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Weekly Newsletter

March, 27 2017

INDEX

INDEX

SU HAPPENINGS

DCC Open House Reminder

Spoken Word Poetry Institute: Featuring Toni Blackman

Theory and Things: An Interdisciplinary Symposium hosted by the Religion Graduate Organization

Negotiating Feminist Perspecitves

Samhain Ritual

The LGBT Resource Center will be holding an open Safer People, Safer Spaces training

Inclusion of People with Disabilities Around the Globe Through Law and Education

SU NEWS

SU community says technology needs to be more accessible for those with disabilities

SEEKING STUDENT FEEDBACK; TIME-SENSITIVE

University Plays Host for Disability Mentoring Day

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Registration for the Disability Studies Cluster Symposium, Complicating Normalcy: Disability, Technology, and Society in the Twenty-First Century

Revised Call for Papers: Disability and Disciplines

Please help – survey on accommodations in higher ed

AHEAD 2015 Management Institutes! Registration is Open

Save The Date - Call For Proposals: Multiple Perspectives 2015

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

University of Hawaii Undergrad Dis. Studies Course - Online (open to non-UH students!)

Western holds disability workshop

Women Enabled International Legal internship

FOUR Interesting New Disability Studies Books

NCID Announcement | Postdoctoral Fellowship Applications Due 11/1

A handful of disabled people defending the rights of thousands

ADVANCED SEMINAR IN DISABILITY AND DIVERSITY STUDIES

QUESTION BRIDGE: UPCOMING EXHIBIT AND INCLUSIVE PROJECT IN SYRACUSE


SU HAPPENINGS

DCC Open House

The DCC recognizes that many events are ocurring around campus and the community this Friday 10/24/14.  We encourage you to stop by the DCC in the Hoople Building rooms 105, 106, and 108 to grab a snack and meet our staff along with many other people from the university and community.  This is an informal open house, so feel free to come any time between 11AM and 1PM!  Bring a friend!

Spoken Word Poetry Institute: Featuring Toni Blackman


Verbal Blend spoken-word poetry program to premiere their SPOKEN WORD POETRY INSTITUTE October 23-25 featuring Toni Blackman
                                                                       
October 23-25 – Verbal Blend, a spoken-word poetry program out of the Office of Multicultural Affairs at Syracuse University, will host their 2nd Annual Spoken Word Poetry Institute in the Schine Student Center Underground, featuring Toni Blackman on October 23 that will begin at 7:30 PM.
 
On Saturday, October 25th Toni Blackman will facilitate “The Wisdom of the Cipher” day writers/performers workshops in Schine Student Center room 228B at 11 am. Students MUST register for the day workshop with Toni Blackman by sending an e-mail to Cedric T Bolton at ctbolton@syr.edu.
 
The institute will open up with a live performance by Toni Black, creator of Freestyle Union on October 23 at 7:30 pm in the Schine Student Center Underground.
 
“The Spoken Word Poetry Institute is an excellent platform for student to deepen their scholarship, appreciation, and best practices for including awareness of social issues,” says Cedric Bolton, coordinator of student engagement in the Office of Multicultural Affairs. “The campus and community get to see how scholarship and the arts have no boundaries, and it allows the student performers to stretch their imagination and create a new world through dramatic wordplay.
 
Toni Blackman is a great influence in the world of hip hop activism.  Founder of Freestyle Union, which uses oral improvisation as the basis for the human and creative development of emerging and established artists by providing artist development workshops.  These sessions emphasize freestyling, writing, speaking, and performance as well as ego management, holistic health care, the study of hip-hop history, and the rapper’s role as a storyteller and historian. As a musical artist Toni has shared stages with the likes of Erykah Badu, Mos Def, KRS One, Vernon Reid, Meshell, Sarah McLachlan, Sheryl Crow, GBS & Youssou Ndour. Toni’s first book, Inner-Course, a book of poetry and inspirational prose was released on Villard/Random House (2003). Her next book, Wisdom of the Cipher will be released Spring 2014 along with music from her Hip Hop Meditation project, and her book Travels of a Lyrical Ambassador, later in 2014.   Toni has performed, led workshops and spoken in 34 different countries including ASPEN Institute’s World Summit on Creativity in Oman, the World Social Forum in Barcelona, a featured speaker at Chicago Ideas Week, TEDx UMass at Amherst, Urban Voices Festival in South Africa and Cutting Edge Festival in Germany. She has appeared on BET, VH1, MTV, FOX News and others.  
 
The Spoken Word Poetry Institute is sponsored by Verbal Blend with support from the Poet's Learning Community, and Nu Rho Poetic Society. The workshop on October 25 is free and open to the public.
 
To attend, register in advance by contacting Cedric Bolton, coordinator for student engagement in the Office of Multicultural Affairs, at ctbolton@syr.edu or 315-443-9676.

Theory and Things: An Interdisciplinary Symposium hosted by the Religion Graduate Organization

 
Please participate in the Religion Graduate Organization’s upcoming interdisciplinary symposium,Theory and Things.  The symposium brings together faculty and graduate students from many different disciplines around the issue of theoretical inquiry. 

Specifically, it will ask about the nature of theoretical inquiry, its relationship to sensation and perception, its connection with embodiment and with the concrete, and its role in deeply contextualized historical, cultural, and political analysis.  It will feature faculty from Religion (Syracuse, Oxford), Philosophy (Syracuse, Lemoyne), Women’s and Gender Studies, History, Architecture, and the Belfer Audio Archive.  It will also feature responses and visual backdrops from Religion graduate students.

This event will run across three Monday afternoon sessions in October and early November.  

Session One:  Theory in Sensation and Perception
 - Monday, October 20th, 12:45-2:15pm, Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages
 
Session Two:  The Materiality of Theory
 - Monday, October 27th, 12:45-2:15pm, Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages
 
Session Three:  Theory in History, Ethnography and Activism
 - Monday, November 3rd, 12:45-2:15pm, Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages  

Please forward this information far and wide.  We hope to have faculty, staff, and students (graduate and undergraduate) from a wide range of disciplines in attendance.  The symposium is free and open to the public.  Refreshments will be provided
.

Negotiating Feminist Perspecitves

Friday, October 24, 12:45 p.m.
304 ABC SCHINE Student center
Intersectionality, transnationalism, and decoloniality are ways of knowing crafted to contest subjugation. Yet, critical uptake and institutionalization of these perspectives can distort and render invisible their oppositional histories. This colloquium examines how to engage each perspective, on its own terms and relationally, to cultivate their radically different possibilities.
CO-SPONSORS: The Departments of African American Studies, English, Philosophy, Religion and Women’s and Gender Studies, the LGBT Studies and Writing Programs, and the Democratizing Knowledge Project in the College of Arts and Sciences; the Department of Cultural Foundations of Education in the School of Education; the Department of Political Science and the South Asia Center at the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs

Samhain Ritual


Monday, November 3
rd, 8 PM
Small Stone Circle South of Hendricks on the Quad
The Samhain Ritual is about honoring those who have died and passed through the veil. This year, the ritual will focus on honoring individuals in the LGBTQ community who have passed. The LGBTQ community is invited to join the Pagan community in this ritual. Names of those who have passed will be read, and those people will be invited to take their seat at the table that has been set so that they will be present that night. Attendees are invited to email Pagan Chaplain Mary Hudson with the names of those individuals who have died that they would like to have included in the ceremony. This can be a member of the LGBTQ community, a family member, a friend, or anyone else. Looking forward to all that is to come.

The LGBT Resource Center will be holding an open Safer People, Safer Spaces training

Friday, October 24th from 2 – 5 PM. The location will be announced closer to the date.
Safer People, Safer Spaces is a 3 hour training that is as close to comprehensive as we can provide in that time. The training will incorporate many different activities and provide participants with a variety of ways to engage and develop their sense of allyship. Safer People, Safer Spaces stickers will be provided at the end of this training.
Students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to attend! If you're interested in participating, please email the LGBT Resource Center.

Inclusion of People with Disabilities Around the Globe Through Law and Education

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

4:30-6:00 pm

Room 352

Dineen Hall

COLLEGE of LAW

Discussion Featuring

Judith E. Heumann, Special Advisor for International Disability Rights, U.S. Department of State

Judy Heumann will discuss the role of disability in U.S. international development work through a question and answer format, co-moderated by Professor of Law, Arlene Kanter and School of Education Doctoral Student, Brent Elder.

A reception will follow and light refreshments will be provided.

Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) and American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided, courtesy of the Office of Disability Services. If you require accommodations for this event, please contact Brent Elder atbcelder@syr.edu by 10/21/14.

This event is free and open to the public. Parking is available at Irving Garage for a fee.

Judith E. Heumann’s visit is the result of a university-wide collaboration and is co-sponsored by the SU College of Law, Disability Law and Policy Program, Disability Law Society, LLM Program, Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, School of Education’s Department of Teaching and Leadership, Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education, School of Education Dean’s Office, SU Disability Cultural Center, and SU Abroad.


SU NEWS

SU community says technology needs to be more accessible for those with disabilities


SEEKING STUDENT FEEDBACK; TIME-SENSITIVE

 
Greetings,

SU Office of Disability Services (ODS) Director, Paula Possenti-Perez, is involved with the New York State Disability Services Council (NYSDSC). This organization was responsible for petitioning the New York State Education Department to establish an Advisory Council for students with disabilities in Higher Education.  The newly formed group will gather for its first meeting 
this Friday in NYC.  
 
Paula has asked me to send something out on her behalf requesting input regarding challenges for students with disabilities in higher education.  Below is an excerpt from a letter that Paula received from the State Education Dept. asking for input:
 
“In order to ensure the Council begins with an understanding of the host of challenges students with disabilities face in preparing, accessing, maintaining, and completing post doctorate studies, I am requesting that each council member prepare a brief presentation on the critical concerns identified by their respective represented group.  Please include in your comments the responses to the following questions:”
 
1.       What is working now?
2.       What is not working?
3.       What needs to be implemented to improve the system/process?
 
Any input that you can provide would be most appreciated. Please direct your feedback and any questions to PAULA at: ppossent@syr.edu

Thank you for your engagement with this important issue.
 
Kind regards,
Diane
 
Diane R. Wiener, Ph.D., L.M.S.W.
Director, SU Disability Cultural Center (Division of Student Affairs)
Research Associate Professor (SU School of Education)

University Plays Host for Disability Mentoring Day

The DCC was a mentorship site!


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Registration for the Disability Studies Cluster Symposium, Complicating Normalcy: Disability, Technology, and Society in the Twenty-First Century

(University of Rochester), is now open. Registration is free. Please see the link for registration informationhttps://www.warner.rochester.edu/newsevents/story/1364/

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Revised Call for Papers: Disability and Disciplines

Disability and Disciplines:  The International Conference on Educational, Cultural, and Disability Studies

1-2 July, 2015

Centre for Culture and Disability Studies, Faculty of Education, Liverpool Hope University

Keynote Speakers: 
Julie Allan (University of Birmingham, UK) Peter Beresford (Brunel University London, UK) David Mitchell (George Washington University, USA) Sharon Snyder (George Washington University, USA)

When we think of disability in Higher Education we are likely to think in terms of access, Learning Support Plans, and so on. These and other such things are of great importance but only represent part of the approach proposed at the biennial CCDS conference. What we explore is a more complex understanding of disability that challenges assumptions and prejudicial actions but also recognises qualities and positivity. While inclusive education is generally an improvement on integration and segregation, it often constitutes little more than what, in The Biopolitics of Disability (2015), David Mitchell and Sharon Snyder call a weakened strain of inclusionism. Until disability is recognised in the context of alternative lives and values that neither enforce nor reify normalcy we cannot truly encounter the material and ethical alternatives disabled lives engage. 
Inclusion may well be a legal requirement in some parts of the world, and perhaps a moral imperative everywhere, but it is also an educational opportunity. Not only students but also staff who identify as disabled should, as Mitchell and Snyder assert, recognize this peripheral embodiment as something to be cultivated as a form of alternative expertise, meaning that disability can become an active, unabashed, and less stigmatising part of classroom discourse. The aim of this biennial conference, then, is to encourage the transformation of academic disciplines by appreciating rather than avoiding disability.  

The keynote presentations have now been confirmed: 
•       ‘The Arts and Inclusive Imagination: Spaces for Civic Engagement’, 
Julie Allan 
•       ‘From Psychiatry to Disability Studies and Mad Studies: Exploring 
Uncharted Relationships’, Peter Beresford
•       ‘The Crip Art of Failure in Education’, David Mitchell and Sharon 
Snyder 

We welcome proposals from professors, lecturers, students, and other interested parties for papers that explore the benefits of interdisciplinarity between Disability Studies and subjects such as Aesthetics, Art, Business Studies, Creative Writing, Cultural Studies, Film Studies, Holocaust Studies, International Studies, Literary Studies, Literacy Studies, Management Studies, Media Studies, Medical Humanities, Museum Studies, Philosophy, Professional Studies, Special Educational Needs, and Technology. This list is meant to be suggestive rather than exhaustive.

Some anticipated panels include: 
•       The Art of Disability: Disability Studies and the Arts
•       Medical Matters: Disability Studies and Medical Humanities
•       Learning to Read People: Disability Studies and Children’s Fiction
•       Beyond the Rhetoric of Inclusion: Disability Studies and Special 
Educational Needs
•       Telling Stories: Disability Studies and Creative Writing

Paper proposals of 150-200 words should be sent to disciplines@hope.ac.uk on or before 1 February, 2015. 

Paper presentations are allocated 20 minute slots and themed panels of 3 papers are also encouraged. 

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Please help – survey on accommodations in higher ed


*On the advice of a nice professor from our list, I am sending you the information regarding my dissertation survey. My study is regarding accommodations in higher education. All university personnel are greatly welcomed to take my survey. Please see the information below.*

*If you are either a college student with a disability or university personnel, there is a research study in which you might be interested. The purpose of this study is to get a better understanding of the perception of what the term reasonable accommodations means in higher education. This can help lawmakers when changing or creating new law regarding accommodations.*

*If you agree to participate in this study, you will be asked to:*

*·       Take a survey (less than 20 minute’s duration)*

*·       After the survey, you can take part in either *

*a focus group or an interview*

*There is no compensation for participating in the survey. However, those who volunteer and are chosen (first come basis) to take part in the focus group or interview will receive a $20 Starbucks or Amazon.com gift card (participant's choice).*

*If you would like to find out more information please visit: *

*https://www.facebook.com/AccommodationsADA
<https://www.facebook.com/AccommodationsADA>*

*To take the survey please visit: To take the survey please visit:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/accommodationsADA
<https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/accommodationsADA>*

*Questions about the study? You may contact Anita via e-mail anita.schwartz@waldenu.edu <anita.schwartz@waldenu.edu> using your school e-mail address *
* or call 845-661-3307*

-- 

*Yours in Education, Anita Schwartz, LMSW*
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/accommodationsADA
<https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/accommodationsADA> * *https://www.facebook.com/AccommodationsADA
<https://www.facebook.com/AccommodationsADA> *
*Cell: (845) 661-3307*

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AHEAD 2015 Management Institutes! Registration is Open

 
October 20, 2014    
     
Registration is now open!
 
AHEAD presents the 9th Annual Management Institutes
 
especially designed for disability & TRiO professionals
 
February 5 - 7, 2015
The Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel
Tampa, Florida, USA
 
 
 
It may be getting colder outside, but the AHEAD Spring Management Institute is just a little over three months away!   We're looking forward to welcoming many of you to sunny, warm Tampa, Florida to offer you new programming designed with something for everyone.
 
There are four, two-day institutes being offered in 2015; plus a terrific Saturday morning plenary session for everyone!  Here are brief descriptions of the four institutes being offered this year.
 
Institute #1
AHEAD Start: Setting the Landscape for New Professionals
Carol Funckes, University of Arizona
 
Designed specifically for disability resource professionals who are new (or newer) to the field, this two-day institute offers a comprehensive overview of the issues that shape postsecondary disability services.  This is the "don't miss" institute for anyone who is in their first one to five years working in disability in postsecondary education.
Audience: Novice
 
Institute #2
Taking the Lead on the Path to Access: Ways to Make a Difference on Your Campus
Adam Meyer, University of Central Florida
Kristie Orr, Texas A&M University
 
We may know a lot about accommodations, processes and specific disabilities. But as employees at our institutions who are expected to develop and maintain access on campus, progress will stall if we do not know how to lead our office and our campus partners on this journey toward greater accessible thinking. This two-day hands-on, interactive session will explore essential concepts all disability professionals need to know in order to make a difference on campus. Topics include: Exploring the purpose of your office, characteristics of leadership, effective communication, building trust, creating and working through change, considerations in important decision-making, working intentionally within your office culture, collaborating beyond your office walls, and finding the passion in what you do.
Audience: Intermediate to Advanced
 
Institute #3
On the Road to Educational Success: Removing Barriers to Student Development
Rhonda Rapp, St. Mary's University, Texas
 
This intensive, hands-on institute, will focus on a broad range of student services in higher education and the removal of barriers to those services for students with hidden disabilities (students with learning disabilities, ADHD, psychological disabilities, and students on the spectrum).  TRiO administrators, staff and faculty, Learning Assistance Center administrators and tutors, the administrators and faculty of Learning and Living communities, and disability service/resource professionals will all benefit from this great institute!
Audience: All
 
Institute #4
The Future is Now: "EIT" and Accessibility
Jamie Axelrod, Northern Arizona University
Teresa Haven, Northern Arizona University
 
Welcome to the 21st Century!  Electronic and Information Technology (EIT) has become as much a part of today's higher education environment as paper and pencil - and in many cases, digital content and tools have replaced paper completely.  Access to all the tools and materials used in higher education environments is critical for student and institutional success.   The challenges, both present and soon coming, are daunting.  This institute is designed to assist you in getting ahead of the curve!
Audience: All  (We encourage you to invite your IT, Library, Faculty, Instructional Designers and other campus colleagues to join you in this important institute.)
 
Saturday Morning Plenary Session
 
A New Perspective on the Future - Helping Students See the Light at the End of the Tunnel
Saturday, February 7, 2015, 9:00 am - 11:30 pm
Jodi Sleeper-Triplett, JST Coaching, LLC
 
 
Please visit:  http://www.ahead.org/conferences/9th_Management_Institutes to see complete information about this fantastic conference including:
  • Full Program
  • Host Hotel Information
  • Institute Faculty Bios, and
  • Registration Details
 
We look forward to seeing you in Tampa in February!
 
p.s.  Do you have a TRiO program on your campus?  Please forward this email to the staff there.  Institute #3 will be of particular interest for them.

NCID Announcement | Postdoctoral Fellowship Applications Due 11/1

 
The National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID) is still inviting applications and nominations for the 2015-2016 cycle of its Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. This initiative, established in 2008, seeks to advance the Center's national commitment to institutional diversity by promoting outstanding early-career scholars engaged in diversity research. With support from the Office of the Provost, the NCID anticipates offering two postdoctoral fellowships for the 2015-2016 academic year. The deadline for applications and nominations is November 1, 2014.
 
The fellowships include protected research time, faculty mentoring, and career development opportunities. While we welcome new Ph.D. applicants, successful candidates may also currently hold tenure-track positions. Please visit our website for more information. 
 
--
Postdoctoral Program Coordinator
NCID Postdoctoral Fellows and Scholars Program
3338 School of Education Building
610 E University Ave
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1259
Office 734.764.6823 | Fax 734.764.6600

Save The Date - Call For Proposals: Multiple Perspectives 2015


PLEASE DISTRIBUTE:
Celebrate Our Progress And Write Our Future History
 
In 1990 Congress introduced the ADA with eight findings:
1.       physical or mental disabilities in no way diminish a person's right to fully participate in all aspects of society, yet many people with physical or mental disabilities have been precluded from doing so because of discrimination; others who have a record of a disability or are regarded as having a disability also have been subjected to discrimination;
2.       historically, society has tended to isolate and segregate individuals with disabilities, and, despite some improvements, such forms of discrimination against individuals with disabilities continue to be a serious and pervasive social problem;
3.       discrimination against individuals with disabilities persists in such critical areas as employment, housing, public accommodations, education, transportation, communication, recreation, institutionalization, health services, voting, and access to public services;
4.       unlike individuals who have experienced discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, religion, or age, individuals who have experienced discrimination on the basis of disability have often had no legal recourse to redress such discrimination;
5.       individuals with disabilities continually encounter various forms of discrimination, including outright intentional exclusion, the discriminatory effects of architectural, transportation, and communication barriers, overprotective rules and policies, failure to make modifications to existing facilities and practices, exclusionary qualification standards and criteria, segregation, and relegation to lesser services, programs, activities, benefits, jobs, or other opportunities;
6.       census data, national polls, and other studies have documented that people with disabilities, as a group, occupy an inferior status in our society, and are severely disadvantaged socially, vocationally, economically, and educationally;
7.       the Nation's proper goals regarding individuals with disabilities are to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for such individuals; and
8.       the continuing existence of unfair and unnecessary discrimination and prejudice denies people with disabilities the opportunity to compete on an equal basis and to pursue those opportunities for which our free society is justifiably famous, and costs the United States billions of dollars in unnecessary expenses resulting from dependency and nonproductivity.
 
What would they find today?  What do you seek for the next twenty-five years?

CALL FOR PAPERS
 
The Fifteenth Annual
Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability:
 
April 13 - 14, 2015
The Ohio State University’s Columbus Campus
This year’s conference will celebrate the progress we have made and the journey still ahead.  What have we learned?  Where are we going? What are the important questions for the next 25 years?

Multiple Perspectives is an ongoing exploration of disability as a reflection of the human condition seen through multiple lenses (theory, discipline, social constructs, personal experience, shared experience…).  Preference will be given to presentations that encourage conversations across the typical divisions (medical and social, education and employment, research and practice, business and government, rights and charity …) Proposers are encouraged to consider parallels, distinctions and intersections with race, gender and ethnicity.  

Past programs and conference updates as they become available can be found at:  http://ada.osu.edu/conferences.htm.

To be on the mailing list for the conference, send e-mail to ADA-OSU@osu.edu

The Multiple Perspectives Conference is hosted by Ohio State University’s ADA Coordinator’s Office is made possible thanks to the generosity of the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation Endowment Fund and ongoing support from The Ohio State University’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Center for Disability Empowerment. 

 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES 2014

Proposals are due January 5th, 2015

Proposals should be submitted by e-mail as an attachment (Word, Word Perfect, TXT, or RTF formats)  to ADA-OSU@osu.edu  with Multiple Perspectives 2015 in the subject line.

Proposals must include:
1.   Name of each presenter with  titles,  institutions, employers etc. as appropriate
2.   Contact information (phone, mailing address, and e-mail) if there is more than one presenter please indicate one individual as the contact and lead presenter.
3.   Title of Presentation   (12 words or less)
4.   Description  (700 words or less)   Please describe the content, focus and desired outcomes for the presentation using these questions as a guide.
·        What is the format of the presentation (Lecture, Panel, Discussion, Performance, Other)?
·        Who is the intended audience (educators, employers, businesses, advocates, students, consumers, researchers, or other)?
·        How familiar should the audience be with the topic (beginner, intermediate, advanced)?
·        What are your three main goals for the presentation?
 
Please Note:  The full conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for presenters of accepted proposals. Presenters are responsible for their own travel and lodging.
 
 
 
Please share with your students:
 
UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT POSTER COMPETITIONS
At the Fifteenth Annual
Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability:
Intersections and Independence
April 13 - 14, 2015
Held on The Ohio State University’s Columbus Campus
 
Poster Submissions are Due no later than March 11, 2015
 
The Multiple Perspectives Conference encourages students to network with professionals, the community, and scholars who share their interests in disability at its annual student poster reception.  A generous gift from the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation will fund awards (Graduate Research - $500; Undergraduate Research $200, Art & Performance $200 and Community Service $100, Class Projects $200 at this year’s competition. 
 
Submissions may be based on:
1.  Class Projects & Papers (Award goes to Department to support future projects)
2.  Independent & Supervised Student Research 
3.  Community Service & Applied Problem Solving from Service Learning Classes or student organizations
4.  Art & Performance
 
Posters can take a variety of forms including print material mounted on poster board or display panels or arranged on a table; PowerPoint presentations, web pages or video presentations from your laptop …  
· Presentation materials must fit on a 3’x6’ table or along 6’ or less of wall space
· Presentation materials should present the information in 10 minutes or less
· Presenters or their designee must be present to interact with the audience
· Presenters must provide their own equipment
 
Visit these sites for tips on developing a poster presentation:
·  http://denman.osu.edu/resources.aspx
·  http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/speaking/poster/index.cfm 
·  http://www.plu.edu/~libr/workshops/multimedia/posters.html  
 
Students and teams of students who wish to present a poster must send the following information to ADA-OSU@osu.edu no later than March 11, 2015
1.  Title
2.  Short Title - 12 word maximum
3.  Poster Format (Print, Model, PowerPoint, Video, …)
4.  Description of their proposed poster topic – 250 word maximum
5.  E-mail address, phone number, and surface mail address of coordinating presenter
6.  As appropriate, university, department, grant, course or student organization affiliation
7.  A letter of support from a faculty member or organization advisor associated with the project
8.   Name of individual, Department or Organization to receive cash award should the project win.
 
Early submissions are encouraged.  Submissions will be reviewed as they arrive. Conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for all accepted presenters.
 
Please Note:
The full conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for presenters of accepted proposals. Presenters are responsible for their own travel and lodging.


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

University of Hawaii Undergrad Dis. Studies Course - Online (open to non-UH students!)

 
Registration is open as of Tuesday, Oct. 28 (CRN: 3098).
 
DIS 383: DISABILITY HISTORY AND CULTURE:
FROM HOMER TO HIP HOP
(Writing Intensive Focus Course)
Spring 2015 (Jan. 12-May 15, 2015)
from the Center on Disability Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa
An online (asynchronous-access at your own time) 3 credit course
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Steven Brown, Professor (retired)
Center on Disability Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa
      
Overview to the history of disability from a disability studies perspective, a multidisciplinary and global approach to studying disability perspectives, focused on personal and collective responses to difference(s) based on disability.
COURSE GOALS
 
v  Learn how a broad range of societies have treated people with disabilities.
v  Read & discuss policies, perceptions, living conditions, and roles of persons with disabilities historically, individually and collectively.
v  Address ideas of impairment; politics and legislation; diversity, advocacy, and education.
v  Historical perspectives will provide insight into current perceptions of disability issues.
v  Skills to be developed include critical thinking;
v  Organizing and conveying information in writing and orally.
 
WHO SHOULD TAKE THIS COURSE?
 
Upper division undergraduate students in history & all other disciplines, e.g.: art, ethnic studies, psychology, political science, interdisciplinary studies, education, public policy, communications, American studies, special education, health sciences, sociology, architecture, & social work.
 
REGISTRATION INFORMATION (NOTE: This course is offered only via Outreach College):
(CRN: 3098):
 
The course is listed at: Spring 2015 Extension Class Availability (https://www.sis.hawaii.edu/uhdad/avail.classes?i=MAN&t=201533)
 
(1) UH Manoa students may register through the Outreach College. https://www.sis.hawaii.edu/uhdad/avail.class?i=MAN&t=201533&c=3098
 
(2) Current UH system students registering for a 300-level or higher course, can call the Outreach office at (808)956-7221 to see about qualifying for a “Campus” override & any other approvals needed to register without having to complete an application. More information is at: http://www.outreach.hawaii.edu/myuh/apply.asp
 
(3) All other students, including those at other universities: To register, non-UH students first
     complete an Outreach College application form
     (http://www.outreach.hawaii.edu/myuh/apply.asp) (Application processing takes 5 working days.) Once the application has been processed, students will be notified and can log into MyUH to register.

Western holds disability workshop


Women Enabled International Legal internship

 
Interested parties are strongly encouraged to speak with our friend and colleague, Professor Arlene Kanter (Kantera@law.syr.edu), who is affiliated with the organization, Women Enabled International.
 
 
Legal Internship
Women Enabled International, Inc. 
 
The legal work involves international human rights, women’s rights, disability rights, violence against women, sexualand reproductive rights and health, conflict and post conflict situations, legal reform and access to justice, among other issues.
The law student would assist with one or more of the following pro bono legal projects:
  • Legal research and communication with Non-government organizations regarding implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on women, peace and security.
  • Utilizing the international human rights legal framework, research on the sexual and reproductive rights of women, with a focus on women and girls with disabilities internationally and in the United States and other possible countries to be identified.
  • Research on violence against women, with a special emphasis on women and girls with disabilities, and a review of existing laws and development of training materials on the prevention and elimination of violence against women with disabilities, internationally and and in the United States and other possible countries to be identified.
  • Development of an annotated bibliography of law review/journal articles in U.S. law reviews/journals and law reviews/journals of other countries written in English addressing issues concerning women and girls with disabilities.
  • Assistance in research and case development for a hearing before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (for this project, knowledge of Spanish would be a plus.)
Qualifications:
Second year or third year law students, LLM students, and recent grads

Strong research, footnoting and writing skills are essential requirements. An interest in and/or experience with research, courses or other work on international human rights law issues strongly preferred. Organization and responsiveness extremely important. This internship is unpaid.
Application Instructions:
Send cover letter with description of areas of interest, resume and dates and number of hours available to
personnel@womenenabled.org. No phone calls please.
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FOUR Interesting New Disability Studies Books

 
From Refrigerator Mothers to Computer Geeks
Jordynn Jack
 
   "Autism and Gender is the book I was waiting for someone to write, and Jordynn Jack's insightful treatment of this timely, complex topic is a joy to read. Among its many strengths are its beautiful, well organized, easy-to-read prose, its breadth of coverage of the topic, and its careful, judicious tone." --Anna Kirkland, author of Fat Rights: Dilemmas of Difference and Personhood
 
   The reasons behind the increase in autism diagnoses have become hotly contested in the media as well as within the medical, scholarly, and autistic communities. Jordynn Jack suggests the proliferating number of discussions point to autism as a rhetorical phenomenon that engenders attempts to persuade through arguments, appeals to emotions, and representational strategies.
 
   In Autism and Gender: From Refrigerator Mothers to Computer Geeks, Jack focuses on the ways gender influences popular discussion and understanding of autism's causes and effects. She identifies gendered theories like the “refrigerator mother” theory, for example, which blames emotionally distant mothers for autism, and the “extreme male brain” theory, which links autism to the modes of systematic thinking found in male computer geeks. Jack's analysis reveals how people employ such highly gendered theories to craft rhetorical narratives around stock characters--fix-it dads, heroic mother warriors rescuing children from autism--that advocate for ends beyond the story itself while also allowing the storyteller to gain authority, understand the disorder, and take part in debates.
 
   Autism and Gender reveals the ways we build narratives around controversial topics while offering new insights into the ways rhetorical inquiry can and does contribute to conversations about gender and disability.
 
University of Illinois Press
April 2014 320pp 2 black and white photographs, 1 chart, 1 table 9780252079894 Paperback £19.99 now only £14.99 when you quote CS1014DISB when you order
 
Disability, Gender, Race
Ellen Samuels
 
   “A beautifully written, ambitiously imagined, and wonderfully nuanced book. Samuels provides brilliantly argued case studies that demonstrate the discursive and visual processes by which Americans have, since the mid-nineteenth century, lived under various regimes of identification—both those imposed and those claimed through one’s subjective understanding of the world. Fantasies of Identification will be a marvelous contribution to disability studies, American studies, and literary historical studies.”-David Serlin,author of Replaceable You: Engineering the Body in Postwar America
 
“Whether through measures of blood quantum, disability assessment, or sex/gender testing in athletics, Ellen Samuels makes clear that what she terms ‘biocertification’ continues to operate everywhere in contemporary cultures, regulating social worth, citizenship, and group membership. We have long needed Fantasies of Identification to understand more fully the ways in which disability is thickly interwoven with histories of race, sexuality, and gender in the United States.”-Robert McRuer,author of Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability
 
   In the mid-nineteenth-century United States, as it became increasingly difficult to distinguish between bodies understood as black, white, or Indian; able-bodied or disabled; and male or female, intense efforts emerged to define these identities as biologically distinct and scientifically verifiable in a literally marked body. Combining literary analysis, legal history, and visual culture, Ellen Samuels traces the evolution of the “fantasy of identification”—the powerful belief that embodied social identities are fixed, verifiable, and visible through modern science. From birthmarks and fingerprints to blood quantum and DNA, she examines how this fantasy has circulated between cultural representations, law, science, and policy to become one of the most powerfully institutionalized ideologies of modern society.
 
  Yet, as Samuels demonstrates, in every case, the fantasy distorts its claimed scientific basis, substituting subjective language for claimed objective fact.From its early emergence in discourses about disability fakery and fugitive slaves in the nineteenth century to its most recent manifestation in the question of sex testing at the 2012 Olympic Games, Fantasies of Identification explores the roots of modern understandings of bodily identity.
 
Ellen Samuels is Assistant Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and English at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
 
NYU Press
April 2014 288pp  9781479859498 Paperback £15.99 now only £11.99 when you quote CS1014DISB when you order
 
Disfigurement and the Politics of Appearance
Heather Laine Talley
 
   "Saving Face offers a persuasive and sociologically rich portrayal of facial disfigurement. Beauty culture depends more upon the 'normal' and unremarkable - rather than the exceptional - face than is usually acknowledged, and Talley offers a fascinating account of how unremarkability is medically, culturally and socially produced. The ethics and politics of reconstructive surgery are not straightforward; Talley gives the subject an admirably nuanced and sensitive treatment."-Victoria Pitts-Taylor,author of Surgery Junkies: Wellness and Pathology in Cosmetic Culture
 
   Imagine yourself without a face—the task seems impossible. The face is a core feature of our physical identity. Our face is how others identify us and how we think of our ‘self’. Yet, human faces are also functionally essential as mechanisms for communication and as a means of eating, breathing, and seeing. For these reasons, facial disfigurement can endanger our fundamental notions of self and identity or even be life threatening, at worse. Precisely because it is so difficult to conceal our faces, the disfigured face compromises appearance, status, and, perhaps, our very way of being in the world.
 
  In Saving Face, sociologist Heather Laine Talley examines the cultural meaning and social significance of interventions aimed at repairing faces defined as disfigured. Using ethnography, participant-observation, content analysis, interviews, and autoethnography, Talley explores four sites in which a range of faces are “repaired:” face transplantation, facial feminization surgery, the reality show Extreme Makeover, and the international charitable organization Operation Smile. Throughout, she considers how efforts focused on repair sometimes intensify the stigma associated with disfigurement. Drawing upon experiences volunteering at a camp for children with severe burns, Talley also considers alternative interventions and everyday practices that both challenge stigma and help those seen as disfigured negotiate outsider status.
 
  Talley delves into the promise and limits of facial surgery, continually examining how we might understand appearance as a facet of privilege and a dimension of inequality. Ultimately, she argues that facial work is not simply a conglomeration of reconstructive techniques aimed at the human face, but rather, that appearance interventions are increasingly treated as lifesaving work. Especially at a time when aesthetic technologies carrying greater risk are emerging and when discrimination based on appearance is rampant, this important book challenges us to think critically about how we see the human face.
 
Heather Laine Talley is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Western Carolina University.
 
NYU Press
August 2014 256pp  9780814784112 Paperback £15.99 now only £11.99 when you quote CS1014DISB when you order
 
Nineteenth-Century Deaf Education and the Growth of Deaf Culture
R. A.R. Edwards
 
   “In this gracefully written book, Edwards offers both a fascinating narrative and a provocative, revisionist thesis. Scholars and general readers interested in the Deaf community and American cultural history will find it a rewarding read.”-Douglas Baynton,University of Iowa || "[A] useful addition to the still-developing history of the nation's evolving deaf community." -The Journal of American History
 
   "[This book is] provocative, detailed, and a welcome examination of the emergence of a signing deaf culture."-American Historical Review
 
   "R.A.R. Edwards' Words Made Flesh: Nineteenth-Century Deaf Education and the Growth of Deaf Culture is a brilliant study of the emergence of a deaf community in nineteenth-century America... Beyond a more nuanced account of the emergence of the American Deaf community, this monograph is ultimately a revisionist history of the ongoing conflict over pedagogical methods in deaf education. Building on the established historiography produced by a small cadre of deaf historians, Edwards represents a new generation of scholarship in the field, offering a revisionist thesis of the ideas originally presented by Van Cleve and Crouch over twenty years ago.Words Made Flesh is a fine addition to New York University press's history of disability series."-Common-Place
 
   During the early nineteenth century, schools for the deaf appeared in the United States for the first time. These schools were committed to the use of the sign language to educate deaf students. Manual education made the growth of the deaf community possible, for it gathered deaf people together in sizable numbers for the first time in American history. It also fueled the emergence of Deaf culture, as the schools became agents of cultural transformations.
 
  Just as the Deaf community began to be recognized as a minority culture, in the 1850s, a powerful movement arose to undo it, namely oral education. Advocates of oral education, deeply influenced by the writings of public school pioneer Horace Mann, argued that deaf students should stop signing and should start speaking in the hope that the Deaf community would be abandoned, and its language and culture would vanish. In this revisionist history, Words Made Flesh explores the educational battles of the nineteenth century from both hearing and deaf points of view. It places the growth of the Deaf community at the heart of the story of deaf education and explains how the unexpected emergence of Deafness provoked the pedagogical battles that dominated the field of deaf education in the nineteenth century, and still reverberate today.
 
R.A.R. Edwards is an associate professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology, in Rochester, New York.
 
NYU Press
January 2014 263pp  9781479883738 Paperback £16.99 now only £12.74 when you quote CS1014DISB when you order

A handful of disabled people defending the rights of thousands



Disabled people will be back in the High Court in London this week to oppose the closure of the Independent Living Fund on the grounds that the decision goes against disability equality legislation.  This is only the latest in the desperate struggles we are having against the rapid deterioration in disabled people's access to independent living in England.  I can't join the vigil outside the High Court but have written this blogpost to publicise the importance of the case.


http://jennymorrisnet.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/unanswered-questionstill-whats-your.html

We are a few months away from a general election and politicians from all parties need to be asked "What's your plan for these people whose lives we apparently can't afford?" - horrible wording but it starkly presents the reality.

ADVANCED SEMINAR IN DISABILITY AND DIVERSITY STUDIES

An online graduate level course offered at the University of Hawaii this Spring (2015)
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Megan Conway
WHO SHOULD TAKE THIS COURSE?  

This course is designed for graduate students and professionals in a variety of disciplines concerned with disability and diversity issues. 
The course is open to currently enrolled UH students and to non-UH students

This is a core course for the interdisciplinary
 Disability and Diversity Studies Certificate Program www.cds.hawaii.edu/certificates but can also be taken as an elective.  Emphasis will be on expanding student knowledge and teaching/presentation skills in the area of disability rights, policy, and culture from a diversity perspective in the context of multiple disciplines.  

WHEN:  Wednesdays, 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST, January 14-May 6
CREDITS:   3
REGISTRATION INFO: (UH Students) Spring 2015 CRN DIS 687 (001) 84093; (Out of State, International and non-UH students) apply and register via Outreach College www.outreach.hawaii.edu Spring Extension 2015 CRN DIS 687 (431) 3100

WHERE: Elluminate Blackboard (live online interactive sessions) and Laulima (online course materials and discussion board)

QUESTION BRIDGE: UPCOMING EXHIBIT AND INCLUSIVE PROJECT IN SYRACUSE



The Community Folk Art Center (CFAC) is pleased to present the exhibition Question Bridge: Black Males, from October 25 – December 13, 2014.  The opening reception will take place on Saturday, November 1 from 2pm - 4pm, located at 805 East Genesee Street, Syracuse, NY 13210.
 
Question Bridge is an innovative transmedia project that facilitates a dialogue between a critical mass of Black men from diverse backgrounds and creates a platform for them to represent and redefine Black male identity in America. This video installation, featuring over 150 men, works to examine Black male identity from all age groups, as they respond to provocative questions about life through the lens of being Black and male.
 
A unique component of this exhibition is the opportunity to engage Syracuse area men of varying ages around issues that impact them locally through a series of questions. Using these questions, we will conduct interviews at CFAC, on campus, and in the community to create a Syracuse-based Question Bridge. 
 
For accommodations requests, questions, and more information, please contact CFAC Director of Education, Tamar Smithers at 315-442-2735, tjsmithe@syr.edu, or you can visit our website at www.communityfolkartcenter.org.
 
Tamar Smithers
Director of Education

Community Folk Art Center

805 E. Genesee Street

Syracuse, NY, 13210

Phone: 315-442-2735

Fax: 315-442-2972

Email: 
tjsmithe@syr.edu


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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