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Weekly Newsletter

September, 25 2017

INDEX

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

A Place at the Table: "Perfect" Bodies?

Mentors in Violence Prevention Training

RELATE: A New Discussion Group from the LGBT RC at SU

SU EVENT OF INTEREST: National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) at Ten

The Dean’s List Tour

SU NEWS

Michele Norris Announced as Keynote for 2015 MLK Event at SU

Access to "Human Rights. Yes! Action and Advocacy on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities"

We're happy to announce that a new ADA anniversary poster produced by the Syracuse Cultural Workers (SCW) is now available!

SPRING 2015 GRADUATE COURSE AT SU

Individuals, Student Groups Invited to Audition for 2015 MLK Celebration at SU

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, and PARTICIPANTS

Live Virtual Conference (at SU): 'Accessing Higher Ground'

Call for Proposals: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society

UCLA CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF WOMEN announces Thinking Gender 2015: 25th Annual Graduate Student Research Conference

Call for Abstracts: Special Issue of Gender and Education

NEWS AND ANNOUCEMENTS

CSMA’s 7th  Annual ARTS FOR ALL MARATHON

Deaf Advocacy Council Town Hall Meeting Next Thursday in Syracuse

Hip-hop Therapy: New Route to Wellbeing? (from The Guardian)

Opportunity to Support the Mental Patients Liberation Alliance

Mother Who Provides Round-the-Clock Care Finds Solace in Her Home Geraldine Kentish supports two children with disabilities, but had little money left over after paying rent on their Harlem apartment.

‘Off Color’ and on Target About Race in America “Off Color,” a New York Times video series, looks at how artists of color are making sharp social commentary about race in America through comedy and performance.

New Buildings for Older People: “Silver” design should ensure accessibility and safety

A Natural Fix for A.D.H.D.: The problem is not just your brain. The problem is boredom.

How Mass Incarceration Was Won: Indiscriminate Imprisonment of Disabled, Deaf, Black & Poor People for Profit

Blog Post of Interest: A Letter to My Wheelchair in Need of Repair


SU HAPPENINGS

A Place at the Table: "Perfect" Bodies?

Join us for a discussion on disability, body image, and body modification onFriday, Nov. 7, from 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. in Hoople 106.  The 'A Place at the Table' luncheon series explores questions about food and culture and what happens when dietary restrictions, allergies, disabilities, ethics, values, principles, religion, and preferences collide with the cultural norms about food and eating.  

BACK TO TOP


Mentors in Violence Prevention Training

Students interested in joining the movement to end relationship abuse and sexual assault and creating a community of empowered bystanders are invited to the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) training on Nov. 14 and Nov. 15.  Please spread the word! 

BACK TO TOP


RELATE: A New Discussion Group from the LGBT RC at SU

 
A discussion group for people with family members who identify within lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans*, and queer (LGBTQ) communities
Tuesday, November 11th & Tuesday, December 2nd @ 6 PM
LGBT Resource Center, 750 Ostrom Avenue
 
The LGBT Resource Center is proud to announce a new discussion group! Relate will provide a safe, nonjudgmental space for people with LGBTQ family members to connect about their shared experiences. Please join us @ the LGBT Resource Center on Tuesday, November 11th and Tuesday, December 2nd at 6 PM for refreshments & conversation. Please email Chase Catalano or Erin Rand, Relate co-facilitators, for more information.

SU EVENT OF INTEREST: National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) at Ten

A Lecture by Prof Jolene Rickard (Cornell University)
Monday November 10, 2014
4:00pm 
Eggers Hall 010
This past September marked the tenth anniversary of the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian on the Mall in Washington, DC. Prof. Rickard, Associate Professor of the Department of the History of Art and Visual Studies and Director of the American Indian Program at Cornell University, served as one of the original Guest curators of NMAI. A citizen of the Tuscarora Nation, Prof. Rickard will reflect on issues such as community curating, decolonizing museum spaces, and the mission of the National Museum of the American Indian over the past decade. All are welcome. 
Supported by a grant from the Syracuse University Humanities Center.

The Dean’s List Tour

Friday November 7th
Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3
6pm
 
THIS FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7TH AT 6PM, the Syracuse University Chapter of the NAACP and the Black Communications Society are very excited to present:
 
THE DEAN’S LIST COLLEGE TOUR PRESENTED BY SCOTT MORRIS IN ASSOCIATION WITH D2LAL
 
The Dean’s List is a traveling showcase of the best underground artists in the New York City area, making stops at more than 25 schools. More than 50 artists across a spectrum of genres (hip-hop, dance, R&B, soul, spoken word) have been chosen to participate on this tour. 
 
Join us in the Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium at 6pm as they make the next stop on their tour here at Syracuse University! For more information, contact NAACP member Imani Wallace atiwallace@syr.edu   


SU NEWS

Michele Norris Announced as Keynote for 2015 MLK Event at SU

 

BACK TO TOP

Access to "Human Rights. Yes! Action and Advocacy on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities"

A print copy of the "Human Rights. Yes! Action and Advocacy on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities" is available at the DCC!  The entire manual is also available online at the link below.  Check it out!  It is a great resource.

We're happy to announce that a new ADA anniversary poster produced by the Syracuse Cultural Workers (SCW) is now available!

This features many of the classic posters produced by the Center on Human Policy, and SCW is distributing these classic posters as well!  

SPRING 2015 GRADUATE COURSE AT SU

 
Are You Interested in the Health and Well-Being of People with Disabilities?
 
Take HTW 669: Disability, Food and Health
Through active discussions and hands-on opportunities to develop skills, students will learn about factors influencing the health and well-being of persons with disabilities including:
•             disability history and theory
•             health-related law and services
•             ethics
•             disparities in violence victimization, food security, healthcare, health
•             health promotion
•             emergency and disaster preparedness
 
People with disabilities are a large and diverse population experiencing significant health disparities. This course meets objectives of Healthy People 2020, and will prepare students to understand how promote health and well-being among people with disabilities from a Public Health perspective.
 
Spring, 2015
Wednesdays 2:15 – 5:05 pm
The Falk Complex: Room 201
 
Katherine McDonald, PhD
Falk College: Public Health, Food Studies & Nutrition
Burton Blatt Institute

Individuals, Student Groups Invited to Audition for 2015 MLK Celebration at SU


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Live Virtual Conference (at SU): 'Accessing Higher Ground'

 
All SU faculty and staff are invited to the virtual version of "Accessing Higher Ground," a live, web-based conference focused on accessible media, web and technology, presented by the Association on Higher Education and Disability.
 

Call for Proposals: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society

 The journal invites submissions for a special issue titled “Pleasure and Danger:  Sexual Freedom and Feminism in the Twenty-First Century,” slated for publication in the Autumn 2016 issue. Please circulate widely.

At the heart of the feminist project is a persistent concern with thinking through the “powers of desire” (Snitow, Stansell, and Thompson 1983) and expanding the potential for sexual and gender freedom and self-determination at the same time that we combat sadly persistent forms of sexual danger and violence.  Exemplified in the US context by Carole Vance’s landmark collection, Pleasure and Danger: Exploring Female Sexuality, feminist debates over sex, gender, and society have been incendiary.  First published in 1984, as proceedings of the infamous “Scholar and the Feminist” conference at Barnard, which initiated the equally infamous “sex wars,” this volume reproduced intense dialogue while also contributing to a much broader investigation of the politics (and pleasures, and dangers) of sexuality within feminist theory and culture. Articles that threw down gauntlets were subsequently canonized and celebrated.  Much has changed since that explosive conference and book. Even the subtitle – “exploring female sexuality” – would now be more deeply interrogated (biologically female? presumptively heterosexual?) and certainly pluralized.  But however reframed, the paradoxical joining that is “pleasure and danger” remains poignantly relevant.  


For this special issue, we invite transdisciplinary and transnational submissions that address questions and debates provoked by the “pleasure and danger” couplet.  Submissions may engage with the historical (how different is our moment from that formative “sex wars” era? have the sex wars moved to new terrain such as trafficking and slut-shaming?); the representational (how does the digital era transform our sexual lives? what does “livestreaming” sexual assault do to/for feminist organizing? what possibilities are there for feminist and queer imagery in an era of prolific porn, commodified otherness, and everyday inclusion?); the structural (how do race, ethnicity, religion, and national cultures enable and constrain sexual freedoms? how do carceral and governance feminisms frame and perhaps contain earlier liberatory impulses?); and/or the intersectional (how do we analyze the mutually constituting relations of sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity, class, nationality, ability, age, and so on?). There are local and global questions to be asked and strategic arguments to be resolved.  And the very terms are themselves constantly debated (whose pleasure are we speaking of and for?  who is the “we” doing that speaking? who is imagined to be “in danger?” how does “gender” signify differently in that couplet from “sexuality?”) 


We particularly encourage analyses from all regions of the globe that address pressing concerns and that do so in a way that is accessible and, well, passionate!  We encourage bold and big thinking that seeks to reckon with the conundrum still signaled by the pleasure/danger frame.  We especially seek submissions that attend to the couplet itself, to the centrality of pleasure/danger within the project of making feminism matter and resonate in ways both intimate and structural, deeply sensual and liberatory, simultaneously championing multiplicities of pleasures and a lasting freedom from violence and abuse.


The deadline for submissions is 
April 1, 2015.

Manuscripts may be submitted electronically through 
Signs Editorial Manager system at http://signs.edmgr.com. Please choose the article type “Pleasure and Danger - Special Issue Article.” Guidelines for submission are available at ttp://www.journals.uchicago.edu/Signs/instruct.html.

This call is available online at 
http://signsjournal.org/for-authors/calls-for-papers/ or for download as a PDF at http://signsjournal.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Signs-CFP-Pleasure-and-Danger.pdf.

UCLA CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF WOMEN announces Thinking Gender 2015: 25th Annual Graduate Student Research Conference

 
How have feminist approaches altered the existing understanding of scientific knowledge and practices? Celebrating the 25th Annual Graduate Student Research Conference at the UCLA Center for the Study of Women, Thinking Gender 2015 invites submissions for individual papers, pre-constituted panels, and posters on topics that focus on the participation and/or contribution of marginalized individuals or groups who have been historically excluded from knowledge production. We welcome papers and posters—across all disciplines and historical periods—that engage with the concept of the body as a contested site intersecting with gender, race, sexuality, and identity and how it is related to certain agencies in particular contexts. Attached please see the CFP and for detail information, please visit 
 
 
25th Annual International Graduate 
Student Research Conference
 
Submission Deadline December 15, 2015
 
THINKING GENDER
“Power, Contested Knowledge
& Feminist Practices”
 
April 23-24, 2015 • UCLA Covell Commons
 
Individual papers, pre-constituted panels and posters
(Undergrads also eligible for poster session)
 
For more information visit:
Click on Grants, Awards and Support > Conferences

Call for Abstracts: Special Issue of Gender and Education

 Shifting Education’s Philosophical Imaginaries: Relations, Affects, Bodies, Materialities
Guest Editors: Sharon Todd, Rachel Jones, Aislinn O’Donnell
 

Deadline: Monday 1st December 2014

 

Further information available 
here.

~
Bedford Branch
 A home of our own – thinking philosophically about alternative education
Dr Harriet Pattison
Thursday 27th November at 5.30pm

Room P1.13, University of Bedford, Bedford

 
Dr Harriet Pattison has slightly amended the focus of her talk on alternative education:
Alternative education in the form of home education is on the rise globally.  Its growing popularity begs a spread of questions on the status of the alternative: educational, legal and ethical questions.  In addressing these questions the whole idea of education is thrown into relief – what are the defining features of education, what is the purpose of education, what possibilities are open to us when it comes to seeking educational alternatives, and how can we judge if such education has been successful or not?  This talk explores the relationship between the mainstream and alternative education, arguing that this is a debate relevant to all as well as being one which will stretch the philosophy of education beyond its current limits. 

The seminar is free for everyone. Please share this with anyone who might be interested.
~

Cambridge Branch - Philosophy Seminar
 Humanising Online Pedagogy: technology, attention and education

Dr David Lewin

Thursday 13th November at 4.30pm 

184 Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 8PQ

Please click 
here for event poster and full details. 




NEXT WEEK at Rochester: Complicating Normalcy: Disability, Technology, and Society in the Twenty-First Century


Call for Papers: Western Social Science Association

 
As a co-chair, Steve Brown invites you to submit an abstract of a paper, panel, or roundtable for presentation in the Chronic Disease and Disability section of the Western Social Science Association 57th Annual Conference April 8-11, 2015 in Portland, Oregon at the Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront. More details can be found at: http://www.wssaweb.com/.   Due date: December 6, 2014.

Call for Abstracts

 
The Center on Disability Studies at the University of Hawaii will be hosting the amazing Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity, in Honolulu, May 18-22, 2015.  Steve Brown will be chairing the 2015 topic area on Disability Studies. You are invited to submit an abstract on that topic or any of the many other​ topic areas​.  More information is available at: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/.  Due date: January 30, 2015 
 

FEMA Webinar: People with Disabilities & Human Trafficking

 
Webinar Information

Human Trafficking is becoming the number one crime against people not only in the US but internationally. Traffickers exploit situations such as disasters when services and survivors may find themselves in need of assistance. 

As some may be aware, human trafficking is on the rise in the United States. Traffickers target populations they see as vulnerable and easy to exploit. Among these groups are people with disabilities, especially youth and young adults with cognitive or developmental disabilities; homeless and foster care youth, and people with mental illness.

As part of a DHS/FEMA national pilot initiative , Regions VI, II, and V Disability Integration Specialists have joined together to raise awareness on this critically important subject by conducting a WEBINAR for disability and other access and functional needs stakeholders.

Join the webinar on November 5, 2014 from 10-11 am (Eastern time) to learn more about the indicators of human trafficking and what you can do to help stop this heinous crime.

To register for this webinar, you can either contact robert.americo@fema.dhs.gov or go directly to the link and call in number to access this important event: https://fema.connectsolutions.com/r6jq30xn3h5/. 1-800-320-4330 PIN 262292.

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS - BEYOND SACRED, A NEW THEATER PROJECT ON MUSLIM IDENTITY- APPLICATION DEADLINE NOVEMBER 15TH!

Beyond Sacred is an interview-based theatre production by Ping Chong + Company and LaGuardia Performing Arts Center exploring the diverse experiences of Muslim communities within New York City. We will interview local residents who identify culturally and/or religiously as Muslim. These interviews become the basis of a script, performed by the interviewees, that weaves together personal, historical, and political narratives. The goal of Beyond Sacred is to use theater and personal testimony to foster greater understanding among Muslim and non-Muslim communities in New York.

Participants in 
Beyond Sacred will vary in many ways, but will share the common experience of living in New York City, and feeling a strong connection to Muslim identity. Participants will come from a range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Participants will also include men and women of different ages, professions, experiences and identities. We are looking for stories that reflect a wide range of Muslim identities, including those who have converted to Islam, those who were raised Muslim but have since left the faith, those who identify as “secular” or “culturally” Muslim, and those who are observant on a daily basis.
If you would like to apply to be a participant in Beyond Sacred please fill out this form and email it to pingchongco@beyondsacrednyc.orgThe deadline to apply is November 15, 2014. For more information, please email pingchongco@beyondsacrednyc.org
This project is part of LaGuardia Performing Arts Center's Beyond Sacred: Unthinking Muslim Identity, as season-long interdisciplinary artistic and academic program of performances, panels, and community dialogues.

Society for Disability Studies 2015 Undergraduate Student Panel Call for Nominations


Building on the success of last year's efforts, the Society for Disability Studies Student Interest Group is hoping to put together another panel showcasing undergraduate student research at the 2015 Society for Disability Studies Conference.

As conferences are often quite foreign to undergraduates, rather than a CFP for this panel, we are seeking faculty nominations of student research projects. Thus, if you know of any undergraduates doing exciting research in Disability Studies or work that relates to this year's theme of disability and (getting it) right/s, please have them write up a 300-word abstract for their project and forward to it to Sa.Larson@emory.edu along with your "official" nomination of them and their contact info.

Please also explain to your student the financial expense of attending a conference and given the limited scholarships SDS has to give out, perhaps direct them towards possible funds for conference support at your institution. Forthcoming information on a new student scholarship opportunity to help make the conference more affordable will be sent through the listservs. Information will also be posted on the Student Caucus social media pages (links are provided below).

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/143156312555420/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SDS_StudentCauc

As the final deadline for SDS submissions is Monday, December 8, 2014, we ask that you forward these nominations and abstracts by Monday, December 1. We will notify students (and nominators) of acceptances by Friday, December 5.

If you have any questions, please send them to Stephanie Larson at Sa.Larson@Emory.edu

CALL FOR RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS


The University at Buffalo is seeking individuals with a physical disability 18 to 50 years old in Western New York for interviews about their experience in the workplace. Interviews will take approximately 1 to 2 hours, will be completely confidential, and will only be used for dissertation research. Participants will receive a 10$ gift card for their time. If interested please contact Paul Durlak in the department of sociology at pauldurl@buffalo.edu, or at 716-949-2173.


Call for Papers: Pippi to Ripley3


Pippi to Ripley3/ITHACON40: Women & Gender in Science Fiction, Fantasy, Children’s Literature and Comics
 
Ithaca College; May 1-2, 2015

Keynote Speaker: Bruce Coville (children’s fantasy author)
Special Guest: Laura Lee Gulledge (YA graphic novelist)
Guiding Spirit: Marleen Barr, Founding Mother of Feminist Science Fiction Criticism

Pippi to Ripley 3 is an interdisciplinary conference with a focus on women and gender in science fiction and fantasy.  We invite papers devoted to imaginative representation in all media: comics, films, television, and video games as well as in folklore, Children’s, Young Adult, and adult-directed literature. 

This year we are partnering with ITHACON, one of the longest-running comic book conventions in North America.  Events will include academic and fan-based panels, workshops for educators and librarians, a science fiction/fantasy trivia contest, and activities for children ages 5-18.  Admission to ITHACON and its related events is free.  

Published authors and illustrators of fantasy, science fiction, or comics who are interested in selling their work at ITHACON should contact Katharine Kittredge at kkittredge@ithaca.edu

Appropriate topics for conference papers may include, but are not limited to:
•       Young female and queer characters, especially in media for young adults and children (The Hunger Games, Divergent, The Song of the Lioness, His Dark Materials, The Runaways, Power Pack)
•       Women and their place in futuristic or other worlds (Dystopic Fiction, Classic Science Fiction, Fantasy Worlds, Star Trek, Doctor Who, Babylon 5, Firefly)
•       Female and queer protagonists in urban fantasy and paranormal romance (Buffy, Anita Blake, Sookie Stackhouse, Clary Fray)
•       Gender politics after the apocalypse (Revolution, Falling Skies, Oryx and Crake, Y: The Last Man)
•       Teaching imaginative fictive/offering imaginative fiction-based programming at all levels (Buffy-based courses; graphic novel units, YA dystopias, children’s fantasy)
•       Female and queer characters in updated/adapted fairy tales (Once Upon a Time, Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters, Snow White and the Huntsman, Grimm)
•       The women of superhero films/television with a special focus on differently abled and gender non-conforming characters (Marvel Cinematic Universe, Agents of SHIELD, Arrow)
•       Female-focused comic book series (New 5, Batgirl and Wonder Woman, Marvel  NOW! X-Men)
•       Horrific women and women in horror (American Horror Story, Lamia, Carrie, Mama)
•       Science fiction and reproductive body horror (Alien franchise, Twilight, Bloodchild)
•       Cyberpunk and the redefinition of gender (William Gibson, Neal Stephenson, Charles Stross)

Please send a 300-500 word abstract by January 15, 2015, to Katharine Kittredge, Ithaca College, Department of English, kkittredge@ithaca.edu


REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE AND RESEARCH PARTICIPATION

 
Hello,
 
I am currently in my final year of my MSW program at the University of Minnesota and am doing an independent study on therapeutic techniques for people with developmental disabilities who have been sexually abused. I have worked with people with DD for most of the past 15 years and have a more recent interest in trauma. While interning at an organization last year that did forensic interviews of children and vulnerable adults who had been abused, I discovered that there are very few therapists in my area who do this type of work despite having a great need for it. This piqued my interest, which led me to my current project.
 
I am looking to interview therapists and other experts in the field to determine what techniques seem to work best to heal from trauma, how/if therapy may vary if someone had a developmental disability or not, prevalence of abuse in the DD community, etc. I am estimating that interviews would take 30-45 minutes over the phone, but I could also send questions via email. My goal after completing my interviews and lit reviews is to publish a paper in the spring. Please let me know if you would be willing to be interviewed and/or if you have any questions. Thank you very much for your time and consideration.
 
Sincerely,
 
Stephanie Morris
 
Stephanie Morris
Ambit and ADAPT Office Manager

REMINDER: Call for proposals on Syracuse Symposium & Spring Symposia

 

HUMANITIES CENTER DEADLINES
 
Monday, November 10 – deadline to submit proposal for
Syracuse Symposium™ themes
 
Both Fall 2015 and Fall 2016 themes will be considered. 
 
Please indicate if you prefer your topic to be considered for Fall 2015, Fall 2016, or if you have no preference.
 
Please include a minimum of 3 names to be considered for a keynote speaker that fits the theme you are proposing.  Please be aware of budgetary limitations when considering the honorarium for potential keynote speakers.  It might be difficult to provide an honorarium much higher than $10,000.
 
 
Monday, November 10 – deadline to submit event for
2015 Spring Humanities Center Symposia
 
 
Please send all submissions to Karen Ortega: kmortega@syr.edu


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

CSMA’s 7th  Annual ARTS FOR ALL MARATHON

 
Artists Tina Christina-Price and Rik Daniels are producing two benefit performances and a workshop this November, in Ithaca
 
Presentation/Audience Feedback on November 8 and 15 at 3:00 pm
The premiere of La Vie en Rose
A Chance Encounter, The Tango, A Break-up and Apology
Donations will be accepted at the door.
 
 
The Workshop is November 22nd 3:00-5:00pm
Cost $20 suggested donation per participant
 
About the workshop:
  • The movement is contact improvisation. No experience necessary.
 
The Participants:
 
  • Anyone over 18 with and without disabilities. If an aide is required by participant, aide will assist as needed.
 
The goal:
  • To discover and develop respect for all people and their bodies.
  • Erase the assumed distinction between abled/disabled.
  • Develop a common language - that of gestures and movements
  • Have fun
 
Please call CSMA for more information (607) 272-1474

Deaf Advocacy Council Town Hall Meeting Next Thursday in Syracuse


President Reynolds asked me to send email out in order to remind all of you that Deaf Advocacy Council will have Town Hall meeting on Thursday evening, November 13th at 7:00 p.m. -- Erwin Methodist Church/Fellowship Hall, 920 Euclid Avenue at Westcott Street, Syracuse, NY across from the Westcott Community Center (old fire station).


We hope to see you there.


Please contact Tommy Reynolds at 
treyno2@twcny.rr.com if you need to contact him.

Have a great day!


Carlton

Hip-hop Therapy: New Route to Wellbeing? (from The Guardian)

 

Opportunity to Support the Mental Patients Liberation Alliance

 
The Mental Patients Liberation Alliance (The Alliance) invites you to join with other proponents of human rights in mental health on Friday, November 14, 2014 and STAND UP to NAMI-NYS and oppose its unanimous and unequivocal support for Bill H.R. 3717.  With sweeping disregard for the avalanche of concerns detailed by thousands of people with relevant lived experiences in New York State and nationwide, NAMI-NYS will “stand united” to honor Rep. Tim Murphy with their Legislative Champion Award.
 
NAMI-NYS has drawn a line
 
The Alliance has reserved a hotel room at the Desmond Hotel and Conference Center, 660 Albany Shaker Road, Albany, New York for November 13 and 14, 2014.  This offers on-sight space for participants to organize, plan and further develop an Active Response.
 
A conference room is reserved nearby at the Holiday Inn, 205 Wolf Road for the day of November 14 to hold teach-ins.  The teach-in opportunity is hosted by The Alliance and the National Empowerment Center.  A round table discussion will begin at 10 a.m. to further organize.  Invitations have been extended to several organizations to provide information around the Murphy Bill, such as: individual and united efforts to challenge the bill, lack of constitutionality, international opposition, and other pertinent topics.  Information will be updated as specific segments are scheduled.   
 
In addition to the teach-ins, individuals and groups are planning diverse activities throughout the day, such as information sharing/distribution, outreach to NAMI members, and press conferences.
 
Participants will gather together at the Desmond Hotel at 5:00 p.m., Friday, November 14 to demonstrate solidarity in opposition to NAMI-NYS and the Murphy Bill.
 
Contact:  The Alliance @ 1-800-654-7227
George Ebert at georgeebert@yahoo.com 

Mother Who Provides Round-the-Clock Care Finds Solace in Her Home Geraldine Kentish supports two children with disabilities, but had little money left over after paying rent on their Harlem apartment.




‘Off Color’ and on Target About Race in America “Off Color,” a New York Times video series, looks at how artists of color are making sharp social commentary about race in America through comedy and performance.


New Buildings for Older People: “Silver” design should ensure accessibility and safety


A Natural Fix for A.D.H.D.: The problem is not just your brain. The problem is boredom.


 How Mass Incarceration Was Won: Indiscriminate Imprisonment of Disabled, Deaf, Black & Poor People for Profit

 
How Mass Incarceration Was WonIndiscriminate Imprisonment of Disabled, Deaf, Black & Poor People for Profit
 
Talk by Talila "TL" Lewis
FounderHelping Educate to Advance the Rights of the Deaf (HEARD)
 
Monday, November 10
6:00pm to 7:30pm
Edward B. Bunn S.J. Intercultural Center, Room 107
Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.
(building is located on campus inside the front gates)
 
Free & Open to the Public
 
 
 
Access: There will be ASL interpretation. The building is wheelchair accessible. Guests are asked to refrain from wearing scented or perfumed products. For more information: http://www.anapsid.org/cnd/files/how2bscentfree.pdfFor any additional disability access or reasonable accommodation requests, contact Lydia Brown by email at lydia@autistichoya.com or by voice or text message at (202) 618-0187 anytime before the event.

Blog Post of Interest: A Letter to My Wheelchair in Need of Repair

 

Disability Right International's Eric Rosenthal appointed Human Rights Chair by Georgetown Law

 
 
DRI's Eric Rosenthal Appointed Georgetown University Law School 2015-2016 Drinan Chair in Human Rights 
 
Washington, DC -- November 4, 2014 -- Georgetown University Law Center today announced the appointment of Eric Rosenthal, Disability Rights International's (DRI) founder and executive director, to the 2015-2016 Robert F. Drinan, S.J. Chair in Human Rights.  
 
"This appointment recognizes Eric Rosenthal for his invaluable contributions to international human rights," said Georgetown Law Dean William M. Treanor.  "We are very pleased that it will allow the Law Center to continue Fr. Drinan's extraordinary legacy."
 
As the Drinan Chair holder, Rosenthal will teach a course during the fall semester of 2015 focused on international human rights advocacy for children and adults with disabilities - allowing J.D. and LL.M. students to benefit from his expertise as a leader in the global disability rights movement.
 
Rosenthal, who was featured in the spring 2013 issue of Georgetown Law magazine, is the founder and executive director of DRI, one of the world's first and leading advocacy organizations dedicated to the protection and full inclusion of children and adults with disabilities under international human rights law.  
 
Recognizing and protecting the human rights of persons with disabilities was the topic of a seminar paper Rosenthal wrote as a student at Georgetown Law. Since establishing DRI a year after graduation, in 1993, he has trained human rights and disability activists and provided assistance to governments and international development organizations worldwide.  Rosenthal helped establish six independent disability rights organizations run by people with disabilities around the world. He has served as a consultant to the U.S. National Council on Disability, UNICEF, the World Health Organization, the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture and the UN Special Rapporteur on Disability.   
 
In 2008, Rosenthal received the Henry A. Betts Award from the American Association of People with Disabilities for his role in helping to inspire and build support for the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. In 2013, he was the recipient of the Charles Bronfman Prize, which "celebrates the vision and endeavor of an individual or team under fifty years of age whose humanitarian work, combined with their Jewish values, has significantly improved the world."  
 
"We are delighted that Eric - an alumnus who created a very effective human rights organization to address a major gap in international law in order to protect a very vulnerable group of people - will be teaching our students next fall," said Georgetown Law Human Rights Institute Director Andrew I. Schoenholtz.
 
"Fr. Drinan was my first human rights professor in law school," said Rosenthal. "But he was much more than a law professor. He was the embodiment of what it is to be a human rights activist - someone who stands up for his values and for people who are downtrodden around the world - whatever others may think. I have always sought to live up to that standard, and I am deeply indebted to Fr. Drinan for his mentorship, friendship and support. It is a true honor to serve as a human rights professor in his name."
Rosenthal received a B.A. from the University of Chicago and a J.D. cum laude from Georgetown Law, where he has also served as an adjunct professor, teaching courses in public interest advocacy.   
 
The Drinan Chair was established in 2006 in honor of Professor Robert F. Drinan, S.J. Drinan was a professor at Georgetown Law from 1981 until his death in 2007, as well as a priest, scholar, lawyer, politician, activist, ethicist and one of the nation's leading advocates for international human rights. He dedicated his life to humanitarian causes and to improving the legal profession.    
 
See Georgtown's announcement on Rosenthal's appointment, here.  


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