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Weekly Newsletter

September, 25 2017

INDEX

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

SU NEWS

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community celebration - VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

Supporting the Center on Human Policy

SU Abroad Summer Course on Women and Gender in the Arab World 7/22 - 8/5

International Day of Persons with Disabilities: Op Ed by Arlene Kanter

Support the Disability Student Union (DSU) in the 2014 Polar Plunge!!

Participate in The Race Card Project at SU 

Spring 2015 Undergraduate Course Announcement

Call to / for LGBT Advocates at SU

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Extended deadline 15 Jan 2015-CfP Everyday Encounters with Violence: Critical Feminist Perspectives

Call for Applications: FCWSRC 2015-2016 Research Associate Program

CESJ Graduate Student Forum

Calling All Students: Apply for the SDS 2015 Digital Access Facilitation Team

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT POSTER COMPETITIONS

Call for Participants SDS Panel: Disabling the Enlightenment

Berkeley Review of Education New Issue and Call for Papers

CALL FOR PAPERS Hysterical Bodies: Disabling Normative Behavior in Contemporary Art

Call for Proposals: Reconsidering Gender, Violence and the State (Radical History Review, Abstract deadline February 1, 2015; full description 

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Disability day: What are you doing?

USAID Impact Blog

The ongoing struggle to memorialize deceased psychiatric patients whose identities have at times if not often been erased

“Unlock the Cage”: The most vulnerable need your help this holiday season(Disability Rights International)

Disability Scoop 12.2.14

The following are recent news stories of interest to people with disabilities and those supporting and working with and for people with disabilities.

This International Day of Persons with Disabilities, Let’s Remember our Rights

2014 Deaf Culture Workshop: Video of Interest (captioned)

Drop in Krip-Hop hip-hop’s Preston quick stop

Disability Scoop 11.25.14

Center For Bioethics and Humanities Center Seminar

Miller Hoffman on “Remembering Our Dead”

12 More Mind-Blowing Documentaries You Can Stream On Netflix (many of these are disability-themed!)

Disability Scoop 11.21.14

From DREAM: Disability Rights, Education, Activism, and Mentoring

Newsworthy: Medical supported decision making

BBC News: The meaning of Mongol


SU HAPPENINGS


SU NEWS

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community celebration - VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community celebration committee is looking for volunteers. 

On Saturday, January 17, 2015 from 12:00 - 4:00 p.m. there will be a Community Celebration held at Fowler High School (227 Magnolia Street, Syracuse NY 13204). This is a community-wide celebration of the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in his commitment to American Civil Rights and social justice. The day will include a series of workshops, performances, information, Maker Hall fun, and recognizing Youth Unsung Heroes. 

This event has been designed to enrich the Syracuse Community's understanding and appreciation for civic engagement with an educational experience focusing on diversity and civic good. Your assistance as a volunteer will assist to foster relationships between Syracuse University and the City of Syracuse Community by providing a fun-filled day with an educational experience.
We are looking for volunteers, just like you, between the hours of 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

If interested, visit https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1zZAQ7gOqp0uG0AdjuIFCksZG2m9E_D6s1WiSeGTm6wI/viewform.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email Marissa Willingham at mlwill07@syr.edu.

Thank you!

Dr. King Community Celebration Committee

BACK TO TOP


Supporting the Center on Human Policy

 
Acknowledging a kind inaugural gift from Professor Steven J. Taylor, The Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy supports the groundbreaking research, policy and activism that come from both Disability Studies and The Center on Human Policy at Syracuse University. The fund sponsors lectures, academic and policy conferences, students presenting at conferences, faculty developing courses, faculty and student research and student-initiated projects from both undergraduate and graduate disability student groups.
 
You can support the Center on Human Policy by:
·         Sending a check made out to Syracuse University with “Center on Human Policy” in the memo line to:
The Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy

250 Huntington Hall

Syracuse, NY 13244
·          
·         Make a single gift, schedule payments, or set up a recurring gift on the Syracuse University secure credit card giving site
 
For more information and giving options, contact Heather Waters, School of Education Assistant Dean for Advancement, at 315-443-7773 or haalliso@syr.edu.
 
Disability studies starts with accepting the disability.
Then it asks the question: ‘How do we equalize the playing field?’

--Steven J. Taylor
 

SU Abroad Summer Course on Women and Gender in the Arab World 7/22 - 8/5

 
Please spread the word! 
 
Summer 2015 SU Abroad Course on Women and Gender in the Arab World
July 22-August 5, 2015
3 credits
Co-taught by Professor Dana Olwan and Professor Carol Fadda-Conrey
 
 
 ENG 360/730, WGS/MES/QSX 400/600: You will travel to Beirut and Amman for two weeks to directly engage with issues pertaining to the study of gender and sexuality in the Arab world. Covering a variety of historical, national, socio-cultural, literary, and theoretical perspectives on constructions of gender and sexuality in Arab societies, this course will provide you with tools to address some of the widespread assumptions and stereotypes that dominate Western discussions about the Arab world. 
 
 Apply by February 20. For more information, please contact Professor Carol Fadda-Conrey at cfaddaco@syr.edu, Professor Dana Olwan at dmolwan@syr.edu, or visit suabroad.syr.edu.

International Day of Persons with Disabilities: Op Ed by Arlene Kanter

 

Support the Disability Student Union (DSU) in the 2014 Polar Plunge!! 


A note from DSU Co-President, Christy Kalebic:

This year, we will be doing the Polar Plunge again to raise money for the Special Olympics! Disability Student Union will be "freezing for a reason" this Sunday when we jump into the lake here in the tundra of Syracuse, and we would all be greatly appreciative if you would donate to this wonderful cause. Donations like yours can help children around New York live their dreams and achieve their goals. Please feel free to send this around!

Thank You!
Happy Holidays!

Follow the link below to join the DSU team and start raising money for the Special Olympics! You can also make a donation using the link. 

http://2014CNY.kintera.org/pp/dsu_su​

Participate in The Race Card Project at SU   


http://theracecardproject.com/make-your-race-card-su/

In anticipation of our 2015 MLK Event, during which the Race Card Project will be discussed by its founder, please connect with the Race Card Project at SU.  Remember, the task is to think about the word "Race" and then describe your thoughts, feelings, observations, and/or experiences in a sentence that only has six words.

Spring 2015 Undergraduate Course Announcement

 
CRS 360 M002 (47936)   
Mindful Communication Theory
Tu/Th 11:00-12:20   Sims 123
Professor Diane Grimes
 
***Please register with the permission of the instructor**
 
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
  • To consider the relationship between mindfulness and a social constructionist (Coordinated Management of Meaning) perspective on communication.
  • To become aware of assumptions, from the individual level to the societal/cultural level.
  • To expose you intellectually and experientially to mindfulness practices and their benefits.
  • To allow you to communicate and extend your understandings and reflections through engaging with your classmates and community.
 
This is not a religion course, nor is it a course in Buddhism. People of many religions (and none) practice meditation and other mindfulness practices. Dr. Grimes has particular meditation backgrounds upon which Dr. Grimes will draw on more frequently than other contemplative traditions. However, you will have an opportunity to explore other traditions. Please contact Dr. Grimes if you have questions or concerns.dsgrimes@syr.edu

Call to / for LGBT Advocates at SU

 
To all LGBT advocates at SU,
 
Earlier this semester, the Chancellor formed several working groups addressing diversity and inclusion efforts on campus. The window of time for applying to join these was very short, and we are concerned there was not adequate outreach to the LGBT community to recruit for the working groups. LGBT advocates are an essential part of diversity on campus, and our participation should be secured on these working groups.
 
The University Senate, in its meeting on 11/4/14, voted unanimously in support of a series of resolutions regarding LGBTQ advocacy. Of note is the following resolution:
 
3. The University administration shall include LGBTQA advocates on working groups, committees, and all other initiatives focusing on campus diversity and inclusion;
 
In response to this, the Senate Committee on LGBT Concerns would like to call for volunteers to serve on these working groups as LGBT advocates. The Committee will then put forth those names to the Chancellor, requesting that they be added to the working groups.
 
If you are interested in serving and representing the community, please contact LGBT Concerns Committee co-chairs Francine D’Amico fjdamico@maxwell.syr.edu and Rachel Fox von Swearingen rsfoxvon@syr.edu.
 
Thank You,
 
Rachel Fox von Swearingen, Co-chair
Francine D’Amico, Co-chair
University Senate, Committee on LGBT Concerns
 
Rachel Fox von Swearingen
Associate Librarian for Music, Dance, Musical Theater
 
Syracuse University Libraries
222 Waverly Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13244
p  315.443.9779 | e  rsfoxvon@syr.edu
[library.syr.edu]library.syr.edu


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Extended deadline 15 Jan 2015-CfP Everyday Encounters with Violence: Critical Feminist Perspectives

 
Call for Papers
Everyday Encounters with Violence: Critical Feminist Perspectives
2015 Feminist and Women’s Studies Association (FWSA) Conference
9-­11 September, 2015
School of Geography, University of Leeds, UK


Although violence is an integral part of experiences in mundane living spaces, feminist conceptualizations of violence have so far been mainly confined to violence over women’s bodies. This conference therefore aims to look beyond, or perhaps behind, such understandings of violence by exploring violence and feminist critiques thereof in all its structural, material, legal, social and embodied forms across both the Global North and Global South.

The conference draws upon a wide definition of violence from sources in the arts, humanities and social sciences, seeing violence as both an everyday social force inflicting harassment, harm, suffering, grief and trauma and as a transformative force that (re)produces gendered agency, social action and resistance. It will explore violence as simultaneously structural, subjective, cultural, material, embodied and representational.


The conference’s focus on violence and gender is situated in the context of everyday encounters: the anticipated or unexpected and deliberate or ad-lib contacts and moments of gendered violence that (re)shape citizenship, identity and subjectivity in daily life. Everyday life spatially ranges from the body and private home space to public venues, state, national and transnational contexts. They interface with social differences along physical, emotional, psychological, sexual, verbal, non-verbal, political, economic and cultural (including ethnic and religious) dimensions. The conference peruses the ways that violence is embedded in this very multiscalar fabric of everyday life via socio-spatially gendered encounters with, among others, modernity, neoliberalism, sovereign power, rule of law, justice, political activism, globalization, development, technology, security, as well as institutional, popular and quotidian cultures. In all these different forms, we are interested in examining the different feminist politics and practices through which violence is upheld, challenged and/or normalized and the discourses through which this violence is rendered both outside and inside of state, law and society.


On the basis of the above rationale, we discern three (not mutually exclusive) key themes, on which we invite conceptual, methodological and/or empirical papers across disciplines and gender practices. We are particularly interested in papers that discuss these issues through in-depth focus on empirical contexts across the world.


Social difference, justice and violence of everyday life
  • Gendered violence and informal justice
  • Religious intolerance and cultural violence
  • Violence of heterosexuality and homophobia
  • Representations and narratives of violence

Bodies and biopolitics of violence
  • Biopolitics of violence
  •  Borders, bodies, violence and (in)security
  • Violence as a threat and resource for feminist politics
  • Eroticism and intimate violence

Landscapes, spaces and scales of violence
  • Spatialities of violence
  • Violence in/of development
  • Feminist politics around violence, anti-violence and non-violence
  • Feminist encounters with neoliberalism and structural violence

As a conference critically engaged with the academic community and civil society, we will also be live tweeting and hosting dedicated conference bloggers among the FWSA membership.


Please submit a max. 300-word abstract and max. 100-word bio via the online submission form
at http://www.geog.leeds.ac.uk/research/events/conferences/fwsa-biennal-conference-2015/form/ by 15 January 2015.

Confirmed keynote speakers
  • Professor Marianne Hester, University of Manchester
  • Dr Mo Hume, University of Glasgow
  • Professor Rachel Pain, Durham University
  • Dr Igea Troiani, Oxford Brookes University
 
Registration and Conference details:
Registration:

Non-FWSA members: £150

FWSA members: £100

Postgraduate students: £100


Accommodation
Apart from a number of hotels in the area, limited accommodation will be available in the University of Leeds on a first-come-first-served basis. Further information about university accommodation is available at 
http://www.meetinleeds.co.uk/storm-jameson-court

Accessibility
We are keen to ensure that the conference is inclusive and accessible to as wide a variety of people as possible and therefore have included provisions for on-site (subsidized) childcare and a range of accessibility needs. Please check the appropriate box when you submit your abstract online.


Organising Committee
Ayona Datta

Martin Zebracki

Emma Kerry

Deirdre Conlon


***************************************
Dr Ayona Datta
Senior Lecturer in Citizenship and Belonging
School of Geography
Faculty of Environment
University of Leeds
Leeds LS2 9JT
 
Follow on twitter: @ayonadatta

Call for Applications: FCWSRC 2015-2016 Research Associate Program

 
Five College Women’s Studies Research Center
2015-2016 Research Associate Program Call for Applications
 
The Five College Women’s Studies Research Center announces a call for applications and nominations for three categories of Associateships in 2015-2016 (DEADLINE: March 1, 2015)
 
Located in an area with one of the largest concentration of scholars dedicated to feminist scholarship and teaching in the world, the Center encourages engaged, critical feminist scholarship from diverse perspectives. During the period of appointment, all Associates are expected to be in residence in the Five College area, to attend weekly seminars, lead one public colloquium, and to collaborate with colleagues based at one or more of the Five College institutions. While at the Center, Associates are provided with an office at the Center and have access to Five College archival and other library resources. This is a non-stipendiary residency. Travel, housing and living expenses are the responsibility of the Associate. 
 
We welcome applications from colleagues worldwide for 2015-2016 Associateships in one of three categories:
 
Research Associateship: Colleagues with faculty status at institutions of higher learning are invited to apply.
 
Graduate Associateship in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Graduate students at the dissertation stage of their PhD are invited to apply.
 
Alumnae Associateship: In the spirit of long-term collaboration between Research Associates and Five College Faculty, this Associateship is awarded to alumnae of the FCWSRC who propose 1) a joint research or teaching project with one or more colleagues located in the Five Colleges to be initiated in 2015-2016 or 2) the continuation of an established research or teaching project in 2015-2016 with one or more colleagues located in the Five Colleges.
 
Applicants should complete our online application at http://apply.interfolio.com/27517 which will also require a project proposal (up to three pages in length), curriculum vitae, and contact information for two professional references. Project proposals should include 1) statement about the contribution to and significance of the project or dissertation for research and teaching in women and gender studies, 2) a detailed description of the project or dissertation and timeline, 3) a statement about the contribution and significance of your project or dissertation for research and teaching in women and gender studies and 4) how a stay in the Five Colleges will advance the project or dissertation. Alumnae Associates will be asked to provide the name(s) of their faculty partner(s) in the Five Colleges.
 
For more information, visit https://www.fivecolleges.edu/fcwsrc or email fcwsrc@fivecolleges.edu. Applicants may also contact Darcy Buerkle, Center Director, at dbuerkle@smith.edu 

CESJ Graduate Student Forum

 
GRADUATE STUDENT FORUM
Shifting Landscapes: Pedagogy, Policy, and Praxis in Communities

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 | 8:30 am - 1:30 pm | Chicago, IL

The Critical Educators for Social Justice (CESJ) SIG would like to invite you to apply to participate in the seventh annual Graduate Student Forum on Wednesday, April 15, 2015 leading up to the AERA conference in Chicago, IL. This forum is a designated session for 25 doctoral students and is free of charge. The session includes a light breakfast, full lunch and a panel of distinguished professors with many opportunities to interact informally with panelists and other participants.


Seismic shifts are occurring in our schools’ demographic landscapes, education policies, and the contestation of knowledge production through empirical research. These shifts are upending the contexts in which social justice educators work. At the same time, graduate students are experiencing shifts in their personal and academic trajectories including expectations for how one must or must not comply to these shifts. It is only when we look at how power circulates that we can understand and account for social justice in imaginative and innovative ways. Therefore, we organize this year’s forum around how pedagogy, policy, and praxis with community address these shifting landscapes.


Our forum collectively asks:


What are the directions for social justice work in resisting compliance?
What will social justice mean and look like as education landscapes change?

Alongside the organizing inquiries that guide our forum, we also interrogate power against the following questions:


How might justice-oriented 
pedagogies respond to move us toward realizing education as a site of and for transformation?
What must be asked of
 policies and policymakers in order to maintain emphases on the importance of social justice projects?
How do critical scholars engage with 
praxis in the communities we work with? How do we, as a community hold each other accountable to these formations of praxis?
The purpose of the Graduate Student Forum is to open up space for doctoral students committed to and engaged in social justice and critical education research to:


● Learn from scholars and peers about the possibilities and tensions involved with social justice and critical education research.

● Help prepare critical scholars for their future scholarship and related work.

● Identify strategies and tools that we can take back to our colleagues and students, communities and home institutions.


The members of the Critical Educators for Social Justice SIG are committed to teach, promote, and implement the principles of critical pedagogy in order to establish an educational movement grounded in the struggle for social and economic justice, human rights, and economic democracy. The members of CESJ are committed to cultural, linguistic, political, and economic self-determination within our classrooms, schools, and communities.


Confirmed panelists:


Dr. Bettina L. Love, Assistant Professor of Educational Theory & Practice, University of Georgia
Dr. Lisa (Leigh) Patel, Associate Professor of Education, Boston College
Dr. Luis Urrieta, Jr., Associate Professor of Cultural Studies in Education, University of Texas at Austin

Thank you for
your interest in this event. If you have any questions, please email us at CESJgradforum@gmail.com.

Sincerely,


2015 GSF Planning Committee


Edward R. Curammeng (co-chair), University of California, Los Angeles

Carolina Valdez (co-chair), University of California, Los Angeles

Cati de los Ríos, Teachers College, Columbia University

Alma Itzé Flores, University of California, Los Angeles

Melissa Gibson, University of Wisconsin-Madison

David Martinez, Arizona State University

Danielle Parker, University of North Carolina

Mike Scott, Virginia Commonwealth University

Katy Swalwell (CESJ Board liaison), Iowa State University


Link to 2015 application: 
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1aXhAIie3D7aJHRDAk_LCNIoRXfFAoJBB_s4qvngkOn8/viewform?usp=send_form

Calling All Students: Apply for the SDS 2015 Digital Access Facilitation Team

 
At past meetings of the Society for Disability Studies certain individuals have taken it upon themselves to live-tweet various portions of the conference. While such live-tweeting was valuable, it was ultimately quite limited and completely dependent on the efforts of a few individuals. Building on those past efforts, this year the SDS Student Caucus will be coordinating a group of students we are calling the Digital Access Facilitation Team (DAFT), who will be responsible for consistently and comprehensively live-tweeting the entire conference as a way of collaboratively increasing the accessibility of our meeting. As a recognition of the labor necessary to produce such access, all members of the DAFT will be compensated via 50% off the Early Bird registration fee for Lower Income/Student Members of SDS.
 
In terms of access, live-tweeting will allow us to translate the key points and trajectories of presentations and conversations during conference sessions into a medium that will allow for new and more inclusive forms of engagement. That is, while in the past we have largely focused on how to make our conferences accessible by getting more folks in the room (making sure our spaces our physically accessible) and making sure those in the room have access to the presentations being made (via CART, ASL translation, etc.), with the use of twitter we can now make our conference more accessible via the integration of what Margaret Price has called “telepresence.” That means, for example, that those who might need to take a break during the day no longer need to miss a session that they might otherwise like to attend; now they can now be “telepresent” in that session by following the twitter-feed, whether live or at a later time, and if following live, can even pose questions via twitter during the session’s Q & A session. And that is but one of many new forms of accessibility that this program will engender. For more information on the program itself, please see the article about it in the forthcoming issue of the SDS Newsletter.
However, in order to achieve the goal of a more accessible conference at SDS 2015 in Atlanta, the Student Caucus needs a dedicated and diverse group of interested students to make up the Digital Access Facilitation Team (DAFT).  In putting together this team, its co-coordinators--Adam P. Newman (Emory University) and Dale Katherine Ireland (Graduate Center, CUNY)--are prioritizing the inclusion of students from a wide range of interests/disciplines (which will allow us to schedule it so that folks can live-tweet sessions they would be interested in attending) and a wide range of institutions and backgrounds. Importantly, we will have an initial training session on the night before panels begin (Wednesday, June 10) so no previous live-tweeting is necessary in order to apply (though we would like to have some volunteers with previous experience with the platform).
 
So, if you are a student and are interested in applying to be a member of DAFT, please submit one (ONLY ONE) version of the application (there are multiple versions provided below for accessibility purposes, including a Google form, SurveyMonkey, and Word .doc, so please just submit one application in the version that is easiest for you to use/fill out) by Dec. 15, 2014. If submitting a version by Word .doc, please email your filled out version of the application to adampnewman89@gmail.com and dalekatherine@gmail.com. If you have any further questions about the program or any issues accessing the applications, please don’t contact the co-coordinators directly at the email addresses listed above. Thanks!
 
Yours Truly,
Adam P. Newman (Emory University) & Dale Katherine Ireland (CUNY)
 
Applications:
 
Google Forms:
 
Survey Monkey:

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT POSTER COMPETITIONS

At the Fifteenth Annual
Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability:
Intersections and Independence
April 13 - 14, 2015
Held on The Ohio State University’s Columbus Campus
Poster Submissions are Due no later than March 11, 2015
The Multiple Perspectives Conference encourages students to network with professionals, the community, and scholars who share their interests in disability at its annual student poster reception.  A generous gift from the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation will fund awards (Graduate Research - $500; Undergraduate Research $200, Art & Performance $200 and Community Service $100, Class Projects $200 at this year’s competition. 
Submissions may be based on:
1.  Class Projects & Papers (Award goes to Department to support future projects)
2.  Independent & Supervised Student Research 
3.  Community Service & Applied Problem Solving from Service Learning Classes or student organizations
4.  Art & Performance
 
Posters can take a variety of forms including print material mounted on poster board or display panels or arranged on a table; PowerPoint presentations, web pages or video presentations from your laptop …  
 
 Presentation materials must fit on a 3’x6’ table or along 6’ or less of wall space
Presentation materials should present the information in 10 minutes or less
Presenters or their designee must be present to interact with the audience
Presenters must provide their own equipment
 
Visit these sites for tips on developing a poster presentation:
 
 
 
Students and teams of students who wish to present a poster must send the following information to ADA-OSU@osu.edu no later than March 11, 2015
1.  Title
2.  Short Title - 12 word maximum
3.  Poster Format (Print, Model, PowerPoint, Video, …)
4.  Description of their proposed poster topic – 250 word maximum
5.  E-mail address, phone number, and surface mail address of coordinating presenter
6.  As appropriate, university, department, grant, course or student organization affiliation
7.  A letter of support from a faculty member or organization advisor associated with the project
8.   Name of individual, Department or Organization to receive cash award should the project win.
 
Early submissions are encouraged.  Submissions will be reviewed as they arrive. Conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for all accepted presenters.
 
Please Note:
The full conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for presenters of accepted proposals. Presenters are responsible for their own travel and lodging.

Call for Participants SDS Panel: Disabling the Enlightenment


Hello, all,

I am organizing a panel on disability and the Enlightenment in the long eighteenth century. See the proposal pasted below. Please email me at cgoerge@emory.edu if you are interested in participating or have any questions

Thanks so much,

Corey Goergen
English Department
Emory University

Disabling the Enlightenment
 In Disability Theory, Tobin Siebers traces a straight line from the Enlightenment ideal of the rationally acting human to Peter Singer’s troubling argument that animals deserve basic human rights more than people with disabilities, stating that Singer’s neo-eugenic logic demonstrates “the limitations of eighteenth-century rationalism” (92). But the course of pure reason never did run smooth: from sentimental novels to Romantic lyrics, the long eighteenth century is not lacking for texts that complicate, resist, and question Enlightenment ideologies of rationality.
Those voices suggest that the eighteenth century might offer its own potential answers to the questions Siebers asks of the relationships between disability and the Enlightenment:
If respect depends on the possession of rationality, is there a minimal rationality below which no respect for human beings should be given? How do we preserve the ideal of rational agency and at the same time make Kant’s kingdom of the ends accessible to differently abled people? (90) This panel seeks contributions from scholars working across a range of disciplines that consider how investigating the disabled figures and figures of disability in the print cultures of the long eighteenth century can both generate potential responses to Siebers’ important questions and produce new, previously unconsidered questions about the relationships between ability and Enlightenment ideals, rationality and participatory systems of government, and consciousness and access.

Berkeley Review of Education New Issue and Call for Papers

 
We are pleased to present the newest issue of the Berkeley Review of Education (BRE), an open-access, peer-reviewed journal edited by students from the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. We are currently accepting submissions on a rolling basis. The process of submission to publication is approximately a year, with notification of acceptance within three months. If you're interested in submitting to our journal, see our Call for Papers, which is also pasted below. Please forward to your colleagues, friends, and other networks. For more information, visit http://berkeleyreviewofeducation.com
 
Call for Papers
The Berkeley Review of Education (BRE) encourages senior and emerging scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers to submit articles that address issues of educational diversity and equity from various intra/interdisciplinary perspectives. The editorial board especially welcomes submission of manuscripts that engage with one or more of our 2014-2015 Board Priorities:
•   Pressing Issues. The BRE seeks to publish papers that address compelling issues impacting schools, educational systems, and other learning environments.
•   Critical Scholarship. The BRE welcomes a broad range of “critical” scholarship, particularly work that analyzes, evaluates, and problematizes power and dominant structures, and helps us to imagine something new.
•   Pushing Borders & Boundaries. The BRE seeks to promote scholarship that re-conceptualizes and transcends academic identities, labels, and categories. We encourage work from all disciplines, as well as interdisciplinary work that builds towards new understandings of educational processes and practices.
•   Forging Communities. The BRE seeks to foster new and existing relationships within and beyond the academy. As an open-access journal, we aim to democratize knowledge and encourage work that originates from and speaks to a wide range of scholars, practitioners, activists, and educators.
 
Submission Guidelines
All papers are subject to a double-blind peer review process. Authors retain the copyright to the articles they publish in the journal. The BRE does not publish material that has been previously published and does not accept papers that have been simultaneously submitted elsewhere for publication (see BRE Policies).
 
We encourage the submission of a wide range of manuscripts including but not limited to theoretical or historical analyses, empirical studies, scholarly essays, analytical literature reviews, and practitioner reflections.
 
Articles must be in American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition (APA) format and have all identifiers blinded. Submit manuscripts as a single word file with a brief abstract (no more than 150 words) and a list of up to five keywords.
 
Address inquiries to the editors at bre_editor@berkeley.edu. Submit manuscripts online through the “submit article” link,http://repositories.cdlib.org/ucbgse/bre.

CALL FOR PAPERS Hysterical Bodies: Disabling Normative Behavior in Contemporary Art


8th Annual PhD Symposium to be held on Saturday March 7, 2015, hosted by the University of California Department of Visual Arts, co-organized by Vanessa Bateman and Amanda Cachia!

"Hysterical Bodies: Disabling Normative Behavior in Contemporary Art" will officially launch on Friday March 6, 2015 at 6:30pm with a Keynote address by renowned scholar Amelia Jones, Professor and Robert A. Day Chair of Fine Art and Professor of Critical Studies at USC Roski School of Art and Design, Los Angeles.

Applicants should submit a CV and 300 word abstract by Monday, December 29, 2014 to: 
UCSDphdsymposium2015@gmail.com. FULL DETAILS AT THE LINK BELOW.

http://visarts.ucsd.edu/sites/default/files/Hysterical%20Bodies%20CFP.pdf 

Call for Proposals: Reconsidering Gender, Violence and the State (Radical History Review, Abstract deadline February 1, 2015; full description at http://www.radicalhistoryreview.org/call-for-papers/)

As emerging scholarship in feminist and queer history makes clear, archives contain surprising histories about gender, sexuality and violence, stories that challenge axiomatic, gendered oppositions of power and vulnerability. This issue of Radical History Review hopes to explore these histories, and reassess conflicting narratives of victimization, subjection, retaliation and self-defense in the context of forms of state authority.
Events and developments over the last two centuries—from the expansion of the provocation defense in the nineteenth century, to the collection of rape testimonies in the early twentieth-century, from the torture and abuse at Abu Ghraib, to the recent mass kidnapping of girls in Chibok, Nigeria—convey contradictory messages about race, gender, violence and the role of the state as enforcer, perpetrator or protector.  Recent calls for critical re-examination of timeworn notions of male violence and female victimhood suggest the need to interrogate longstanding assumptions about the relationships among gender, violence and the powers of the State. 
This special issue of Radical History Review invites critical reflection on gendered violence as a historical, intersectional topic of lasting significance. How have conceptions of masculinity and femininity over time informed the persistence of and punishments for gendered violence?  What do the archives reveal about the larger structural factors that perpetuate gendered violence?  How have feminist and queer organizing efforts to protect and/or avenge victims, further complicated the legal, penal, and legislative efforts to address gendered violence?
Building on contemporary debates and conversations about feminism, its evolving critique of violence, and some of its blind spots, this issue of Radical History Review seeks to reanimate conversations about gender, violence, resistance, victimization, and the role of the state as arbiter among these categories.  We hope to engage histories that reveal how gender and violence are mutually constituted categories of personal, political, cultural and legal subjectivity.  And we hope to reconsider the ways in which violence – and narratives of violence – can be used to uphold, resist or reshape the ordering structures of the State.  
Potential topics might include:
• Gendered violence as an effect of state dominance
• Women as agents of state violence (e.g., in police, prison, and military contexts)
• Gendered violence and vulnerability within the criminal justice enterprise
• “Lost” histories of gendered political violence and/as effects of archive formation
• Unintended consequences of feminist engagements with violence and anti-violence in the law, such as the imbrication of affirmative self-defense claims (e.g. “stand your ground” laws)
• Legal responses to gendered violence, and its race and class implications for incarceration and control
• Gender implications of popular cultural constructions of state violence
• Sexual assault in the military as instantiating institutionalized, hierarchical state power
• Government efforts to decrease violence against women (and forms of gendered violence)
• Compulsory sterilization and chemical castration programs as strategies of state authority and punishment
The RHR seeks scholarly, monographic research articles, but we also encourage such non-traditional contributions as photo essays, film and book review essays, interviews, brief interventions, “conversations” between scholars and/or activists, and teaching notes and annotated course syllabi for our Teaching Radical History section. Preliminary inquiries can be sent to Lisa Arellano (larellan@colby.edu), Amanda Frisken (frisken@oldwestbury.edu), and Erica Ball (eball@fullerton.edu).  
Procedures for submission of articles: At this time we are requesting abstracts that are no longer than 400 words; these are due by February 1, 2015 and should be submitted electronically as an attachment to contactrhr@gmail.comwith “Issue 126 submission” in the subject line.  By March 31, 2015, authors will be notified whether they should submit a full version of their article to undergo the peer review process.  The due date for completed drafts of articles is July 1, 2015.  An invitation to submit a full article does not guarantee publication; publication depends on the peer review process and the overall shape the journal issue will take.
Please send any images as low-resolution digital files embedded in a Word document along with the text. If chosen for publication, you will need to send high-resolution image files (.jpg or .tif files at a minimum of 300 dpi), and secure written permission to reprint all images. Authors must also secure permissions for any other media that they may wish to include with their articles in the online version of the journal. Those articles selected for publication after the peer review process will be included in issue 126 of Radical History Review, scheduled to appear in Fall 2016.
Abstract Deadline: February 1, 2015 
Email abstract to: contactrhr@gmail.com


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Disability day: What are you doing?

By Emma Tracey & Kathleen Hawkins
BBC News, Ouch
 
People over the world are marking the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD) and have been getting in touch to tell us what they are doing.
 
All around the world, people are encouraged to get together to celebrate disability identity. It has been observed annually by the United Nations since 1992. It promotes disability rights and the benefits of integrating disabled people into all aspects of life.
 
Events in the UK tend to consist of performances by disabled artists and live discussion forums. This year, Liverpool's DaDaFest are running their inaugural international congress on how disability arts has affected social change. The Central Library Manchester will give disabled people hands-on access to the books and artefacts on display in a First World War exhibition. And in Cardiff, Disability Wales are running an event to help shape their new manifesto.
 
So far, most disabled people who've contacted us weren't aware it was happening.
 
James West, who has MS, obviously doesn't think it's a very special day, lined up for him is: "dragging myself out of bed and going to work, as I do every day". Along similar lines: "I will be spending another day on public transport being kicked about & having to ask for a seat from oblivious folk", tweets Penny Rabiger.
 
@dorsetcharlie isn't impressed by the name of the day. She tweeted: 'International Day of Persons with Disabilities' Really, that's the best name they could come up with?! #PCMadness
 
But @catobellingsen got in touch to tell us he is attending a conference in Oslo on growing up with a disability in Norway, where the minister for social inclusion Solveig Horne is speaking.
 
And @iainmassingham tweeted to say he is spending the day "showing thanks that I am part of the amazing disability football club @AFCMasters #football4all".
 
@Matt_Davies1705 is spending the day talking to students with disabilities who are seeking paid internships, and @rebeccalawthon and @k_runswick_cole were both celebrating it with events in Manchester.
 
As the day rolls on, we'll be tracking what people are doing.
 
Though the UN calls it IDPD, it seems to also go by other names and acronyms depending on language preference. The Department for Work and Pensions in the UK are referring to it as IDDP and many have inserted a W for 'with' as in IDPWD.
 
Sometimes, though, the IDPD bush telegraph goes quiet and it feels like the day goes by without much fuss or fanfare. So please tell us what you're doing on December 3 this year. Or better still, send pictures and reports from your event. We'll update this post with your contributions as the day progresses.
 
Email ouch@bbc.co.uk to let us know how you are marking the day, or tweet us @BBCOuch on Twitter or post on our Facebook page

USAID Impact Blog

 
In celebration of December 3 as the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, please check out the DRG Center USAID Impact Blog: Election Access for Voters with Disabilities: The Good, the Bad and the Totally Bizarre, here. 

The ongoing struggle to memorialize deceased psychiatric patients whose identities have at times if not often been erased

 

“Unlock the Cage”: The most vulnerable need your help this holiday season(Disability Rights International)


Disability Scoop 12.2.14


The following are recent news stories of interest to people with disabilities and those supporting and working with and for people with disabilities.

 
Dr. Nora's Top Articles (9 of 90 news articles)
 
1.   “Girl with Low IQ May Suffer Less After Sex Assault, Says LAUSD Expert” --- At trial, Ring asked Katz what he meant when he had testified that the girl's mental disability "acts as a protective factor." According to the court ... --- 89.3 KPCC --- November 24, 2014  (CALIFORNIA)  http://is.gd/fbbtQc
2.   “Ex-Group Home Employees Sentenced in Abuse Case” --- Rivera said Jones was the leader of the employees who engaged in misconduct and recorded staff members abusing residents, the warrant states. --- Hartford Courant --- November 26, 2014  (CONNECTICUT)  http://is.gd/lB1I8m
3.   “Teacher to Return to Arizona on Sex Charges” --- A special education teacher who recently began working in a Hawaii public school will be extradited to Arizona where she's accused of having sex ... --- Honolulu Star-Advertiser --- November 20, 2014  (HAWAII)  http://is.gd/MkONOK
4.   “State Placed Disabled Children with Untrained Nurses” --- The disabled foster children removed from a troubled Laurel-area group home this summer were placed by Maryland regulators in facilities where ... --- Baltimore Sun --- November 29, 2014  (MARYLAND)  http://is.gd/lxKjVM
5.   “Lawmakers Question Probe into Boy's Death at Maryland Group Home” --- Health and social services regulators have been criticized for their oversight of LifeLine, which won state contracts to care for disabled children despite ... --- Baltimore Sun --- November 21, 2014  (MARYLAND)  http://is.gd/OEoY8K
6.   “Rape of Resident Reported at Montana Developmental Center in Boulder” --- Disability Rights Montana says a report by the Montana Department of Justice also outlines a botched response to the November 3 incident. --- KRTV Great Falls News --- November 25, 2014  (MONTANA)  http://is.gd/k7plnZ
7.   “Mom Accused of Using Medical Treatment to Abuse Son” --- Duke wore leg braces and enrolled in a special-needs school. Before the nightmare ended, records show, Duke was on 15 medications, including an ... --- WFAA --- November 21, 2014  (TEXAS) http://is.gd/WL5pYc
8.   “Corinth Police Find Disabled Being Neglected and Abused in Private Residence” --- Police say a Corinth man has been arrested after abusing, restraining and neglecting three disabled individuals in his home. --- NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth --- November 21, 2014  (TEXAS)  http://is.gd/F2zYjS
9.   “Former Casper Police Worker Faces Sexual Assault Allegations” --- Authorities have charged James "Jim" Holscher, 47, with second-degree sexual assault and exploitation of a vulnerable adult. He appeared Monday ... --- Casper Star-Tribune Online --- November 24, 2014  (WYOMING)  http://is.gd/2XvEFh
 
 
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
The other 81 stories for this week, as well as newsfeeds from prior weeks, can be found at:http://www.disabilityandabuse.org/newsfeed/contents.htm
 
The Disability and Abuse Project of Spectrum Institute provides this newsfeed. These are articles involving people with disabilities across the life span, any type of disability and any type of maltreatment, abuse, crime or, articles regarding law enforcement issues and individuals with disabilities. We have a particular focus on individuals with developmental disabilities. We welcome your input and feedback regarding this feature of our CANDO List. Please note that the articles are listed in alphabetical order by state, so you can easily scan through the articles for those within your state or other states in which you have a particular interest

This International Day of Persons with Disabilities, Let’s Remember our Rights

by Melissa Graham
In 2010 Prime Minister Stephen Harper ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities  (CRPD). This historic document recognized specific ways that disabled people are often left out of society such as Access to Justice (Article 13), Living independently and being included in the community (Article 19), Education (Article 24), Adequate standard of living and social protection (Article 28), as well as participation in political and public life (Article 29); the CRPD also recognized that women and children are further disenfranchised (Articles 6 and 7).
The Council of Canadians with Disabilities states that the CRPD marks a paradigm shift by addressing the human rights of persons with disabilities from a progressive social model approach to disability. In many instances, this new approach requires a new way of understanding the exercise of key human rights.
However, CRPD also has an Optional Protocol that Harper left unsigned. The Optional Protocol on Communications (OP) provides for a complaints mechanism whereby groups and individuals, after having exhausted all national resources, can have the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities consider a claim that a State Party has violated the provisions in the CRPD. In other words, while the Harper government was agreeable to these rights for disabled people, it did not want to be held accountable for upholding these rights.
Disabled people face different levels of oppression depending on the communities they come from. This varies not only on an international level, but also across province and territories, genders, age, race, class, disability, and whether or not the person is Aboriginal.
This International Day of Persons with Disabilities, December 3, 2014, we call on Canadians with Disabilities and organizations to demand that the federal government of Canada sign the Optional Protocol in the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Let this be a first step towards greater social justice for Canadians with Disabilities, and the international communities we come from.
Melissa Graham, on behalf of the Toronto Disability Pride March.

2014 Deaf Culture Workshop: Video of Interest (captioned)

Password: gloria 

Drop in Krip-Hop hip-hop’s Preston quick stop


Disability Scoop 11.25.14


Center For Bioethics and Humanities Center Seminar


 The Center for Bioethics & Humanities invites you to our upcoming Center Seminar:

********************************************************

Unintended Consequences:  Ethical Decision Making in Times of Crisis

Cynthia Morrow, MD, MPH

Friday, December 5, 2014
12:00 - 1:00 pm
2509/10 Setnor Hall
766 Irving Ave
SUNY Upstate Campus

In a crisis, key decision-makers are required to make difficult choices with little time for deliberation. Crises that are perceived to directly threaten our health are among the most challenging. Over the past few months of the Ebola outbreak in parts of West Africa, U.S. Politicians and organizational leaders made key policy decisions (such as mandatory quarantine for health care workers returning from affected areas) that could have profound unintended consequences.  Dr. Morrow will challenge some of these decisions and provide a framework for ethical decision-making in times of crises, taking into account both public health and medical ethics.   

Dr. Cynthia Morrow is Assistant Professor of Bioethics and Humanities and of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at SUNY Upstate. In addition, she is Professor of Practice in Public Administration and International Affairs at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. Dr. Morrow served as Commissioner of Health for the Onondaga County Health Department from 2005-2014.

********************************************************

For more information about Bioethics & Humanities Center Seminars, contact Deirdre Neilen, PhD, at neilend@upstate.edu SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210 

Miller Hoffman on “Remembering Our Dead”


12 More Mind-Blowing Documentaries You Can Stream On Netflix (many of these are disability-themed!)


Disability Scoop 11.21.14


From DREAM: Disability Rights, Education, Activism, and Mentoring

Sponsored by the Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University
 -------------------------------
Weekly Email Update on Issues Related to Disability and Higher Education 
Week of November 16-22, 2014
------------------------------
 Disability and higher education in the news (in no particular order):
* The three most common mental and emotional health concerns on campuses are anxiety, eating disorders, and addiction:http://www.uloop.com/news/view.php/142534/Most-Common-Mental-Illnesses-On-College-
 
* Two graduate students feature a podcast on stuttering, ableism, and informed consent (no captions or transcript available):http://stuttertalk.com/stuttering-activism-disability-ableism-and-informed-consent-ep-483/
 
* A new report gives statistics on study abroad rates for college students with disabilities: http://www.miusa.org/resource/tipsheet/opendoorstats
 
* Loyola University Maryland begins using student workers to live caption events (although we wonder why they are using regular typing instead of learning captioning software like C-Print): http://www.loyola.edu/news/2014/1118-closed-captioning-work-study-program
 
* UCLA starts a new health and wellness initiative, but apparently they only want nondisabled campus members to be healthy:http://dailybruin.com/2014/10/22/alexandra-tashman-initiatives-signs-use-ableist-discourse/
 
* An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education suggests older professors should make way for younger ones, because they are “crippling university faculties.”  Most of the criticism about the article focused on ageism (for example, seehttp://www.slate.com/articles/life/education/2014/11/stop_bullying_old_professors_into_retirement_it_won_t_fix_higher_ed.html) but there’s a lot of assumptions about healthy, young, and energetic professors need to be (meaning disabled professors aren’t welcome, either):http://www.slate.com/articles/life/education/2014/11/stop_bullying_old_professors_into_retirement_it_won_t_fix_higher_ed.html
        
* The best way to reduce stigma about counseling may be for campuses to reach out to first-year students – the earlier, the better:http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sam-rivman/for-college-freshmen-ment_b_6188068.html
 
* A blog about life as a graduate student with a chronic illness, and the many barriers students face: http://phdisabled.wordpress.com/2014/11/19/a-reflection-on-chronic-illness-and-graduate-school/
 
* Although we couldn’t find more online information about it, there’s apparently a new program called “Team Impact” to have a local kid with a disability work with a college athletic team.  Read about Macalester College’s football team doing this: http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2014/11/20/macalester-football-team-drafts-4-year-old-with-disability/
 
* One woman describes how getting a label of ADHD in college finally helped her understand herself and the attitudinal barriers around her:http://dailyemerald.com/2014/11/18/comnes-why-my-adhd-diagnosis-was-relief/
 
 
 
And a few related items of possible interest to college students:
* The US Department of Education and US Department of Justice have released guidelines for K-12 schools to provide effective means of communication for students with disabilities: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-effective-communication-201411.pdf
 
* Proud about your independence and how little help you need?  Here’s a different perspective on having a disability and not wanting “help” from anyone:http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/11/on-disability-and-accepting-help/382514/
 
* It’s becoming more socially acceptable to talk about disabled men paying for sex, but is this just more ableism and misogyny? http://feministcurrent.com/9828/the-notion-that-its-ok-for-disabled-men-to-pay-for-sex-is-rooted-in-misogyny-and-ableism/
 
* “Call of Duty” video game features a protagonist with a disability: http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2014/11/disability-diversity-and-evolution-in-call-of-duty.html
 
* Free publication about traveling with non-visible disabilities, available from Mobility International USA: http://www.miusa.org/away
 
* A new cover of Meghan Trainor’s “All About That Bass” is going viral – but it’s called “All About That Chair” (no captions or audio description available):http://themighty.com/2014/11/the-wheelchair-parody-of-all-about-that-bass-is-better-than-the-original/
 
* If you’re ever in London and looking for a wheelchair accessible, LGBT-friendly dance space, check out this place: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/theatre-dance/news/london-to-see-worlds-first-wheelchairaccessible-genderneutral-lgbtfriendly-dance-studio-9850057.html
 
 
* Are hearing interpreters the public face of ASL?  And what are the implications of that?  http://www.streetleverage.com/2014/11/hearing-interpreters-the-danger-of-being-the-public-face-of-asl/
 
* A new CNN move “The Ivory Tower” (which aired last night and again on November 23) will cover broad issues about diversity in higher education (though probably not disability): http://diverseeducation.com/article/68019/?utm_campaign=Diverse%20Newsletter%203&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua&elq=6d68ac522b3f41caa4da653fcf4ac043&elqCampaignId=415
 
* Does he or doesn’t he?  Now Jerry Seinfeld says he doesn’t have autism after all (video has captions but not audio description):http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2014/11/20/seinfeld-doesnt-autism/19864/
For more information about DREAM or the Taishoff Center, contact:
Wendy Harbour (wharbour@syr.edu)
Or check out the DREAM website at http://dream.syr.edu
To subscribe or unsubscribe to the DREAM email list, fill out the form at http://dream.syr.edu/contact-us.html and ask to join or leave the listserv.
By the way, please don't presume DREAM, the Taishoff Center, or Syracuse University agree with everything in these links we send out - we're just passing along the information so you can form your own opinions.  Thanks.

Newsworthy: Medical supported decision making

 
The issue of supported decision making as a substitute for adult guardianships has been coming up frequently.

BBC News: The meaning of Mongol



Mongolian author Uuganaa Ramsay explores why her ethnicity is used as an offensive term for Down's syndrome, a condition later diagnosed in her own son.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-ouch-30129358



BACK TO TOP


The following are recent news stories of interest to people with disabilities and those supporting and working with and for people with disabilities.

 
Dr. Nora's Top Articles (12 of 107 news articles)
 
1.   “Woman Finds Disabled 7-year-old Daughter in Cage Wearing Soiled Diaper at School” --- The mother of a developmentally disabled girl has filed a legal claim -- the precursor to a lawsuit -- against her daughter's ... --- The Post-Standard - syracuse.com --- November 10, 2014  (CALIFORNIA)  http://is.gd/DD3Xai
2.   “Disabled Adults Found Malnourished, Without Heat, Water in Cobb” --- A 70-year-old Cobb County woman was arrested for allegedly running an unlicensed care home where three disabled men were living in deplorable ... --- Atlanta Journal Constitution --- November 14, 2014  (GEORGIA)  http://is.gd/XNROhv
3.   “Teacher Arrested in Waikiki for Alleged Sex with Student” --- Deborah Hoshiyama had been teaching special education for just six school days and was immediately suspended, according to Principal Jeff Vilardi. --- Honolulu Star-Advertiser --- November 18, 2014  (HAWAII)  http://is.gd/fhOoiU
4.   “Teacher's Aide under Investigation for Allegedly Molesting 11-Year-Old Autistic Student” --- Parents of an 11-year-old autistic girl who said she was twice molested by a teacher's aide at a Boston elementary school classroom expressed ... --- Boston.com --- November 15, 2014  (MASSACHUSETTS) http://is.gd/S9gvfQ 
5.   “Alleged Rape of 6-year-old Girl with 'Cognitive Disabilities' Lands Convict a New Felony Charge” --- A 29-year-old Muskegon man who was discharged from prison in 2013 has been charged with a new felony for allegedly raping ... --- The Muskegon Chronicle --- November 14, 2014  (MICHIGAN) http://is.gd/CWlmxW
6.   “Bath & Body Works Apologizes for Denying Entry to Special-needs Students” --- A St. Louis-area Bath & Body Works has apologized and vowed to better train employees after a group of special-needs students said they were ... --- Washington Times --- November 10, 2014  (MISSOURI)  http://is.gd/RNtQnD
7.   “Woman Sentenced to 5 Years in 'Horrendous' Cigarette Lighter Child-abuse Case” --- Quoting the woman, Linneweber said the victim has Down syndrome, functions at the same level as a 3-year-old and suffered first-, second- and ... --- Billings Gazette --- November 10, 2014  (MONTANA) http://is.gd/DiYIi8
8.   “Woman Fired from Beatrice Center Loses Appeal” --- Woman fired from Beatrice center loses appeal ... who failed to immediately report suspected abuse at the Beatrice State Developmental Center. --- Lincoln Journal Star --- November 10, 2014  (NEBRASKA) http://is.gd/e13llO
9.   “Driver Admits Leaving Young Kids on Parked School Bus in Summer Heat” --- A school bus driver who left two special-needs boys alone on a parked bus in July has pleaded guilty to cruelty and neglect of a child. --- The Star-Ledger --- November 17, 2014  (NEW JERSEY)  http://is.gd/LdRi5z
10.   “Hearings Set for Rutgers Professor Accused of Sexually Assaulting Mentally Disabled Man” --- A pair of hearings have been scheduled to address whether certain evidence can be admitted at the trial of Rutgers-Newark professor ... --- The Star-Ledger --- November 13, 2014  (NEW JERSEY)  http://is.gd/bysZ90
11.   “10-year-old with Autism Found after Jumping Off Bus in New Jersey, Bus Driver Charged” --- A 10-year-old boy with autism was allowed to get off his school bus Monday afternoon even though there was no adult to pick him up. --- WABC-TV --- November 11, 2014  (NEW JERSEY)  http://is.gd/Ti5LvK
12.   “Lawsuit Says Special Ed Student Sexually Assaulted” --- Parents of a special education middle school student are suing not only the teacher they believe sexually assaulted their ... --- Albuquerque Journal --- November 19, 2014  (NEW MEXICO) http://is.gd/Kt4Jls
 
 
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
The other 95 stories for this week, as well as newsfeeds from prior weeks, can be found at:http://www.disabilityandabuse.org/newsfeed/contents.htm
 
The Disability and Abuse Project of Spectrum Institute provides this newsfeed. These are articles involving people with disabilities across the life span, any type of disability and any type of maltreatment, abuse, crime or, articles regarding law enforcement issues and individuals with disabilities. We have a particular focus on individuals with developmental disabilities. We welcome your input and feedback regarding this feature of our CANDO List. Please note that the articles are listed in alphabetical order by state, so you can easily scan through the articles for those within your state or other states in which you have a particular interest

Presidential Proclamation -- International Day of Persons with Disabilities, 2014

 
President Obama released a Proclamation in support of International Day of Persons with Disabilities. In it he states:
 
Each year, the United States joins with the international community to celebrate the inherent dignity and worth of every person.  In America and in countries around the world, individuals with disabilities support families, strengthen their communities, and contribute to the global economy. On International Day of Persons with Disabilities, we reaffirm the fundamental principle that those with disabilities are entitled to the same rights and freedoms as everyone else:  to belong and fully participate in society, to live with respect and free from discrimination, and to make of their lives what they will.
 
As we celebrate today, let’s take time to honor all those around the world who are fighting for the rights of individuals with disabilities, including those activists whom we have lost far too soon.  As Secretary Kerry stated:
 
The way we treat people of all backgrounds demonstrates our values and defines who we are. That’s our greatest export, and on this International Day of Persons with Disabilities, we renew our determination to make sure that we leave no one behind -- anywhere.
 
To read more from President Obama, please see the link to the Proclamation here: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/12/02/presidential-proclamation-international-day-persons-disabilities-2014
 
Also, please see Secretary of State Kerry’s remarks here: http://www.state.gov/secretary/remarks/2014/12/234639.htm

Writings by Dyslexics Needed


Request for Your Feedback

The DOJ is currently accepting comments on some pending legislation involving captioning in movie theaters. This is a chance to make your opinion known on an issue that affects many people in the disability community. These are the links to follow in order to file a comment on movie theater accessibility.


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS