
As death closes in, he requestions all the ideas that he has always taken for granted.
A young stockbroker has a frictional relationship with his grandmother, whom he nurses in a hospital. When it is discovered that a neighboring patient has had his kidney stolen, he starts out on a trail that leads him to a kidney tourism racket. Altruism and concern leads him to confront the recipient of the kidney, eventually making him discover how intricate morality could be.
Following the separate strands of their philosophical journeys, and their eventual convergence, Ship of Theseus explores questions of identity, justice, beauty, meaning, and death.

Why I am a Bioconservative

 
A Public Lecture by Rosemarie Garland-Thomson
 
10/23/14
7:00 to 8:00 pm Watson Theater
Reception & Book Signing 8:00 to 9:00 pm
Light Work SU Campus
 
 
This lecture has two interrelated purposes. First, it broadly suggests ways that principles, logics, guidelines, and rules of religious bioethics can serve effectively in situations and for populations outside of the particular religious tradition that generates them. Second, it offers the term bioconservative to describe my own ethical position as a disability bioethicist. To do this, I lay out a position between the concepts of conservation and liberal social politics to bridge religious and nonreligious belief communities. Because the term conservative is associated with the politics of the right, I bring forward a rationale for what is accomplished by invoking the term conservative and conservation for a disability equality and human rights-based perspective in bioethics. In the service of these larger aims, and most specifically, this talk draws from religious bioethics to explicate dignity as it pertains to quality-of-life judgments used in biomedical decision-making for life ending medical treatments.
 
This lecture is sponsored by the Central New York Humanities Corridor, from an award by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Co-sponsored by the SU Humanities Center in the College of Arts and Sciences, the Burton Blatt Institute, the SU Disability Cultural Center, Hendricks Chapel, and David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, with support from: Center on Human Policy; Cultural Foundations of Education; School of Education; School of Social Work; Department of Women’s and Gender Studies; Slutzker Center for International Services; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Resource Center; Disability Student Union; Disability Law and Policy Program at the College of Law; Disability Studies; Renée Crown University Honors Program; Office of Multicultural Affairs; Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee (BCCC); and Disability Law Society.
 
American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided during the presentation and the reception/book signing. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be provided during the presentation.
 
If you require accommodations for this event, please contact William Myhill at 315-443-1367 or wmyhill@syr.eduby 10/16/14. Free accessible parking will be available in Booth Garage adjacent to Watson Hall.

Fit In Conference

 
The Fitness-inclusion Network is an initiative out of the Burton Blatt Institute at SU looking to promote adaptive athletics and recreation throughout CNY and beyond. They’ve become involved with OrangeAbility, and are networking with many of the same folks as part of what they do. I’m involved with various projects around their network.
 
Their annual conference, more like a summit between community leaders, colleges, and local hospitals where many are first connected to adaptive athletics, is coming on 10/10, and will be held downtown at the WCNY building.
 
Anne Marie, whose initial message is below, is in search of volunteers to help with the portion of the day where conference participants are invited to try out equipment. This seems like a similar experience to OrangeAbility, but at a different kind of event.
 
If you, or any friends/peers/colleagues might be interested in helping out, please contact Anne Marie directly. Her info is below. 
 
-If transportation seems like an issue, the venue is about a block away from the Warehouse, SU’s downtown facility, and a major stop on the Connective Corridor bus route. We could also likely carpool.
-If you are interested in attending and not volunteering , or know of someone who might be, please get in touch with me and I can connect you further!
 
Hope everyone doing well!
See you soon,
Eddie
 
 
--
Eddie Zaremba
Cultural Foundations of Education and Disability Studies
Syracuse University

Cold Cases and Voting Rights: The Life and Murder of Vernon DahmerAn Evening with Ellie and Bettie Dahmer

Thursday October 2, 2014
7pm-9pm
Gray Ceremonial Court Room, College of Law
This is for the upcoming program on the murder of Vernon Dahmer, in Mississippi in January 1966.  Mr. Dahmer was killed by Klan members for his voting rights activism.  His house was firebombed.  While he defended the home, his wife and four children were able to escape.  However he died from his severe wounds.  This was a cold case for 32 years until some of the perpetrators were convicted in 1998.  His widow Mrs. Ellie Dahmer and daughter Ms. Bettie Dahmer will speak at the law school on October 2d at 7:00-9:00 pm.  As we are now on the heels of elections in November 2014 and the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act in 2015, we thought this program was especially important and timely. 
The program is free and the public is invited to attend.  Parking is free at the Stadium Lot (Stadium Place and Raynor Streets). 

JAN 2014/2015 Webcast Training Schedule - FREE Registration

 
For those of you who wish to increase your own knowledge and for your forwarding to employers with whom you work who may be looking to increase their employment of persons with disabilities, especially in response to federal legislation that dictates that agencies and federal contractors employ a certain percentage of workers with disabilities.
 
Chuck Reutlinger
Associate Director
Career ServicesSyracuse University
303 University Place, Suite 235
Syracuse, NY 13244-2070
Phone:315 443-3616 / Fax: 315 443-2805
 

Campus Community Encouraged to Save the Date for Student-University Forum

As announced in early September by Chancellor Syverud, the University is hosting a forum on Thursday, October 2, from 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. in Hendricks Chapel to foster a campus discussion about diversity, inclusion, and respect. 
The forum planning committee led by a number of student leaders, as well as Vice Chancellor and Provost Eric Spina and Senior Vice President and Dean of Student Affairs Rebecca Reed Kantrowitz will provide the campus community with additional details and information about the forum in the coming days.  All students, staff, and faculty are invited to join Chancellor Syverud in attending.


SU NEWS

For SU Faculty and Graduate Students

 
The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program runs a listserv for faculty and graduate students, which provides updates on campus academic events during the school year as well as CFPs and conference announcements in the field of LGBT Studies. If you would like to be added to this listserv, please email Roger Hallas (rhallas@syr.edu). There is also a graduate reading group in LGBT Studies. If you are interested in participating in that, please contact Melissa Welshans <mlwelsha@syr.edu>.

Add Your Name to the You Are Not Alone List!

 
In honor of Coming Out Month (#OUTSpokenSU), the annual You Are Not Alone list will be published in the Daily Orange on Thursday, October 9th. To submit your name for inclusion on this list, please emaillgbt@syr.edu by 5 PM on Friday, October 3rd from your Syracuse University/SUNY-ESF email account. In the body of the email, please include your name as you would like it to appear in the publication. Please note that due to space constraints, we cannot include campus affiliation or degree/professional credentials.
 

Syracuse University Martin Luther King Jr. 2015 Celebration Unsung Heroes Award

 
 
 
Dear Friend and Colleague:
Each year, Syracuse University's Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Committee presents "Unsung Heroes" awards to members of the greater Syracuse community who exemplify the spirit, life, and teachings of Martin Luther King Jr., but who are not widely recognized for their efforts. The individuals or groups are recognized during the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration held in the Carrier Dome. This year's event - the 30th anniversary of the celebration - will be held on January 18, 2015. 
We seek your organization's help in identifying recipients for this award. We are looking for people who have made a positive difference in the lives of others. Past recipients have been recognized for their work to advance human rights, nonviolence, diversity, and nondiscrimination; organize soup kitchens; provide help and companionship for the elderly and people with disabilities; promote youth mentoring programs; advocate for peace and justice; build bridges between diverse communities; and provide opportunities for people living on the margins of society.
Nominations can be made online at http://hendricks.syr.edu (click on the Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration button on the right) or by mailing the enclosed form to the address indicated. Nominations may be submitted in any or all of the following categories: "community youth/teen", "community adult", "SU/SUNY ESF student" or "SU/SUNY ESF faculty/staff member." The deadline for submitting nominations is Friday, October 10, 2014.
Thank you for your time and contributions that enable the University to recognize outstanding members of the Central New York community.
Sincerely,
Michelle Singletary, chair
Martin Luther King Jr. Awards Committee


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Addressing Critical Needs: Cultivating Alliances and Committing to a Culture of Racial and Ethnic Inclusion in Legal Education

 
Friday, October 17th
 
Conference Summary:
Syracuse University College of Law cordially invites you to a one-day conference where we will examine and discuss the obstacles to racial and ethnic diversity and inclusion in legal education and the legal profession.  Through dialogue and the sharing of experiences and ideas, we will:
 
  • Evaluate institutional efforts towards achieving meaningful inclusion of students of color from the pipeline, to the classroom, to the workplace.
  • Identify and implement effective approaches to increase racial and ethnic diversity in law schools.
  • Develop essential lawyering skills and cultural competencies to meet the legal needs of diverse communities.
  • Explore how law schools can create an environment where students of color thrive, engage, and remain connected to the law school and the legal community at large.
  • Devise an action plan for law schools and legal employers that incorporates deliberate efforts to make inclusion matter in their institutions and their communities.
Where:
Syracuse University College of Law
Dineen Hall
950 Irving Avenue
Syracuse, New York 13244
Register:
Please follow the link to our Conference Registration Page or visit the Conference Website to register.
Registration fee is $100; $150 by check at the door.
 
CART Services will be available during all conference sessions.

About the AERA Minority Dissertation Fellowship in Education Research

Deadline: November 3, 2014
The American Educational Research Association (AERA) is pleased to announce the AERA Minority Dissertation Fellowship in Education Research. The Council of the AERA established the fellowship program to provide support for doctoral dissertation research, to advance education research by outstanding minority graduate students, and to improve the quality and diversity of university faculties. This fellowship is targeted for members of racial and ethnic groups historically underrepresented in higher education (e.g., African Americans, Alaskan Natives, American Indians, Asian Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islanders). This program offers doctoral fellowships to enhance the competitiveness of outstanding minority scholars for academic appointments at major research universities. It supports fellows conducting education research and provides mentoring and guidance toward the completion of their doctoral studies.

Award Period
Each fellowship award is for 1 year, beginning July 1 or later, and is nonrenewable. This fellowship program is intended as a write-up fellowship. Fellowships are awarded for doctoral dissertation research conducted under faculty sponsorship in any accredited university in the United States.

Eligibility
Eligible graduate students for the AERA Minority Dissertation Fellowship in Education Research will be at the writing stage of their dissertation by the beginning of the fellowship. The dissertation study should focus on an education research topic such as high stakes testing; ethnic studies/curriculum; tracking; STEM development; measurement of achievement and opportunity gaps; English language learners; or bullying and restorative justice. Applicants can come from graduate programs and departments in education research, the humanities, or social or behavioral science disciplinary or interdisciplinary fields, such as economics, political science, psychology, or sociology.

Fellows are required to provide proof of advancement to candidacy at the beginning of the award period. Applicants must work full-time on their dissertations and course requirements and should be in the writing stage of their dissertation. This program is open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents who are members of racial and ethnic groups historically underrepresented in higher education (e.g., African Americans, Alaskan Natives, American Indians, Asian Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islanders).
 
Direct any questions about the AERA Minority Dissertation Fellowship in Education Research, eligibility requirements, orsubmission process to fellowships@aera.net or202-238-3200. The application deadline is November 3, 2014.
 
Visit the AERA Minority Dissertation Fellowship in Education Research for the Call for Proposals and the online application.

The AHEAD Information Services Project: Next opportunity for input

 

 
Greetings!
 
In early July we sent a note to all AHEAD members about a new AHEAD initiative-The Information Services Project. As you may recall, the project is exploring how AHEAD can support the membership in using research and evidence- based practice in our daily work.
 
Following the July announcement, we conducted six focus groups made up of AHEAD members attending the annual conference in Sacramento. We very much appreciate the time and candid conversation provided by the focus group participants! We had lively conversations around the power and possibilities of evidence-based practice to bolster and guide our work. We also discussed some of the challenges and barriers we face in using research and data in our demanding and busy jobs.
 
Building on what we are learning, we now invite you to provide your input online to five key focus areas. Follow the link below to find a brief description of the project and links to each of the five focus areas. Please share your thoughts and perspectives on as many or as few areas as you choose. If you are pressed for time, quick replies to the guided multiple choice questions are welcome. If you have time to make comments and share your experiences more fully, we would love to hear from you.
Please provide your input by OCTOBER 8, 2014.
 
Thank you for your time, and we hope you will join us by participating in this important information gathering process.
 

Call for Papers, Special Issue of the journal Intersectionalities on Mad Studies

 
Guest Editors
Peter Beresford, Professor of Social Policy, Brunel University, UK
Brenda LeFrançois, Associate Professor, Memorial University 
Jasna Russo, PhD Candidate, Brunel University, UK
Abstract Submission Deadline: November 3rd  2014

The special issue Mad Studies: Intersections with Disability Studies, Social Work and ‘Mental Health’ aims for an  interdisciplinary – or ‘in/disciplinary’ - collection of articles that will demonstrate the relationship and contribution of Mad Studies to other related fields of study.

Questions that we would in particularly like to explore include, but are not limited to:
  •  How has the project of Mad Studies been taken up both in and outside of Canada in the fields of disability studies, social work and/or ‘mental health’? How is this emergent field evolving internationally?
  • How are Mad bodies read within the fields of ‘mental health’, disability studies and/or social work?   How might Mad Studies open a space to read Mad bodies differently and/or understand madness through the filter of social justice principles and in particular with the centering of the analyses of those who have been psychiatrized?
  • What kind of knowledge production might lead to the development of non-medical conceptualizations and alternative social responses to madness, sanism, and psychiatrization, including resistance to current power relationships within and outside of the mental health system?
  • In what ways do Mad identities intersect with other socially disadvantaged subjectivities in (re)producing hierarchies of dominance and subordination?
  • In what ways does using an intersectionality lens support the unpacking of the role of sanism within the matrix of domination?
  •  What  are  the  working  realities  of  Mad-identified  scholars  and  advocates  within  both academic and non-academic settings?

Intersectionalities provides a forum for addressing issues of social difference and power. In order to keep with the journal’s focus we in particularly seek contributions   which consider the intersections of age, disability, class, poverty, gender and sexual identity, geographical (dis)location, colonialism/imperialism, indigeneity, racialization, ethnicity, citizenship. Please see the Journal policy at: 
http://journals.library.mun.ca/ojs/index.php/IJ/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
Review process and the time line
  • Please submit abstracts by November 3rd 2014 (not more than 500 words).
           The guest editors of this special issue will review the abstracts and notify you about the decision byNovember 24th 2014.
  • The full manuscripts are due March 30th 2015.
 
Submitting manuscripts
  • Contributions should be between 3000 and 7000 words.
  • Please note it is the responsibility of the submitting authors to ensure that the articles are correctly edited for Canadian English and within the journal’s format.
  • At the top of your submission, please clearly state: “Special Issue: Mad Studies: Intersections with Disability Studies, Social Work and ‘Mental Health’
We encourage contributions from authors of various regions and backgrounds and will answer any further inquiries. Please direct inquiries to the guest editors:

Peter Beresford,  peter.beresford@brunel.ac.uk
Brenda LeFrançois,  blefrancois@mun.ca
Jasna Russo,  contact@jasnarusso.com

Upcoming conference of interest (featuring Peter Breggin and Robert Whitaker!)

 

Resident Advisor “Diversity Drive-In” Presentation Opportunity

 
Good Morning,
 
Hope all is well. ORL is hosting its 2nd Annual RA Diversity Drive-In conference. This is a one day, October 25th, drive-in conference opportunity where we invite professional staff and RAs from neighboring institutions to join us in exploring different topics of inclusivity and diversity as it directly relates to the skill building and the relationship RAs foster with residents within the residence halls and as campus leaders.
 
We would like to share this opportunity with you by inviting you to submit a presentation proposal for this event. Presentation topics include but are not limited to the following:
 
* Diversity programming successes
* Current diversity trends and issues
* Power of language
* Microaggressions in the residence halls
* Universal design programming
 
The presentation application link can be found on the main page of the ORL website. If you are interested in presenting and/ or attending please complete the presenter application link as well as the registration form link. Please disregard information related to registration fees. The registration fee supplements cost for meal tickets and handouts; however, our office will provide complimentary meal tickets (to Ernie Davis Dining for lunch) and collaborate with assisting with any printing cost for presentation handouts.
 
Website link: http://orl.syr.edu/


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Update on Japan's "Disability and Development" Webpage

 
World Bank, Tokyo Learning Center, launches the new website on 
"Disability and Development."


Disability and Development Programs at World Bank, Tokyo Learning Center

https://www.jointokyo.org/en/programs/category/C214

The website includes two ASL lecture on Disability and Development by 

me. Or couser, it has spoken English interpretation and English captions 

for accessibility for all.


Enjoy!


Best,


Soya MORI

-- 

Our book about PWD livelihood in developing countries published

from Keiso-Shobo Press just won the 2013 The OKITA Memorial Prize for International Development Researchf by Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development. You could find the pictures of the plaque and honnourable cetificate of the award witht the following site. 
https://sites.google.com/site/developmentandsignlintuistics/Home/da-lai-shang
The English version of the book is published from Routledger soon. 

Please find the info on the following their website.

http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415507851/

Possible opportunity of interest, looking at disability and television at Curtin University in Australia:

 

 

Indigenous Persons with Disabilities Advocate for Inclusion

 
With the support of the Disability Rights Advocacy Fund (DRAF) and the International Disability Alliance (IDA), indigenous persons with disabilities successfully advocated for inclusion of disability as a crosscutting issue in the Outcome Document of the first World Conference on Indigenous Peoples (WCIP), occurring September 22-23 in New York.
 
During this week’s World Conference at the UN Headquarters in New York, more than one thousand participants have come together to promote cultural diversity and full inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in the post-2015 development process. Among them are members of the Indigenous Persons with Disabilities Global Network (IPWDGN) representing indigenous persons with disabilities from diverse regions of the world, including Asia, the Pacific, North America, Central and South America, and Africa.
 
The network succ essfully advocated for concrete references to indigenous persons with disabilities in the WCIP Outcome Document discussed over the past few months of preparation for the conference. These include: a specific paragraph on the rights of indigenous persons with disabilities (OP9) and recommendations for inclusion of indigenous persons with disabilities in data collection and in initiatives aimed at eliminating violence and discrimination.
 
Later in the week, representatives of this network will participate in a parallel World Summit of funders of Indigenous Peoples, convened by International Funders for Indigenous Peoples (IFIP). Setareki Macanawai, Chair of the IPWDGN and Diana Samarasan, Founding Executive Director of DRAF, will speak from the plenary.
 
This participation is a milestone in the recognition of a group of people who face multiple discrimination and marginalization on a daily basis.
 
 

Op-Ed: Audio Describer donates her voice to help those with disabilities




Reminder - Applications for JPED Executive Editor Due October 1st

 
    
 
Dear colleague,
 
This is a follow up reminder to the notice we sent approximately six weeks ago, that there is just about one week left to submit applications for the following opportunity.
 
The Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability (JPED) is published by the Association on Higher Education and Disability. JPED is the premier peer reviewed journal focusing on disability and higher education. Published in a variety of formats four times a year, JPED has enjoyed sustained robust growth in recent years. The Journal publishes one special issue annually; recent topics have included STEM research and practices, JUST/Universal Design, and college programming for students with intellectual disabilities. The Journal has increased the international scope of both its review board members and published manuscripts. Primarily a research journal, JPED also publishes innovative Practice Briefs that can inform research studies.
                        
The Journal is seeking a new executive editor (or team of editors) to begin a three-year term starting in July 2015. This opening provides a unique opportunity to have a major impact on the field of higher education and disabilities. In addition to the recognition this type of role provides, the position comes with a highly effective editorial team and production process as well as meaningful compensation.
 
Please read the complete information posting here: http://ahead.org/publications/jped-editor-search. We invite you to contact either of us with questions. Applications are due by October 1, 2014.

International News: Disability in the Arts and Culture

 

GSK Joins the Disability Equality Index as a Founding Partner

Company joins American Airlines, Comcast / NBCUniversal, CVS Health, and New Editions Consulting, Inc. to support launch of online tool to measure businesses' inclusion of people with disabilities
For Immediate Release
September 18, 2014
Contact: Anita Howard
Phone: (800) 706-2710

anita@usbln.org
WASHINGTON, DC (September 18, 2014) - Today, the US Business Leadership Network® (USBLN®) and the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) are pleased to announce that GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) joined as a Founding Partner of the USBLN and AAPD's new Disability Equality IndexSM (DEISM), an online tool that offers businesses the opportunity to objectively measure their full inclusion of people with disabilities as employees, suppliers, and customers. "We are thrilled to have GSK join us on this groundbreaking initiative for the business and disability communities," said Jill Houghton, Executive Director of the USBLN. "As a DEI Founding Partner, GSK is showcasing their support of disability inclusive practices throughout corporate America," said Mark Perriello, President and CEO of AAPD.
Created by leaders in the business and disability communities, and after the successful completion of the DEI pilot with 48 Fortune 1000 scope companies in March 2014, the first Annual DEI will launch to Fortune 1000 companies in October 2014.
The DEI is a benchmarking tool that offers businesses the opportunity to receive an objective score on their disability inclusion policies and practices, and identify avenues for continued improvement. Companies self-report on a wide-range of criteria within four categories: Culture & Leadership, Enterprise-Wide Access, Employment Practices, and Community Engagement & Support Services.
"We see the DEI as a fundamental tool for assessing how we're doing in key categories and where we could do more to enable all of our employees to achieve their full potential," said Belinda Shannon, Vice President, Equality & Inclusion, GSK.
The DEI Founding Partner status is a one-time opportunity exclusive to the first 15 companies that join before December 31, 2015. To date, DEI Founding Partners include American Airlines, Comcast and NBCUniversal, CVS Health, GSK, and New Editions Consulting, Inc. Companies interested in learning more about becoming a DEI Founding Partner should contact Liz Taub, USBLN Director, Business Relations & Strategic Partnerships, at liz@usbln.org.
For more information about the DEI, please visit: http://www.usbln.org/programs-dei.html.

About the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN)
The US Business Leadership Network (USBLN) is a national non-profit that helps business drive performance by leveraging disability inclusion in the workplace, supply chain, and marketplace. The USBLN serves as the collective voice of nearly 50 Business Leadership Network affiliates across the United States, representing over 5,000 businesses. Additionally, the USBLN Disability Supplier Diversity Program® (DSDP) is the nation's leading third party certification program for disability-owned businesses, including businesses owned by service-disabled veterans. www.usbln.org
About the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation's largest disability rights organization. AAPD promotes equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. AAPD's members, including people with disabilities and family, friends, and supporters, represent a powerful force for change. To learn more, visit the AAPD Web site:www.aapd.com.

As many of you may be aware, there has recently been much debate about the proposed TEACH Act and how it relates to the adoption and use of Electronic and Information Technology by institutions of higher education. AHEAD has created the following letter in response to some widely circulated opposition to the proposed legislation. The letter, created by the AHEAD Board of Directors, is intended to dispel misunderstanding of the TEACH Act, it's intentions, and why AHEAD supports the legislation. This letter can be located on AHEAD's website for additional review by visiting: http://ahead.org/teach_act_clarification_letter. Links to the articles and opinions recently expressed are available below.
 
Inside Higher Ed Article:
 
Boston Globe Article:
 
Nonprofit Quarterly:
 
The proposed Bill:
 
 

AHEAD's Letter

 
The TEACH Act - A need for clarification
 
Regarding the Opposition to the proposed TEACH Act Legislation
 
Recently there has been much debate about the proposed TEACH Act and the opposition to it being circulated. As the landscape in higher education has evolved, and most educational opportunities now require interactions with electronic and information technology (EIT), institutions have been left without an effective structure for taking access for all into account. Currently, institutions have only lawsuits and enforcement actions to guide them; the point of the TEACH Act is to pave the way for consistent national guidance in this arena. The Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD) supports the proposed legislation and seeks to clarify a few points.
First, it is important to remember that the TEACH Act comes directly from a recommendation made in the Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM)Commission Report, and second to remember that the AIM Commission was authorized within theHigher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008 and had representation of AHEAD as well as additional representation from both two-year and four-year colleges, among many stakeholders representing advocacy groups, service providers, and publishers.
In addition, it is helpful to take a close look at the TEACH Act language itself, and compare it to the arguments being raised in articles such as the recent "Good Intentions, Bad Legislation" published by Inside Higher Education. While there are several arguments that were raised within the opinion piece that warrant a closer look, one particular statement claimed:
"Rather than simply providing helpful, voluntary guidelines, the TEACH Act would effectively require colleges to only use technologies that meet guidelines created by a federal agency, or risk being sued."
 
In reality, voluntary guidelines are precisely what the legislation would authorize the Access Board to establish. While it is conceivable that a federal agency could choose to adopt those guidelines at some point in the future, which would potentially lead to the adoption of standards, this legislation itself is simply outlining a means for guidelines to be established. Guidelines would not require institutions to adopt or not adopt any given technology; they would, however, serve as navigational structures that institutions could use to chart their course.
The bigger point, though, is that Colleges and Universities are already required to honor the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended in 2008 (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), as well as any relevant state or local statutes. This responsibility is already established, but as court case after compliance review after investigation has proved, institutions are struggling to meet the existing obligations. This legislation does not add new responsibilities or any additional burden, undue or otherwise, to educational institutions, but could, by establishing a common baseline for due diligence, help alleviate some of the existing burden.
In addition, having recognized guidelines allows the commercial publishers, software developers, and others who produce for the educational market to create products that will assist their customers in meeting their current obligations under the law. The TEACH ACT would not change the existing requirements surrounding the adoption of technology, but it would provide guidance for both the producers and consumers of educational products.
Under both the ADA and Section 504, colleges and universities are required to provide equally effective access to students with disabilities. Currently, campuses struggle to meet this obligation when it comes to technology. We know that the individual accommodation process is not an effective way to ensure equal access in regard to information and communication technology related barriers. This legislation expressly allows the individual accommodation process to be utilized where appropriate, and would offer institutions a more effective framework within which to operate to better ensure efficient, proactive accessibility rather than second-class service to some of their students. Currently, most institutions can only "accommodate" inaccessible technology with patches, workarounds, and other local ad hoc approaches that result in not only unequal and less effective access, but are also unsustainable.
 
The point of the Teach Act, we believe, is to end after-the-fact decision-making processes in how to accommodate technology. The point is not to force certain choices upon the institutions but to ensure that the needs of individuals with disabilities are seriously considered and taken into account at the right point in the acquisition process.
 
The American people long ago concluded that "separate but equal" was inappropriate treatment of a portion of the population in our country; why do we think it is acceptable now? We support consistency in practices with technology across all college and university campuses to ensure all students with disabilities are afforded the same opportunities as other students. Continuing to operate without national guidelines would not ensure equal access.   
 
Resources
 
 
 
 

COLLIDESCOPE - A NEW WORK BY PING CHONG AND TALVIN WILKS PREMIERES AT UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND IN NOVEMBER 

A new multidisciplinary work written and directed by Ping Chong and Talvin Wilks, inspired in part by the unjust killing of Trayvon Martin, Collidescope will create a prismatic exploration of the history of violence directed towards African Americans from the Colonial Era to the present. Created in collaboration with graduate and undergraduate designers and performers from the School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies at the University of Maryland, this devised work examines the roots of Black and White race relations moving back and forth in time to connect the dots between America’s troubled racial history and its on-going consequences.
Collidescope will use theater, movement, video projections and a collaged soundscape to create a collision course view of the legacy and psyche behind this history of violence in America.
November 7 - 14, 2014
Kogod Theatre

University of Maryland 
For more information click here


Disability Cultural Center
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Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
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