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Weekly Newsletter

September, 25 2017

INDEX

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

Unsung Heroes to Be Honored at MLK Celebration on Sunday (1.18.15)

SU NEWS

Women’s & Gender Studies Department Teaching Assistant Positions

SU NEWS: College of Law Opens First Comprehensive Veterans Legal Clinic in New York State

Getting to Know: Office of Disability Services Director Paula Possenti-Perez (SU News)

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, PARTICIPANTS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Call for Submissions

News & Notes from Central New York & Beyond

Call for Research Participants

Call for Research Participants

DDP Small Grant Program

Call for Proposals: Critical media literacy conference

Disability Studies in Education Conference, Chicago in Springtime

Call for Proposals on Collaborative Communities

2015 AAPD Summer Internship Program

Call for papers & reviewers - the SoJo Journal of Educational Foundations and Social Justice

Call for Work/Participants: Museum of disABILITY History reading and panel

Three Public Events at the 2015 Multiple Perspectives Conference, April 13 & 14 at The Ohio State University, Columbus Ohio

Call for Research Participants/ Study Announcement

Call for Presentations: Disability Studies at Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity

Postdoctoral Fellowship for research on print-related disabilities

Disability Determination Process (DDP) Small Grant Program

Seeking students for the Beinecke Scholarship nomination

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Disability Scoop 1.13.15

Celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the ADA at School

Why disabled achievers should be remembered - BBC News (Tom Shakespeare)

Note from the Disability and Abuse Project

Community Supporter Wanted (requested by Micah Fialka-Feldman

Disability Advisory Committee to the Federal Communications Commission

Deaf Culture, History and French Sign Language in France

Disability and Abuse Project: 2014 in Review

DisArt Festival 2015 (Disability 101 [Part 1]: Disability as dialogue)

Lennard Davis to present 2015 Ken Campbell Lecture on Disability Policy at the Ohio State University’s Multiple Perspectives Conference on April 13th

Article regarding abuse of people with disabilities in Korea

The following are recent news stories of interest to people with disabilities and those supporting and working with and for people with disabilities.

Disability Scoop 12.19.14

Disability Scoop 12.12.14

Disability Scoop 12.16.14

Disability Scoop 12.5.14

Message from the Autism Society

ABLE Act Passes through Senate, heads to President's Desk

State of the Art Conference PowerPoints

NEWS FROM AHEAD (Association for Higher Education and Disability): Early Bird Deadline for 2015 Management Institutes Fast Approaching!

Latest Issue of RDS Now Posted!

Recent NEW YORKER article about students with mental health issues and/or disabilities


SU HAPPENINGS

Unsung Heroes to Be Honored at MLK Celebration on Sunday (1.18.15)


New To  Quse

A discussion group for people who are new to the LGBTQA campus communities
Monday, January 12
th, 2015 @ 6 PM
LGBT Resource Center, 750 Ostrom Avenue
 
Please join us TONIGHT for the first New 2 ‘Quse of the semester! We’ll talk about our winter breaks as well as transitions from campus to home and back again. We’ll be eating subs from Jimmy John’s. Looking forward to seeing you there! For more information, please email Abby Fite or Angela Diaz, co-facilitators of New 2 ‘Quse.

Embody

A discussion group for people who identify as gender questioning, genderqueer, gender nonconforming, or trans*
Wednesday, January 14th, 2015 @ 6 PM
LGBT Resource Center, 750 Ostrom Avenue
 
Please join us this Wednesday for the first Embody of the semester! For more information, please email Chase Catalano or Bravo, co-facilitators of Embody.

Fusion

A discussion group for people of color who identify within LGBTQ communities
Thursday, January 15th, 2015 @ 6:30 PM
LGBT Resource Center, 750 Ostrom Avenue
 
Join us this Thursday for the first Fusion of the semester! For more information, please contact Michael Riley or Montinique McEachern, co-facilitators of Fusion.
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Safer People, Safer Spaces Training

Wednesday, January 21st, 2015
6 – 9 PM
 
Safer People, Safer Spaces is a 3-hour training that is as close to comprehensive as we can provide in that time. Safer People, Safer Spaces will incorporate many different activities and provide participants with a variety of ways to engage and develop their sense of allyship. To sign up, please email the LGBT Resource Center to reserve your spot!



Hendricks to Host Morning Meditation

 
Beginning Monday, Jan. 12, Hendricks Chapel will host daily morning meditation sessions in the Small Chapel (lower level) from 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.  No experience necessary.  All are welcome.  




New groups at the Counseling Center

 
Hello,
 
I would like to inform you of a new opportunity this semester for students. The Sexual and Relationship Violence Response Team is offering two new groups through the Counseling Center. Please share the attached flyers with students and staff.
Groups will meet weekly and will remain open throughout the semester. New groups will be formed based on need. If you have questions regarding the groups, please feel free to contact me or the other group facilitators.
 
Each student participating in group must complete a group orientation. Students should call the Counseling Center and refer to the group flyer to schedule this orientation meeting. Listed below are brief descriptions of each group.
 
Sexual Assault Recovery Group- Mondays 3:30 to 4:30pm (Health Promotions Office)
Begins February 9th, through April 20.
Facilitated by Carrie Brown and Megan Dietz
This group is for female survivors of sexual assault. Members will share their experiences and feelings in an understanding and accepting environment. The group will aim to help members reduce guilt, develop coping strategies, and strengthen self-esteem.
 
Healthy Relationships 101- Thursdays 3:30 to 4:30pm (Schine Student Center)
Begins February 12th, through April 23rd.
Facilitated by Megan Dietz and Beth Salatti
This group will help students understand components of healthy and unhealthy relationships. Students will learn to recognize relationship violence and complete safety planning. The focus of the group is to provide education and support for those who have experienced relationship violence. The group is open to people of all genders.
 
Thank you,
Beth
 
Beth Salatti, LCSW, CASAC
Staff Therapist
Syracuse University
Counseling Center
200 Walnut Place
Syracuse, NY 13244
Phone: 315-443-4715
Fax: 315-443-4276


SU NEWS

Women’s & Gender Studies Department Teaching Assistant Positions

 
Fall 2015/Spring 2016
 
 
The Women's & Gender Studies Department is seeking applicants for Teaching Assistants for academic year 2015- 2016.
 
Teaching Assistants earn a stipend in addition to a tuition scholarship. The primary responsibility of these positions is to provide teaching assistance to courses offered in the Women's & Gender Studies major in both the fall (WGS 101) and spring (WGS 201) semesters.
 
Applicants must be matriculated in a PhD program at Syracuse University. Preference is given to graduate students with advanced standing and strong qualifications in the humanities and/or social sciences. Teaching experience, knowledge of/coursework in feminist theory, and a CAS in women’s and gender studies is preferred. All TA's will be part of the Future Professoriate Program.
 
In addition to a resume and the names of two references, applicants should provide a cover letter briefly describing prior teaching experience, pedagogy/philosophy of teaching and background in women's & gender studies or feminist theory coursework.
 
Direct all inquiries to Vivian May, Chair;  Attn: TA Selection, Women's & Gender Studies Department, 208 Bowne Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-1200 by February 6, 2015.  Additional questions, or clarification, can be obtained by contacting Susann DeMocker-Shedd, Administrative Specialist at 443-3560.
 
Decisions will be made in March 2015.

SU NEWS: College of Law Opens First Comprehensive Veterans Legal Clinic in New York State


Getting to Know: Office of Disability Services Director Paula Possenti-Perez (SU News)



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SU graduate student in Disability Studies seeks roommate

 
Kate Corbett Pollack
 
Clean, quiet, hard of hearing/deaf woman seeks working professional or graduate student roommate. Euclid and Allen Streets, two blocks from Westcott Street. Two family house; I am on the first floor. It is a three bedroom flat with a dishwasher and a working fireplace, backyard patio, washer/dryer in basement, dining room, living room, remodeled bathroom, and sun room. Good friends of mine live upstairs and are not often home. $500 plus utilities. The place is largely furnished, but I can make room for some furniture. This is mostly a room for rent type of a situation. I am very clean. Apt. is two blocks from bus line on a quiet street. Not a party environment, but a peaceful place to live and work. Queer/LGBTQ friendly/preferred.  

SU News: Support Groups for Survivors of Sexual and Relationship Violence


The Humanities Center Faculty Advisory Board is pleased to announce its theme for 2015 SYRACUSE SYMPOSIUM™:

 
NETWORKS
 
In the past decade, the figure of the network has emerged as an important frame through which to explore, understand, and interrogate a broad range of social and cultural phenomena. From Randall Collins’ extensive tracing of the history of philosophy to Yochai Benkler’s and Alan Liu’s arguments about the construction of knowledge to Julie Cohen’s explorations of the legal implications of the “networked self,” scholars across and beyond the humanities have found in networks a robust, productive concept for the study of art, literature, history, rhetoric, and culture.
More recent work in the digital humanities tells us that, long before the emergence of the information age, networks have shaped the constellation of people, places, and things that comprise our identities and societies. Networks signify relationships, arrangements, connections, and histories; they articulate formulations and exclusions. The proliferation of digital media across local and global contexts have blurred the boundaries separating our various networks from one another and called them to our attention, making it necessary to question understandings of authorship, ownership, privacy, collective action, and cultural production and circulation. Studies of networks can lead us to examine issues of mobility, learning, and delivery; they can help us understand the role of agency in the making and shaping of meaning.
If the past decade has convinced us of the broad relevance of networks, it is important to temper that relevance with a sense of context and history. What new modes of thought and scholarship do networks make possible (and what do they foreclose)? Can we think about networked cultures without reducing them to a single, undifferentiated mass of nodes? Does our reliance on a networked epistemic obligate us to accept the presentism, solutionism, and/or inevitability often associated with contemporary technologies? Will networks allow the humanities to find common cause with other fields and disciplines? As promising as the work of the past decade has been, we have only just begun to understand the various implications of networks and the degree to which the future of the humanities may depend on accounting for them.
 
 
PLEASE CIRCULATE WIDELY.  WE ENCOURAGE ALL TO PROPOSE AN EVENT.  PROPOSAL FORMS ARE NOW AVAILABLE AThttp://www.syracusehumanities.org/center/grants/.  THE DEADLINE IS MONDAY, MARCH 16 AT NOON.
 
IF YOU WILL BE TEACHING A FALL 2015 COURSE THAT ADDRESSES THE THEME OF NETWORKS, PLEASE CONSIDER APPLYING FOR YOUR COURSE TO BECOME A SYRACUSE SYMPOSIUM ™ SEMINAR.  PROPOSAL FORMS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE AND DUE MARCH 16 AT NOON.
 
 
AN INFORMATION SESSION WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17 AT 12:45pm IN THE HUMANITIES CENTER LIBRARY, 300 TOLLEY HUMANITIES BUILDING.  WE’LL BE HAPPY TO ASSIST WITH PROPOSAL PREPARATION AND DISCUSS ANY QUESTIONS OR IDEAS YOU HAVE.

Fast Forward Syracuse Launches New Website

 

Fast Forward Syracuse Launches New Website
Check out the new Fast Forward Syracuse website! This website offers more information on the initiatives, includes ways to share feedback, and compiles all news in one place.


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Call for Submissions

 
Madeleine Slade, a junior illustration major, will be creating a comic anthology entitled “A Queer Mind” for her Capstone Project. This book will contain a collection of comics about personal experiences with the intersections between mental health & LGBT issues. In order to cover a wide range of experiences and situations, Madeleine is asking for folks to submit written works to her. These can be in the form of short stories or poetry, but each submission must involve LGBT identities and mental health. Certain works will be selected and adapted into comics. For more information or to submit a written work, please email Madeleine Slade. The deadline for submissions is January 24th.

News & Notes from Central New York & Beyond

 


 
The Victory Congressional Internship is accepting applications for Summer 2015. The Victory Institute will bring outstanding LGBTQ college students to Washington, D.C., for an intensive leadership program, including a Congressional internship with an LGBT-friendly member of Congress. The program includes a generous stipend, housing in D.C., placement in a congressional internship and travel to/from Washington, D.C., as well as travel and registration to the LGBT Leaders 2015 Conference.
 
Applications for Summer 2015 are due Monday, January 19thApply now! 

Call for Research Participants

 
A qualitative research study (IRB #104603) is being conducted at Eastern Michigan University to explore the experiences of LGBTQ persons with disabilities at the collegiate level. This study is a research study conducted by Amanda Bell from the College of Education as part of a dissertation project. If you’re interested in participating, or for more information, please email Amanda Bell.
 

Call for Research Participants

 
The City University of New York is conducting a study that will examine victimization experiences among LGBTQ college students as well as the role of social supports from family, peers, and school. Theresa Bhoopsingh, a doctoral candidate in the Ph.D. program in Educational Psychology, will be conducting this study. Participants in this study must identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning; be enrolled in a college or university in the United States; and be 18 years of age or older. Take the survey now! For more information, please email Theresa Bhoopsingh.

DDP Small Grant Program

 
For all students interested in finding out more about the SSA’s Disability Determination Process (DDP) Small Grant Program, there will be an informational conference call titled “DDP Application Overview “on Thursday, January 22nd 2014 at 3 p.m. (ET). All students interested in submitting an application to the DDP Small Grant Program are invited to attend. We will provide a brief introduction to the program, review the elements of a successful application and answer questions. Please click here to register. For more information and to access application materials, please visit http://ddp.policyresearchinc.org.  Contact us at ddp@policyresearchinc.org with any questions.

Call for Proposals: Critical media literacy conference

 
3rd annual Critical Media Literacy conference, at Illinois State University, on March 21. Proposals are due Feb. 1, Shirley Steinberg is the keynote. Papers are published in conference proceedings.
 

Disability Studies in Education Conference, Chicago in Springtime!


Disability Studies In Education: What It Is, Who Decides, and Why It 
Matters Fourteenth Annual Second City DSE Conference National Louis 
University in Chicago April 14-15, 2015


CFP: Abstract proposals due February 16, 2015, a Monday.


…special education is not a solution to the “problem” of disability, it 
is the problem. (Linton, 2006, p. 161)

Theme:

What is disability studies in education? Who makes decisions about what 
it is, what it involves, what kind of research and scholarship it 
entails? And why does it matter?
It could be argued that there have been two waves of scholarship and 
research in the still nascent field we’ve come to call disability 
studies in education. The first wave came before disability studies was 
a thing (Taylor, 2006), and was undertaken by a variety of people 
critical of special education. The second, most recent wave, began in 
1999, with a meeting at TASH, the formation of an AERA Special Interest 
Group, and the creation of an international conference on the topic 
held each year since then. This second wave is old enough to have had 
some histories written about it – and as with all histories, they 
establish a dominant discourse, boundaries of the field, and scope of questions to be asked.

It could be argued that a third wave of disability studies in education 
is in the offing, or has already begun. What will this third wave look 
like? What will its dominant discourse be? To whom will it be 
accountable? What research and scholarship interests will it explore?
What questions will it ask? Will it (and if so, how) problematize the 
work of first and second wave disability studies in education projects?
And what activist projects will it undertake?

Please join us to talk about these and other revolutionary and 
subversive topics of disability studies in education as the Second City 
DSE Conference comes back to its Chicago roots. Preference is given to 
items relating to the theme, but your work likely relates to it at 
least loosely, or can be located in one of the waves.

Details:

To DSE2015@outlook.com, please send your one-page abstract with 
separate cover page including: title, list of presenters, institutional 
affiliations (if any), and email contact info. Deadline is Monday, 
February 16th, 2015. Authors will be notified of acceptance status 
before the end of February. Successful proposals will be reprinted in 
the program as submitted. Thank you very much for your participation!

We look forward to seeing you in Chicago, and making history together

Call for Proposals on Collaborative Communities

 
Call for Proposals
 
Building and Maintaining Collaborative Communities: Schools, University, and Community Organizations for Information Age Publishing
 
Judith J. Slater, Ruth Ravid, and R. Martin Reardon are pleased to issue a call for proposals for a new edited volume titled Building and Maintaining Collaborative Communities: Schools, University, and Community Organizations for Information Age Publishing.
 
This new volume seeks to explore and make explicit the tacit understandings that underpin the interaction and leadership for educational change among the three vertices of the university-school-community triad.  The aim is to further understand how the collaborative endeavor can be advanced, and the conditions under which the goals and objectives of each of the collaborative partners can be reached. An enhanced understanding of the complexities of the resultant communities that lie at the heart of the collaborative context will sharpen the focus on serving the needs of children and families who deserve to have their educational prospects enhanced.
 
Slater and Ravid’s Collaboration in Education (2010) developed a model that depicts and analyses the notion that although sharing similar goals, universities and schools have different structures and little permeability among and between their structures, and they operate according to bureaucratic rules and regulations that delimit their collaboration. The meme of operation of each organization dictates the way each thinks and operates and limits the ability to share power and work together. There is an overriding structural component to every organization that establishes modes of operation that insulates them from other organizations even if they share goals.  
 
Based on this seminal work and the global examples provided in the volume, there is the possibility to manage change and collaborate successfully if participants understand what the limitations of each level of collaboration entails. The Slater Matrix (Slater & Ravid, 2010) allowed contributors to analyze their collaborative project according to criteria of complexity in expectation that at the higher levels of the matrix there will be systemic change and that each organization will have made adjustments that allow them to reach out in future projects to use the talent, resources, and trust established to make future collaborations possible, effective and frequent.
 
This new volume expands on the Slater Matrix (Slater & Ravid, 2010) criteria of:
1. Purpose
2. Resources
3. Mutuality
4. Resistance to change
5. Positives
6. Limitations
 
The addition unique to this volume is that of community and it acknowledges that school-university collaborations are situated in specific national, political, and social contexts which become increasingly salient as schools face issues that are more global in scope. 
 
The first issue is the question of student competitiveness in the world, second are questions of limited resources both monetary and personnel, and third are issues of leadership in managing change so that collaboration is a possibility.
 
Acknowledging community as a third partner in the analysis and discussion of projects that involve all three organizations (universities, schools, and community) adds depth to the complexity of analysis. Defining what is meant by community itself is two pronged. One prong references the public, governmental agencies (local, state, and federal) that intersect with schools and universities. The second prong refers to the private interests and foundations that competitively fund specific initiatives in schools in light of the increase of charter schools and for profit organizations running schools.
 
Public community organizations include those that are directly funded by local, state, and federal agencies that act as overseers of the rules and regulations that govern each. There are union components, political implications, and chains of command that delimit such organization’s scope of operation, and their ability to effectively deal with their mandates and extend their realms of influence and enforcement. There is a multiplicity of agencies that may or may not collaborate among themselves. Further, agencies are vulnerable to reductions in funding or issues that result in their falling out of favor. 
 
Private community organizations are dependent on donations and funding from foundations that is both competitive and issue driven (for example the Gates Foundation).  Each competes, often with each other, for limited resources and funds. Many private community organizations are governed by a board whose members represent special interests that may be at odds with potential collaborating organizations. They also can rely on volunteers or paid employees whose personal agendas (perhaps inadvertently) filter organizational policies even as they are implemented.
 
Requirements for possible inclusion in the volume are a submission of intent and a brief opening statement describing the context of the collaboration that includes university, school and community involvement in the project. All three organizations must be evident as a partner. This should be followed by a brief analysis based on the six criteria:
1. Purpose
2. Resources
3. Mutuality
4. Resistance to change
5. Positives
6. Limitations
 
The entire submission for inclusion should not exceed FIVE double-spaced pages.
 
Deadline for consideration is March 1, 2015
 
Please direct inquiries and send all proposals to each of the three editors listed below. Proposals will be evaluated collectively according to the criteria of inclusion of all three elements.
 
Judith J. Slater, Professor Emeritus, Florida International University
 
Ruth Ravid, Professor Emeritus, National-Louis University
 
R. Martin Reardon, Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Leadership

2015 AAPD Summer Internship Program

Call for Applications
Applications must be received by Friday, February 6th at 5:00pm EST
If you will be living in the Washington, DC area during the 2015 summer and you’re a college student, graduate student, law student, or recent graduate (within one year), the AAPD Summer Internship Program provides the opportunity to gain hands-on professional experience to help advance your career goals. Interns will receive a stipend, mentor matching, and additional resources during the summer. Candidates interested in careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and veterans with disabilities are highly encouraged to apply.

To apply, please visit
 www.aapd.com/aapdinternship. Questions and requests for accommodations can be directed to internship@aapd.com.

TaKeisha S. Bobbitt
Managing Director
American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
2013 H Street NW, 5th Floor
Washington, DC 20006
Phone: (202) 521-4312
Fax: (866) 536-4461
 
Promoting equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. 

Call for papers & reviewers - the SoJo Journal of Educational Foundations and Social Justice

Happy New Year everyone,
 
I write to you today with a special invitation to be part of the inaugural issue of the new journal The SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education. I know very well the valuable, important, and insightful work that CFE does, and as part of the editorial team I would love to have you be part of this journal. Currently we are seeking people interested in being manuscript reviewers and/or contributors. The first issue will be published in Fall 2015. Manuscripts are due February 1st.
 
If you have any interest in being a reviewer, please reply with the following information:
-preferred email address
-institutional affiliations(s)

-a brief description of your areas of research/expertise (4 or 5 key words)
 
Finally, we encourage you to share this call with any of your colleagues and contacts who might be interested in reviewing and/or submitting. The full call is included below as well as attached as a PDF. Please feel free to contact me or the Editor-in-Chief, Brad Porfilio (bradley.porfilio@csueastbay.edu) with any questions.
We look forward to hearing from you!
David Wolken
Assistant Editor - 
The SoJo Journal
 
----------------------------------------
 
The SoJo Journal
Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education
 
CALL FOR PAPERS
 
The editorial team of The SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education is soliciting manuscripts for its inaugural issue. The journal is an international peer-reviewed journal of educational foundations. The Department of Educational Leadership at California State University, East Bay, whose mission is to prepare and influence bold, socially responsible leaders who will transform the world of schooling, is hosting the journal.
The journal welcomes manuscripts that examine contemporary educational and social contexts and practices from critical perspectives. The SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education is interested in research studies as well as conceptual, theoretical, philosophical, and policy-analysis essays that advance educational practices that challenge the existing state of affairs in society, schools, and (in)formal education.
Manuscripts for publication consideration for the inaugural issue should be submitted electronically via email by attachment by February 1, 2015 to Bradley J. Porfilio at bradley.porfilio@csueastbay.edu. The issue will be published in the fall of 2015.
Style Guidelines
 
All manuscripts must adhere to APA sixth edition format, include an abstract of 100-150 words, and range between 20 - 30 pages in length (including camera ready tables, charts, figures, and references). Two copies of the manuscript should be attached: a master copy including a title page and a blind copy with the title page and all other author-identifying information removed (including citations and references pertaining to any of the contributing authors’ works). Attachments should be in Microsoft Word.
Journal Contact
Bradley J. Porfilio
Editor-In-Chief
The SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education
California State University, East Bay
25800 Carlos Bee Blvd, Hayward, CA 94542
Phone: 609-339-5011
 
Assistant Editor
David J. Wolken
Syracuse University
 
Associate Editors
Nicholas D. Hartlep
Illinois State University
 
Lisa William-White
Sacramento State University
 
__________________
David Wolken
Teaching Assistant | Cultural Foundations of Education
 
350 Huntington Hall
Syracuse University
Syracuse, NY 13244
djwolken@syr.edu | 402-707-6700
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Call for Work/Participants: Museum of disABILITY History reading and panel

March 6-7 
Stephen Hawking once said, “Sometimes I wonder if I’m as famous for my wheelchair and disabilities as I am for my discoveries.” And it’s true that Hawking’s face is as recognizable as his science; as is Einstein’s, as is Ben Franklin’s. But would anyone know Einstein without his characteristically crazy hair, or Ben without his bald head and pocket watch? We’re quick to judge people by their appearances, even if their talents overshadow them. We’re quick to dismiss those we think can’t hold talent beneath their wheelchairs, behind their speech impediment or within their non-mainstream bodies, because they don’t fit our idea of what a scientist, an artist, a dancer looks like. That’s the society we live in. That’s wrong.
On Friday, March 6th, 2015, the Museum of disABILITY History will host an evening reading and panel of disabled writers or writers who cover disability; to read from their work and discuss the “Crip Lit” culture, what it means to them, and how it empowers writers of difference.
On Saturday, March 7th, 2015, we will open the mic to local and regional disability writers who want to share their own writing, their own stories and their own contribution to “Crip culture.” We’re inviting writers, poets, novelists, and academics who are willing to share a little piece of themselves to show that normal is no virtue, because normal doesn’t exist. Join me to talk about where we sit, where we stand, where we exist within our own society and the larger context. Let’s start a conversation; let’s contribute to the movement.
Are you interested in participating? Send an email to schumeea@gmail.com, with “Writing Application [your name]” in the subject line, explaining a bit about yourself, your writing background, and why you’d like to join the conversation. Please include 2-3 writing samples, so we can get an idea of your work.
-30-

-- 
Lizz Schumer
cell: (716) 220-1238 

Three Public Events at the 2015 Multiple Perspectives Conference, April 13 & 14 at The Ohio State University, Columbus Ohio

Celebrate Our Past - Write Our Future: 2015 Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability
 
"It is crucial that disability studies be included in the curricula of schools so that when Rosa Parks and the civil rights movement are studied, when films on Stonewall are screened, Chicano authors are read — that disability history and culture be included as well." Lennard Davis
 
Celebrate Our Past - Write Our Future
Three Public Events at the 2015 Multiple Perspectives Conference, April 13 & 14 at The Ohio State University, Columbus Ohio
 
The Ken Campbell Lecture on Disability Policy "The Stories We Tell: The Americans with Disabilities Act After 25 Years"   presented by Lennard J. Davis. Based on his forthcoming book, Enabling Acts the human story illustrating the successes and shortcomings of the ADA in areas ranging from employment, education, and transportation to shifting social attitudes. 
 
The Ethel Louise Armstrong Lecture on Disability Art & Culture  “The Hearing World Around Me” presented by Trix Bruce reflects culture clash and connection, contact and confusion, and the many ways which language and identity can shape our perceptions. 
 
Student Perspectives, a reception and poster competition that  encourages students to network with professionals, the community, and scholars who share their interests in disability.  A generous gift from the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation  funds cash awards for graduate research, undergraduate research, arts, community service and class projects focused on disability.  Student poster submissions are due 3/11/15. 
 
 
There is still time to submit a session proposal to the Multiple Perspectives Conference (April 13-14).  I would love to have you join our featured presenters Lennard Davis & Trix Bruce on the program.  Concurrent presentations (including those by Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Disability Rights Ohio & the Center for Disability Empowerment) can focus on community, education, employment, recreation, technology, communications, ….  Consider a proposal for more information visit http://ada.osu.edu/conferences/2015Conf/callforproposals2015.html
 
Concurrent Session Proposals should be submitted by the week of January 5th as an e-mail attachment (Word, Word Perfect, TXT, or RTF formats)  to ADA-OSU@osu.edu  with Multiple Perspectives 2015 in the subject line.
Proposals must include:
  1. Name of each presenter with titles, institutions, employers etc. as appropriate
  2. Contact information (phone, mailing address, and e-mail) if there is more than one presenter please indicate one individual as the contact and lead presenter.
  3. Title of Presentation (12 words or less).
  4. Description (700 words or less).  Please describe the content, focus and desired outcomes for the presentation using these questions as a guide.
  • What is the format of the presentation (Lecture, Panel, Discussion, Performance, Other)?
  • Who is the intended audience (educators, employers, businesses, advocates, students, consumers, researchers, or other)?
  • How familiar should the audience be with the topic (beginner, intermediate, advanced)?
  • What are your three main goals for the presentation?
Please Note:  The full conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for presenters of accepted proposals. Presenters are responsible for their own travel and lodging

Call for Research Participants/ Study Announcement

 
A qualitative research study (IRB # 104603) is being conducted at
Eastern Michigan University to explore the experiences of LGBTQ
persons with disabilities at the collegiate level. This study is a
research study conducted by Amanda Bell from College of Education at
Eastern Michigan University as part of a dissertation project. Your
participation in this study is voluntary. Please read the information
below and ask questions about anything you do not understand, before
deciding whether or not to participate.

This study seeks to examine the experiences of persons with
disabilities belonging to the LGBTQ community at the collegiate.
Additionally, the study will examine how self-determination among
participants influences these experiences or vise versa.

If you volunteer to participate you will be asked to do the following:

1.     Participate in an initial tape-recorded interview, anticipated
to last up to 90 minutes, in which the researcher will ask you about
your experiences as a member of the disabled and LGBTQ community at
the collegiate level. Following the interview, you may be contacted to
participate in follow-up interview(s). If you agree follow up
interview(s) will be scheduled.

2.     The purpose of the follow-up interview(s), anticipated to last
up to 90 minutes, will feature semi-structured questions based upon
your answers from the initial interview, which will help the
researcher gain a clearer understanding of your collegiate experience.

3.     The interviews will occur over a three-week span, with a week
between each interview.

4.     If willing, you will be observed in public settings such as
student activities or gatherings within the collegiate environment.

5.     The purpose of these observations is to gain a deeper
understanding of your collegiate experience as a member of the LGBTQ
and disabled populations.

Eligible participants are persons who meet the following criteria:

-18 years or older
-College student who identifies as a person with a disability and
identify with the LGBTQ population
-Interest in discussing your collegiate experiences


Please contact me at abell@emich.edu for more information.

Call for Presentations: Disability Studies at Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity

 
Call for Presentations:
 
​In Honolulu, HI, May 2015:​
 
Disability Studies: Impact, Influence and Social Change

Disability studies have the potential to advance research that benefits the world.  Likewise, disability studies scholars can lead or be essential stakeholders in global and localized discussions on the intersections between disability, race, class, religion, gender, and age.  Disability scholars have the potential to be ambassadors for social change, infusing their scholarly might into fields as diverse as public health, education and employment. Many of us are doing this work but what is our impact in the world?

See more, including how to submit a proposal
​,​
--
Steven E. Brown, Ph.D. 
Affiliate Faculty
Center on Disability Studies 
University of Hawai‘i
Honolulu, HI 96822-2313
Skype:  stevenebrown
Twitter:  @disculture
Co-Founder: Institute on Disability Culture
Website: www.instituteondisabilityculture.org 

Postdoctoral Fellowship for research on print-related disabilities

 
Postdoctoral Fellowship (Job Number: 0170760)

The Postdoctoral Fellow will contribute to a thorough literature review, the development of a theoretical framework for research on print related disabilities and MSI’s, assist with conducting the research, and conduct both quantitative and qualitative analysis. In addition, the postdoctoral fellow will participate in development and evaluation of an educational component for faculty, student, and administrator training, as well as training of other constituents.

Major Responsibilities:

-Conduct literature reviews, present briefs, and organize resources.

-Plan and conduct research projects autonomously while working collaboratively with Co-PI and grant staff.

-Participate in grant related meetings as needed.

-Conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis.

-Help develop and evaluate education and training modules.

-Perform other related duties as needed.

-Travel to and conduct research at Minority Serving Institutions.


 


Disability Determination Process (DDP) Small Grant Program

 
 
***TIME SENSITIVE -- PLEASE DISTRIBUTE WIDELY***
 
APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 2, 2015
 
 
The Disability Determination Process (DDP) Small Grant Program
awards $10,000 stipends for graduate-level research on improving disability determination processes.
 
 
The DDP Small Grant Program is a one-year stipend program that allows graduate students, both full and part-time, to conduct supervised independent research on improving the efficiency and reducing the complexity of disability determination processes. Policy Research, Inc, (PRI) is pleased to announce the fifth round of this federally-funded stipend program. This program is directed by PRI of Delmar, NY, and is funded through a grant (#IDD11000001) from the Social Security Administration.
 
We will be holding an informational conference call titled “DDP Application Overview “on Thursday, January 22nd 2014 at 3 p.m. (ET). All students interested in submitting an application to the DDP Small Grant Program are invited to attend. We will provide a brief introduction to the program, review the elements of a successful application and answer questions. Please click here to register.
 
For more information and to access application materials, please visithttp://ddp.policyresearchinc.org. Contact us at ddp@policyresearchinc.org with any questions.
 
Sincerely,
 
Margaret Lassiter, Program Coordinator
Disability Determination Process (DDP) Small Grant Program
Policy Research, Inc.
Delmar, NY 12054
p: (518) 439-7415 ext. 5230

Seeking students for the Beinecke Scholarship nomination

 
Questions? Contact Kate, directly: khanso01@syr.edu(315) 443-2759
 
Syracuse University was recently selected to become one of the 125 schools selected to submit a student for nomination for the prestigious Beinecke Scholarship. Beinecke selects college juniors with a history of need-based financial aid who are planning to go to graduate school in the arts, humanities, and social science fields. Awardees receive $4,000 immediately prior to entering graduate school and an additional $30,000 while attending graduate school.
 
Eligible students must:
• Have demonstrated superior standards of intellectual ability, scholastic achievement and personal promise during his or her undergraduate career. GPA typically should be 3.7+
• Be a college junior pursuing a bachelor's degree during the 2014-2015 academic year.
• Plan to enter a master's or doctoral program in the arts, humanities or social sciences. This does not include professional school programs including law, business, education, architecture, or journalism. Neuroscience is excluded, but social psychology is eligible.
• Be a United States citizen or a United States national from American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.
• Have a documented history of receiving need-based financial aid.
 
Please share this notice with your students. The SU internal deadline is January 16, 2015 and we’re hoping to submit an excellent candidate this year. If there is a student that you would like me to contact directly, please let me know.
 
All the best,
Kate
 
Kate Hanson
Assistant Director, Scholarship and Fellowship Preparation
Center for Fellowship and Scholarship Advising (CFSA)| http://nationalscholarships.syr.edu
Renée Crown University Honors Program | http://honors.syr.edu
Syracuse University | 306 Bowne Hall | Syracuse, NY 13244
(315) 443-2759


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Disability Scoop 1.13.15


Celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the ADA at School

 
This July, 26th  marks the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act.  The anniversary serves as reminder of the rich history and the role this dimension of diversity plays today.
 
"It is crucial that disability studies be included in the curricula of schools so that when Rosa Parks and the civil rights movement are studied, when films on Stonewall are screened, Chicano authors are read — that disability history and culture be included as well." Lennard Davis
 
From the physics of wheelchairs & universal design to civil rights and the political process there are opportunities to include disability across the curriculum.  Here is one resource, e d g e (education for disability and gender equity) is a web experience designed for high school students.  Model lessons in physics, biology, government and culture guide an exploration of disability. This project is part of a demonstration funded by the Department of Education on how disability and gender can be part of school curriculums and includes teacher's guide, resources, suggested activities and quizzes.  Visit EDGE at http://www.disabilityhistory.org/dwa/edge/curriculum/index.htm 
 
Ohio State’s Multiple Perspectives conference offers an opportunity for college student at Student Perspectives, a poster competition that  encourages students to network with professionals, the community, and scholars who share their interests in disability.  A generous gift from the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation  funds cash awards for graduate research, undergraduate research, arts, community service and class projects focused on disability.  Student poster submissions are due 3/11/15. 

Why disabled achievers should be remembered - BBC News (Tom Shakespeare)

http://m.bbc.com/news/blogs-ouch-30700874

Note from the Disability and Abuse Project

 
The Disability and Abuse Project focuses on reducing the risk of abuse AND the sexual rights of people with disabilities.  These are separate, although related topics.  We recently published a report on sexual rights of adults with I/DD.  The webpage that gives access to the report says:
 
This essay contains a legal analysis of the sexual rights of adults with developmental disabilities who reside in California.  It also discusses the duties and responsibilities of agencies, such as Regional Centers, to advise and counsel clients of their sexual rights as well as ways to reduce their risk of becoming victims of abuse.  Duties of conservators and court-appointed attorneys are also included in the analysis.
 
Here is a link to the webpage: http://disabilityandabuse.org/sexual-rights/

Community Supporter Wanted (requested by Micah Fialka-Feldman)

 
I am a young professional with an intellectual disability who is a student and educator at Syracuse University. I also do a lot of public speaking related to Self-Advocacy. I am looking for a support person to assist me with recreational and social activities, doctors’ appointments, as well as some organization around my home. If you can assist me with my cooking skills that is a big plus as well! If interested, please contact Martha Majka @ 434-9597 x 210 or martham@oclinc.org


Disability Advisory Committee to the Federal Communications Commission

 
Public notice regarding the establishment of a Disability Advisory Committee to the Federal Communications Commission.  The FCC will be considering nominations of all different types of stakeholders.  
 
 
The deadline for nominations is January 12, 2015.

Deaf Culture, History and French Sign Language in France

University of Rochester ASL Program
May 31st-June 21st, 2015
ASL 113 - French Sign Language and Deaf Culture in France (6 Cr.)
Join us for an international course on Deaf culture, history, and French sign language this summer for deaf and hearing students fluent in ASL. The course will focus on development of conversational LSF (French Sign Language) and on a basic understanding of French Deaf culture and general French culture. There will be classes and guided tours of significant sights in these areas. All classes and tours will be conducted in LSF and International Sign.
 
For more information and an application, please go to our Web site at http://www.asl.rochester.edu/paris/index.html
 
And follow the links to our international programs.
Tel: (585) 286-2714 (VP)
      (585) 273-5165

Disability and Abuse Project: 2014 in Review


DisArt Festival 2015 (Disability 101 [Part 1]: Disability as dialogue)


Lennard Davis to present 2015 Ken Campbell Lecture on Disability Policy at the Ohio State University’s Multiple Perspectives Conference on April 13th

 
 
I am delighted to announce that Lennard J. Davis will present "The Stories We Tell: The Americans with Disabilities Act After 25 Years" as the 2015 Ken Campbell Lecture on Disability Policy  at the Ohio State University’s Multiple Perspectives Conference on April 13th.  Based on his forthcoming book, Enabling Acts Davis' topic honors both the 25th Anniversary of the ADA and Campbell’s life’s work as an advocate including over twenty years guiding the City of Columbus’ disability policies and practice.  A highlight of the Multiple Perspectives conference this public lecture was established by the Columbus Advisory Committee on Disability Issues after Campbell's death in 2007.  
 
Davis is a Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, a Professor of Disability and Human Development  and a Professor of Medical Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  A well published author whose works on disability include Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness, and the Body,  the Disability Studies Reader and his memoir My Sense of Silence numerous journal articles, presentations and interviews.  In addition Davis has edited several collections including his parents’ correspondence Shall I Say a Kiss: The Courtship Letters of a Deaf Couple, 1936-38.  His forthcoming book, Enabling Acts will be published in July for the 25th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act by Beacon Press.
 
Davis tells the neglected story behind the Americans with Disabilities Act, a model for civil rights laws around the world that is too often absent from the curriculum and too far from popular consciousness at home.  Enabling Acts is not a dry legislative history.  Davis tells the rich human story; illustrating the successes and shortcomings of the ADA in areas ranging from employment, education, and transportation to shifting social attitudes.  This powerfully told story promises to set the stage for the next generation of disability rights leaders. 
 
Davis summed up the importance of these stories this way.  "I have come to see that disability studies is imperative. It is crucial that students in elementary and secondary school, as well as students in the university, grow up in close contact with people with all kinds of disabilities. It is crucial that disability studies be included in the curricula of schools so that when Rosa Parks and the civil rights movement are studied, when films on Stonewall are screened, Chicano authors are read — that disability history and culture be included as well from the accomplishments of Vietnam Vets and Ron Kovic to the Berkeley movement led by disability activist Ed Roberts to the Deaf President Now movement at Gallaudet University. The drafting of the ADA should be studied the way that the drafting of the Declaration of Independence is studied. Students should be able to read the work of Nancy Mairs or Andre Dubus, to know about the disabilities of artists and writers like James Joyce, Harriet Martineau, and William DeKooning, as well as the more obvious Beethoven or Ray Charles."
Session Proposals Due January 5th  Student Posters Due March 11th http://ada.osu.edu/conferences.htm
 
 
L. Scott Lissner,
ADA Coordinator & 504 Compliance Officer
The Ohio State Univeristy, Office Of Diversity And Inclusion
   Associate, John Glenn School of Public Affairs
   Lecturer, Knowlton School of Architecture, Moritz College of Law & Disability Studies
   Board, Center for Disability Empowerment
   Appointed:  State HAVA Committee & Columbus Advisory Council on Disability Issues
 
614-292-6207 (voice)  614-688-8605 (TTY) Lissner.2@osu.eduhttp://ada.osu.edu
154 West 12th Street, Columbus, Ohio, 43214

Article regarding abuse of people with disabilities in Korea

 
The islands of abuse: Inside South Korea's slave farms for the disabled

The following are recent news stories of interest to people with disabilities and those supporting and working with and for people with disabilities.

 
Dr. Nora's Top Articles (10 of 86 news articles)
1.   “Brutal Beating of Disabled, Sleeping Homeless Man in SF Was a ‘Thrill Kill' ” --- Police are calling the death of a sleeping, disabled homeless man in San Francisco's Financial District, a thrill kill. --- CBS Local --- December 4, 2014  (CALIFORNIA) http://is.gd/9jiyoT
2.   “Disabled Teen Brought in Weighing about 40 Pounds” --- Police have arrested the father of a mentally disabled 15-year-old girl who authorities say was brought to a central Indiana ... --- WANE --- December 2, 2014  (INDIANA)  http://is.gd/1VMEWV
3.   “Suit Seeks Information about NY Disabled Abuse” --- An advocate for the disabled has sued the Cuomo administration for detailed disclosures about crimes against disabled individuals in ... --- Schenectady Gazette --- December 1, 2014  (NEW YORK) http://is.gd/nkO6WJ
4.   “Caregiver Who Stole $4,000 from Disabled People Who Couldn't Talk Gets 8 Months in Jail” --- A 48-year-old caregiver who stole about $4,000 from two developmentally disabled Southeast Portland residents, both of whom are in wheelchairs ... --- OregonLive.com --- December 1, 2014  (OREGON) http://is.gd/1OSZtC
5.   “Two Pennsylvania Men Get Life in Prison in Murder of Disabled Woman” --- ... on Monday after pleading guilty to charges they beat, stabbed and burned to death a mentally disabled woman one of them had befriended. --- Reuters --- December 8, 2014  (PENNSYLVANIA)  http://is.gd/6DGgr7
6.   “Bond Set for Teens Charged in Bullying of Special Needs Student” --- Bond was set Thursday afternoon for eight Socastee High students arrested Wednesday and charged with assaulting a 15-year-old special needs ... --- WPDE --- December 4, 2014  (SOUTH CAROLINA)  http://is.gd/NZLVbd
7.   “Former Austin Special Education Teacher Charged with Biting 11-year-old Student During Class” --- Austin police charged 30-year-old Samuel Haire on Thursday with a felony count of injury to a child. Officers say he bit the 11-year-old Kocurek … --- Daily Journal --- December 5, 2014  (TEXAS)  http://is.gd/fdDEyW
8.   “Mentally Disabled People Prey to 'Hidden Sexual Violence' ” --- Sexual assaults on mentally disabled people in Hong Kong were an increasingly common occurrence, social workers said, reflecting both the ... --- South China Morning Post --- December 7, 2014  (HONG KONG)  http://is.gd/9Cxp2s
9.   “North Korea 'Castrates Dwarfs' and Makes Those with Disabilities 'Disappear,' Claim Defectors” --- North Korea is getting rid of its disabled population by subjecting them to chemical weapons tests and castrating them, it was claimed today. --- Mirror.co.uk --- December 11, 2014  (NORTH KOREA)  http://is.gd/L0DxVG
10.   “Jacksonville Man Charged with False Imprisonment on Ten Disabled Adults” --- Police began investigating a “rooming house” on Agnes Street on the ... The group home- Agnes St Group Home for the Elderly- had not been ... --- WOKV --- December 1, 2014  (FLORIDA)  http://is.gd/bhnZaK
 
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
The other 76 stories for this week, as well as newsfeeds from prior weeks, can be found at:http://www.disabilityandabuse.org/newsfeed/contents.htm
 
The Disability and Abuse Project of Spectrum Institute provides this newsfeed. These are articles involving people with disabilities across the life span, any type of disability and any type of maltreatment, abuse, crime or, articles regarding law enforcement issues and individuals with disabilities. We have a particular focus on individuals with developmental disabilities. We welcome your input and feedback regarding this feature of our CANDO List. Please note that the articles are listed in alphabetical order by state, so you can easily scan through the articles for those within your state or other states in which you have a particular interest


Disability Scoop 12.12.14


Disability Scoop 12.16.14


Disability Scoop 12.5.14


Message from the Autism Society

On December 16th, the U.S. Senate passed the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) -- a victory for grassroots advocacy for parents and people with disabilities. The Autism Society has worked with many partners in the disability community and with you, our members, to get this bill passed. 

The ABLE Act allows for savings accounts for individuals with disabilities for certain expenses, like education, housing, and transportation, without jeopardizing certain important federal benefits such as SSI and Medicaid. The funds saved in these accounts, if managed correctly, can be another tool in planning for the lifetime support needs of an individual with disabilities. Up to $14,000 a year can be put in an ABLE account, with a cap of $100,000.

The bill must now be signed by the President to become law. Once the law is implemented in each state, the ABLE Act will allow the following: 

1.    Enable people with disabilities or family members to put up to $14,000 per year in the account, up to $100,000 total amount.
2.    ABLE accounts could generally be rolled over only into another ABLE account for the same individual or into an ABLE account for a sibling who is also an eligible individual.
3.    The funds must be spent on qualified expenses related to the individual's disability, such as health, education, housing, transportation, training, assistive technology, personal support, and related services and expenses. 

Sadly, the man who conceived and worked tirelessly to pass the legislation, Steve Beck of Burke, Virginia, died suddenly last week. Steve was 44 years old and the parent of two daughters, including Natalie who had a disability. Steve, along with a group of parents around his kitchen table, conceived the idea of a savings account for his daughter, similar to the 529 account used for college savings.  The passage of this Act is a wonderful tribute to the memory of Steve Beck.

As the process to open accounts for our family members with autism develops, we will keep our members informed as to next steps.

ABLE Act Passes through Senate, heads to President's Desk

 
The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act Passed in Senate Tuesday
After Eight Years, Congress’ Most Bipartisan Bill Passes Set for a Presidential Signing
Washington, DC, December 17- Following overwhelming passage in the House of Representatives (404-17) last week, the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act (H.R. 647/S. 313) passed the US Senate as part of the Tax Extenders Package last evening. The ABLE Act is the most bipartisan, bicameral bill before the 113th Congress. The President now has ten days to sign the bill for it to become law.
No other bill before the 113th Congress equals or surpasses the ABLE Act’s bipartisan and bicameral support - 77 United States Senators, including Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), and the bill’s Senate Champions Bob Casey (D-PA) and Richard Burr (R-NC). In the House, 381 Representatives, including a dedicated set of House Champions - Congressman Ander Crenshaw (R-FL), House Budget Committee Ranking Member Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), House Republican Conference Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) and House Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions (R-TX).
“Passage of the ABLE Act is a major victory for those with disabilities and their families,” Casey said. “This bill reminds us all that those with disabilities have a lot of ability. Soon those with disabilities and their families will be able to better save for their long-term care.”  
“Some have called the ABLE Act the most significant piece of legislation affecting the disabled since passage of the American Disabilities Act nearly 25 years ago.  I got involved in this effort nearly 8 years ago with Senator Casey.  Families of severely disabled children came to us expressing the critical need for an easy way to save for their child’s future expenses, especially since many Americans with Down syndrome and autism are now outliving their parents,” said Senator Burr. “Most middle-class families don’t have the money to spend on lawyers and financial planners to set up sophisticated trusts to make sure that their disabled child will be OK long after they are gone.  What’s worse current federal law actually discourages parents from putting any assets in the name of their disabled child in fear of disqualifying them from federal programs down the road. It’s utterly unacceptable that our current laws doom a child born with a disability to a lifetime of poverty and dependence.  This is especially unfortunate when a parent or other family member has the resources and the desire to save and plan for that child’s future expenses but are advised by lawyers and planners not to.  The ABLE Act will take the first critical step in ending this injustice.”
NDSS has been one of the leading advocacy organizations behind the ABLE Act for over eight years and four Congress. Last week, ABLE House Champions renamed the landmark legislation to honor NDSS’ late Vice Chairman and chief ABLE Act architect Stephen Beck Jr., who passed away suddenly just days after the House passage. “The ABLE Act’s initial concept grew out of an idea around Steve Beck’s kitchen table, and now will be forever marked with his legacy,” said NDSS Chairman Rob Taishoff.  
“The ABLE Act proves that people with disabilities and their families can make a difference. We fought long and hard to make the ABLE Act a reality for all people with Down syndrome and their families in this country,” said Sara Weir, NDSS interim President. “This landmark legislation puts a stake in the ground that people with disabilities, for the first time ever, can work and save money for the future. For NDSS, this has been a civil rights issue, and we can’t wait for President Obama to sign this bill into law.” 
Under current law, they cannot have more than $2,000 worth of assets before critical government support programs they need are cut off.  In the face of enormous medical, transportation, and education costs, that amount does not extend very far and certainly hinders independent living.
The National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS), Autism Speaks and more than 100 other national organizations have endorsed the bill, which will ease the financial strain on families who have loved ones with disabilities.

State of the Art Conference PowerPoints

 
As promised, the presentations from the 2014 SOA Conference have been posted on our website. Please enjoy:
http://kihd.gmu.edu/policy/conference/2014-conference/soa2014-presentations
 
And as a reminder, all of the photos have been posted on the Conference's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/290873051102530/?ref=br_tf
 
Hope to see you next year,
Rachel
 
 ------------------
Rachel Korpan Lee
Logistics Coordinator 
2014 State of the Art Conference on Postsecondary Education and Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

NEWS FROM AHEAD (Association for Higher Education and Disability): Early Bird Deadline for 2015 Management Institutes Fast Approaching!

 
December 3, 2014
 
Think it's cold now? Just imagine how chilly it will be in February!
 
Join AHEAD in sunny Tampa, Florida to escape the winter blues at the
2015 Management Institutes, February 5-7!
 
Discount registration rates are available until December 23, 2014.
 
This two and a half day workshop offers disability services professionals, academic skills staff, and IT personnel an intensive opportunity to gain knowledge and skills from respected instructors in an interactive learning setting.
 
Attendees choose one of four topical tracks to attend all day Thursday and Friday of the Institute:
Institute #1: AHEAD Start: The Institute for New and Newer Disability Services Managers
 
Institute #2: Taking the Lead on the Path to Access: Ways to Make a Difference on Your Campus
 
Institute #3: On the Road to Educational Success: Removing Barriers to Student Development(this is also great for TRiO program staff!)
 
Institute #4: The Future is Now: "EIT" and Accessibility
 
plus a Saturday morning plenary session for ALL attendees:
A New Perspective on the Future - Helping Students See the Light at the End of the Tunnel
 
Full workshop and registration information is available at:
 
Group discounted rates the Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel are available until January 20, 2015
 
We look forward to meeting with you in sunny Tampa, Florida this winter!
 

Recent NEW YORKER article about students with mental health issues and/or disabilities


Latest Issue of RDS Now Posted!

 
I am pleased to announce the release of Volume 10, Issue 3&4 of The Review of Disability Studies. This issue includes a forum on Art History and Disability guest edited by Ann Millett-Gallant and Elizabeth Howie. Check out our blog for an interview with Ann Millett-Gallant.
 
Volume 10 will conclude our print edition of RDS and subscribers will be receiving their print issues soon. This will also be the last issue where the current volume will be available for free online without a subscription. So subscribe now! We will be launching our new website platform early in the New Year. Stay tuned. Megan Conway

Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal
Copyright 2014
Table of Contents
Editorial: Progress
Megan A. Conway, PhD, RDS Editor-in-Chief
Forum: Art History and Disability
Guest Editors:
Ann Millett-Gallant, University of North Carolina, USA
Elizabeth Howie, Coastal Carolina University, USA
Forum Editor Introduction
 
Forum Articles
 
Composing Dwarfism: Reframing Short Stature in Contemporary Photography
Amanda Cachia, University of California, San Diego, USA
A 16th Century Portrait of Disability? Quentin Matsys' A Grotesque Old Woman
Sara Newman, Kent State University, USA
Shifting Perception: Photographing Disabled People During the Civil Rights Era
 
Timothy Hiles, University of Tennessee, USA
Becoming Aware of One’s Own Biased Attitude: The Observer’s Encounter with Disability in Chris Ware’s Acme Novelty Library no. 18
Nina Heindl, Ruhr-University, Germany
Research Articles
Facing Dyslexia: The Education of Chuck Close
Ken Gobbo, Landmark College, USA
Summer of 2012: Paralympic Legacy and the Welfare Benefit Scandal
Liz Crow, Bristol University, United Kingdom
A Capabilities View of Accessibility in Policy and Practice in Jordan and Peru
Joyojeet Pal, PhD, University of Michigan, USA
Book and Media Reviews
Both Sides of the Table: Autoethnographies of Educators Learning and Teaching With/In [Dis]Ability. Disability Studies in Education, Vol 12. Eds. Susan L. Gabel and Scot Danforth Reviewed by Steven E. Brown, PhD, University of Hawaii, USA
Quality of Life and Intellectual Disability; Knowledge Application to Other Social and Educational Challenges, Edited by Roy I. Brown and Rhonda M. Faragher
Reviewed by James G. Linn, PhD, USA
Mad Matters: A Critical Reader in Canadian Mad Studies, Edited by Brenda A. LeFrançois, Robert Menzies, and Geoffrey Reaume
Reviewed by Shulan Tien, PhD Candidate, Fu-Jen University, Taiwan
FIXED: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement, Directed by Regan Brashear
Reviewed by Amanda McLaughlin
Disability Studies Dissertation Abstracts


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS