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Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

INDEX

SU HAPPENINGS

“Writing In-Between, Living In-Between”: A Creative Nonfiction Reading


SU NEWS

SU NEWS: The Syracuse University Counseling Center is offering a free course in Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction to SU and SUNY-ESF students

Call for Drag Performers

Call for Applicants

fullCIRCLE Mentoring Program Seeking Applicants (Office of Multicultural Affairs)

SU NEWS: Alumnus, Wife Leave Lasting Legacy to Assist Students with Disabilities

Women’s & Gender Studies Department Teaching Assistant Positions

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY HUMANITIES CENTER LIBRARY SERIES

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, PARTICIPANTS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Call for Submissions: Public Health and/in the US and Global South

New Webinar Series on Faith and Disability

Call for Proposals: Transgender Studies Quarterly special issue: Trans/Feminisms

Call for Proposals: Disability as Insight, Access as the Function of Design

2015 AAPD Summer Internship Program

GLUTEN STUDY ON SU CAMPUS

Summer 2015 Research Program

Call for Interview Participants

Internship Opportunity

Yale Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Studies Research Fellowship

Call for Study Participants

Call for Study Participants

Call for Papers: Religion and Disability Studies Group, American Academy of Religion

Graduate Student Stipends for AERA--limited availability

Invitation to Speak – April 29-30 for “Living in Community: Changes and Continuing Challenges”

Call for Proposals: Special Issue of CJDS: Disability and Contingent Employment in Academia

Youth in International Development and Foreign Affairs internship program

Reminder from the School for Advanced Research: 

Final Reminder: Pac Rim Call for Proposals -- Due Jan 30, 2015

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Notice of NIH's Interest in Diversity

NEW BOOK OF INTEREST (featuring work by SU Alumnus, Jagdish Chander)

Barnard Center for Research on Women: Body Undone: A Salon in Honor of Christina Crosby

Move Along Adult Basketball Program

DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: January 18-24, 2015

NC State Symposium on Universal Design

Disability Scoop 1.23.15

New Issue of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies (Vol. 4 No. 1)

Save the Date

Participate in the National Online Dialogue on Families, Disability and Postsecondary Success

Disability Scoop 1.27.15

Sections 508 and 504: Closed Captioning and Web Accessibility Requirements


SU HAPPENINGS

“Writing In-Between, Living In-Between”: A Creative Nonfiction Reading

On the occasion of Prof. Minnie Bruce Pratt's retirement, former students will read from their creative nonfiction writing inspired by the SU organizing in fall 2014.
February 26
4:00 to 5:15 pm: Welcome & Readings
5:15 to 6:00 pm:  Reception
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons
Bird Library
Sponsored by the Writing Program, the Department of Women's & Gender Studies, & the LGBT Studies Program, this event is part of:
#Feminisms, a series of events sponsored by the Department of Women's & Gender Studies, engaging contemporary feminisms in words, actions, images, and ideas.
The Nonfiction Reading Series sponsored by the Syracuse University Writing Program.  Initiated in 2008 by Professor Eileen Schell, the Nonfiction Reading Series features local, national, and international writers of all types of nonfiction. Past readers have included Cheryl Strayed, Mary Karr, George Saunders, Stephen Kuusisto, and Susan Faludi.
CART TRANSCRIPTION WILL BE PROVIDED FOR HEARING ACCESSIBILITY: Computer-Aided Real-time Translation of the texts being read will be projected on an overhead screen.
The reading is free and open to SU students, faculty, staff, and the general public.
Please RSVP to: lapayne@syr.edu


SU NEWS

SU NEWS: The Syracuse University Counseling Center is offering a free course in Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction to SU and SUNY-ESF students


Call for Drag Performers

 
Love Pride Union’s annual Totally Fabulous Drag Show? Consider auditioning to be a featured student performer! Auditions will be held on Saturday, January 31st from 2 – 4 PM at the LGBT Resource Center (750 Ostrom Avenue). For more information, please email Pride Union.

Call for Applicants

 
Applications are now being accepted for Senior Class Marshal! Syracuse University juniors graduating in May of 2016 are eligible to apply. For more information, please visit the Senior Class Marshal page online!

fullCIRCLE Mentoring Program Seeking Applicants (Office of Multicultural Affairs)

 
If you are interested in a mentoring program that will provide academic, social and professional guidance throughout your four years – join the fullCIRCLE family! fullCIRCLE is a sustainable, multilayered program designed to assist students in effectively adjusting to the different challenges of college life, including those that are academic, social, professional and personal in nature, with the goal of retention. The program serves first-year and upper-class students with an emphasis on African American/ Black, Asian and Pacific American, Latino/ Hispanic, and Native students. fullCIRCLE promotes academic success, personal development, campus leadership and civic engagement.
 
Program Goals
1.    To provide academic resources and connections outside of the classroom, including but not limited to, time management skills, networking, resume writing workshops, and help navigating the financial aid and bursar offices on campus
2.    To connect students with a role model who shares personal success and growth opportunities
3.    To guide students through their acclamation to Syracuse University, and their personal identity and cultural journey
4.    To create intentional connections with faculty, staff, employers, and alumni after their first year in the program
5.    To successfully retain students through their four years at Syracuse University
For more information, please visit our website. If you are interested in joining the fullCIRCLE family as a Peer Mentor for the 2015-2016 academic year, please apply online by Monday, February 2, 2015. If you have questions, please feel free to e-mail us atfullCIRCLE@syr.edu, call us at 315-443-9676, or stop by our office in Schine 105.

SU NEWS: Alumnus, Wife Leave Lasting Legacy to Assist Students with Disabilities


Women’s & Gender Studies Department Teaching Assistant Positions

 
Fall 2015/Spring 2016
 
The Women's & Gender Studies Department is seeking applicants for Teaching Assistants for academic year 2015- 2016.
 
Teaching Assistants earn a stipend in addition to a tuition scholarship. The primary responsibility of these positions is to provide teaching assistance to courses offered in the Women's & Gender Studies major in both the fall (WGS 101) and spring (WGS 201) semesters.
 
Applicants must be matriculated in a PhD program at Syracuse University. Preference is given to graduate students with advanced standing and strong qualifications in the humanities and/or social sciences. Teaching experience, knowledge of/coursework in feminist theory, and a CAS in women’s and gender studies is preferred. All TA's will be part of the Future Professoriate Program.
 
In addition to a resume and the names of two references, applicants should provide a cover letter briefly describing prior teaching experience, pedagogy/philosophy of teaching and background in women's & gender studies or feminist theory coursework.
 
Direct all inquiries to Vivian May, Chair;  Attn: TA Selection, Women's & Gender Studies Department, 208 Bowne Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-1200 by February 6, 2015.  Additional questions, or clarification, can be obtained by contacting Susann DeMocker-Shedd, Administrative Specialist at 443-3560.
 
Decisions will be made in March 2015.

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY HUMANITIES CENTER LIBRARY SERIES

 
Interested in submitting an application for a 2015-2016 Humanities Center Dissertation OR Faculty Fellowship?  Applications are now available at http://www.syracusehumanities.org/center/applications-and-funding/. The deadline is Monday, February 16 at noon.
 
Have questions? Need more information? The Humanities Center Interim Director and staff will be available to answer your questions:
 
Thursday, January 29th
12:45-1:45 p.m.
The Leonard and Ruth Sainsbury Library
3rd floor, Tolley Humanities Building
 
Open to the Syracuse University community
~
Light refreshments will be served
 
Sponsored by the Syracuse University Humanities Center in the College of Arts & Sciences


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Call for Submissions: Public Health and/in the US and Global South

Southern Spaces, an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed online journal, invites scholars, critics, writers, health care providers, public health practitioners, and patients to submit essays, photo essays, original documentaries, and digital projects for a forthcoming series titled Public Health and/in the US and Global South.

This 2015–2016 series will examine the relationship between public health and specific geographies—both real and imagined—in and across the US and global South. The journal welcomes projects relating to any time period or genre. Interdisciplinary frameworks, critical approaches to space and place, and work that foregrounds a transnational approach to public health are especially encouraged. Where possible, proposals should include media—sound, video, maps, images.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following themes framed in relationship to the US and/or global South:

-The relationship between health and migration -Public health and its material culture(s) -Intersections of public health with place, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class -Campaigns for immunization, safe food, clean water, and disease eradication -Forms of healing (religious, spiritual, nutritional, and medicinal) -Historically Black Medical Schools -Disease specific analyses: sickle cell anemia, malaria, pellagra, hookworm, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, alcoholism, Ebola, HIV/AIDS -Disability studies -Local, state, and federal public health programs and institutions: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Public Health Service (PHS), Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) -Drug testing, DNA analysis, and genetic screening programs -Prisoners and public health -Health insurance: Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and the Affordable Care Act -Public health and racial segregation -Labor and public health, corporate medical policies, work-related health issues -Rural poverty and well-being -Mental health -Food deserts and place-based food insecurity -Health-focused writing: fiction, memoir, and (auto)-biography -Domestic violence -Gun control and public health -Eugenics -Maternal and child morbidity and mortality

In addition to essays, photo essays, and short videos, this series will feature peer-reviewed digital projects. Please contact the journal if you have any questions about the submission process or other aspects of digital project publishing. Southern Spaces editors are committed to assisting scholars at all levels of technological proficiency and support journal authors in selecting and producing multi- media materials to accompany their scholarship.

Please submit proposals (350-700 words) to seditor@emory.edu by March 31, 2015.

Series editor: Mary E. Frederickson, Emory University.
 
Submission deadline: March 31, 2-15.
 
See more at: http://southernspaces.org/blog/call-submissions-public-health-andin-us-and-global-south
 
Best,
 
Jordan Johnson
Editorial Associate, Southern Spaces 

New Webinar Series on Faith and Disability


Call for Proposals: Transgender Studies Quarterly special issue: Trans/Feminisms

In Trans/Feminisms, a special double-issue of TSQ, we will explore feminist work taking place within trans studies, trans and genderqueer activism, cultural production in trans, genderqueer, and nonbinary gender communities, and in communities and cultures across the globe that find the modern Western gender system alien and ill-fitting to their own self-understanding. Simultaneously, we want to explore as well the ways in which trans issues are addressed within broader feminist and women’s organizations and social movements around the world. We want this issue to expand the discussion beyond the familiar and overly simplistic dichotomy often drawn between an exclusionary transphobic feminism and an inclusive trans-affirming feminism. We seek to highlight the many feminisms that are trans inclusive and that affirm the diversity of gender expression, in order to document the reality that feminist transphobia is not universal nor is living a trans life, or a life that contests the gender binary, antithetical to feminist politics. How are trans, genderqueer, and non-binary issues related to feminist movements today? What kind of work is currently being undertaken in the name of trans/feminism? What new paradigms and visions are emerging?  What issues still need to be addressed? Central to this project is the recognition that multiple oppressions (not just trans and sexist oppressions) intersect, converge, overlap, and sometimes diverge in complex ways, and that trans/feminist politics cannot restrict itself to the domain of gender alone. We seek to publish numerous shorter pieces (1000-2500 words) to represent the diversity of trans/feminist practices and problematics, and welcome original research articles as well as theory, reports, manifestos, opinion pieces, reviews, and creative/artistic productions rooted in particular trans/feminist contexts. We also seek to republish key documents of trans/feminist history, and welcome suggestions for inclusion. Please send complete submissions, author’s biography (50 words or less), abstract (150 words or less), and keywords (3-5 for indexing) by March 2, 2015 to tsqjournal@gmail.com. While the language of publication will be English, we accept submissions in any language and will work with authors to translate submitted work.
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly is co-edited by Paisley Currah and Susan Stryker, and published by Duke University Press, with editorial offices at the University of Arizona’s Institute for LGBT Studies. TSQ aims to be the journal of record for the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies and to promote the widest possible range of perspectives on transgender phenomena broadly defined. Every issue of TSQ is a specially themed issue that also contains regularly recurring features such as reviews, interviews, and opinion pieces. To learn more about the journal and see calls for papers for other issues, visit http://lgbt.arizona.edu/transgender-studies-quarterlyFor info about subscriptions, visithttp://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?productid=45648.

Call for Proposals: Disability as Insight, Access as the Function of Design


The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy is calling for submissions to a special topic issue themed around disability, accessibility, and digital pedagogy. We welcome traditional articles and digital projects. Full details are included in the call, which can be accessed here:http://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/submit/#issuecall

Please send inquiries to Andrew Lucchesi (a.j.lucchesi@gmail.com) and Sushil Oswal (oswal@u.washington.edu).  Submission deadline: April 15, 2015.

-From the CFP-
Suggested topics may include but are not limited to:

- What does it mean to compose multimodally with accessibility in view as a person with or without disability? What might it look like to design inclusive user interactions in social virtual spaces? What complexity, creativity, or obfuscations are visible in today's social media compositions at the intersections of gender, race, and disability?

- What novel disability and accessibility scholarship projects have been made, or are possible by virtual Social Networks? What new knowledge is possible through assistive-technology-related disability and accessibility research for universal users?

- Besides the functional innovations, what possibilities for play and improvisation are possible through assistive technologies and related research? How do such play and improvisation stabilize existing knowledge and directionally change the generation of new knowledge?

- Development of assistive technology tools or applications for "mainstream" purposes; rhetorics of assistive technologies; rhetorical histories of assistive technologies morphing into "mainstream" products; rhetorics of, or analyses of, consumer mobile technologies as assistive technologies; visions of assistive technologies for able-bodied users.

- Analyses of new models of Universal Design; benefits and/or analyses of disabled-centered participatory designs; position papers on innovative, crowd-sourced designs by and for the disabled.

- Generative research methods for evaluating accessible designs, products, and pedagogies; profiles or analyses of digital tools for disability activism, or community building; or experiments in fostering accessibility in learning, work, and research environments in college and beyond.

- We invite both textual and multimedia submissions employing interdisciplinary and creative approaches in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. Besides scholarly papers, the proposed submissions can consist of audio or visual presentations and interviews, dialogues, or conversations; creative/artistic works; manifestos; or other scholarly materials.

2015 AAPD Summer Internship Program

 
The American Association for People for Disabilities (AAPD), located in Washington D.C., is looking for applications for their 2015 Summer Internship Program. Applications are due by Friday, February 6th at 5:00pm EST. Please direct questions and send application materials to:internship@aapd.com

GLUTEN STUDY ON SU CAMPUS

Dear Faculty & Staff,
 
David B. Falk College of Sports and Human Nutrition is looking for volunteers to participate in a survey regarding nutrition and diet behaviors. The survey will take between 10-15 minutes of your time. 
 
If you are interested in participating or would like more information, please click the link below. If you have any further questions regarding this study, please contact the primary investigator, Sara Quinteros at saquinte@syr.edu
 
 
Thank you for your time.
 
Sincerely,
 
Sara Quinteros-Fernandez
Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant 
Graduate Student in Nutrition Science and Dietetics
David B. Falk College of Sports and Human Nutrition

Summer 2015 Research Program

 
The Syracuse University Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) Research Program is a paid summer research opportunity that provides undergraduate scholars with the opportunity to work with distinguished faculty and staff as well as network with others in their field of interest. Student scholars have the opportunity to conduct and present research over a ten-week period under the direction of a faculty research mentor at Syracuse University. For more information, please check out the Summer 2015 Research Project online.

 

Call for Interview Participants

 
An undergraduate Newhouse student is looking for a trans* student to participate in a short, character-driven story/documentary for their newspaper class. If you’re interested in participating, please email Laritza Salazar.

Internship Opportunity

 
The American Association for People with Disabilities (AAPD), located in Washington, D.C., is seeking applicants for their 2015 Summer Internship Program. For more information, please visit the AAPD website. Please send any questions to AAPD email. Applications are due by Friday, February 6th, at 5:00 PM.  

Yale Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Studies Research Fellowship

 
This annual fellowship is designed to provide access to Yale resources to lesbian, gay, bisexual, & transgender studies scholars who live outside the greater New Haven, Connecticut region. The program supports scholars from any field pursuing research in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer studies at Yale University, giving them access to faculty resources, manuscript archives, and library connections at Yale. The fellowship provides an award of $4,000. The one-month fellowship must be taken up between September 1, 2015 and April 30 2016. The recipient is expected to be in residence for a minimum of twenty days during the period of their award. Graduate students conducting dissertation research, independent scholars, and all faculty are invited to apply. For complete program guidelines and application instructions, visit the Yale Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies website.

Call for Study Participants

 
If you are 18 or older, identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB), and reside in the United States or a US territory, please consider participating in a national and anonymous on-line survey study on LGB strengths and positive aspects of being LGB (IRB Approval #2015-051). The study is being conducted by Dr. Darrell Greene and Dr. Paula Britton, through John Carroll University and the JCU Counseling Department. The study will take about 20 minutes to complete. The benefit to you as a participant involves contributing to our knowledge of how to better measure LGB strengths. Complete the survey, and be eligible to win from $10 to up to $50 in gift cards. Take the LGB survey online.

 

Call for Study Participants

 
Lauri Lindquist, doctoral candidate in school psychology at the University of Montana, is conducting a study on high school supports for sexual and gender diverse individuals. If you are between the ages of 18 and 24; identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning; or engage in sexual behaviors or have sexual attractions to members of the same sex, you are eligible to participate in this study. The survey takes approximately 20 – 30 minutes to complete, and participants will be entered into a drawing for one of four $50 Amazon gift cards. If you have any questions, please email Lauri Lindquist.  Take the high school supports survey online.

Call for Papers: Religion and Disability Studies Group, American Academy of Religion

Atlanta, November 21-24, 2015

The Religion and Disability Studies Group of the American Academy of Religion welcomes paper submissions on any aspect of the intersection between religion, theology, and disability studies. We have particular interest in the following topics:

*  Notions of time and space in disability cultures and religious
communities: notions of futurity, crip time, reconfigurations of liturgical space, etc.
*  Papers that engage and extend the work of Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, in conversation with disability theologies and ethics
*  Papers in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, including papers that examine the interrelationship with disability justice, racial justice, and the civil rights movement
*  Papers that explore the intersection between queer theory and disability studies as it relates to the study of religion for a possible co-sponsored session with the Queer Studies in Religion Group.
*  Papers that examine illness narratives or other aspects of the interrelationship between disability, religiosity, literature, and art for a possible joint session with the Arts, Literature, and Religion Group and the Bioethics and Religion Group
*  Papers that engage disability from diverse religious and cultural contexts

*Contact the Co-Chairs:*
Julia Watts Belser, jwb84@georgetown.edu Mary Jo Iozzio, mary.jo.iozzio@bc.edu

Proposals must be submitted online through the Program Administration Proposal, Evaluation, Review, and Submission (PAPERS) System. The deadline for all proposal submissions is March 2, 2014, 4:59 PM Eastern Standard Time.
https://papers.aarweb.org/content/welcome

*About the Group:*
The Religion and Disability Studies Group of the American Academy of Religion is committed to maintaining the visibility, viability, and value of the experience and politics of disability as they relate to the study and practice of religion. We promote engagement between disability studies theory and the study of religion, examine the role of disability in lived religious experience and theology, and consider the historical and contemporary role of disability in diverse religious traditions, texts, and cultures.

*Please feel free to share this call for papers with your colleagues and networks.*

Graduate Student Stipends for AERA--limited availability

 
Greetings, Division G Graduate Students!
Division G is pleased to announce travel stipends available for the 2015 Annual Meeting.  If you are a current graduate student in the area of social contexts of education, you may apply for one of the Division G travel stipends for the 2015 Annual Meeting in Chicago.  Application deadline: Sunday, February 8, 2015 at 11:59 p.m. EST.
To apply, please use the following link: http://wp.me/P1m9dv-f1, where you will need to complete an application form and submit your curriculum vitae.  Please have your AERA member number ready.
We will use a process of random selection after the committee reviews applicants for eligibility. Applicants must meet at least one of the following criteria:
  • Applicant is a first time presenter with AERA annual meeting or
  • Applicant’s paper was accepted for presentation at the AERA conference. Applicant is an author of accepted paper or
  • Applicant is involved with Division G (e.g. attending Mentoring Pre-Conference Seminar, Campus Liaison, attending Fireside or Student Session)
 
Please upload your materials on the following link no later than Sunday, February 8, 2015 by 11:59 p.m. EST.  Recipients will be notified by February 15, 2015. N.B.:  This form does not save, so you will need to submit all information at once.

Please contact Sakeena Everett, Division G graduate student representative, if you have any questions.
 
~Division G Graduate Student Executive Committee
 
Sakeena Everett 
Curriculum, Instruction and Teacher Education, PhD Candidate
Michigan State University
116Y Erickson Hall
everet63@msu.edu

American Educational Research Association, Division G (Social Contexts of Education)
Graduate Student Senior Representative | Blog: https://aeradivg.wordpress.com/grad-students/
Twitter: @AERA Division G | Facebook: AERA Division G Students: Social Context of Education

Invitation to Speak – April 29-30 for “Living in Community: Changes and Continuing Challenges”

  The Center for Disability Studies in collaboration with the Center For Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDEA), the Disability Education and Advocacy Network (DEAN), and the Museum of disABILITY History invites you to join us for an exciting conference at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, April 29-30, 2015.

The conference aims to bring together regional scholars, community members, students, and activists to address the theme “Living in Community: Changes and Continuing Challenges.” In addition to focusing on issues such as the built environment, product design, transportation, education and employment, we hope the conference will engage the ways in which people with disabilities define—and derive meaning and value from—the term “community.”
 
Individual as well as panel proposals are welcome. Submissions need not be formal. An e-mail briefly (200 words) explaining your proposal will suffice. 
We may ask for follow-up information. The conference organizers have funds to support travel, lodging, and a modest honorarium.

If you are interested, please e-mail your proposal to Program Committee Chair, Andrew Marcum at abmarcum@buffalo.edu by Friday, March 13, 2015. 
Proposals will be reviewed and participants will be notified of their acceptance no later than Monday, March 23, 2015.

We hope to hear from you soon! 

Call for Proposals: Special Issue of CJDS: Disability and Contingent Employment in Academia


In September 2013, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ran an article called “Death of an Adjunct,” recounting the fate of Duquesne University instructor Margaret Mary Vojtko. The attention given to Vojtko, who had died in poverty at eighty-four after fifty years of adjunct teaching, helped to spread awareness that most university courses in North America are taught by part-time workers being paid by the credit hour with no pension, benefits, or job security. Adjuncts rallied to tell their own stories of poverty and struggle under the hashtag IamMargaretMary. Two months later, however, Slate magazine’s food correspondent ran an exposé suggesting that Vojtko’s case had not been so simple: “The reasons Vojtko’s life ended in misery had much less to do with her status as an adjunct professor than tweeters using the #IamMargaretMary hashtag might believe.” The Slate article portrays Vojtko as ascetic and stubborn, pedagogically rigid and theologically retrograde, a hoarder and virtually a hobo. Vojtko repeatedly refused aid from family, the university chaplain, and the campus police, ultimately dying of a cardiac arrest while walking up the steep hill to her collapsing, unheated, junk-filled house. Although the exploitation of adjunct faculty is a grave injustice, it argues, there is nothing Duquesne could have done to save such a recalcitrant and difficult old teacher.

The journalistic trope presented in the Slate article is a simple and common one — “Good cause, bad poster-child.” But the issues it raises are far from simple: they concern the place of disability, mental and physical, in the life of contingent faculty and the ways that disability affects the image of contingent faculty. Indeed, there is a problem in the article’s thesis that Margaret Mary’s is not a story of exploited adjunct labor. A salaried, tenured teacher with her problems could have requested a leave of absence from work, taken a taxi home, or stayed in a heated motel. A nondisabled adjunct who otherwise shared her circumstances might never have been laid off. But somehow her disabilities, or the fact that she didn’t get them treated properly, exclude her from consideration as an exemplar of the ill-used part-timer. The Canadian Journal of Disability Studies seeks contributions for an issue addressing such intersections of disability and contingent employment. Topics may include, among others, the causal relationship between disability and contingent employment; the expendable non-tenure track body; contingent faculty and disability pedagogy; contingent faculty organizing and disability; how disability rights and contingent faculty rights have converged in professional rhetoric; the intersections between aging, gender, contingent employment, and disability; disabled instructors under neoliberal management; support and mutuality among or for disabled contingent faculty. Are we indeed Margaret Mary, in ways that the mainstream discourse has not yet recognized? 

We welcome submissions from such fields as labor studies, education, law, and other disciplines as well as disability studies. Send abstracts of 150 – 200 words to Josh Lukin (jblukin@temple.edu) or Kristin Lindgren (klindgre@haverford.edu) by 15 March 2015. Final articles (6000 - 7000 words) will be due by 1 September 2015.

Jay

Jay Dolmage, Ph.D
Editor, Canadian Journal of Disability Studies Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies Associate Professor of English University of Waterloo Department of English Hagey Hall of Humanities Building Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1
Tel: 519 888 4567 x31035
Fax: 519 746 5788
dolmage@uwaterloo.ca

Youth in International Development and Foreign Affairs internship program

 
DEADLINE EXTENDED TO February 4, 2015!
 
The summer 2015 Youth in International Development and Foreign Affairs internship program remains open for applications until February 4, 2015 at 5 pm EST.  
 
This program is for recent graduates, graduate students, and undergraduates from across the U.S. who wish to pursue a career in international development or foreign affairs. The U.S. International Council on Disabilities (USICD) has coordinated this internship program since 2013.
 
 
The summer 2015 internship program will bring a group of talented graduate students, recent graduates, and rising college juniors and seniors to Washington, DC, for nine weeks.  This will include a one-week training and orientation program followed by an eight-week internship at an international organization in the Washington, DC, area.  Each intern is usually placed at a different organization.  USICD will cover the cost of fully-accessible housing during the program, reimburse travel expenses to and from DC, and provide a limited stipend.  It is anticipated that the program will run from May 24 to July 25, 2015. These dates may be subject to change.  
 
Applicants must be U.S. citizens, must identify as a person with a disability, and must be either a student or a recent graduate. "Recent graduates" graduated between spring 2014 and spring 2015 with either a graduate degree or a bachelor's degree.  All applicants must have completed at minimum their sophomore year in college.  Most applicants should be age 30 or younger.  In limited circumstances, some candidates (particularly U.S. veterans) may be eligible up to age 35.
 
To learn more about the Youth in International Development and Foreign Affairs internship program, its eligibility criteria, and the application process, please visit http://usicd.org/template/page.cfm?id=257.  You can also download a printable handout on the internship program.
 
Please disseminate this announcement widely.  If you represent an international organization in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area interested in hosting an intern from June 1 to July 24, 2015, please communicate with internships@usicd.org.
 
USICD thanks the Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation for their support for this initiative.
 
Application deadline for USICD's summer 2015 internship program is February 4, 2015 at 5 pm EST (2 pm PST).

Reminder from the School for Advanced Research: 

The application deadline for Advanced, Research Team, and Short Seminars is February 1. Seminars at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) promote communication among scholars and/or practitioners who are at a critical stage of research on a shared topic. Each seminar consists of up to 10 scholars — including one or two who serve as chair/s — who meet at SAR's Santa Fe campus for three to five days of intense discussion. For additional information, including application guidelines and instructions, visit: sem.sarweb.org
 
Maria Spray
Scholar Programs Assistant
School for Advanced Research
(505) 954-7237
P.O. Box 2188
Santa Fe, N.M.  87504

Final Reminder: Pac Rim Call for Proposals -- Due Jan 30, 2015

 
The 2015 Pacific Rim International Conference on Disabilty & Diversity will be held in Honolulu, Hawaii on May 18-19, 2015. Lots of great topic areas, of course. But since I'm chairing the Disability Studies section--abstracts due Friday, Jan. 30--2 days from now--here's some information on it:
Disability studies have the potential to advance research that benefits the world.   Likewise, disability studies scholars can lead or be essential stakeholders in global and localized discussions on the intersections between disability, race, class, religion, gender, and age.  Disability scholars have the potential to be ambassadors for social change, infusing their scholarly might into fields as diverse as public health, education and employment. Many of us are doing this work but what is our impact in the world?


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Notice of NIH's Interest in Diversity

 
Issued by National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Purpose
NIH’s mission is to seek fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and to apply that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce illness and disability. To achieve this mission, NIH substantially invests in research to improve public health; it also devotes substantial resources to identify, develop, support and maintain the quality of its scientific resources, including human capital.
The purpose of this notice is to provide an updated diversity statement that describes NIH's interest in the diversity of the NIH-funded workforce. This diversity statement was informed by a literature review, the reports and deliberations of several internal NIH committees, as well as input from Institute and Center officials, program staff and external stakeholders.
Implementation Timeline
This notice is effective upon its release date; however, existing funding opportunity announcements (FOA) with diversity statement language will continue to use existing language for the duration of the FOA.
Diversity Statement
Every facet of the United States scientific research enterprise—from basic laboratory research to clinical and translational research to policy formation–requires superior intellect, creativity and a wide range of skill sets and viewpoints. NIH’s ability to help ensure that the nation remains a global leader in scientific discovery and innovation is dependent upon a pool of highly talented scientists from diverse backgrounds who will help to further NIH's mission.
Research shows that diverse teams working together and capitalizing on innovative ideas and distinct perspectives outperform homogenous teams. Scientists and trainees from diverse backgrounds and life experiences bring different perspectives, creativity, and individual enterprise to address complex scientific problems. There are many benefits that flow from a diverse NIH-supported scientific workforce, including: fostering scientific innovation, enhancing global competitiveness, contributing to robust learning environments, improving the quality of the researchers, advancing the likelihood that underserved or health disparity populations participate in, and benefit from health research, and enhancing public trust.
Underrepresented Populations in the U.S. Biomedical, Clinical, Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Enterprise
In spite of tremendous advancements in scientific research, information, educational and research opportunities are not equally available to all. NIH encourages institutions to diversify their student and faculty populations to enhance the participation of individuals from groups identified as underrepresented in the biomedical, clinical, behavioral and social sciences, such as:
  1. Individuals from racial and ethnic groups that have been shown by the National Science Foundation to be underrepresented in health-related sciences on a national basis (see data at http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/showpub.cfm?TopID=2&SubID=27 ) and the report Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering). The following racial and ethnic groups have been shown to be underrepresented in biomedical research: Blacks or African Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, American Indians or Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders.
  2. Individuals with disabilities, who are defined as those with a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, as described in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended. See NSF data at, http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/2013/pdf/tab7-5_updated_2014_10.pdf .
  3. Individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, defined as:
    1. Individuals who come from a family with an annual income below established low-income thresholds. These thresholds are based on family size, published by the U.S. Bureau of the Census; adjusted annually for changes in the Consumer Price Index; and adjusted by the Secretary for use in all health professions programs. The Secretary periodically publishes these income levels at http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/index.shtml.
    2. Individuals who come from an educational environment such as that found in certain rural or inner-city environments that has demonstrably and directly inhibited the individual from obtaining the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to develop and participate in a research career.
     The disadvantaged background category (C1 and C2) is applicable to programs focused on high school and undergraduate candidates.
Literature shows that women from the above backgrounds(categories A, B, and C) face particular challenges at the graduate level and beyond in scientific fields. (See, e.g., Inside the Double Bind, A Synthesis of Empirical Research on Undergraduate and Graduate Women of Color in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics http://her.hepg.org/content/t022245n7x4752v2/fulltext.pdf).
Women have been shown to be underrepresented in doctorate-granting research institutions at senior faculty levels in most biomedical-relevant disciplines, and may also be underrepresented at other faculty levels in some scientific disciplines. (See data from the National Science Foundation National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics: Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering, special report available athttp://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/2013/sex.cfm, especially the table describing science, engineering, and health doctorate holders employed in universities and 4-year colleges, by broad occupation, sex, years since doctorate, and faculty rank (Table 9-23 of Special Report NSF 13-304 from 2013).)
Upon review of NSF data, and scientific discipline or field related data, NIH institutes, centers, and offices may include women as eligible candidates in faculty-level, diversity-targeted programs to address faculty recruitment, appointment, retention or advancement. This option is not available for funding opportunities that do not directly provide structured opportunities for advancement (i.e., Diversity Supplement).
Inquiries
Please direct all inquiries to: 

Lisa Evans, JD

Scientific Workforce Diversity Officer

Office of Extramural Programs

Email: 
evansl@od.nih.gov

NEW BOOK OF INTEREST (featuring work by SU Alumnus, Jagdish Chander)


Disability Histories

Edited by Susan Burch and Michael Rembis
 "This book will be instantly recognized for what it is: a much-needed sampling of the best scholarship in a field that has grown tremendously over the past decade. It is a gem."—Lauri Umansky, co-editor of The New Disability History: American Perspectives
   The field of disability history continues to evolve rapidly. In this collection, Susan Burch and Michael Rembis present nineteen essays that integrate critical analysis of gender, race, historical context, and other factors to enrich and challenge the traditional modes of interpretation still dominating the field.
   As the first collection of its kind in over a decade, Disability Histories not only brings readers up to date on scholarship within the field but fosters the process of moving it beyond the U.S. and Western Europe by offering work on Africa, South America, and Asia. The result is a broad range of readings that open new vistas for investigation and study while encouraging scholars at all levels to redraw the boundaries that delineate who and what is considered of historical value.
    Informed and accessible, Disability Histories is essential for classrooms engaged in all facets of disability studies within and across disciplines.
   Contributors are Frances Bernstein, Daniel Blackie, Pamela Block, Elsbeth Bösl, Dea Boster, Susan K. Cahn, Alison Carey, Fatima Cavalcante, Jagdish Chander, Audra Jennings, John Kinder, Catherine Kudlick, Paul R. D. Lawrie, Herbert Muyinda, Kim E. Nielsen, Katherine Ott, Stephen Pemberton, Anne Quartararo, Amy Renton, and Penny Richards.
University of Illinois
January 2015 9780252080319 18 b&w photographs 448pp

Barnard Center for Research on Women: Body Undone: A Salon in Honor of Christina Crosby


Move Along Adult Basketball Program

 
Our Adult Program enables adult recreational athletes to play the game of wheelchair basketball, while improving physical well being in an inclusion league. This program offers a semi competitive atmosphere which fosters team work and team building skills. (Maybe it’s good for your company to enter a team!?)
This program is designed to enable adults play recreational pickup basketball games.
 
3 on 3 League will be forming as attendance grows (February/2015)
 
This program runs on Monday Evenings from 600 PM to 800PM:
 
Winter Session (6 dates):   January 26, February 2, February 9, February 23, March 2
 
Early Spring Session (6 dates):   March 9, March 16, March 23, April 13, April 20, April 27
 
Spring Session (6 dates):  May 4, May 11, May 18, June 8, June 15, June 22
 
Location: Granby Elementary School (400 West Seventh Street, North Fulton, NY)
 
For More information contact Jeff Wright – jeff_wright@movealonginc.org
Greg Callen - greg@movealonginc.com   or  315.374.0082. 
 
Registration will occur at the first visit but the forms can be submitted prior by email.  This program asks for a donation per game/attendance of $5, or can be paid in full at the start of the league play.  Recreation sessions will ask for a donation, league play will have a fee of $35 per person. Each 3 on 3 session will run 6 weeks with round robin games pending team registrations.
 
Gregory M. Callen
Founder
 
Move Along Inc.
P.O. Box 5220
Oswego, NY 13126
Phone: (315).350.1726

DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: January 18-24, 2015

From DREAM: Disability Rights, Education, Activism, and Mentoring
Sponsored by the Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University
 -------------------------------
Weekly Email Update on Issues Related to Disability and Higher Education 
Week of January 18-24, 2015
* DREAM honors Martin Luther King, Jr and the work of civil rights activists that continues to this day.  We’re sharing a couple of posts to recognize MLK Day:
·         Disability activist Leroy Moore shares the story of Reverend Cecil Ivory, who participated in a “wheelchair sit-in” – Moore also has written a poem in honor of him: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=928219937211087&set=a.101799026519853.4072.100000692695171&type=1&pnref=story
·         * National Black Deaf Advocates has published a video o Chenae Laldee, Miss Black Deaf America 2013-2015, signing a poem in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr.  (poem is in American Sign Language with captions, and there is a full transcript at the website):http://www.nbda.org/news/martin-luther-king-jr.-asl-video-by-chenae-laldee-miss-black-deaf-america
·         Read Access Living’s statement about Black Lives Matter and Disability Solidarity: https://www.accessliving.org/1410ga64
·         Take a look at the Black, Disabled and Proud website from the HBCU Disability Consortium (still under construction):http://blackdisabledandproud.weebly.com/
-------------------------------
 Disability and higher education in the news (in no particular order):
* Technology for students with all kinds of disabilities is moving out of the disability services offices and helping students across campus:http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/assistive-tech-campus-993/
 
* The Florida House passed a bill to allow guns on state university campuses just two months after a shooting at Florida State University – many students and mental health activists are concerned about guns on campuses, but Florida legislators think they will make universities safer:http://diverseeducation.com/article/68938/?utm_campaign=Diverse%20Newsletter%203&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua&elq=7ddeeb7263334db68dd5feace9ba6b4e&elqCampaignId=415
 
* Ed Roberts and “The Rolling Quads” fought to make UC-Berkeley more accessible, and in the process also started the Independent Living Movement and many new ideas about what disabled students in higher ed could do.  January 23 is Ed Roberts Day and you can learn more about him here: http://yodisabledproud.org/ed-roberts-day/
 
* An article from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor explores controversies, questions, and benefits of prescription drugs for college students’ mental and emotional conditions, especially among women (trigger warning: discussion of suicide, substance abuse):http://www.michigandaily.com/article/walking-glue
 
* A new study published in the Journal of Intellectual Disabilities suggests that students with intellectual disabilities who enroll in postsecondary education programs have better luck with finding jobs and getting higher pay: http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2015/01/20/study-postsecondary-outcomes/19972/
 
* The RAND Corporation has issued a new report on the impact of collaboration for mental health initiatives at California colleges and universities:http://www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR955.html
 
* More details are becoming available about the ABLE Act, and how it will help people with disabilities save money for college:http://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/finance/advisorvoices/whats-529a-account/
 
* Goalball – coming to a campus near you…and perhaps soon followed by other college sports for students with disabilities:http://www.care2.com/causes/disabled-athletes-are-now-able-to-compete-even-in-college.html
 
* The Florida House passed a bill to allow guns on state university campuses just two months after a shooting at Florida State University – many students and mental health activists are concerned about guns on campuses, but Florida legislators think they will make universities safer:http://diverseeducation.com/article/68938/?utm_campaign=Diverse%20Newsletter%203&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua&elq=7ddeeb7263334db68dd5feace9ba6b4e&elqCampaignId=415
 
* Deafpeople.com profiles Dr. Peter Hauser, a Deaf clinical neuropsychologist at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf:http://deafpeople.com/dp_of_month/Hauser.html
 
* A profile of the English department at The George Washington University, and how they are combining English, disability studies, and LGBT studies: http://www.gwhatchet.com/2015/01/20/english-professors-combine-areas-of-study-for-new-specialization/
 
* The PIER program in Maine tries to provide quick and early support to people (including college students) with mental and emotional illnesses to prevent suicide or full-blown crises, and the model is spreading across the country: http://www.pressherald.com/2015/01/18/saving-minds/
 
* Sheridan College in Ontario has set up Homeward Bound Halton, a program to help single mothers complete college and find a job.  The profile talks about how some of these mothers also are experiencing disability-related barriers for themselves or family members:http://www.insidehalton.com/news-story/5269404-homeward-bound-halton-will-provide-single-mothers-chance-to-go-to-college/
 
* Colorado State University has established Conscious Student Alliance, a new group promoting mental health on campus:http://www.collegian.com/2015/01/conscious-student-alliance-aims-to-spread-mental-health-awareness/107949/
 
* Initial findings are available from PEPNet, which did a survey of disability services providers to see what kinds of study abroad accommodations they are giving deaf and hard-of-hearing students: https://www.surveymonkey.com/results/SM-TVNK556V/
 
* Campus Disability Advocates at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville is having its annual Disability Issues and Advocacy Conference on March 26-27: http://utkcda.com
 
 And a few related items of possible interest to college students:
* Fill out your FAFSA for financial aid!  $2.9 billion in Pell Grants was left unclaimed last year, even though students don’t have to pay back Pell Grants: http://college.usatoday.com/2015/01/20/2-9-billion-unused-federal-grant-awards-in-last-academic-year/
 
* Greg Abbott is being sworn in as the governor of Texas, and he is only the third governor in history to use a wheelchair – is that a statement of disability politics by itself, regardless of his disability policies?  (note that this publication requires registration to read the article):http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/greg-abbott-and-the-new-politics-of-disability/njqqp/
 
* An investigation is underway after a video surfaces apparently showing San Francisco police officers tipping a man out of his power wheelchair (video has closed captions but no audio description) (http://abc7news.com/news/sfpd-officer-appears-to-tip-man-in-wheelchair/485787/); the timing is particularly interesting because the city of San Francisco is currently asking the Supreme Court to exempt police from having to follow the Americans with Disabilities Act (http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/01/09/disability-advocates-appeal-over-s-f-police-shooting-puts-ada-at-risk)
 
* The Center for Disability Rights has launched several new blogs – check them out here: http://cdrnys.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=17&Itemid=12
 
* Better to be sick and disabled than fat?  New US guidelines from the Endocrine Society suggest treating obesity with pharmaceuticals before managing other health conditions, including diabetes; authors of the recommendations work for pharmaceutical companies and admit obesity drugs carry safety risks and rarely result in significant weight loss: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/838285#vp_2
 
* The popular Sex+ YouTube video series with Laci Green is now captioned: https://www.youtube.com/user/lacigreen
 
* An OpEd in the LA Times looks at the current Congressional assault on Social Security in the context of US culture and attitudes about disability and who “deserves” assistance: http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-obrien-social-security-disability-insurance-20150122-story.html
 
* Is Hollywood making Asperger’s into a joke? http://mashable.com/2014/05/08/aspergers-tv-movies/
 
* What is intersectionality?  Stephanie Johnson (“Najma”), a Deaf-Blind Black Panqueer community educator explains and critiques this concept, especially the implications for Deaf communities (video in American Sign Language with captions, and below the video is a link to a full transcript):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po8AvBSaD1A
 
The Washington Post reports on two parents who have completely redesigned their home around the long-term needs of their two sons with disabilities: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/2014/04/04/de21d61c-b4fa-11e3-b899-20667de76985_story.html
 
* A theater group in Scotland is actively seeking new or undiscovered performers with disabilities: http://www.gallowaygazette.co.uk/what-s-on/what-s-on/disability-led-theatre-company-is-looking-for-scotland-s-undiscovered-disabled-artists-1-3663731
 
* A list of 12 famous speeches by women about disability, with links to details (note that this is also an ad for a public speaking coach, and DREAM is not endorsing this ad in any way): http://eloquentwoman.blogspot.com/2015/01/12-famous-speeches-by-women-on.html
 
* A new app called “Be My Eyes” connects volunteer readers with people who are blind or visually impaired (video has no captions or audio description): http://www.wdam.com/story/27897155/be-my-eyes-connects-blind-people-with-helpers
 
* Sophie Webster, an autistic woman from the UK, shares her experiences with sensory overload and how it feels:http://themighty.com/2015/01/adult-with-nonverbal-autism-shares-what-sensory-overload-feels-like-for-her/
For more information about DREAM or the Taishoff Center, contact:
Wendy Harbour (wharbour@syr.edu)
Or check out the DREAM website at http://dream.syr.edu
To subscribe or unsubscribe to the DREAM email list, fill out the form at http://dream.syr.edu/contact-us.html and ask to join or leave the listserv.
By the way, please don't presume DREAM, the Taishoff Center, or Syracuse University agree with everything in these links we send out - we're just passing along the information so you can form your own opinions.  Thanks.

NC State Symposium on Universal Design


Disability Scoop 1.23.15


New Issue of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies (Vol. 4 No. 1)

http://cjds.uwaterloo.ca/index.php/cjds/issue/view/11

Articles:

Ontario’s Institutional Cycle: Considering the Relationship Between Fictional Narratives and Policy Discourses in the Construction of Mental Disability 
Karen McCauley, Duncan Matheson 

Navigating Post-Secondary Institutions in Ontario with a Learning Disability: The Pursuit of Accommodations
Cameron McKenzie        

Examining ‘Inspiration’: Perspectives of Stakeholders Attending a Power Wheelchair Soccer Tournament
Michael Cottingham

More Than Voting Booths: Accessibility of Electoral Campaigns for People with Disabilities in Ontario
Mary Ann McColl, Alexandra Giancarlo, David W. Shannon, Ulysses Patola  

Reviews:

Review of Dea Boster's African American Slavery and Disability 
Dustin Galer

Review of Alison Kafer's Feminist, Queer, Crip
Eliza Chandler  

Review of the Film Wretches and Jabberers 
Estée Klar

Review of Sally Chivers' The Silvering Screen 
Katie Aubrecht

Save the Date

 
The Disability Rights Division of the New York State Division of Human Rights is partnering with the New York State Department of Health’s AIDS Institute to undertake an anti-discrimination campaign for those living with HIV/AIDS in New York. The campaign will feature an event in the Syracuse area on February 18th, 2015 at the Senator John H. Hughes State Office Building, 333 East Washington Street, Main Hearing Room, Syracuse, NY. The program will include education and information about the rights of people living with HIV/AIDS. Please save the date!

Participate in the National Online Dialogue on Families, Disability and Postsecondary Success

Are you a family member of a young adult with a disability who's currently or recently enrolled in a postsecondary education program (e.g., certificate, apprenticeship, community college, college or university)? Participate in ePolicyWorks' upcoming online dialogue, Connecting Families: Supporting Postsecondary Success of Young Adults with Disabilities.
The dialogue is open for participation now and will continue through February 6, 2015. Register and join the discussion today!


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS