Weekly Newsletter

Follow Us Like Us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube Follow us on Tumblr

Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

INDEX



The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

Trans* 101: Understanding Trans* Identities and Experiences

FREE Midnight Movies: Including FREE popcorn and soda (for students)

Women's Leadership Luncheon - Friday, November 14 (for SU students)

SU NEWS

Disability Cultural Center Staff and All at SU Mourn the Passing of Professor, Mentor, Friend, Colleague, and Activist, Steven J. Taylor

Steve Taylor & disability studies (close captioned) 

SPRING 2015 DISABILITY LAW AND POLICY SEMINAR: A COURSE FOR SU GRADUATE STUDENTS AND 2L/3L LAW STUDENTS

2015 Teaching Mentor Call...

Spring 2015 Course: CFE 600: Trans* identities: Embodiments and Institutions

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, and PARTICIPANTS

Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Dissertation Fellowships (DEADLINE: Feb 1, 2015)

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Registration is still open! "Accessing Higher Ground" Live virtual conference

Funded Ph.D. Studentship: 'Gendered Perspectives on Death, Illness and Loss' (U.K.)

Ithaca College Dissertation Diversity Fellowships

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY SEMINAR ON DISABILITY STUDIES, NEXT WEEK (11/20; RSVP by 11/17)

Call for Proposals: Digital Literary Studies International Conference

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: October 27-November 7, 2014

Joint guidance on effective communication for students with disabilities in public schools issued by Justice Department and Department of Education

ICPSR Announces New Archive on Disability

For people with disabilities, doctors are not always healers - The Washington Post

Information about a protest in Albany against NAMI-NYS H.R. 3717 (Murphy's bill)

Walmart Joins the Disability Equality Index as a Founding Partner

The Center for Bioethics and Humanities invites you to the upcoming Center Seminar


SU HAPPENINGS

Trans* 101: Understanding Trans* Identities and Experiences

Hall of Languages 500
Thursday, November 13
7 p.m.

FREE Midnight Movies: Including FREE popcorn and soda (for students)

Free Midnight Movies will be screened Fridays and Saturdays at midnight in Gifford Auditorium (HBC).   
Admittance, popcorn, and soda are all FREE!  Please spread the word to your fellow friends and classmates!
Below is the schedule of movies for the remainder of the semester:


Friday, November 14:  Wish I Was Here
Saturday, November 15:  Neighbors
Friday, December 5:  This is Where I Leave You

Women's Leadership Luncheon - Friday, November 14 (for SU students)

Please join the Women's Leadership Luncheon on Friday, November 14 from 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. in Schine 304ABC.
This month's luncheon will feature a panel of women from the Syracuse community. Lunch will be provided.
Dr. Cynthia Morrow: Dr. Morrow is Professor of Practice at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University as well as an Assistant Professor in the Center for Bioethics and Humanities; Public Health and Preventive Medicine; and Pediatrics at SUNY.
Crystal Doody, J.D.: Crystal Doody is a disability rights attorney at Legal Services of Central New York. Crystal received her J.D. and Certificate of Advanced Study in Disability Studies from Syracuse University College of Law and her M.A. in Education with a certificate in Disability Studies from Syracuse University School of Education. Crystal is a founding member of the LGBTQ Law Association of Central New York and is a member of the Onondaga County Bar Association’s Diversity Committee.
Kimberly Sacco: Kimberly Sacco is a clinician and program compliance coordinator at the Alcohol & Drug Council of Tompkins County’s Outpatient Clinic. Previously, she was the Executive Director of the Syracuse Onondaga Drug and Alcohol Abuse Commission. Kimberly studied and graduated from Colgate University. She is an advocate for under-represented populations.


SU NEWS

 

Disability Cultural Center Staff and All at SU Mourn the Passing of Professor, Mentor, Friend, Colleague, and Activist, Steven J. Taylor

 
You may send and share your condolences by mail to the Center on Human Policy, Syracuse University, 805 S Crouse Ave, Syracuse, NY 13244; by email to thechp@syr.edu; or via the Center’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/CenteronHumanPolicy.  There has been a request for **no phone calls**, please. There will be a memorial in the coming months; details will follow when they become available. 

Steve Taylor & disability studies (close captioned) 


SPRING 2015 DISABILITY LAW AND POLICY SEMINAR: A COURSE FOR SU GRADUATE STUDENTS AND 2L/3L LAW STUDENTS

 
LAW 809- DISABILITY LAW AND POLICY SEMINAR
Professor Arlene Kanter
Spring  2015
 
THIS COURSE IS OPEN TO ALL 2L AND 3L LAW STUDENTS AND SU GRADUATE STUDENTS FROM ANY COLLEGE.
 IT REQUIRES NO PREVIOUS KNOWLEDGE OF DISABILITY LAW.
 
The goal of the seminar is to have each student develop a project in disability, education, or a related field of law and policy. The course offers readings from the field of disability studies as a theoretical background to the study of related legal issues. Students have the opportunity to work on projects that are from international, national and  local disability rights organizations such as the UN, USAID, ABA Commission on Disability, National Council on Disability, Disability Rights International, etc.  Or, students may develop their own research topics.
 
This year, we have been asked to prepare disability-related country reports on  Morocco and Tunisia with local partners from those countries. We also have been asked to collect and analyze law, policies and research on issues related to violence against women in various countries, particularly in Africa, the Middle East and the Americas as well as participate in a project on the rights of refugees with disabilities.
 
Law students have used this course to prepare what would become their COL writing sample. Graduate students from other colleges have used this course to explore issues that became part of their PhD proposals and dissertations. Several of the student papers written for this class were accepted for publication in law and referee journals.
 
This course is open to second and third year law students and to SU graduate students, with permission of the instructor. In addition to completing a paper, students will be required to prepare and present their research to the class. This course meets the COL writing requirement. The COL grading curve does not apply to this course. There is no final exam. Grades are based on the quality of the student’s final paper/project and class participation. Enrollment is limited.  Students who have not taken Disability Law are welcome to enroll in this course. There are no prerequisites. This course is usually required for students seeking to obtain the COL Certificate/ Concentration in Disability Law and Policy and is recommended for students seeking to obtain the CAS in Disability Studies from the Cultural Foundations Department of the School of Education. The course will meet on Tuesdays from 5-7:30 in Room 436 of the College of Law (Dineen Hall).
 
If students have any questions about this course or would like permission to enroll, please email Professor Arlene Kanter at kantera@Law.syr.edu .

2015 Teaching Mentor Call...

 
Dear TAs and Graduate Students,
 
Sorry for any duplication across listservs…
 
Recruitment efforts for the position of Teaching Mentor with the August TA Orientation Program are now underway. As most of you may recall, Teaching Mentors lead small groups and deliver much of the Orientation programming. A description of the position and application process is attached.
 
If you are an experienced TA (current or former at SU), I urge you to consider applying. In addition to the pay (and eligible Teaching Mentors will have work opportunities during the academic year as well), service as a Teaching Mentor very effectively demonstrates your investment in the teaching role to prospective employers. It also has social rewards in the form of a network of like-minded grad students from around campus.
 
In order to apply, you must attend one of the Teaching Mentor info sessions that will be held in Bowne 218 on the following schedule:
 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.  
Tuesday, January 20, 2015, 10:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. 

Thursday, January 22, 2015, 3:00 - 4:00 p.m.
 
Current and former Teaching Mentors will be on hand to tell you about the job and answer your questions. *Application forms will only be available at these info sessions.* This year the Graduate School is especially interested in attracting applicants with TA experience in underrepresented fields such as: STEM fields, the Arts, and Architecture. Applications will be accepted through Friday, February 6, 2015.
 
I hope to see you at one of the info sessions. In the meantime, enjoy your upcoming and well-deserved Fall Break!
 
 
Thank you and take care,
 
 
Shawn Loner
 
TA Program Coordinator,
    Graduate School Programs, Syracuse University
 
Adjunct Instructor
    Religion, Le Moyne College
 Graduate Student,
    Religion, Syracuse University

Spring 2015 Course: CFE 600: Trans* identities: Embodiments and Institutions

Thursdays, 4-7 p.m.
Huntington 056
Dr. D. Chase Catalano
 
This course will examine the histories and contemporary iterations of trans* identities, conceptualizations of embodiments, and experiences navigating institutions (medical industrial complex, prison industrial complex, and higher education). Students will explore literature disaggregating and conflating of the intersections of gender, sex, sexuality, as well as historical intertwining of trans* politics and gay, lesbian, and bisexual movements. Under examination will be the impact the “wrong body” narrative, discourse focused on bio-medical transitioning, and the role of the Standards of Care. This course will also address how higher education attends to trans* inclusion in areas such as policies, practices, and education strategies.
 
Undergraduate seniors and graduate students outside the School of Education need to contact Dr. Catalano for permission to register:djcatala@syr.edu


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Dissertation Fellowships (DEADLINE: Feb 1, 2015)

 
The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation will award ten or more dissertation fellowships to graduate students who will complete the writing of their dissertation in 2016. The fellowships are intended to contribute to the support of the doctoral candidate to enable him or her to complete the thesis in a timely manner and are only appropriate for students approaching the final year of their Ph.D. work.
Topics that interest the foundation include violence and aggression in relation to social change, intergroup conflict, war, terrorism, crime and family relationships, among other subjects. Dissertations with no relevance to understanding human violence and aggression will not be supported. Priority will also be given to areas and methodologies not receiving adequate attention and support from other funding sources.
Eligibility: These grants are made to Ph.D. candidates who are entering the dissertation stage of graduate school. Usually, this means that fieldwork or other research is complete and writing has begun. If analysis and writing are not far enough along for an applicant to be confident that s/he will complete the dissertation within the year, s/he should not apply, as the application will not be competitive with those that comply with this timetable.
Funding: These fellowships of $20,000 each are designed to contribute to the support of the doctoral candidate to enable him or her to complete the thesis in a timely manner.
Deadline: February 1, 2015
Contact: Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation
25 West 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019
Phone: (646) 428-0971
Email: info@hfg.org
Website: www.hfg.org/df/guidelines.htm

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

 
The New York State Foundations of Education Association (NYSFEA) is pleased to announce our 2015 conference entitled: “Is Teacher Education Worth Fighting For?”     The conference will be held at Colgate University in Hamilton, N.Y on Friday, March 27th and Saturday, March 28th. Building on the momentum generated at last year’s conference, we will focus our attention more directly on what concerns those of us in the academy most personally: the health and survival of our teacher education programs. 
 
The keynote speakers for the conference will be Peter Taubman and Paula Salvio, an inspiring pair of life partners who have dedicated their work to social justice, lively and loving public education.  Dr. Taubman is professor of Education in the School of Education at Brooklyn College. He is a founder of both the Bushwick School for Social Justice, and Reclaiming the Conversation on Education, the latter a powerful coalition of resistance to corporate reforms.  He is the author of Teaching by Numbers: Education in the Age of Accountability and Disavowed Knowledge: Psychoanalysis, Education and Teaching.   Dr. Salvio is Professor of Education at the University of New Hampshire, where she currently serves as an Education and Culture Faculty Scholar, working as a feminist and media studies specialist on the design of projects that bring the knowledge and creative inquiry of the humanities to studies in sustainability.   She is the author of Anne Sexton: Teacher of Weird Abundance and Love’s Return: Psychoanalytic Essays on Early Childhood, Teaching and Learning.
 
CALL FOR PAPERS
 
All proposals should be submitted through the new NYSFEA website, which will be up and running by December 1st.  An email announcement will go out on December 1st with a link to the website and detailed submission procedures.
 
Please note as you are preparing your proposals that NYSFEA has a long history of hosting artistic/alternative formats for presentations and we welcome creative submissions.
  
Proposals that directly address the conference theme will have preference, but we welcome a wide array of proposals that address social justice concerns about education from a variety of methodological perspectives. NYSFEA uses a blind review process.
 
PROPOSALS ARE DUE BY JANUARY 15.  NOTIFICATIONS WILL SENT OUT NO LATER THAN FEBRUARY 1.  
 
1) Individual Papers/Alternative Format Presentations:
Along with a 350 word abstract + short bibliography, please include a separate very brief biographical statement.  Please specify if your presentation will use an alternative format.  
 
2) Panel Proposals:
Please submit one proposal for the whole panel.  Include names of all the panelists. Provide a 250 word statement that frames the theme of the panel, and a 100 word abstract + short bibliography for each paper on the panel.  Each presenter should include a separate very brief biographical statement.  
 
Please contact the NYSFEA secretary, Dr. Rebecca Johnson (rjohnson@elmira.edu) with any questions or concerns.  

Registration is still open! "Accessing Higher Ground" Live virtual conference

 
There’s still time to register!
 
You are invited to the virtual version of "Accessing Higher Ground," a live, web-based conference focused on Accessible Media, Web and Technology, presented by theAssociation on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD)The 17th annual conference will be held Monday – Friday, November 17 – 21, 2014 and be hosted on the SU campus in Rooms 2-202, 1-218 and 0-213 in the Center for Science and Technology.  Registration is free; please register at http://its.syr.edu/aheadreg if you plan to attend any sessions.
 
You can pick and choose which sessions you want to attend! Once registered, you may attend any of the virtual sessions. See the virtual conference website for session abstracts and schedule. 
 
Accessing Higher Ground (AHG) focuses on the implementation and benefits of Accessible Media, Universal Design and Assistive Technology in the university, business and public setting. There is a strong focus on campus accommodation. Other topic areas cover legal and policy issues, including ADA and 508 compliance. The creation of accessible media and information resources, including Web pages and library resources are a particular focus of the event.
 
Presentation of this conference on the SU campus is jointly sponsored by the Office of Faculty Development, the Office of Disability Services, the Disability Cultural Center, SU Libraries, and Information Technology and Services.
 
Who should attend?
This conference is intended for individuals who need to design or provide accessible Web, media, information resources and technology in the academic and business environment. In the past, audiences have included Web designers, assistive technologists, ADA coordinators, human resource personnel, persons with disabilities, disability specialists, faculty, media specialists and programmers interested in accessibility and incorporating Universal Design into curriculum.
 
About the virtual conference
AHG will stream sessions live from all 5 days of the conference, one track during the pre-conference and two tracks during the main conference. For complete information, including session abstracts and schedule, visit the virtual conference website
 
NOTE: ITS has arranged for group tickets, each of which covers presentation of all virtual conference sessions at a single site on the SU campus. DO NOT register for the virtual conference on the AHG website, unless you want to participate as an individual, or from another location. Also note that the times shown on the virtual conference website are Mountain Time. Events will be presented here on campus two hours later than shown on the conference website.
 
If past practice is any guide, sometime after the conference AHEAD will post recordings of the sessions (or at least most of them) on their Adobe Connect server and send us log-in credentials.  It’s expected they'll do the same this time around, and we'll send out the link and credentials to all who register here at SU. One caveat: last year it took them quite a while to get this set up, so we may need to be patient to view the sessions after the live event.
 
Questions? Send an email to Information Technology and Services at accessibility@syr.edu and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.  Please include your name and phone number in your email.
 
Hope to see you there!

Funded Ph.D. Studentship: 'Gendered Perspectives on Death, Illness and Loss' (U.K.)


(Funding to start in January 2015; application deadline is November 24, 2014)

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AJW420/phd-studentship-in-gendered-perspectives-on-death-illness-and-loss/

The supervisory team will be led by Professor Beverley Clack, (Philosophy of Religion), with Dr. Molly Cochran (International Relations) and Dr. Victoria Browne (Politics). The team supporting this research project possesses expertise in a number of disciplines, notably philosophy, politics and international relations that will allow for a rich conceptual exploration of how gender intersects with death, illness and loss within the interdisciplinary frame of the medical humanities. 

They welcome proposals from applicants specializing in a range of fields, and are particularly interested in students taking a philosophical and/or political approach. 

Possible themes include: Terminal illness and ‘living with dying’; Death, loss and mourning in war; Reproductive loss / prenatal death; Disenfranchised grief; Euthanasia and control over life and death  

Possible theoretical approaches include: Feminist / queer philosophy and theory (e.g. Cavarero, Ahmed, Edelman); Biopolitics (e.g. Agamben, Foucault, Butler); Existential philosophy (e.g. Beauvoir, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard) ; Psychoanalytic theory (e.g. Freud, Irigaray, Kristeva) 

Victoria Browne is willing to answer enquiries: vbrowne@brookes.ac.uk 

Ithaca College Dissertation Diversity Fellowships

 
The School of Humanities and Sciences at Ithaca College announces the Dissertation Diversity Fellowship Program for 2015-16. The fellowships support promising scholars who are committed to diversity in the academy in order to better prepare them for tenure track appointments within liberal arts or comprehensive colleges/universities. 
 
IC offers a $32,000 stipend, + $3,000 in travel/professional development, relocation reimbursement, office space, health benefits, and access to the Ithaca College and Cornell University libraries.  IC seeks "promising scholars committed to diversity in the academy in order to better prepare them for tenure track appointments within liberal arts or comprehensive colleges/universities".  Candidates must have approved dissertation proposals; preference will be given to those who are in the last year of dissertation writing.  

We are specifically searching for people in Women's and Gender Studies, though the ad also lists a range of other disciplines of interest. 
The School of Humanities and Sciences at Ithaca College announces the Dissertation Diversity Fellowship Program for 2015-16. The fellowships support promising scholars who are committed to diversity in the academy in order to better prepare them for tenure track appointments within liberal arts or comprehensive colleges/universities. 

Applications are welcome in the following areas/departments:  Communication Studies, History, Philosophy, Religion, Sociology, Theatre Arts, Writing, and Women’s and Gender Studies. The School of Humanities and Sciences houses additional interdisciplinary minors that may be potential sites of collaboration for candidates: African Diaspora Studies, Latina/o Studies, Jewish Studies, Latin American Studies, Asian American Studies, Muslim Cultures, Native American Studies and Women's Studies. 
 
Position Responsibilities and Terms of Fellowship: Fellowships are for the academic year (August 16, 2015 to May 31, 2016) and are non-renewable. The fellow will receive a $32,000 stipend, $3,000 in travel/professional development support, relocation reimbursement, office space, health benefits and access to Ithaca College and Cornell University libraries. The fellow will teach one course in the fall semester and one course in the spring semester, and will be invited to speak about her/his dissertation research in relevant classes and at special events at Ithaca College. Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited program leading to a Ph.D. degree at a U.S. institution; evidence of superior academic achievement and commitment to a career in teaching at the college or university level is required. Candidates must also be authorized to work in the United States. Prior to August 15, 2015, the fellow must be advanced to candidacy at the home institution, with an approved dissertation proposal. Preference will be given to candidates in the last year of dissertation writing.
 
Position/Job Qualifications:  Successful candidates will show evidence of superior academic achievement, a high degree of promise for continued achievement as scholars and teachers, and a capacity to respond in pedagogically productive ways to the learning needs of students from diverse backgrounds. Candidates should demonstrate sustained personal engagement with communities that are underrepresented in the academy and an ability to bring this asset to learning, teaching and scholarship at the college and university level.  Using the diversity of human experience as an educational resource in teaching and scholarship is expected.
 
Ithaca College, a comprehensive residential campus community of 7,000 students, combines the best of education in the liberal arts and sciences with training in the professions. Our strategic plan, called IC 20/20, positions us to offer a truly distinct integrative learning experience that allows us to graduate students who are ready for today's personal, professional and global challenges. We seek candidates who embrace integrative learning and want to be a part of this exciting time in Ithaca College history. 

Ithaca College continually strives to build an inclusive and welcoming community of individuals, with diverse talents and skills from a multitude of backgrounds, who are committed to civility, mutual respect, social justice, and the free and open exchange of ideas. Candidates from underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 


Nestled in the heart of New York State's scenic Finger Lakes region, Ithaca College sits atop South Hill overlooking picturesque Cayuga Lake and is just minutes away from the city center. Combining small town warmth and charm with the vibrancy of a college community, the thriving and culturally diverse city of Ithaca has been rated by Kiplinger's as one of the top 10 places to live in the U.S. To learn more about Ithaca College, visit us at www.ithaca.edu.  
 
Instructions for submitting your application: Interested individuals should apply online at www.icjobs.org, and submit a C.V./resumé, cover letter, two sample syllabi for courses you might wish to teach, a list of references, and a transcript. Questions about the online application should be directed to the Office of Human Resources at (607) 274-8000.  Screening of applications begins December 15, 2014.


 


Dr. Carla Golden


Professor, Department of Psychology


Coordinator, Women's and Gender Studies


Ithaca College


Ithaca, NY 14850


 


(607) 274-3504 (office)


(607) 274-1925 (fax)
BACK TO TOP

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY SEMINAR ON DISABILITY STUDIES, NEXT WEEK (11/20; RSVP by 11/17)

Concordance between Parents and Scientists about Autism Spectrum Disorder
Ruth L. Fischbach, PhD, MPE
Director for the Center of Bioethics
Columbia University
 
There is no reported investigation comparing attitudes and beliefs about autism spectrum disorder (ASD) between parents of children with ASD and scientists who research ASD. To investigate levels of concordance between these groups on causes of autism, priorities of research, perceived stigma, and disclosure of genetic testing, a computer-assisted telephone interview was conducted, with additional questions for scientists on incentives and barriers to communication. Parents of children with ASD (n=502) were recruited from the Simons Simplex Collection, and research scientists (n=60) were recruited from investigators funded by the Simons Foundation. Response rates were notable (parents 91%, scientists 80%). Parents and scientists differed significantly in beliefs of the likely major cause of autism (p=0.007) and priorities for further research (p<0.001); scientists believed more strongly in genetic causes and advocated for more genetics research, while many parents believed in vaccines. Parents (37%) were more likely to hesitate vaccinating their child (p<0.001). In contrast, there was strong concordance regarding the level of perceived stigma (95% vs. 93%) and preferences for disclosure of genetic results, including incidental findings. While scientists believed communication was important and identified only time and lack of invitation as major barriers, paradoxically fewer than half reported it was important for parents to understand scientific research or for scientists to communicate directly with parents. There is much to learn about the held views of parents and scientists and ways to promote meaningful and productive communication on ASD-related issues. 
 
Parents of children with ASD are frequently aware of hurtful words said about their children.  Dr. Fischbach will also present data to show how parents respond to these hurtful situations, and how many show moral courage in the face of discriminatory challenges.
 
  Thursday, November 20, 2014 
4:00-6:00 pm
 
Faculty House, Seminar Rooms 3 and 4
Columbia University
64 Morningside Drive
 
Faculty House is located on Columbia University’s East Campus on 116th Street between Amsterdam Ave. and Morningside Drive. Refer to http://www.columbia.edu/about_columbia/map/faculty_house.html For disability access map, see http://www.columbia.edu/about_columbia/map/AccessibilityMap.pdf
 
The venue is wheelchair accessible. Sign-language interpreters will be provided. If you require other disability accommodations, please contact Columbia’s Disability Services at 212 854 2388 by November 16, 2014.
 
Please RSVP by November 17th to dsseminar@gmail.com with the number of individuals who will attend the seminar presentation.

Call for Proposals: Digital Literary Studies International Conference

 
International Conference: Digital Literary Studies 
Date: May 14-15, 2015 
Location: School of Arts and Humanities, University of Coimbra, Portugal
 
'Digital Literary Studies' is an international conference exploring methods, tools, objects and digital practices in the field of literary studies. The digitization of artifacts and literary practices, the adoption of computational methods for aggregating, editing and analyzing texts as well as the development of collaborative forms of research and teaching through networking and communication platforms are three dimensions of the ongoing relocation of literature and literary studies in the digital medium. The aim of this two-day conference is to contribute to the mapping of material practices and interpretative processes of literary studies in a changing media ecology. 

We invite researchers to submit papers and posters on projects concerned with the digital reinvention of literary studies. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
  • computational literary analysis (macro analysis, data mining, distant reading, topic modelling; visualization, corpora);
  • digital philology (electronic editions and archives, textual databases);
  • computational literary creation (automatic generation of text, textual instruments, kinetic texts, locative narrative, etc.);
  • the teaching of literature in a digital context;
  • peer review and open access (new practices of collaboration, dissemination, transfer and validation of knowledge production).

The ‘Digital Literary Studies’ conference will take place at the School of Arts and Humanities, University of Coimbra on May 14-15, 2015. Paper and poster proposals should be submitted by January 15, 2015 through EasyChair (https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=eld2015). We also welcome panel proposals (three presenters per panel). All paper proposals must be between 1500 and 2000 words (including references). Authors should provide name, contact details, and institutional affiliation, as well as title, abstract, and keywords for their paper. Authors will be notified of the peer review results by February 15, 2015. Proposals can use any of the following languages: Portuguese, English, Spanish, French, and Italian. Selected articles resulting from the conference papers will be published in a special issue of the journal MATLIT (http://iduc.uc.pt/matlit).  

For additional updated information, please check the conference website at http://eld2015.wordpress.com/  
The Organizing Committee may be contacted via the e-mail eldcol2015@gmail.com    

    
Keynote Speakers
  • Florian Cramer (Creating 010, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences)
  • Matthew Kirschenbaum (University of Maryland)
  • Paulo Franchetti (Unicamp - Universidade Estadual de Campinas)
  • Susan Schreibman (Trinity College Dublin)   
   
Organization
  • PhD Programme in Materialities of Literature (FCT PhD Programme)
  • No Problem Has a Solution: A Digital Archive of the Book of Disquiet (research project PTDC/CLE-LLI/118713/2010)
  • Research Group “Digital Mediation and Materialities of Literature”
  • Centre for Portuguese Literature at the University of Coimbra (CLP)


 



BACK TO TOP


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: October 27-November 7, 2014

From DREAM: Disability Rights, Education, Activism, and Mentoring
Sponsored by the Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University
 -------------------------------
 Disability and higher education in the news (in no particular order):
* New research shows that college health services are not prepared to help students deal with chronic illnesses, and they are more prepared for some conditions (like asthma) versus others (like diabetes).  A summary of the research is at http://consumer.healthday.com/diabetes-information-10/diabetes-management-news-180/colleges-could-do-better-job-of-caring-for-students-with-chronic-ills-study-finds-693054.html and there is a captioned video (no audio description) at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videos/news/College_Healthcare_102714-1.html
 
*Active Minds has created a “Mental Health Unity Pledge” training, where campus participants can get a sticker to show their room or office as a safe place to talk about mental health: http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/nwtonight/item/74652-unity-pledge-advanced-as-rainbow-flag-of-solidarity-for-mental-illness?linktype=hp_nwt
 
* At Syracuse University, student groups are engaging in their fourth protest since the new Chancellor took over less than a year ago, and are now doing a 24/7 sit-in in the administration building.  They are protesting a number of changes to diversity-related initiatives (including those related to disability), and a lack of communication about those changes: http://thegeneralbody.org/
 
* University of Washington Tacoma students and disability activists are asking the Student Activities Board to end their partnership with the Pierce County Asylum Haunted House and to apologize for contributing to the stigma of mental illness, saying continued funding of the event goes against the university’s commitment to diversity: https://www.change.org/p/student-activities-board-of-the-university-of-washington-tacoma-formally-apologize-to-those-affected-by-the-partnership-with-the-pierce-county-asylum-haunted-house-add-more-checks-and-balances-in-the-approval-system-for-events
 
* Seton Hill is now offering students the chance to take an online screening for risk factors related to suicide, and it will be offered to every student using health services, counseling and disability services: http://triblive.com/news/westmoreland/7053800-74/suicide-hill-seton#axzz3IPOvDhkV
 
* The New York Times profiled Renny Vilorio, an immigrant who is spending his days attending Hofstra with a backpack full of asthma medications, and spending his nights studying in the homeless shelter where he lives: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/05/nyregion/pursuing-a-degree-while-balancing-chronic-illness-and-classes.html?_r=0
* Michigan State University and the University of Michigan may have a famous rivalry, but they come together each year for Alex’s Great State Race, to raise funds for disability services on both campuses.  The race honors Alex Powell, who got his degree while undergoing cancer treatment, thanks to the disability services office at MSU: http://statenews.com/article/2014/10/rcpd-alexs-great-state-race
* Blind Texas A&M University sophomore Kaitlyn Kellermeyer came up with a creative and beautiful way to help blind and visually impaired students navigate numerous walking paths on campus – she’s proposing the university place wind chimes in strategic locations:http://www.kbtx.com/home/headlines/Bli-280589742.html
* Florida has created state-backed scholarships for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities to pay for services and to save for postsecondary coursework, but critics say the money is a voucher system in disguise that funnels money out of special education and public schools:http://www.news-journalonline.com/article/20141026/NEWS/141029518/1040?p=1&tc=pg
* Deaf swimming world record holder Matthew Klotz has verbally committed to Louisiana State University for 2015: http://swimswam.com/deaf-world-record-holder-matthew-klotz-verbally-commits-lsu/
 
* “Athletes Connected” at the University of Michigan is a new pilot program for athletes to start discussing and addressing the stigma of mental and emotional health concerns – first steps include producing two videos of student athletes discussing their own stories (please note these videos are not captioned or audio described): http://michiganradio.org/post/u-m-rolls-out-pilot-program-offer-mental-health-support-student-athletes
* When state services for the blind helped Danara Barlow imagine a life beyond Chicago’s low-income housing, she was inspired to do the same for others.  Now a student at North Central College, she’s created Project Better to help low-income kids consider college: http://www.theherald-news.com/2014/09/29/former-resident-of-joliet-low-income-housing-returns-to-motivate-kids-to-college/ajovg8m/
* Ruthie Weinmann, a sophomore at Morningside College, has therapy rats (i.e., comfort animals) in her dorm room, and it’s making a difference in her college success:  http://siouxcityjournal.com/lifestyles/columnists/kuester/rats-provide-comfort-for-college-student-with-depression/article_99482f18-04c5-5f3f-a809-ba07450d49d2.html
 
* Isabell Florence a deaf and blind instructor at Mott Community College, makes a difference through her work teaching and training with the National Deaf Blind Equipment Distribution Program: http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2014/10/mount_morris_woman_is_deafblin.html
 
* There’s a new disability studies program at the University of Maryland, offering a minor and a certificate program:http://www.diamondbackonline.com/news/article_3de74c90-6625-11e4-a188-001a4bcf6878.html
 
* Rather than asking universities to create barrier-free campuses for people with disabilities, India is now asking all universities to earmark funds for the task so it will be completed by next year: http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2014-11-02/news/55682588_1_disabled-students-institutions-ugc
 
* A Boston University student suggests a few simple ways to welcome people with disabilities on campus: http://www.bu.edu/today/2014/pov-how-can-universities-welcome-people-with-disabilities/
 
 
And a few related items of possible interest to college students:
* Any trouble voting?  We’re hearing from college students across the country who couldn’t get to the polls, were stuck in rehab hospitals on voting day, couldn’t vote or access voting booths, or were otherwise prevented from participating in election day.  Learn more about how to complain to people monitoring the situation: http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2014/11/04/justice-access-polls/19813/
 
* Have you heard about Brittany Maynard choosing to end her life because of cancer?  While controversy rages about her decision, activists with disabilities offer their own take on the situation: http://badcripple.blogspot.com/2014/10/the-latest-photogenic-face-of-assisted.html
 
* Athlete Tatyana McFadden won the NYC Marathon wheelchair division – a record eighth win in a row:http://olympictalk.nbcsports.com/2014/11/02/tatyana-mcfadden-wins-new-york-city-marathon-wheelchair/

*
* Do you have dyslexia or some other disability that made it difficult to write a college application?  Goucher College is experimenting with a new video application system and “no SAT scores” policy that may be a great alternative for many students with disabilities:http://diverseeducation.com/article/67572/?utm_campaign=Diverse%20Newsletter%203&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua&elq=e591643508084518bc790ab48ed35c96&elqCampaignId=415d
* TedX Talks seem to have a problem talking about disability, but Haben Girma, who is DeafBlind, is working to make things better:http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/11/05/tedx-talks-have-a-disability-problem-but-this-incredible-young-woman-is-working-to-change-that.html
 
* Using Airbnb for travel?  You may need to interpret the term “accessible place to stay” as “easy to use if you can sprout wings:”http://nypost.com/2014/11/03/airbnb-spots-dupe-the-disabled-on-accessibility-advocates/
 
* Susan Mazuri won the “What is the Disability Experience?” Facebook competition for VSA, and you can read the winning poem “Metamorphosis” here:http://disabilityvisibilityproject.com/2014/11/03/poetry-by-susan-mazuri/
 
* One University of Washington professor is taking on superheroes and disability: http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2014/11/04/justice-access-polls/19813/
* Australians fear new legislative bills may lead to elimination of closed captions on TV: http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2014/nov/04/closed-caption-requirement-for-tv-may-be-scrapped-disability-advocates-fear
 
* The BBC did a profile of deaf people during WWI in Britain – their stories and roles in the war may surprise you: http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-ouch-29846154
For more information about DREAM or the Taishoff Center, contact:
Wendy Harbour (wharbour@syr.edu)
Or check out the DREAM website at http://dream.syr.edu
To subscribe or unsubscribe to the DREAM email list, fill out the form at http://dream.syr.edu/contact-us.html and ask to join or leave the listserv.
By the way, please don't presume DREAM, the Taishoff Center, or Syracuse University agree with everything in these links we send out - we're just passing along the information so you can form your own opinions.  Thanks.

Joint guidance on effective communication for students with disabilities in public schools issued by Justice Department and Department of Education

 
On November 12, 2014, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division together with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services issued joint guidance about the rights of public elementary and secondary students with hearing, vision or speech disabilities to effective communication.  The guidance includes a letter to educators, a Frequently Asked Questions document, and a summary Fact Sheet, and is intended to help schools, parents, and others understand schools’ obligations under Federal law to meet the communications needs of students with disabilities. The guidance documents are available in HTML and PDF versions on ADA.gov.  The Dear Colleague Letter and Fact Sheet are also available in Spanish in PDF versions.

ICPSR Announces New Archive on Disability


Introducing the Archive of Data on Disability to Enable Policy and research (ADDEP)

Ann Arbor, Michigan - November 3, 2014 - The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research, a part of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, has established a new repository of data to coordinate the sharing of disability data. This new archive will include longitudinal data sets that make it easier to follow the onset of disability and changes in functional status that occur over time. The Archive of Data on Disability to Enable Policy and research (ADDEP) will increase discovery about and understanding of persons living with disability in the U.S., aiding researchers, policy makers and others by:

Building disability data sharing capacity Disseminating disability data and providing technical assistance for data users Connecting research data and community

A sampling of datasets available:

*         Evaluation of Violence Against Women With Physical Disabilities in Michigan, 2000-2001

*         RAND Center for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD) Data Core Series: Disability, 2000 [United States]

*         National Collaborative Project on Speech and Hearing, 1985-1987



For more information, please contact:

Alison Stroud, Archive Manager                alistrou@umich.edu
Amy Pienta, Archive Director                      apienta@umich.edu
                                           734-615-7957

For people with disabilities, doctors are not always healers - The Washington Post


Information about a protest in Albany against NAMI-NYS H.R. 3717 (Murphy's bill)


Walmart Joins the Disability Equality Index as a Founding Partner

Retailer demonstrates commitment to diversity and inclusion by joining other Fortune 1000 companies to support launch of online tool to measure enterprise-wide inclusion of people with disabilities
For Immediate Release
November 10, 2014
Contact: Anita Howard
Phone: (800) 706-2710

anita@usbln.org
WASHINGTON, DC (November 10, 2014) - Today, the US Business Leadership Network® (USBLN®) and the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) are pleased to announce Walmart has joined as a Founding Partner of the USBLN and AAPD's new Disability Equality IndexSM (DEISM), an online tool that offers businesses the opportunity to objectively measure their full inclusion of people with disabilities as employees, suppliers and customers.
"We are thrilled to have Walmart join us on this groundbreaking initiative for the business and disability communities. This is the latest development in a long-standing leadership position on disability inclusion," said Jill Houghton, Executive Director of the USBLN. "By joining as a DEI Founding Partner, Walmart is showcasing their support of disability inclusive practices throughout corporate America," said Mark Perriello, President and CEO of AAPD.
Created by leaders in the business and disability communities, and after the successful completion of the DEI pilot with 48 Fortune 1000 scope companies in March 2014, the first Annual DEI was launched to Fortune 1000 companies in October 2014.
Designed to serve as an objective benchmarking tool, the DEI offers businesses the opportunity to receive a score on their disability inclusion policies and practices while identifying avenues for continued improvement. Companies self-report on a wide-range of criteria within four categories: Culture & Leadership, Enterprise-Wide Access, Employment Practices, and Community Engagement & Support Services.
"As a global company we recognize disability is one of the few aspects of diversity that truly has no cultural, geographic or socioeconomic boundaries," saidSharon Orlopp, Global Chief Diversity Officer and Senior Vice President - Corporate People for Walmart. "The DEI is a key resource helping companies examine their entire enterprise to identify best practices in diversity inclusion to become part of the broader corporate narrative while also isolating strategic opportunities for continuous improvement."
In keeping with the spirit of advancing inclusion for people with disabilities around the world, Walmart has formally committed its support to the efforts centered on achieving Senate ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), also known as The Disability Treaty.
The DEI Founding Partner status was a one-time opportunity exclusive to the first 15 companies that joined. The USBLN and AAPD are excited to announce that the 15 spots have been filled. To date, DEI Founding Partners include American Airlines, CVS Health, DuPont, GlaxoSmithKline, Lockheed Martin, New Editions Consulting, Inc., Northrop Grumman Corporation, Raytheon, Walmart, and WellPoint. The other DEI Founding Partners will be announced soon. Comcast / NBCUniversal is the DEI Exclusive Founding Technology Partner. Companies interested in learning more about other DEI opportunities should contact Liz Taub, USBLN Director, Business Relations & Strategic Partnerships, at liz@usbln.org.
For more information about the DEI, please visit: https://www.disabilityequalityindex.org/.

About the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN)
The US Business Leadership Network (USBLN) is a national non-profit that helps business drive performance by leveraging disability inclusion in the workplace, supply chain, and marketplace. The USBLN serves as the collective voice of nearly 50 Business Leadership Network affiliates across the United States, representing over 5,000 businesses. Additionally, the USBLN Disability Supplier Diversity Program® (DSDP) is the nation's leading third party certification program for disability-owned businesses, including businesses owned by service-disabled veterans. www.usbln.org
About the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation's largest disability rights organization. AAPD promotes equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. AAPD's members, including people with disabilities and family, friends, and supporters, represent a powerful force for change. To learn more, visit the AAPD Web site: www.aapd.com.

The Center for Bioethics and Humanities invites you to the upcoming Center Seminar


Mercy Killers

Wednesday, November 19, 2014
12:00 - 1:30 pm
9295 Weiskotten
SUNY Upstate Campus
766 Irving Ave

“[a] mesmerizing, harrowing indictment of US healthcare”

“raw, emotional and devastatingly honest”

Michael Milligan’s one-man show, Mercy Killers puts a human face on the fact that more than 60% of personal bankruptcies in the US are related to medical debt.

In this one-act play, Joe is a blue-collar mechanic with a red-state perspective. He prizes hard work, self-reliance, and personal liberty and believes in the American way of life.  Everything changes when his beloved wife is diagnosed with cancer. Suddenly thrown into the labyrinth of health care and its contradictory rules and stratospheric costs, Joe finds himself questioning everything and trusting no one.

Michael Milligan trained at Juilliard where he won the John Houseman Prize for excellence in classical drama. He appeared on Broadway most recently in August: Osage County.  His own works include Heroine and Urgent: Aliens.

Lunch will be served
Joint guidance on effective communication for students with disabilities in public schools issued by Justice Department and Department of Education


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

Follow Us Like Us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube

A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS