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Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

INDEX

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  

Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Monday with your submission.

 

SU HAPPENINGS

BCCC 3rd session Steven J. Taylor Memorial Reading Series

2016 Commencement date

Upcoming TA Program events

Women’s & Gender Studies Department Graduate Paper Prize for 2015-2016

“Musical Methods for Teaching and Researching Movement in Sport”

CAS 102 SummerStart Seminar Instructor Position

CRS Public Lecture: Mapping Anti-Black Campus Racism in 2015: A Muted Group Finds Its Voice

Tim Dye to Speak at South Asia Center

Alternative Spring Break Programs

Black History Month Commemorative Lecture: Alicia Garza

fullCIRCLE Mentoring Program Peer Mentors 2016-17

Syracuse University College of Law’s Spring 2016 Lecture Series in honor of the 10th Anniversary of the Disability Law and Policy Program (DLPP)

“The Great Mistake: How Private-Sector Models Damage Universities, and How they Can Recover”

Take Back the Night (TBTN) 2016

Opportunity For All Doctoral Students: The Productive and Inspired Academic 

ITS adds walk-in consulting and expands workshops for improving the accessibility of documents, web pages, and videos

Spring meditation schedule Hendricks Chapel

SU NEWS

Brainfeeders Brings Farm to Table for Campus Community

Campus Community Invited to Visioning Sessions with Chancellor’s Workgroup on Diversity and Inclusion

Syracuse University Fit Families Program to Include Children with Autism

Climate Survey Seeks Campus Input to Help SU Develop More Inclusive Environment

ORANGE AFTER DARK Expects Exciting Spring Semester

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Syracuse University Fit Families Program for children with Autism and their families 

Registration is now open for the 2016 Jacobus tenBroek Disability Law Symposium

2016 Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) Leadership Academy

CFP: Journal of Narrative Theory: Special Issue: Dis/enabling Narratives

26th Annual Aging with Developmental Disabilities Conference

SUNY Cortland 7th Annual Student Conference for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Grab the World

Call for Papers | SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education

1st Annual Gender and Sexuality Studies Conference, University of Central Oklahoma

Call for Papers: History of Education Society, 2016 Annual Meeting

CFP: The Disorder of Time, American Ethnological Society (AES) Meeting

The Transnational NGO Leadership Institute 2016

Part-Time Internship with CBM International in NY

Columbia University Institute for Research in African-American Studies Summer Institute: “The Many Worlds of Black New York”

12th Annual Summer Session on Contemplative Higher Education

Syracuse University LOGIN Study

Call for Narrators - Do you identify as a person with a disability?

Newhouse Student Narrative Project: People with disabilities 

Freeman-ASIA Scholarships for Study Abroad Summer 2016

Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Black Studies Research, University of California Santa Barbara (2016-2017)

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Disability Rights Orgs Win Landmark Department of Labor Decision Against Sheltered Workshop 

Now Accepting Nominations for the 2016 Paul G. Hearne Award for Disability Rights

I Am Not Wheelchair Bound | Paraquad

PEAT Talk: Raising the Bar on Accessibility

Autistic Hoya: Autistic Representation Crisis in Massachusetts (but dying of not surprise)

Lead On Network: Black disability history

Jewish Disability Awareness and Inclusion Month February 2016

Disability Employment Awareness Book Project

Disability short film festival in Australia 

Disability.gov Update

Disability Scoop

Cruel April Poetry Book Fair 2016


SU HAPPENINGS

BCCC 3rd session Steven J. Taylor Memorial Reading Series

The BCCC would like to announce our third event in the Steven J. Taylor Memorial Reading Series – Monday February 22nd @ 11:30am in Hoople Room 013. 

The topic of the readings this time will be institutionalization. Attached to this email is a reading from Steve’s book (PDF & Word Doc) -  Acts of Conscience. The flyer for the event is also attached.    Additionally, please find two links below to recent articles which we also plan to discuss.  

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/05/who-decides-where-autistic-adults-live/393455/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/micaela-connery/disability-housing-instit_b_7849666.html 

We will be providing snacks as well as ASL interpretation.

Please contact Justin Freedman at jefreedm@syr.edu if you have any questions.


 

 

2016 Commencement date

As the spring semester has just begun, the Office of Special Events is in full swing planning and coordinating the various activities and events for Commencement 2016. An important item to note is that this year's Commencement ceremony is scheduled for Sunday, May 15. Note that this is not Mother's Day as Commencement is scheduled based on the annual academic calendar. Please share this important information with your respective colleagues, staff, students, and/or other constituents to confirm the May 15th date.

For further information regarding 2016 Commencement, please visit commencement.syr.edu or email commencement@syr.edu.


 
 

Upcoming TA Program events

Below are the first two TA Program events of the Spring ’16 semester.  The first is being held this Friday, 2/12/16, and is intended to help TAs/Instructors with issues and concerns that they might have about their TA role and their interactions in the classroom.  The second is being held next Friday, 2/19/16, and is intended to help TAs better understand the level of content knowledge of their students and to help foster better engagement and learning. 

Revisiting Orientation: a follow-up for TAs

Friday, February 12, 12:00-1:30pm

HBC Kittredge Aud. (basement level)

Whether you have been teaching for a few weeks, a semester, or years, there are always new issues and unexpected situations that arise in the classroom. Come join a panel of experienced Teaching Mentors as we revisit TA Orientation by discussing the most pressing issues and concerns that you have about your TA role and your performance in the classroom.  

Lunch will be provided courtesy of the GSO 

To RSVP, please email Shawn Loner directly at scloner@syr.edu, by Thursday, 2/11/16

Teaching to Non-Experts: Good Questions and Student Thinking

with Dr. Sharon Dotger (Dual Associate Professor of Science Education, Chair of Science Teaching and Faculty in Teaching and Leadership) & Erica Layow (Teaching Mentor & Graduate Student in Science Teaching)

Friday, February 19, 9:45-11:30 a.m.

Hall of Languages 114 

Teaching assistants, regardless of their discipline, need to be able to engage students at a variety of levels of content knowledge and expertise. This session, applicable for new and returning TAs, will assist TAs in developing a useful set of skills by exploring how to listen to student thinking and engage them in thinking critically. 

Snacks will be provided courtesy of the GSO 

To RSVP, please email Shawn Loner directly at scloner@syr.edu by Wednesday, 2/16/16.


 
 

Women’s & Gender Studies Department Graduate Paper Prize for 2015-2016

The Women’s & Gender Studies Department announces it is now accepting entries for its Toni Taverone Graduate Paper Prize. The deadline in March 11, 2016. The award amount is $150.00.

Eligibility

Currently enrolled graduate students at Syracuse University who have not previously won the graduate paper prize may submit papers written in any WGS courses during Spring 2015, Summer 2015, or Fall 2015.

Guidelines

1. Papers are to demonstrate scholarly competence in a subject matter relevant to women’s and gender studies. Specifically, papers will be selected based on: general excellence; intersectional gender analysis or use of feminist theory; and interconnections between theory and activism.

2. Faculty may nominate students, or students may enter their own papers.

3. A detachable cover sheet indicating the entrant’s name, the paper title, and the source of the paper (course title and professor).  Also include local address, phone number and email.

4. Two copies of each paper—running header should only contain the paper title and page numbers (no personal identification).

Electronic submissions will be accepted, please send to sademock@syr.edu.

5. Authorship of papers may be individual or collaborative.

6. Paper may be no more than 25 pages in length.

Review Process

Papers are read and ranked (without author identification) by the paper prize committee, which is established by the Women’s & Gender Studies Department faculty.

Please send entries NO LATER THAN March 11, 2016 to the Women’s & Gender Studies Department Paper Prize Committee, 208 Bowne Hall.  For further information please contact Susann DeMocker-Shedd at 443-3560 or sademock@syr.edu


 
 

“Musical Methods for Teaching and Researching Movement in Sport”

“Musical Methods for Teaching and Researching Movement in Sport” presented by the Department of Art & Music Histories.


Monday, February 22, 2016

4:00 – 5:15pm at 304 Tolley

REGISTRATION DEADLINE is Monday, February 15, 2016

Dr. Jonathan Dueck (The George Washington University) follows a public lecture with this participatory workshop that explores strategies for understanding kinetic ethnography through social media, video interviews, and motion captures.

Space is limited. RSVP to Deborah Justice.


 
 

CAS 102 SummerStart Seminar Instructor Position

University College at Syracuse University seeks part-time instructors to teach a one credit course for 2016 Summer Session II: CAS 102-Summer Start Seminar. SummerStart at Syracuse University is designed to ensure a smooth transition from high school to college for newly admitted students. This six-week program provides pre-freshmen with an opportunity to become familiar with the academic, social, and cultural life at Syracuse. The programs dates for this summer are July 5 – August 12. Classes meet Monday-Thursday for 75 minutes (8am, 10am, 12noon & 2pm).

Course Description: The SummerStart Seminar is a required supplemental credit course that will provide an introduction to study strategies, critical thinking skills, and the basics of making a smooth transition to college. Students will also be introduced to campus facilities, resources, and student life. Some specific topics include: Critical Thinking, Study Skills; Time Management, Issues of Multiculturalism, Leadership and Personal Development, Academic Rules and Regulations, Money Management, and Planning for a Successful Fall Semester. Additionally, the session will include introduction to the S.U. Library System, Computing Resources, Student Organizations, Student Affairs, Career Services, and the Health Center. 

Master’s degree (earned or in progress) in Student Personnel, Higher Education or related field. 

To apply, please go to www.sujobopps.com.


 
 

CRS Public Lecture: Mapping Anti-Black Campus Racism in 2015: A Muted Group Finds Its Voice

SU Communication and Rhetorical Studies presents a public lecture

Mapping Anti-Black Campus Racism in 2015: A Muted Group Finds Its Voice.

Ronald Jackson, Professor of Communication, University of Cincinnati

FRIDAY, February 12

2:30 to 4pm

500 Hall of Languages

Open to the public.

vpa.syr.edu/crs


 
 

Tim Dye to Speak at South Asia Center

Professor Tim Dye

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, School of Medicine and Dentistry

University of Rochester 

Food, Fear, and Fortunes: Sociomedical encounters with Hepatitis B among Tibetan Refugees in Ladakh 

Despite the reported high prevalence of Hepatitis B in Tibetan populations, little is known about how Tibetans perceive of Hepatitis B, how they deal with it, and how stigmatizing it may be. This project represents a rapid qualitative inquiry to better understand Hepatitis B in the community and public health context of settlements governed by the Central Tibetan Administration in Ladakh, India. Qualitative interviews and focused discussions were conducted with 296 individuals, trying to elicit illness narratives and conceptual models of Hepatitis B. 

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

12:30pm

341 Eggers Hall


 
 

Alternative Spring Break Programs

NYC

Hendricks Chapel would like students to be aware of an alternative spring break program available to them this semester in New York City.  The Office of Engagement and Baptist Campus Ministry have partnered with Let My People Go, a short-term mission experience committed to teaching local churches and individuals how they can intentionally love others and stop the exploitation of the vulnerable, to offer this opportunity.  Students who participate in this program will learn practical skills to apply in the fight against human-trafficking and exploitation.

The program is Sunday, March 13 to Friday, March 18, and costs $100.  Students have until Sunday, Feb. 21 to apply online.  Only undergraduate SU/ESF students are eligible to apply and decisions will be communicated by Monday, Feb. 26.  Visit the Let My People Go website for more information or email Devon Bartholomew with questions.

Syracuse

Hendricks Chapel would like students to be aware of another alternative spring break program available to them.  Here in Syracuse, students have the opportunity to learn how to address the prevalent issue of youth violence in the community.  Participants will go into the city of Syracuse to see how community leaders are working to mentor youth and work alongside local organizations to learn how to be a mentor and positive influence in a child's life.

The program is Sunday, March 13 to Thursday, March 17, and costs $50.  Students have until Sunday, Feb. 21 to apply online.  Only undergraduate SU/ESF students are eligible to apply and decisions will be communicated by Monday, Feb. 26.  Email Syeisha Byrd with questions.


 
 

Black History Month Commemorative Lecture: Alicia Garza

Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA) Black History Month Commemorative Lecture will be presented by Alicia Garza, Social activist and co-creator of the viral Twitter hashtag and movement #BlackLivesMatter.

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Hendricks Chapel   | 7pm

For More Information, Contact Cedric T. Bolton at 315.443.9676 or ctbolton@syr.edu


 

fullCIRCLE Mentoring Program Peer Mentors 2016-17

The fullCIRCLE Mentoring Program in the Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA) is currently looking for students to become Peer Mentors for the 2016-17 academic year.  Peer Mentors are upper-class students who work with one or two first-year and/or transfer students as a mentor, assisting in their overall success at SU by offering guidance and consistent support, and serving as a positive role model.  For more information or to apply, students should visit the fullCIRCLE page by Wednesday, Feb. 24.  Questions can be emailed to program staff.


 

Syracuse University College of Law’s Spring 2016 Lecture Series in honor of the 10th Anniversary of the Disability Law and Policy Program (DLPP)

The DLPP was founded to provide law students the opportunity to specialize in disability law and to participate in innovative academic programs, interdisciplinary research, and experiential learning opportunities that advance the rights of people with disabilities in the U.S. and throughout the world. The 2015-16 Spring Lecture Series also commemorates the 40th Anniversary of the Individual with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA), the 25th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the 10th Anniversary of the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (CRPD) by bringing to campus noted disability rights scholars and practitioners. The lectures will take place in the College of Law, Dineen Hall, 950 Irving Avenue (Rooms TBA). CART and sign language interpreters will be available. 

This Lecture Series is co-sponsored by the DLPP, the Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences and its Women and Gender Studies Department, the Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, the School of Education and its Cultural Foundations of Education Program, the Transnational NGO Initiative of the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, the Disability Cultural Center, The Disability Law Society, The Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, and the Renee Crown Honors Program.   

THE DLPP 2016 SPRING LECTURE SERIES 

FEBRUARY 25: Eric Rosenthal, Director, Disability Rights International:A Call for the End of Institutionalization and Trafficking of Children, Thursday, 12-1:30 pm. 

MARCH 3: Michael Waterstone, J. Howard Ziemann Fellow and Professor of Law, Loyola Law School:Olmstead Exceptionalism, COL Faculty Workshop, Thursday, 11:30-1 pm.   

MARCH 22: Stephanie Ortoleva, President, Women Enabled International, Inc.:The Rights of Women with Disabilities: An International, Legal, Disability Rights and Feminist Activist Approach, Tuesday, 4-5:30 pm. 

APRIL 5: Samuel Bagenstos, Frank G. Millard Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School:The Politics of Disability Identity at ADA +25, Tuesday, 4-5:30 pm. 

APRIL 12: Sagit Mor, Teaching Fellow, University of Washington and Senior Lecturer at the University of Haifa Faulty of Law:From Misfortune to Injustice: Disability, Torts and Inequality, Tuesday, 4-5:30 pm.

For more information about the Lecture Series, please contact Professor Arlene Kanter, Director, DLPP at kantera@law.syr.edu or Chris Ramsdell at ceramsde@law.syr.edu, 443-9542.


 

“The Great Mistake: How Private-Sector Models Damage Universities, and How they Can Recover” 

SU College of Arts and Sciences presents:

“The Great Mistake: How Private-Sector Models Damage Universities, and How they Can Recover”

a talk by Christopher Newfield (Prof. of Literature & American Studies, UC Santa Barbara)

FEBRUARY 19, 2-3:30 pm

Hall of Languages 207

Reception to follow


 


 

 

Take Back the Night (TBTN) 2016 

It’s On Us… all of us, to support survivors and come together as a community to end sexual and relationship violence. We invite you, leaders and mentors of the student body at Syracuse University, to take part in Take Back the Night (TBTN) 2016. This international event is recognized on campus each spring through a series of events sponsored by the Office of Health Promotion.  

This year, Take Back the Night will be the kick-off event for the “It’s On Us SU Week of Action,” scheduled for April 2-9.  Take Back the Night will be held on the evening of Wednesday, March 30, at Hendricks Chapel beginning at 7 p.m. The night will include a rally and march, followed by a speak-out. Take Back the Night brings our community together to raise awareness about sexual violence as well as relationship and other forms of interpersonal violence. Take Back the Night provides an important opportunity for those affected by violence to speak out and share their stories and for all members of our community to show their support for ending all forms of interpersonal violence.

We wish to extend the opportunity for you and your students to take part in this important event. We encourage faculty and staff to raise awareness by providing the date and information about this event to your students.  We also encourage incorporating active discussion about sexual and relationship violence during classes to extend the reach of the event, and the Office of Health Promotion staff and peer facilitators are available to speak with classes on these issues by contacting healthpromotion@syr.edu. If you have any further questions, please feel free to email: Megan Dietz, SU Sexual and Relationship Violence Response Team (mldietz@syr.edu) or Tekhara Watson, SU Sexual and Relationship Violence Response Team (tdwats01@syr.edu)

 
 

 

Opportunity For All Doctoral Students: The Productive and Inspired Academic 

School of Education Professor Julie Causton is offering a series of eight 2-hour seminars during the Spring 2016 semester that aim to provide doctoral students in ANY program with the tools and inspiration to improve their productivity and effectiveness in the world of academia. Sessions will cover everything from engaging teaching strategies in college classrooms, to finishing in-progress writing projects, to issues of vulnerability, happiness, and authenticity. These sessions are designed to create a collaborative community of scholars as we examine and address the real challenges of becoming an academic and a scholar.

Come to one seminar, a few, or all of them - the choice is yours!

All seminars held from 1:30-3:30 p.m. in 056 Huntington Hall

Writing Boot Camp
3 Sessions: Thursday, February 11; Wednesday, March 9; Tuesday, March 29
This pomodoro-based work session is for seminar members who wish to meet and work in a structured and supportive environment. We will begin with 5 minutes of rule setting followed by a two-hour productive working session. This session will be divided into 15 minute increments with 5 minute sharing breaks to increase accountability and support for participants.

Vulnerability and Academia
Tuesday, March 8
Inspired by the work of scholar Dr. Brene Brown, this session will focus on what it means to be more vulnerable and authentic within our profession. Seminar participants will engage with work by diverse researchers, authors and activists in order to leave with strategies for embracing authenticity and vulnerability, practicing mindfulness related to self-worth and belonging, and an appreciation for the power of being true to one’s authentic self.

Happiness and Academia
Tuesday, March 22
Inspired by Harvard scholar Dr. Sean Achor, this session focuses on cultivating the Seven Principles that fuel success and performance. Seminar participants will leave with research-based strategies to boost happiness, productivity and effectiveness.

Landing the Job
Monday, March 28
This seminar session will be centered on thoughtful advice for going on the market and obtaining your dream job. We will discuss everything from CVs to cover letters to job talks. Seminar participants will leave with concrete strategies for planning for and executing a successful job search.

Register for Productive and Inspired Academic Seminars

BACK TO TOP
  

ITS adds walk-in consulting and expands workshops for improving the accessibility of documents, web pages, and videos 

SU seeks to ensure that all people regardless of individual ability or disability can effectively access University communications and technology.  Information Technology Services (ITS) is pleased to announce their new Walk-in IT Accessibility Help Desk hours. New this semester, the IT Accessibility Help Desk provides consultation on related topics, including video captioning, remediation of your PDF, PowerPoint, or Word documents to ensure accessibility, and identifying and fixing accessibility issues on your website. This new service is available Mondays and Thursdays, 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the ITS Service Center, in room 1-227 Center for Science and Technology. 

Accessibility training workshops available 

ITS is accepting registrations for three training workshops that will build faculty and staff awareness of, sensitivity to, and proficiency in ensuring the accessibility of information communications and technologies. Creating Accessible Documents focuses on course materials and documents, Evaluating Your Website for Accessibility focuses on websites and online resources, and a new workshop called Video Captioning covers the basics of adding captions to video content. The workshops will help participants understand accessibility, put it into practice on the job, and support Syracuse University’s efforts to ensure accessibility of documents, systems, and communications across campus. 

The workshops will be presented by Sharon Trerise and Kara Patten from ITS’s Academic Services team at the dates, times, and locations shown below. Each session has space for 12 participants. Seating is limited, so register early! There is high demand for this training, so registration is on a first-submitted, first-enrolled basis. Use the links below to register. 

About the workshops 

Register here for any of the workshops 

Creating Accessible Documents   

Overview

This three-hour workshop provides a fundamental overview of creating accessible documents in Microsoft Office and Adobe Acrobat Pro DC on Windows or Mac computers. At successful completion, participants will be able to: 

  • Explain and demonstrate the importance of creating accessible documents
  • Understand basic concepts of creating accessible documents
  • Understand best practices for creating accessible Word and PDF documents
  • Remediate legacy Word and PDF documents to make them accessible
  • Utilize the Office accessibility checker
  • Identify and correct common accessibility errors
  • Use Adobe Acrobat Pro DC’s accessibility checker 

All sessions are held Wednesday mornings from 9 a.m. – noon as follows: 

Operating System     Day and Date                          Location          

Mac                         Wednesday, March 16              Huntington Hall, room 070A

Windows                  Wednesday, March 9               Steele Hall, room 001

Windows                  Wednesday, April 13                Steele Hall, room 001

Windows                  Wednesday, May 25                Steele Hall, room 001

Windows                  Wednesday, June 22                Steele Hall, room 001   

Evaluating Your Website for Accessibility 

Overview:

Designed for anyone who manages, creates or maintains web content, this workshop will discuss relevant concepts and coach participants through evaluating their pages against the accessibility checkpoints. The workshop will cover basic techniques for evaluating web content, including: 

  • Accessibility resources and tools at SU
  • Applicable legislation and compliance
  • Automated accessibility checkers
  • Steps for manually checking web page accessibility
  • A brief introduction to screen readers
  • Design considerations
  • Captioning vendors and tools 

Workshop Dates (all take place Wednesdays from 9 a.m. – noon in Steele Hall 001)

February 24

March 30

May 11

June 8

Video Captioning 

Overview:

The video captioning workshop is designed for anyone who manages, creates or maintains video content and is offered in two parts. Part one covers the basics of captioning as well as considerations when purchasing captioning services from third party vendors. Part two is optional and designed for those who wish to know more about creating their own captions. 

Part One: Captioning basics and third party services

  • Audience considerations
  • Caption types and terminology
  • Cost and resource considerations for DIY vs. captioning vendors
  • Vendor comparisons 

Part Two: DIY captioning

  • Hands-on experience with captioning tools
  • Caption file formats
  • Captioning rules and quality control
  • Costs and resources 

All video captioning workshops take place in Steele Hall 001 at these dates and times: 

Workshop Dates           Part 1 (Basics)           Part 2 (DIY)

Friday, February 12       9:30 – 10:45 a.m.        11:00 a.m. – noon

Thursday, March 10       1:00 – 2:15 p.m.         2:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Friday, April 15             9:30 – 10:45 a.m.        11:00 a.m. – noon

Tuesday, May 24          9:30 – 10:45 a.m.        11:00 a.m. – noon 

Register here for any of the workshops 

Other topics 

If you are interested in learning about ensuring the accessibility of online and mobile applications, or other services and communications, please send an email to accessibleIT@syr.edu with a description of your interest and with any questions. Your input will guide the development of coming programs. 

For more information 

ITS offers a growing variety of resources to ensure accessibility for all members of the Syracuse University community. Visit the Technology Accessibility web page and check out the Accessible Technology Toolkit. If you have any questions about workshops, or other accessibility and technology issues, please send them in an email to accessibleIT@syr.edu.


 

Spring meditation schedule Hendricks Chapel

These are the meditations held in the Small Chapel at Hendricks, open to students, staff, and faculty.  Some are led by students, others by members of the Zen Center of Syracuse.  The first 15 minutes are for instruction and settling in; we sit for half an hour, and then have about 15 minutes to debrief and return the space to its former condition.  If needed, you may come "late," during the first 15 minutes or even after the sitting has begun. 

Spring, 2016

Monday, 12-1 pm

Tuesday, 12-1 pm , also 5-6 pm

Wednesday, 5:30-6:30 pm

Thursday, 5-6 pm

Friday, 12-1 pm, 5-6 pm  

No experience necessary. All faith traditions welcome! 


 

 
 


SU NEWS

Brainfeeders Brings Farm to Table for Campus Community

http://news.syr.edu/brainfeeders-brings-farm-to-table-for-campus-community-17588/

  

Campus Community Invited to Visioning Sessions with Chancellor’s Workgroup on Diversity and Inclusion

http://news.syr.edu/campus-community-invited-to-visioning-sessions-with-chancellors-workgroup-on-diversity-and-inclusion-64626/

 

  

Syracuse University Fit Families Program to Include Children with Autism

  

Climate Survey Seeks Campus Input to Help SU Develop More Inclusive Environment

http://news.syr.edu/climate-survey-seeks-campus-input-to-help-su-develop-more-inclusive-environment-38800/

 

  

ORANGE AFTER DARK Expects Exciting Spring Semester

http://news.syr.edu/orange-after-dark-expects-exciting-spring-semester-65161/ 

FEATURING ENCORE SCREENING (WITH CAPTIONS AND AUDIO DESCRIPTION) OF INSIDE OUT, THE EVENING OF “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON, ON 4/1/16!!!

 

  
 

 
 


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Syracuse University Fit Families Program for children with Autism and their families 

Do you have a child aged 5-10 with Autism? Do you want to learn ways to promote physical activity for your entire family? Then this program is for you!

You and your child with Autism are invited to participate in a research study that will include five one-day workshops on inclusive recreation:

• Sensory Integration and Behavior Management

• Communication

• Motor development and physical activity

• Aquatic opportunities (learn how to swim)

• Sports 

The purpose of this research is to learn more about physical activity experiences for children with Autism and their families. We hope to identify common issues, understand what types of activities your family currently enjoys, and how we might increase your family’s physical activity experiences.

This research study consists of a pre-program interview protocol (2 hour and 15 minutes); parents and children completing questionnaires; measurements of physical activity; measurements of blood pressure; participate in a physical activity program (no more than five hours); and post-program interview and completion of parent and child questionnaires. 

During each of the education seminars, the participating families will receive FREE physical activity equipment (e.g., balls, cones, etc.) that they can later use during their spare time with their children with Autism and their entire family.

The first workshop will be held in April 2016 in the Women's Building at Syracuse University. Additional workshops will be held during the months of September, October, November, and December 2016.

This program is offered FREE but registration is required. For more information please contact Dr. Luis Columna at lcolumna@syr.edu or (315) 443-9699. The specific dates of the program will be provided to aid in your decision to participate. Space is limited, so please complete the online application at http://blogs.soe.syr.edu/fit-families


 
  

Registration is now open for the 2016 Jacobus tenBroek Disability Law Symposium 

Diversity in the Disability Rights Movement: Working Together to Achieve the Right to Live in the World

March 31 – April 1, 2016 at the National Federation of the Blind Jernigan Institute, Baltimore, Maryland

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear 2016 keynote speaker U.S. District Judge Myron H. Thompson and leading disability rights and civil rights advocates examine the status of diversity in the disability rights movement and explore ways to increase diversity so that all may achieve Dr. tenBroek's vision of equality of opportunity. Other speakers will include:

  • Samuel Bagenstos, Frank G. Millard Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School
  • Alison Barkoff, Director of Advocacy, Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
  • Rabia Belt, Research Fellow, Stanford Law School
  • Claudia Center, Senior Staff Attorney, Disability Rights, American Civil Liberties Union Foundation
  • Matthew W. Dietz, President and Litigation Director, Disability Independence Group, Inc.
  • Jane Dunhamn, Director, National Black Disability Coalition
  • Regina Kline, Senior Counsel (Acting), Office of the Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice
  • Jonathan Lazar, Professor of Computer and Information Sciences, Towson University
  • David Lepofsky, Chair, Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance
  • Anil Lewis, Executive Director, National Federation of the Blind Jernigan Institute
  • Alison J. Lynch, Staff Attorney, Disability Rights New York
  • Kathleen Martinez, Senior Vice President, Disability Market Segment & Strategy, Wells Fargo & Company
  • Jonathan Martinis, Legal Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
  • Marc Maurer, Immediate Past President, National Federation of the Blind
  • Alice Wong, Advisory Board Member, Asian and Pacific Islanders with Disabilities of California

Documentation for CLE credits will be provided. 
Registration fee: $175
Student registration fee: $25

For more information about the symposium, hotel accommodations, and symposium sponsorship opportunities, please visit https://nfb.org/law-symposium

You can register online by going to: https://nfb.org/civicrm/event/register?reset=1&id=60.  


 

2016 Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) Leadership Academy

This a reminder that Autistic Self Advocacy Network is now accepting applications for the 2016 Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) Leadership Academy! The ACI summer leadership training prepares Autistic students to create systems change on their college campuses. View and download the application here. Applications are due February 21, 2016. 

Accepted applicants will travel to Washington, DC and participate in advocacy training at Gallaudet University from May 28 to June 4, 2016. Participants will acquire valuable skills in community organizing, policy formation, and activism. Travel and lodging are fully covered by ASAN.

View our flyer

Watch the video of our 2013 alumni sharing their experiences

Applicants must identify as Autistic and be current college students with at least one year remaining before graduation. The Autistic Self Advocacy Network will cover travel and lodging costs for all ACI students. We especially encourage students of color, LGBT students, students with intellectual disabilities, AAC users, and students from other or multiply marginalized communities to apply.

To apply, please submit a completed application by February 21, 2016 to Natalia Rivera Morales at NRiveraMorales@autisticadvocacy.org with the subject line “2016 ACI Application.”

View and download the 2016 application here.

If you need assistance or accommodations at any stage, please contact Natalia Rivera Morales at NRiveraMorales@autisticadvocacy.org

ACI is made possible with the generous support of the Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation, the HSC Foundation, and Wells Fargo.

 

 


 



 

CFP: Journal of Narrative Theory: Special Issue: Dis/enabling Narratives 

CFP: Journal of Narrative Theory: Special Issue: Dis/enabling Narratives | cfp.english.upenn.edu

https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/node/62254


 

26th Annual Aging with Developmental Disabilities Conference - May 16-17, 2016 

http://us5.campaign-archive1.com/?u=d2043daa38d4f95b4719686f9&id=e2c3adf5f6&e=ad3793483c


 

SUNY Cortland 7th Annual Student Conference for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Grab the World

The Multicultural Life and Diversity Office and our Conference Committee would like to invite all students, faculty, staff, and alumni of Syracuse University to our 7th Annual Student Conference for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Grab the World. This academic conference will be held on Saturday, April 9th, 2016 in Corey Union on the Cortland Campus. The purpose of this conference is to give students an academic conference experience that is directly connected to diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice as it intersects with their discipline. Faculty and staff are asked to mentor their students through the CFP and presentation processes. This conference is one of the ways that we, at the Multicultural Life and Diversity Office, fulfill one of the missions of our office: to promote and explore all aspects of diversity, especially as it relates to each students discipline.

Registration is now open!!!

Please Click Here for Individual Registration 

Please Click Here for Group Registration 

Deadline to register is March 25, 2016.

Call for Papers/Presentations (CFP)

Please Click Here to see CFP 

The deadline to submit proposals is March 1, 2016. 

If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to send an email to jacquelynn.akins@cortland.edu 


 

Call for Papers | SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education

The SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education invites you to submit a manuscript to one or both of our upcoming issues.  We are currently accepting submissions for a General Issue as well as a Special Issue on Educational Technology and Social Justice, please find general information listed below.

All manuscripts must adhere to APA sixth edition format, include an abstract of 100-150 words, and range between 20 - 30 pages in length (including camera ready tables, charts,figures, and references). Submissions should be submitted electronically via email to SoJo Associate Editor, Julie Ficarra at jmficarr@syr.edu by April 30, 2016.  The submission should include two copies of the manuscript: a master copy including a title page, and a blind copy with the title page and all other author-identifying information removed (including citations and references pertaining to any of the contributing authors’ works).  


  

 

1st Annual Gender and Sexuality Studies Conference, University of Central Oklahoma

1st Annual Gender and Sexuality Studies Conference, University of Central Oklahoma

Edmond, Oklahoma, September 26-28 2016

Deadline for proposals: March 11th 2016 

The Center at the University of Central Oklahoma, composed of the Women’s Research Center and the BGLTQ+ Student Center, invites proposals for presentations at the first annual Gender and Sexuality Studies Conference, which will take place September 26-28, 2016 in Edmond, Oklahoma

The organizers of this international interdisciplinary conference welcome proposals for presentations in a variety of formats that address issues of gender and sexuality in the social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, and fine arts. We invite students, faculty, staff, scholars, and activists to propose papers, panels, round table discussions, and poster presentations. We also welcome proposals to present or perform creative work including creative writing, drama, music, and visual art. 

Send a 250-350 word abstract about your project by March 11th to thecenteratuco@gmail.com 

Additional Information:

https://www.facebook.com/thecenteratuco/

http://www.uco.edu/central/thecenter/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheCenteratUCO

  


 

Call for Papers: History of Education Society, 2016 Annual Meeting

Providence, Rhode Island

November 3-6, 2016

Proposal Deadline: Sunday, March 13, 2016

The Program Committee for the 2016 Annual Meeting of the History of Education Society invites proposals on all topics related to the history of education, in any period or nation, and especially proposals that cross cultures, periods, or national boundaries. The Committee defines education broadly to include all institutions of socialization – such as schools; universities; mass media; voluntary organizations; learned and/or scientific societies; libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions; vocational and/or corporate training enterprises; after-school and out-of-school learning environments; international organizations; and technology-mediated education. We invite proposals for individual papers, complete paper sessions, panel discussions, or workshops.

At the 2016 Annual Meeting, we will mark several key anniversaries relevant to the history of education, including the 50th anniversary of the Coleman Report, the 100th anniversary of Dewey’s Democracy and Education, and the 150th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1866.

All proposals are welcome, but we particularly encourage submissions on the following themes:

  1. Otherness: The history of education and persons who do not conform to various kinds of norms. Includes the process of “othering” as well as intended/unintended consequences.
  2. Technologies and education: The history of education and technologies – broadly construed, such as technique, symbolic mediation, education at mass scale, education at a distance, automation, and measurement.
  3. Networks: The history of education as it is shaped by the linkages between and among people, ideas, and institutions from local, national, international, and transnational perspectives.
  4. Reconsiderations: Reevaluation of “general understandings” of the history of education.
  5. Research methods: Analysis of research methods in the history of education. Includes, for example, archival research, quantitative research, oral history, digital humanities, new types of sources, and historiography.
  6. Teaching: Teaching the history of education. Includes pedagogical strategies; primary sources and technology; the place of foundations of education in the disciplines of history, education, other humanities, and social sciences, etc.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
Proposals can take one of four forms: (a) an individual paper, (b) a complete session, (c) a panel discussion, or (d) a workshop.
Individual Paper: Proposals should spell out the paper’s focus and rationale; if accepted, this paper and others related to it will be combined into a complete session. An individual-paper proposal should be single-spaced and no more than two pages long, excluding references. It should include the topic and an overview of the findings or conclusions, a discussion of how the paper relates to other scholarship in the field, and the sources. Please remove personal identifying information from the proposal document before uploading it, but include institutional affiliations and email addresses as instructed on the website.

Complete Session: Proposals should provide a prospectus for a coherent collection of 3-4 papers, including a title for the session, a title and summary of each paper, and a chair and
discussant, if possible. A complete-session proposal should be single-spaced and no more than four pages long, excluding references. The proposal should include the topic and an overview of the findings or conclusions, a discussion of how the session relates to other scholarship in the field, and the sources. Please remove personal identifying information from the proposal document before uploading it, but include institutional affiliations and email addresses for all participants elsewhere as instructed on the website.

Panel Discussion: Proposals should outline a session in which a group of three or four qualified panelists presents a series of thought-pieces that discuss important issues, research, or books in the field. A panel-discussion proposal should be single-spaced and no more than four pages long, excluding references. The proposal should include an overview of the discussion topic, the major findings or conclusions, how they contribute to the field, and a chair. The identities of panel members need not be anonymous. Regardless, however, please include institutional affiliations and email addresses for all participants elsewhere as instructed on the website.

Workshop: Proposals should explain the focus of the session (e.g., research methods or teaching practices), the number of leaders (no more than three), and how the session will proceed. A workshop proposal should be single-spaced and no more than four pages long, excluding references. The proposal should describe the plan of the workshop, the intended audience, the activities, and the workshop’s connections to larger issues in the field. The identities of panel members need not be anonymous. Regardless, however, please include institutional affiliations and email addresses for all participants elsewhere as instructed on the website.

The submission website will be available beginning January 1, 2016. Proposals are due on or before Sunday, March 13, 2016 (no later than 11:59 p.m. PT).
SUBMISSION PROCEDURES

To submit a proposal, please go to https://cmt3.research.microsoft.com/HES2016. The website will accept proposals beginning January 11. (Note: You must use https; using http will not work.)
From the Login screen, simply click “Create Account” (or choose the “Registration” tab at the top). Then click the “Create a New Paper Submission” button. The prompts will help you enter your proposal information (title, abstract, and author(s)…) and upload your proposal.
The History of Education Society requires all presenters at the 2016 conference to be members of the Society. Invitations for membership will be sent to authors of accepted proposals along with details about the conference.
Please send questions to Jackie Blount, program chair, at blount.36@osu.edu; phone: 614 292-3552, or mail: 101C Ramseyer Hall, 29 W. Woodruff Ave., Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.


 
CFP: The Disorder of Time, American Ethnological Society (AES) Meeting 

American Ethnological Society (AES) Meeting, March 31-April 2, 2016, Washington, DC (http://aesonline.org/meetings/spring-conference

The Disorder of Time -- Our sense of time provides order in our lives, yet this is often a fleeting sense. What happens when our temporal expectations are subverted, historically or in terms of a life course? As economic and social circumstances become increasingly unstable globally, the future cannot be planned for or predicted. What happens to our sense of time and history when time no longer seems to order events? This panel will explore situations of temporal disruption that call into question the way life worlds are ordered, in thinking about time as a potential agent of chaos rather than order.  

Please send paper abstracts to Rachel Fleming at rachel.fleming@colorado.edu by or before Februrary 15, 2016.

The Transnational NGO Leadership Institute 2016

June 12 - June 17
Syracuse, New York, USA

The Transnational NGO Leadership Institute welcomes global NGO professionals to a five-day, intensive and interdisciplinary program to gain skills to make their next leadership “leap”.  The Institute is hosted by the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, America’s highest ranked graduate school of public affairs (US News and World Report, 2013). Maxwell has been hosting executive leadership programming for public and nonprofit/NGO leaders across different sectors and regions since 1964. The Leadership Institute makes excellent use of Syracuse University’s expertise in promoting inclusion of persons with disabilities in cross-sectoral initiatives as one of the leading disability research universities in the United States.

Program participants

Global leaders at the second tier of responsibility focused on obtaining top transnational NGO leadership positions

What are the leadership “leaps”?

  • Leading in a Complex Context: The impact of your individual leadership styles; Strategic leadership behavior choices that increase your effectiveness; Leadership vs. management; The broader landscape of actors and issues; Your personal preparation for making the next leadership “leap”
  • Leading and Managing Organizational Change: Leading dramatic useful change, and managing organizational change processes; Organizational design; Leading boards; Organizational culture change
  • Collaboration and Crisis: The leader as communicator, team facilitator and team coach; Collaborative leadership skills; Leadership in crisis situations; Leadership and stress
  • Politics, Power Relationships, Negotiation and Persuasion: Leadership from a political frame; Compromise versus collaboration
  • Strategic Decision-Making and Performance Management: Emergent versus planned strategies; Resource planning, allocation and management

Program takeaways

  • Understand the effect of your individual leadership style and receive customized insight
  • Expand and test specific leadership competencies
  • Integrate your learning through experiential, hands-on exercises, assignments and simulations 
  • Engage with peers examining similar leadership challenges and expand your global network
  • Reap actionable benefits in terms of your leadership and organizational challenges

For more information on the program content, costs and application process:

http://www.maxwell.syr.edu/leadershipinstitute/


  


  

Part-Time Internship with CBM International in NY

CBM International in NY is currently seeking a part-time intern (paid internship). 

Persons with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Location:             New York City  

Please note that applicants must have a valid work permit for the United States. 

Contract Period: April to December 2016

Objective:           This position intends to build the intern’s skills, knowledge and networks that would enable him/her to pursue a career in development and/or disability rights fields.   

Key Responsibilities: 

The intern will report to the CBM Representative to the UN in NY (Elizabeth Lockwood).  

A precise list of tasks will be developed with the successful candidate, but proposed areas of work include the following.  

·       Advocate with partners for the inclusion of the rights of persons with disabilities at the UN in line with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and Inclusive Development.

·       Develop advocacy strategies to raise awareness, network, build capacity, and lobby for the rights of persons with disabilities at the UN level

·       Conduct research, write briefs, organize meetings, and coordinate stakeholders to assist with strategies for inclusion of persons with disabilities in the 2030 Agenda processes

Responsibilities of the intern include, but are not limited to: 

·       External communication

·       Conducting research and writing policy briefs

·       Organizing meetings and events

·       Giving possible interventions and/or presentations

·       Carrying out logistical support (e.g., printing documents, etc.) 

Level of education and required qualifications:

  • University degree
  • Computer literacy – MS Office
  • Communication skills: Good knowledge of English (speaking/signing, reading and writing); other languages are a strong asset, including International Sign                       

Competencies:

  • Flexible and reliable; enjoys working in an international team and networking
  • Identifies with the values of CBM; committed to promoting the rights of persons with disabilities and interested in international cooperation (development and humanitarian action) 

The future jobholder commits to CBM Child Protection Policy. 

To apply, please send your CV and letter of intent to Dr. Elizabeth Lockwood elizabeth.lockwood@cbm.org by February 24, 2016. Only shortlisted applicants will be informed. Interviews will be held during the week of March 14th.

CBM is an international Christian development organisation, committed to improving the quality of life of persons with disabilities in the poorest countries of the world. Based on over 100 years of professional expertise, CBM addresses poverty as a cause, and a consequence, of disability, and works in partnership to create a society for all. For further information about CBM please refer to www.cbm.org


  

 

Columbia University Institute for Research in African-American Studies Summer Institute: “The Many Worlds of Black New York”

The Columbia University Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS) is now accepting applications for its 2016 Summer Teachers and Scholars Institute (STSI). Convening for one week between Monday 11 and Friday July 16, this year’s STSI is themed “The Many Worlds of Black New York” and will focus on the history, cultures, and institutions of African-descended peoples in New York City. 

This Summer Institute offers what few others are able:

  • The opportunity to study African-American art, photography, history, culture, politics, and life through the lens of New York, and in New York
  • Attend seminars facilitated by today’s leading scholars in African-American Studies
  • Visit and tour historical landmarks and institutions around the city
  • Receive instruction in the latest research methods and,
  • Enjoy afternoon and evening cultural excursions throughout New York City

​This year’s lecturers will include Samuel K. Roberts (STSI Director), Cheryl Hicks, Farah Jasmine Griffin, Brian Purnell, and Christina Greer. STSI seminars will explore various themes including:

  • The New Negro Movement and the Harlem Renaissance
  • Educating Harlem: Activism for Equality in the Mid-20th Century
  • The Struggle for Civil Rights in Brooklyn
  • Race, Policing, Gender and Criminal Justice
  • Black Immigration since 1965
  • Health/Medical Rights 

In addition to serving as a space for collaborative thinking and skills training, STSI will offer a unique opportunity to explore the tremendous richness and vast scope of African-American Studies.  

The fee for the STSI is $1,800 and a limited number of partial fellowships are available.  

Please go to  www.columbiastsi.com for more information.

For more information contact us at stsi@columbia.edu.


 

12th Annual Summer Session on Contemplative Higher Education

http://us6.campaign-archive1.com/?u=fda1a7734373c0e15713c8470&id=0f89ead489&e=5b2a75ca08


  

Syracuse University LOGIN Study

Our research aims to make computers and the Internet more accessible and easier to use. To help design more accessible technologies, we are seeking to learn from the experiences of computer/Internet users who have cognitive disabilities. 

We are a group of researchers at Syracuse University and we are recruiting adults with cognitive disabilities, including those with developmental disabilities such as autism and specific learning disabilities such as dyslexia to better understand their difficulties in using current login systems. The researchers will visit their homes or other environments (e.g., public library) where the participants regularly use computers and the Internet. 

The visit will take about 1 hour in which the researchers will observe how participants use computers and the Internet, and log into various services, attempting to uncover any difficulties that the participants experience. The researchers will also ask the participants to fill out two surveys and conduct an interview to better understand their needs. 

Participants who complete the study will receive between $5 and $30. Compensation will be pro-rated in a way that recognizes time and effort put in prior to withdrawal: withdrawal prior to pre-test survey ($5); pre-test survey ($5); being observed for computer usage and logging into websites ($10); interview ($10); and post-test survey ($5).

If you’re interested in participating in this study, please fill out our recruitment survey at http://goo.gl/1hWZkN

If you are selected, you will be contacted via email with detailed information on the study. We look forward to hearing from you!

Contact Dr. Yang Wang for more information about the study at ywang@syr.edu or (315.443.3744).

 

Call for Narrators - Do you identify as a person with a disability?

Native intersections: How structures of socioeconomic status and disability enable agentive identity processes

Call for Narrators - Do you identify as a person with a disability?

Have you ever wanted to write/otherwise document a memoir or have you started one and have yet to finish it? This research conducted by a person with disabilities from Syracuse University investigates disability, socioeconomic status, and how you shaped your identity by generating portions of memoir and through interviews.

Aside from collaborating to create this research text, you will get assistance/compensation:

  • Organizing and expressing your experiences
  • Documenting and revising your work
  • Making creative and purposeful authorial decisions
  • Deciding whether or not to claim your authorship in the manuscript should this work be published and a share of any profit this research generates, if any.
  • Continued support, feedback, and advisement for additional writing of your memoir for 6 months after the completion of the research project.

Participation requires a fairly significant time commitment of 20-40 hours of interviewing and documentation, though you will have a great deal of flexibility about when and where we collaborate. Participation is limited to people ages 18 years or older. If you have any questions or would like to schedule a preliminary interview to discuss participation please contact: Steve Singer at sjsinger@syr.edu (preferred) or (315)350-3803


 

Newhouse Student Narrative Project: People with disabilities 

Newhouse student would like to hear your stories for her Disability Studies Narrative Project.

If you’re interested, please email Jingyu ‘Viola’ Wan at jwan100@syr.edu

Starting date is Spring 2016.

 

Freeman-ASIA Scholarships for Study Abroad Summer 2016

IIE is now accepting applications for summer 2016 Freeman Awards for Study in Asia (Freeman-ASIA).  

The student deadline for summer 2016 is March 1, and the adviser deadline is March 8. To access the application, and to learn more about eligibility, timelines, and scholarship requirements, please visit the IIE website: http://www.iie.org/Programs/Freeman-ASIA.  

The Freeman Foundation’s generous support for the relaunch of Freeman-ASIA builds on prior grants to IIE that funded more than 4,500 American undergraduates in Asia from 2001 to 2014. The newly available awards will advance IIE’s Generation Study Abroad, a five-year initiative aiming to double the number of U.S. students abroad by the end of the decade by mobilizing resources and commitments across the higher education, philanthropy and corporate sectors. The Freeman-ASIA relaunch is the latest of several steps IIE has taken to increase the number and diversity of Americans studying abroad and their study destinations. Studying in Asia before graduating can give students a competitive advantage in their professional careers, especially when collaborating with international peers. More than half of Freeman-ASIA alumni reported being employed in a position related to Asian affairs or requiring knowledge of an Asian language. As more employers seek new hires with meaningful and substantive experience in Asia, it is critical that more Americans learn about and engage with Asian economies, political systems and cultures.  

Read the press release: http://www.iie.org/Who-We-Are/News-and-Events/Press-Center/Press-Releases/2016/2016-01-05-IIE-Relaunches-Freeman-Asia  

Visit the website: http://www.iie.org/Freeman-ASIA

 
 

Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Black Studies Research, University of California Santa Barbara (2016-2017) 

The Center for Black Studies Research at the University of California Santa Barbara seeks applications for a postdoctoral fellowship on research related to Black Studies, African diaspora, Haitian studies, social movements, engaged scholarship, or urban studies. 25% of the fellowship is devoted to developing the Center's Engaged Scholarship initiative and mentoring undergraduate research. No teaching is required. Ph.D. must be received by June 30, 2016. The fellowship will provide a $45,000 annual stipend, $5,000 annual research and travel allowance, and health insurance. 12-month position, to begin July 1, 2016, with possibility of 2nd year, upon evaluation. The Center is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research and service.

Applicants should submit a cover letter indicating research interests and experiences with engaged scholarship (broadly conceived as public scholarship, applied research, activist research, community engagement), CV, an article-length writing sample or dissertation chapter, and two letters of reference (submitted by letter writers) to Diane Fujino, CBSR Director via online site https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/apply/JPF00639.

Apply by 03/1/16; thereafter, open until filled.

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

       


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Disability Rights Orgs Win Landmark Department of Labor Decision Against Sheltered Workshop

In a groundbreaking opinion, the U.S. Department of Labor found that a sheltered workshop in Ohio had violated federal minimum wage laws by underpaying three of its workers with disabilities, including one autistic man. The opinion followed a petition that Autistic Self Advocacy Network filed along with Disability Rights Ohio, the National Federation of the Blind, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP. Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities, had been paying the complainants, Joe Magers, Pam Steward, and Mark Felton, an average of $2.50 an hour for more than three years.

An outdated exception to federal minimum wage laws, known as Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act, allows certain employers to pay less than minimum wage to people with disabilities if they can show that the disabilities prevent them from being as “productive” as the average nondisabled worker.

Although federal law allows workers with disabilities to file a petition for review of their wages by the U.S. Department of Labor, Felton, Magers, and Steward are among the first workers with disabilities ever to use the petition process to fight for fair wages. This low level of enforcement means that many workshops have paid people below-minimum wages based simply on the assumption that people with disabilities are not as productive as people without disabilities, using flawed productivity measurements as “documentation.”

An administrative law judge for the Department of Labor found that Felton, Magers, and Steward, and Felton were entitled to back pay to make up the difference between their past wages and minimum wage, and to minimum wage going forward.

“Many people are shocked when they find out that it is legal to pay people with disabilities less than minimum wage,” said Samantha Crane, Legal Director and Director of Public Policy at ASAN. “But what’s even more surprising is how rare this type of enforcement action has been until now. We hope this decision puts other workshops on notice that they won’t get away with this sort of exploitation.”

“The opinion highlights that each of our clients brings valuable employment skills to the Seneca Re-Ad facility, and their value as workers should be respected,” says DRO Attorney Barbara Corner. “People with disabilities are full and equal members of society and should be paid fairly.”

Mark A. Riccobono, President of the National Federation of the Blind, said: “This decision cuts through the low expectations based on stereotypes and misconceptions that undergird the antiquated and discriminatory subminimum-wage employment model. The National Federation of the Blind is proud of our role in helping these workers to earn compensation that reflects the skilled work that they perform. We believe that this decision sends a strong signal that subminimum wages are an idea whose time has long since passed.”

About the Autistic Self Advocacy Network: The Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) is a national, private, nonprofit organization, run by and for individuals on the autism spectrum. ASAN provides public education and promotes public policies that benefit autistic individuals and others with developmental or other disabilities. Its advocacy activities include combating stigma, discrimination, and violence against autistic people and others with disabilities; promoting access to employment, health care and long-term supports in integrated community settings; and educating the public about the access needs of autistic people. ASAN takes a strong interest in cases that affect the rights of autistic individuals to participate fully in community life and enjoy the same rights as others without disabilities.

About Disability Rights Ohio: Disability Rights Ohio is the federally and state designated Protection and Advocacy System and Client Assistance Program for the state of Ohio. The mission of Disability Rights Ohio is to advocate for the human, civil and legal rights of people with disabilities in Ohio. Disability Rights Ohio provides legal advocacy and rights protection to a wide range of people with disabilities.

About the National Federation of the Blind: The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future. Every day we raise the expectations of blind people, because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams. You can live the life you want; blindness is not what holds you back.


 

Now Accepting Nominations for the 2016 Paul G. Hearne Award for Disability Rights 

American Bar Association Commission on Disability Rights

Call for Nominations -- 2016 Paul G. Hearne Award for Disability Rights

Do you know an outstanding advocate for persons with disabilities who has achieved professional excellence in his or her field?
The ABA Commission on Disability Rights is seeking nominations for the 2016 Paul G. Hearne Award for Disability Rights. This award will be presented at a reception during the 2016 ABA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, CA on Monday, August 08, 2016 at the Moscone Center West.

Submit your nomination

The deadline to submit the nomination form and supporting materials is the close of business on Monday, April 25, 2016.

If you have nominated someone previously and want to nominate them again for 2016, please (1) submit the nomination form and (2) contact Michael Stratton at 202-662-1571 or Michael.Stratton@americanbar.org.

For more information, please click on the links below:
About the Award
Nomination Form
View the list of distinguished award recipients

If you have further questions, please contact Michael Stratton at 202-662-1571 or via email at Michael.Stratton@americanbar.org.

 
  

 

I Am Not Wheelchair Bound | Paraquad

 
 
 


  

PEAT Talk: Raising the Bar on Accessibility 

PEAT Talks: Raising the Bar on Accessibility

Join Dan Sullivan of AudioEye on Thursday, February 18, 2:00 p.m-2:30 p.m. ET. Dan will discuss the return-on-investment for employers who embrace accessible technology that benefits all users.
Register Now

About PEAT Talks

PEAT Talks is a virtual speaker series hosted by the Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT). Held the third Thursday of every month at 2:00 p.m. ET, PEAT Talks showcases various organizations and individuals whose work and innovations are advancing accessible technology in the workplace. Featured speakers deliver a 10- to 15- minute talk and then field questions from attendees. To learn more about PEAT and our upcoming events, visit PEATworks.org.

  

 
 
  

Jewish Disability Awareness and Inclusion Month February 2016

Here are just a few things happening this month for JDAIM 2016. Engage with more content and conversation on Facebook and Twitter! 

The Language Of Prayer
Synagogues are opening the doors to participation by people with disabilities in large numbers. New buildings and remodeling projects follow the requirements provided by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Many synagogues have greeters stationed at the doors to welcome people and direct newcomers to coat rooms, washrooms and the sanctuary. Trained ushers know where assistive listening devices are located and can seat people who use wheelchairs with their family and friends.  

Are You a Gatekeeper?

Fourteen years ago I accompanied Stephanie to meet with the rabbi of one of the synagogues in my hometown of Minneapolis. It was a unique experience for Stephanie, who lives with cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair. It was the first time she had been in a synagogue since moving to the Twin Cities fifteen years earlier. Read more on Rituwell.com 

Jewish Disabilities Awareness and Inclusion Month

This month marks the eighth year that an ever increasing number of Jewish communities recognize Jewish Disability Awareness and Inclusion Month (#JDAIM). Members of the Jewish Special Education Consortium, of which I’m a member, recognized that people with disabilities across the lifespan were missing from Jewish life. We wanted to raise awareness collectively and chose February, a month where the major Jewish holidays were either far behind or far before us so we could have time to plan coordinated efforts with each other in our communities. Read more... 

Sharing your events on social media? Stay connected and help spread the word by using the hashtag #JDAIM16 with all of your posts, blogs and tweets! 

Be sure to "Like" Inclusion Innovations on Facebook and to follow them on Twitter @inclusioninnova!


Disability Employment Awareness Book Project 

We Are Creating a Book for You To Better Serve Employees With A Disability.

Please Help Us With Pictures and Profiles! 

We are in the process of composing a "coffee table" style book to demonstrate to potential employers that people with disabilities are successful in the workplace. We are looking for pictures and profiles of success stories about those who are currently gainfully employed. 

The book will feature individuals with varied disabilities and varied abilities.  We need your help by contacting us with suggestions, photographs and short profiles. View a narrative about the project and sample pages at DamonBrooks.com/Book.  It is being funded by The Biella Foundation which will allow us to donate the book to organizations and people making employment decisions. 

The photographs might be of you, people with whom you work or clients that you serve. Once again, all of the details can be found at DamonBrooks.com/Book. PLEASE feel free to contact Marc Goldman with any questions about the photo and profile suggestions: (805) 604-9017 Marc@DamonBrooks.com

  
 

 

Disability short film festival in Australia 

NOVA Employment in Australia, a not-for-profit organisation that helps find employment for disabled people, hosts a worldwide disability awareness short film festival, called Focus on Ability. The aim of the festival is to raise awareness of the talents and abilities of disabled people, as well as raise disability awareness in general.

Each year people from all over the world submit their own short films of up to 5 minutes, which are viewed online and in theatres. Last year 163 films were submitted, and screenings were held in Sydney, New York, and Auckland; with more planned for this year.

Anyone can submit a film, it’s free to enter, there are prizes to be won, and it’s a great way for people to share their stories with a global audience.

Please contact Steven Last at steven.last@novaemployment.com.au if you wish to enter or watch a film.

 www.novaemployment.com.au

  
 

 

Disability.gov Update


Disability Scoop

Disability Scoop 2.5.16

https://www.disabilityscoop.com/emailers/ds160205.html

Disability Scoop 2.9.16

https://www.disabilityscoop.com/emailers/ds160209.html

 

Cruel April Poetry Book Fair 2016

The Point of Contact Gallery is seeking published poets to display and sell their poetry collections at our annual poetry book fair. Poets' works will be available for purchase throughout the month of April for our series, Cruel April, which celebrates National Poetry Month. In addition to the annual poetry book fair, Cruel April includes weekly poetry readings by poets featured in our publication, Corresponding Voices Vol. 9. Through Cruel April, Point of Contact hopes to promote poetry and the verbal arts on an international and local level. 

How It Works 

Interested poets can fill out this consignment form and return it to the gallery or email it to amsterli@syr.edu. Poets are responsible for sending a maximum of 10 books to the gallery before March 24. The Point of Contact Gallery then displays the books during poetry readings where patrons have the opportunity to purchase any of the books displayed. After the final Cruel April poetry reading on April 28, poets are responsible for keeping up any remaining books and a check for their profits. All books and checks must be picked up by May 13. 

Questions 

Any questions about the book fair or Cruel April can be addressed to Amanda Sterling, Administrative and Marketing Coordinator at The Point of Contact Gallery, amsterli@syr.edu.


  


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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