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Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

INDEX



The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

Contemplative Collaborative Brownbag Series Continues with 'Mindfulness Goes to School'

Ann Cvetkovich Lecture: Archival Turns and Queer Affective Methods (March 2)

Upcoming (March 18-19) talks on communication access/interpreting - Jeremy Brunson

OrangeAbility 2015: Accessible Athletics Expo

Board Game Night at Cafe Q.

The Tireless Pursuit: Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Micere Mugo as Activist, Artist, and Architect of Alternative Sites of Knowledge

Racial Justice and the Law in the Americas

Crystal T. Laura: Against the Social Ecology of School Discipline: Teaching for Love, Justice, and Joy.

Ann Cvetkovich: Archival Turns and Queer Affective Methods.

Certificate in University Teaching seminar series 

Graduate Career Services and the FPP present …

The Douglas Biklen Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series: Lecture, this Thursday

SU NEWS

Student leaders needed for Community Ambassador program

Summer 2015 Course Offering

It’s time to honor the best of the best for 2015!

STUDENT OPPORTUNITY AT SU: BE WISE SEEKING PEER EDUCATORS

SU NEWS: MakerSpace is Making a Difference

SU NEWS: Institute for Veterans and Military Families Announces $500,000 Grant

SU NEWS: OttoTHON Aims to Raise Money for Golisano

SU NEWS: Thursday, 2/26/15: Diversity Law Day at College of Law

Featured in SU Magazine, Spring 2011: An Inclusive Blast from the Past (with some not-live links, alas)

FOUR of SIX 2014 “Cripping” the Comic Con videos are finally LIVE on YouTube!

SU Graduate Student Ashley Taylor’s Response to Christine Montross's Feb. 18th New York Times Op-Ed, "The Modern Asylum"

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT POSTER COMPETITIONS

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS: Documentary and Disability

Call for Proposals: Special Issue "Ability Expectation and Ableism Studies (short Ability Studies)"

Invitation to Speak – April 29-30 for “Living in Community: Changes and Continuing Challenges”

Call for WGS Graduate Paper Submissions

Reminder: CFP: Disability and Design, special issue of Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy

Call for Papers: Journal of Contemplative Inquiry (Special Issue on Intention, Method and Evaluation)

Casting International Students for Short Documentary

Recruitment for Study Looking at Effects of Childcare on Grandparents of Employed Adult Children

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Special Issue "Community-based Rehabilitation and Community Rehabilitation"

AHEAD Welcomes New JPED Executive Editor

TASH Executive Director’s Response to NYT Article on Re-institutionalization of People with Intellectual Disabilities

CIL-NET Presents...an IL Conversation via Teleconference

I am a member of the national disability rights group ADAPT and the ADAPT Fun Run for disability rights is coming up in April!

Flexibility & Its DiscontentsRethinking Disability in Academic Spaces

Disability Rights International (DRI) research reveals shocking abuses against women with disabilities in Mexico City

Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry

Keith A. Alford Honored for Activism and Service

Atlantic article from the past; recently recirculated: Understanding Deafness: Not Everyone Wants to Be 'Fixed'

Education – Restraint and Seclusion Bill Introduced in the House of Representatives

Canadian Restaurant Hires All Deaf Waitstaff, Makes Customers Order In Sign Language (Video)

New Book of Interest: Becoming a Person: The Biography of Robert Martin

The 6th Annual Arts Experience: A Festival Celebrating Inclusion & the ArtsMarch 30-April 10, 2015

Disability Scoop 2.20.15

Help Reform ADA TAP

ACTION ALERT: Responses to NYTimes Op-Ed Needed (“call” courtesy of the Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law)

DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: February 15-21, 2015

Why Disability Advocates Say No to Doctor-Assisted Death

Two analyses of AB 128 (Nevada's proposed medical power of attorney for people with intellectual disabilities)

Boston’s busing history to be taught in schools: Painful chapter now in class plan

Working with People Who Have Experienced Domestic/Sexual Violence & Chemical Dependency.

Mobility International is Hiring


SU HAPPENINGS

Contemplative Collaborative Brownbag Series Continues with 'Mindfulness Goes to School'

The Syracuse University Humanities Center’s Spring Symposia will continue on Friday, Mar. 6, with the concluding installment of its three-part Contemplative Collaborative Brownbag Series, titled "Mindfulness Goes to School: Linking Research with Practice.”
The event, which will begin at noon in room 123 in Sims Hall, will feature Dessa Bergen-Cico, assistant professor in the Department of Public Health at Syracuse University, and Rachel Razza, assistant professor of Child and Family Studies at Syracuse University. The pair will explore and discuss mindfulness and contemplative practices in school settings, linking research with practice.
Free and open to the public, the Brownbag Series is part of the Humanities Center’s Jeanette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship. The interdisciplinary brownbag series aims to uncover contemplative practices for students, faculty, and community members.
The Brownbag Series is organized and presented by the SU Humanities Center. Co-sponsors include: the Writing Program; Departments of Women’s and Gender Studies and Communication and Rhetorical Studies; Hendricks Chapel; Hendricks Chapel Wellness Fund; and the Contemplative Collaborative. Queries can be directed to Patrick W. Berry at pwberry@syr.edu or 315-443-1912.

Ann Cvetkovich Lecture: Archival Turns and Queer Affective Methods (March 2)

 
Ann Cvetkovich
Ellen Clayton Garwood Centennial Professor of English and Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Texas at Austin
 
Archival Turns and Queer Affective Methods
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Bird Library
6.30pm, Monday, March 2
 
The push for LGBTQ state recognition, civil rights, and cultural visibility has been accompanied by a desire for the archive – a claim that the recording and preservation of LGBTQ history is an epistemic right. Yet new LGBTQ archival projects must also respond to historical and theoretical critiques, including decolonizing ones, that represent archives as forms of epistemological domination and surveillance or as guided by an impossible desire for stable knowledge. This talk will focus on artists working in a range of genres, including drawing, painting, photography, and fiction, who create archives by moving from one medium to another. As experiments in archival preservation, these innovative media practices grapple with the materiality of the archive in order to reveal its ephemeral and affective dimensions. 
 
Presented by LGBT Studies. Co-sponsored by the Departments of English, Psychology, Religion and Women’s and Gender Studies.
 
ASL interpretation will be available at the lecture
 
Professor Cvetkovich will also be offering a mini-seminar on her book Depression: A Public Feeling on March 2 from 1.30-3pm. Interested graduate students and faculty should contact Roger Hallas (rhallas@syr.edu) to register for the mini-seminar as seating is limited.

Upcoming (March 18-19) talks on communication access/interpreting - Jeremy Brunson


Professor Jeremy Brunson (SU PhD alum and Assoc. Prof. at Gallaudet University) will be visiting Syracuse and will speak on issues of communication access at 3 events open to the public:

SU Sociology/Disability Studies event on Thursday, March 19, 12 noon -1:30 - Informal research presentation: “The Social Organization of Access: The Blurry Lines of Staff Interpreting in Organizations”
303 Maxwell Hall

Upstate/Consortium for Culture and Medicine event on Thursday, March 19, 4 - 5:30 p.m. - Panel discussion: Border Crossings: Communication Across Cultures & Languages in Health Care Featuring Jeremy Brunson, Monu Dhakal, and Jennifer Wissman
1507/1508 Setnor

In addition, Jeremy will speak at the CNYRID (Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf) on Wednesday, March 18, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.: " Looking at Interpreting Through a Sociological Lens"
Rosamond Gifford Community Room  (Lower Level United Way Building, 518 James Street) 
Cost for non-RID members - $20.  With student ID - $7 
(Presented in English with sign-language interpretation.)

There will be sign-language interpretation at all events.  

If you have questions, please contact Marj DeVault (mdevault@syr.edu)

OrangeAbility 2015: Accessible Athletics Expo

Please Distribute Widely! 
 
 
OrangeAbility 2015: Accessible Athletics Expo
When: Saturday, March 28th, 1-4 pm
Where: Flanagan Gym, SU Main Campus.  
What: Experience Relays, Sled Hockey, Wheelchair Basketball, Power Soccer, and more! Engage with local teams on the court, as well as organizations in our expo area. Try some equipment out yourself, and bring some friends along!
You don’t have to be able-bodied to play, and you don’t have to have a disability to play accessible sports!
Drop in to join or sign up online to:
  • play with a team
  • volunteer
  • table with your group
  • request specific accommodations (ASL Interpretation Provided)
Free and open to the public. Parking and accessible parking available onsite, but please register in advanced if possible. Contact: orangeability@gmail.com or visit orangeability.syr.edu
Powered by: The Syracuse University Disability Cultural Center, the Syracuse University Department of Recreation Services, Move Along, Inc, the Syracuse University Disability Student Union, and the Syracuse University Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee
Flyer for print, press release, and more available online at orangeability.syr.edu

Board Game Night at Cafe Q.

Thursday, February 26, 6 PM - 8 PM. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Resource Center, 750 Ostrom.

The Tireless Pursuit: Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Micere Mugo as Activist, Artist, and Architect of Alternative Sites of Knowledge

Friday, April 3, 2015
9-5:30pm
Drumlins Country Club, 800 Nottingham Road
 
 
Mĩcere Gĩthae Mũgo, a world-renowned poet, playwright, literary critic, and scholar, is widely studied across the disciplines in the arts, humanities, social sciences and education. In spring 2015, this Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence retires after teaching in Syracuse University’s Department of African American Studies since 1993. “The Tireless Pursuit” celebrates the legacy of Mugo as activist, artist, and academic. Central to her pursuit of new sites of knowledge is orature—or the art of the spoken word—as resistance art that tirelessly fights for independence for African descendants, human empowerment, and critical social justice. For Mugo this included the mission: “to enlighten; educate widely; engage new knowledges and ideas; hold conversations among cultures; [and] use knowledge to create change.” Please join us for this momentous event. 
 
 
When: Thursday, April 2 (by Invitation); and Friday, April 3, 2015
 
Time: 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. (dinner will follow)
 
Where: Drumlins Country Club, 800 Nottingham Road, Syracuse
 
Follow us on Twitter @ #Mugocelebration
 
Schedule (Will be Available on March 15, 2015)
 
For More Information Contact AAS Front Office at aas@syr.edu or 315-443-4302

Racial Justice and the Law in the Americas

Friday, 2/27, 2-4pm, Slocum 104
 
A Symposium featuring Professors Melynda Price (Kentucky), Tanya Hernandez (Fordham), and Kevin Noble Maillard (Syracuse).
 
Tanya Hernandez is Professor of Law at Fordham University, where she specializes in comparative civil rights, critical race theory, and employment discrimination. She is the author of Racial Subordination in Latin America: The Role of the State, Customary Law, and the New Civil Rights Response (Cambridge, 2013) as well as numerous articles in scholarly journals and popular publications, including the New York Times. Hernandez has been a visiting professor at Princeton and Rutgers, and she has been a Scholar in Residence at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. She received her B.A. from Brown and her J.D. from Yale Law School, where she was an editor of the Yale Law Journal.
 
Melynda Price is Robert E. Harding, Jr. Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky. Her research focuses on the intersection of race, gender, and citizenship, as well as the politics of punishment. Her recent publications include the articles “Performing Discretion or Discrimination: Race, Ritual, and Peremptory Challenges in Capital Jury Selection” and “Litigating Salvation: Race, Religion, and Innocence in the Cases of Karla Faye Tucker and Gary Graham.” She received her J.D. from the University of Texas, where she was a member of the Texas International Law Journal. She also received a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan and she received the Best Dissertation Award from the Race, Ethnicity, and Politics Section of the American Political Science Association.
 
Kevin Noble Maillard is Professor of Law at Syracuse University, where his scholarship focuses on family law, civil liberties, and race. He is the co-editor of Loving v. Virginia in a Post-Racial World (Cambridge, 2012), and he has published scholarly articles on Native American civil rights, inter-racial marriage, and cross-racial adoption. Maillard is also a public intellectual: he has been frequently published in The New York Times as well as in Essence MagazineThe Atlantic, The Grio, andIndian Country Today. Maillard holds a Ph.D. in political theory from the University of Michigan and a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where he as an editor of the Journal of Constitutional Law. He is a member of the Seminole Nation, Mekusukey Band.
 
This event is free and open to the public; all are welcome. If you have questions, please contact Vincent Lloyd (vwlloyd@syr.edu) or Kwame Dixon (dldixon@syr.edu). Organized by the SU Black Political Thought Working Group, with support from the Dean’s Office, College of Arts and Sciences; the Anthropology Department; the Religion Department; the African American Studies Department; the Women’s and Gender Studies Department; and the Political Science Department.

Crystal T. Laura: Against the Social Ecology of School Discipline: Teaching for Love, Justice, and Joy.

Thursday, February 26, 5: 30 PM. Maxwell Hall Auditorium.

Ann Cvetkovich: Archival Turns and Queer Affective Methods.

Monday, March 2, 6:30 PM. Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Bird Library.
 

Certificate in University Teaching seminar series …

 
Crafting the Teaching Philosophy
Tuesday, March 3
3:30 – 4:45 p.m.
Hall of Languages 107
 
Writing the teaching philosophy statement is, for many, the most daunting part of compiling a teaching portfolio. Yet it is, aside from the C.V., the document most likely to be required of applicants for faculty positions. The final session in the CUT seminar series will offer strategies for answering such basic questions as “What is my teaching philosophy?” and will highlight some of the key qualities of effective teaching statements. Guest presenter Dr. Jeffrey Chin of Le Moyne College will share his insights on the role of teaching philosophies in faculty searches at teaching-intensive institutions, and how you can discuss your teaching in a way likely to advance your candidacy.
 
Jeffrey Chin is Professor of Sociology at Le Moyne College in Syracuse. He is a sociologically trained social psychologist specializing in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
 
Click here to register.

Graduate Career Services and the FPP present …

 
The Academic Job Market: An Ecological Introduction
with Prof. Leonard Cassuto (English, Fordham University)
Friday, February 27
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Kittredge Auditorium, HBC
 
In many fields, graduate students pursuing faculty careers face long odds and, if initially successful, extended periods of apprenticeship and/or probationary service. Staying the course requires the full commitment of one’s intellectual and emotional resources. At the same time, grad students facing an adverse academic job market do themselves a grave disservice by not exploring and consciously developing the skills needed for alternative career paths within and outside academia. The requisite combination of hope and hard-headedness can generate serious cognitive dissonance—not to say existential dread—in even the most promising candidates. Prof. Leonard Cassuto (English, Fordham U.) will offer thoughts on how you can navigate these conflicted waters, discussing some of the assumptions shared by faculty and graduate students alike about the market and encouraging us to think more expansively about what a meaningful career can be.
 
Leonard Cassuto is a Professor of English at Fordham University. He is author of the forthcoming book The Graduate School Mess: How It Came about and How We Can Fix It (Harvard, 2015). He also writes regularly on graduate education issues for the Chronicle of Higher Education and is widely recognized as one of the most important and influential voices about issues in higher education and the graduate experience.
 
Register via OrangeLink

The Douglas Biklen Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series: Lecture, this Thursday

 
Dr. Crystal Laura, author of Being Bad: My Baby Brother and the School-to-Prison Pipeline, will deliver a talk this Thursday, February 26, 5:30 PM in the Maxwell Auditorium.


SU NEWS

Student leaders needed for Community Ambassador program

 
The Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services is seeking student applicants for the 2015-2016 Community Ambassador program. Students can apply online atoffcampus.syr.edu. Students must submit their application by March 23, 2015.
This program matches successful off-campus students with selected blocks in the University neighborhood.  Selected students will serve as an ambassador and role-model to the residents of the street they are living on. Community Ambassadors (CA) provide a point of contact for student-residents on their assigned block, provide access to resources and build community in order to ease the transition to off-campus living. CAs must work well in a team, be responsible, possess strong communication skills, and be enthusiastic about supporting their community.
Blocks participating in the 2015-16 Community Ambassador program include:
·         Ackerman Ave
·         Clarendon St
·         Euclid Ave
·         Lancaster Ave
·         Livingston Ave
·         Ostrom Ave
·         Maryland Ave
·         Redfield Pl
·         Sumner Ave
·         Park Point Syracuse
For questions or more information, contact Kerry Heckman, assistant director for OCCS, at kmheckma@syr.edu

Summer 2015 Course Offering

Native Knowledge, Identity, and Learning 
Cultural Foundations of Education department

Taught by Kelsey John and Hugh Burnam

Online course for masters and undergraduate students 
Course Description: 
In this course we propose to explore indigenous knowledges in the local Haudenosaunee communities then contextualize these knowledges in broader sociological and philosophical conversations. Using a cross-disciplinary methodology our course will draw from indigenous oral histories, narrative, history, disability studies, sociology, and philosophy. This course will challenge students to re-think knowledge systems within higher education through exposure to ideas, discourses, and theories that have been commonly shut out or negatively anthropologized in the academy. 
For more information contact: kdjohn@syr.edu 

 

It’s time to honor the best of the best for 2015!

The Awards Committee of the Syracuse University Alumni Association Board of Directors is seeking nominations for the 2015 Arents Award, the Melvin A. Eggers Senior Alumni Award, and the Generation Orange Award. 

>> The Arents Award is Syracuse University’s highest alumni honor. Presented annually, it recognizes alumni who’ve excelled in their fields. The award is named for George Arents, a successful manufacturer who served on Syracuse University’s Board of Trustees from 1930 to 1960.

>> The Melvin A. Eggers Senior Alumni Award is presented to those alumni who graduated more than 50 years ago and have demonstrated loyalty and service to Syracuse University.

>> The Generation Orange Award recognizes graduates of the past 10 years for their continued commitment to Syracuse University.

All award nominations must be submitted by March 30, 2015, at alumni.syr.edu/awards. 

If you have questions about the nomination process or need more information, contact Monique Frost at 315.443.3408, email 
mvfrost@syr.edu, or visit alumni.syr.edu/awards.

Thank you for your consideration, support, and Orange spirit!


Andy's signature
Andrew Laver VPA ’01
Chair, Awards Committee

Syracuse University Alumni Association

STUDENT OPPORTUNITY AT SU: BE WISE SEEKING PEER EDUCATORS

 
Peer educators provide educational trainings and outreach on increasing awareness about alcohol use and alcohol poisoning. This group of dedicated students will be working with staff from the Counseling Center to receive training and support surrounding these topics. Peer educators can provide presentations to classrooms, on and off campus student groups, and other groups that request information.  Students can apply via the BE Wise website.

Dimensions Mentoring Program is a women of color mentoring program. Dimensions serves first-year and upper-class self-identified female students with an emphasis on African American/ Black, Asian/ Pacific American, Latin@/ Hispanic, and Native/ Indigenous students. Dimensions addresses issues that impact women from diverse backgrounds through facilitated dialogues where our women can support each other; engage with one another, and acquire leadership and professional development skills.
Program Overview
1.       Dimes Series is a six week leadership series where the women are paired with upperclass mentors who provide academic resources and connections outside of the classroom.

2.       Retreats that focus on cultural identity development, multicultural training, building self-confidence, and teambuilding.

3.       Reflections and discussions to guide students through their acclamation to Syracuse University, and their personal identity and cultural journey.

4.       Foster relationships to create intentional connections with female self-identified student leaders of color on campus.

5.       Goal to successfully retain students through their four years at Syracuse University.

Join the Dimensions Sisterhood! Apply 
here

SU NEWS: MakerSpace is Making a Difference


SU NEWS: Institute for Veterans and Military Families Announces $500,000 Grant


SU NEWS: OttoTHON Aims to Raise Money for Golisano


SU NEWS: Thursday, 2/26/15: Diversity Law Day at College of Law


Featured in SU Magazine, Spring 2011: An Inclusive Blast from the Past (with some not-live links, alas)


FOUR of SIX 2014 “Cripping” the Comic Con videos are finally LIVE on YouTube!

 
Take Away the Suit, and What are You? “Cripping” the Comic Con 2014: Welcome to our “CripCon”
 
Take Away the Suit, and What are You? “Cripping” the Comic Con 2014: Zombie 101
 
Take Away the Suit, and What are You? “Cripping” the Comic Con 2014: William Peace
 
Take Away the Suit, and What are You? “Cripping” the Comic Con 2014: Becky Curran

SU Graduate Student Ashley Taylor’s Response to Christine Montross's Feb. 18th New York Times Op-Ed, "The Modern Asylum"

 


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT POSTER COMPETITIONS


Celebrate Our Progress - Write Our Future History

http://ada.osu.edu/conferences/2015Conf/callforstudentproposals2015.html

At the Fifteenth Annual

Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability: April 13 - 14, 2015

Held on The Ohio State University's Columbus Campus

Poster Submissions are Due no later than March 11, 2015



The Multiple Perspectives Conference encourages students to network with professionals, the community, and scholars who share their interests in disability at its annual student poster reception.  A generous gift from the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation will fund awards (Graduate Research - $500; Undergraduate Research $200, Art & Performance $200 and Community Service $100, Class Projects $200 at this year's competition.



Submissions may be based on:

1.  Class Projects & Papers (Award goes to Department to support future projects)

2.  Independent & Supervised Student Research

3.  Community Service & Applied Problem Solving from Service Learning Classes or student organizations

4.  Art & Performance



Posters can take a variety of forms including print material mounted on poster board or display panels or arranged on a table; PowerPoint presentations, web pages or video presentations from your laptop ...

* Presentation materials must fit on a 3'x6' table or along 6' or less of wall space

* Presentation materials should present the information in 10 minutes or less

* Presenters or their designee must be present to interact with the audience

* Presenters must provide their own equipment



Visit these sites for tips on developing a poster presentation:

*  http://denman.osu.edu/resources.aspx

*  http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/speaking/poster/index.cfm

*  http://www.plu.edu/~libr/workshops/multimedia/posters.html



Students and teams of students who wish to present a poster must send the following information to ADA-OSU@osu.edu<mailto:ADA-OSU@osu.edu> no later than March 11, 2015

1.  Title

2.  Short Title - 12 word maximum

3.  Poster Format (Print, Model, PowerPoint, Video, ...)

4.  Description of their proposed poster topic - 250 word maximum

5.  E-mail address, phone number, and surface mail address of coordinating presenter

6.  As appropriate, university, department, grant, course or student organization affiliation

7.  A letter of support from a faculty member or organization advisor associated with the project

8.   Name of individual, Department or Organization to receive cash award should the project win.



Please Note:

The full conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for presenters of accepted proposals. Presenters are responsible for their own travel and lodging.

The Multiple Perspectives Conference is hosted by Ohio State University's ADA Coordinator's Office is made possible thanks to the generosity of the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation Endowment Fund and ongoing support from The Ohio State University's Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Center for Disability Empowerment




Celebrate Our Progress - Write Our Future History<http://ada.osu.edu/conferences/2015Conf/2015conf.html>  at the 2015 Multiple Perspcetives Conference, April 13-14.

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS: Documentary and Disability

Editors: Catalin Brylla and Helen Hughes

In September 2013 the symposium Documentary and (Dis)ability at the University of Surrey brought together international scholars, practitioners and practice-based researchers to critically reflect on how documentary film has contributed to the visibility of disability in philosophical, political, social and cultural terms. A wide range of perspectives - including ethnography, phenomenology, semiotics, iconography and historical studies - mapped issues of disability within contexts of production (both behind and in front of the camera), distribution, exhibition, reception, public action and government legislation.

Inspired by this symposium we are now preparing a proposal for an edited volume under the same title, for which we invite contributors working on the intersection of documentary film with disability studies. The proposed format of the book is to have a substantive introduction and around twelve chapters of 6-7000 words divided into
(1) methods for bringing together documentary and disability studies,
(2) film historical case studies, and (3) contemporary debates and film production practices.

The following topics are a guideline to potential chapter proposals and are not meant to exclude other interpretations of the book's title Documentary and Disability:

*Defining and representing disability and documentary film *The visibility/audibility of ability and disability *Diversity and the adaptation of production practices *Disability, embodied space and affect *Alternative documentary forms (e.g. animation) and disability *Politics of funding, distribution and exhibition in relation to disability issues *Disability in a trans-national context *Documentary ethics, authorship and disability *Documentary and disability legislation *Disability through a post-colonial lens *Technologies of in(ex)clusion

If you are interested in contributing a chapter to this edited book, please send a chapter title, a 200-word abstract, a bibliography and a short biography to Dr. Helen Hughes (h.hughes@surrey.ac.uk) and Catalin Brylla (catalin.brylla@southwales.ac.uk) by March 31st 2015.  We would envisage needing the full drafts by 1st October 2015. We look forward to receiving your chapter proposal.

Call for Proposals: Special Issue "Ability Expectation and Ableism Studies (short Ability Studies)"


Invitation to Speak – April 29-30 for “Living in Community: Changes and Continuing Challenges”

 
The Center for Disability Studies in collaboration with the Center For Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDEA), the Disability Education and Advocacy Network (DEAN), and the Museum of disABILITY History invites you to join us for an exciting conference at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, April 29-30, 2015. The conference aims to bring together scholars, community members, students, and activists to address the theme “Living in Community: Changes and Continuing Challenges.” In addition to focusing on issues such as the built environment, product design, transportation, education and employment, we hope the conference will engage the ways in which people with disabilities define—and derive meaning and value from—the term “community.” Individual as well as panel proposals are welcome. Submissions need not be formal. An e-mail briefly (200 words) explaining your proposal will suffice. We may ask for follow-up information. The conference organizers have funds to support travel, lodging, and a modest honorarium. If you are interested, please e-mail your proposal to Program Committee Chair, Andrew Marcum at abmarcum@buffalo.edu by Friday, March 13, 2015. Proposals will be reviewed and participants will be notified of their acceptance no later than Monday, March 23, 2015.

Call for WGS Graduate Paper Submissions

 
 
Women’s & Gender Studies Department Graduate Paper Prize for 2014-2015
 
The Women’s & Gender Studies program announces it is now accepting entries for its Toni Taverone
Graduate Paper Prize. The deadline is March 20, 2015. The award amount is $150.
 
Eligibility
Currently enrolled graduate students at Syracuse University who have not previously won the
graduate paper prize may submit papers written in any WGS courses during Spring 2014,
Summer 2014, or Fall 2014.
 
Guidelines
1. Papers are to demonstrate scholarly competence in a subject matter relevant to women’s
and gender studies. Specifically, papers will be selected based on: general excellence; intersectional
gender analysis or use of feminist theory; and interconnections between theory and activism.
2. Faculty may nominate students, or students may enter their own papers.
3. A detachable cover sheet indicating the entrant’s name, the paper title, and the source of
the paper (course title and professor). Also include local address, phone number and email.
4. Two copies of each paper—running header should only contain the paper title and page
numbers (no personal identification).
5. Authorship of papers may be individual or collaborative.
6. Paper may be no more than 25 pages in length.
 
Review Process
Papers are read and ranked (without author identification) by the paper prize committee, which
is established by the Women’s & Gender Studies Department faculty.
 
Please send entries NO LATER THAN March 20, 2015 to the Women’s & Gender Studies Department,
Paper Prize Committee, 208 Bowne Hall.
 
Electronic submissions will be accepted, please send to sademock@syr.edu.
For further information please contact Susann DeMocker-Shedd at 443-3560 or sademock@syr.edu

Reminder: CFP: Disability and Design, special issue of Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy


*The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy *is calling for submissions to a special topic issue themed around disability, accessibility, and digital pedagogy. We welcome traditional articles and digital projects. Full details are included in the call, which can be accessed here:http://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/submit/#issuecall

Please send inquiries to Andrew Lucchesi (a.j.lucchesi@gmail.com) and Sushil Oswal (oswal@u.washington.edu).  Submission deadline: April 15, 2015.

-From the CFP-
Suggested topics may include but are not limited to:

- What does it mean to compose multimodally with accessibility in view as a person with or without disability? What might it look like to design inclusive user interactions in social virtual spaces? What complexity, creativity, or obfuscations are visible in today's social media compositions at the intersections of gender, race, and disability?

- What novel disability and accessibility scholarship projects have been made, or are possible by virtual Social Networks? What new knowledge is possible through assistive-technology-related disability and accessibility research for universal users?

- Besides the functional innovations, what possibilities for play and improvisation are possible through assistive technologies and related research? How do such play and improvisation stabilize existing knowledge and directionally change the generation of new knowledge?

- Development of assistive technology tools or applications for "mainstream" purposes; rhetorics of assistive technologies; rhetorical histories of assistive technologies morphing into "mainstream" products; rhetorics of, or analyses of, consumer mobile technologies as assistive technologies; visions of assistive technologies for able-bodied users.

- Analyses of new models of Universal Design; benefits and/or analyses of disabled-centered participatory designs; position papers on innovative, crowd-sourced designs by and for the disabled.

- Generative research methods for evaluating accessible designs, products, and pedagogies; profiles or analyses of digital tools for disability activism, or community building; or experiments in fostering accessibility in learning, work, and research environments in college and beyond.

- We invite both textual and multimedia submissions employing interdisciplinary and creative approaches in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. Besides scholarly papers, the proposed submissions can consist of audio or visual presentations and interviews, dialogues, or conversations; creative/artistic works; manifestos; or other scholarly materials.

Call for Papers: Journal of Contemplative Inquiry (Special Issue on Intention, Method and Evaluation)


Casting International Students for Short Documentary

 
This is Kyung Seo Han, and I major in Television, Radio, and Film. For my graduation project, I'm producing a short documentary about how international students living in dorms survive in terms of food. So, I'm looking for two international students who would like to speak their opinions and experiences for my project. If you are willing to be filmed in the documentary, please email to khan02@syr.edu or contact to 315-436-0838. Thanks. (P.S. It would be also wonderful if you introduce me any friend who is willing to be filmed!)
 
 
Kyung Seo (Karoline) Han 
Syracuse University | 2015
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications | Television, Radio, and Film | B.A.

College of Arts and Sciences | Economics | B.A.

khan02@syr.edu | 315.436.0838

Recruitment for Study Looking at Effects of Childcare on Grandparents of Employed Adult Children

 
My name is Anna Lorys, and I am an undergraduate student in the Department of Psychology at the University of Georgia. My research lab is currently recruiting grandparents and their employed adult children for a paid research study examining the effects of grandchild care on health, well-being, and career outcomes. This study is funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 

I was hoping you might be willing to share information about our study with The Couple and Family Therapy Center. This study will provide valuable information on how families and organizations can best support the needs of grandparent caregivers and their employed adult children. This is a very important study, so we very much appreciate your time in helping us! Our flyer is attached if you would like to distribute it to your members.

To be eligible for the study, adult children must:

- Work at least 35 hours per week
- Have a child who receives care from a grandparent at least once per month

Grandparents must:

- Provide care to a grandchild at least once per month

Both the grandparent and the adult child must be willing to participate in this study, and both must reside in the United States.

Each participant will receive $30 in exchange for his or her participation in a survey and phone interview.

Those who are interested in participating can complete our screening questionnaire online at 
 
 
or can contact us at ebylab@uga.edu or 706-389-1202.

Thank you,


Anna Lorys
Undergraduate Student
Department of Psychology

University of Georgia


NEWS AND ANNOUNCMENTS

Special Issue "Community-based Rehabilitation and Community Rehabilitation"


AHEAD Welcomes New JPED Executive Editor

 
The Association on Higher Education And Disability (AHEAD) has selected Roger Wessel, Ph.D. to take over the helm as the Executive Editor of the Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability (JPED), the official peer reviewed journal of the association.
Dr. Wessel, a professor of higher education in the Department of Educational Studies at Ball State University's Teachers College, will officially replace outgoing JPED Executive Editor David R. Parker, Ph.D., on July 1, 2015. Dr. Parker has served as the JPED's Executive Editor for the past five years.  
 
"We can't begin to thank David enough for the work he has contributed to JPED as the executive editor," said AHEAD Executive Director Stephan Smith. "At the same time, we are very excited to know that the JPED will be under the excellent guidance of Roger."
 
Wessel brings a wealth of experience in higher education and disability issues to JPED. He has been a member of the JPED Editorial Board since 2012 and has contributed many articles to the publication.  Regarding his new appointment, Wessel added "I look forward to helping advance the mission of JPED and AHEAD. And, I trust this reflects positively on the Department of Educational Studies and Teachers College at Ball State University."
 
As the official journal of AHEAD, JPED is the leading forum for scholarship in the field of postsecondary disability resources and services.A refereed journal, the JPED has been published for nearly twenty years, bringing to the field scholarly publications on a variety of related topics that emphasize research, issues, and trends related to the theory and practice of postsecondary disability services. JPED is published four times a year, with a special issue that is created by a guest editor or team of guest editors, in close collaboration with the executive editor. For more information about JPED, including access to previous issues, please visit: http://ahead.org/publications/jped

TASH Executive Director’s Response to NYT Article on Re-institutionalization of People with Intellectual Disabilities



CIL-NET Presents...an IL Conversation via Teleconference

Promoting Disability Pride: Exploring the Evolution of Disability Culture

 I am a member of the national disability rights group ADAPT and the ADAPT Fun Run for disability rights is coming up in April!  

 For decades ADAPT has been fighting for disability rights. We’ve made great progress, but there's much more to do. The majority of us in ADAPT have disabilities. ALL of us have been discriminated against in employment, housing, & other areas. Some of my fellow ADAPT members have been forced into nursing facilities simply because of their disabilities. This is why is it so important for us to continue to fight for the rights of all people with disabilities who are discriminated against daily. 
 We fight to end discrimination. We fight for affordable, accessible, integrated housing. We fight for deinstitutionalization. We fight for the basic civil rights that so many take for granted. 
 We’re a bunch of passionate advocates that chant, chain ourselves to things (including the White House fence), & occasionally get arrested fighting for disability rights. 
 Your donation will help our advocacy efforts, including covering travel expenses, making sweet protest signs, & even some legal fees (so to past donors, thanks for bailing me out of jail!). 
 So that is why you should donate to ADAPT, but why should you donate to me as a Fun Runner? Well, here are a few reasons:
 1. I’m a cat lady. No joke. I have 4 cats. My life is basically 50% cats and 50% disability rights, so if you don’t want me to become a full blown cat lady – complete with cat sweaters – then please help me keep the fight for Disability Rights alive.
2. I’ve been challenged by my toddler nieces. My nieces, Charlee and Bella Rose, are also raising money for the ADAPT Fun Run for Disability Rights. They bet me that they could raise more money than me. Do you really want me to lose a bet to tiny humans that genuinely think that “airplanes can fly because… bubbles.” I mean, come on! That doesn’t even make sense!
3. I rarely take more than 3 showers per week. For real. This means I’m conserving our Earth’s water. Earth is running low on water and you need water to survive. I’m basically doing you a lifesaving favor. You’re welcome. You owe me. 
4. I’m no good to anyone when I’m in jail. Last Fall I was arrested in Little Rock, Arkansas twice in two days for civil disobedience because I was fighting for the right of people with disabilities to live in the community instead of being forced into nursing facilities against their will. If it wasn’t for generous donations from people like you to pay my bail and legal fees, I might be stuck in jail right now.  Then who would feed my cats?!?! Help me keep my cats fed by donating so that I can pay bail in the future.
5. If I raise at least $2000, I will donate at least 10 inches of my hair. First, my hair is pretty awesome, so donating it is a big deal, not only for me, but for whoever receives these luscious locks! Also, I’m a ginger, so by donating my hair I am essentially creating another ginger in this world. Gingers are like unicorns. Who doesn’t want the world to have more unicorns? You can help make this happen just by sponsoring me.
Still not convinced? That’s okay. I’m not above bribing/rewarding you for your generosity. So what’s in it for you? 
Everyone who donates to me, no matter the amount, will get the following:
1. A hand drawn picture by me. I’m a pretty stellar drawer. Ask people who donated in previous years.
2. A temporary tattoo, so you can be hardcore like me… at least temporarily. 
Anyone who donates at least $100 will get:
1. A picture of one or more of my cats doing something hilarious. Or evil. More likely evil actually.
2. One secret, surprise gift. You won’t know what it is or when it’s coming, but you won’t be disappointed.*
The person who donates the highest amount will get some added bonuses, including:
1. A ride in one of my wheelchairs. This is quite a reward considering my chairs are the prettiest & coolest chairs ever.  
2. Dinner with me. You can even sit in my chair while we eat & do wheelies because you’re a rock star. 
3. A kitten mug. Who doesn’t want a mug with a kitten on it? 
It’s easy to donate.  Just use this link: http://adaptfunrun.net/runner/message/398# and donate what you can. 
In the end, the most important thing is that your sponsorship will help us to fight for disability rights. 
Sincerely, 
Stephanie 
Oh. Ps.  Remember, your donation is tax deductible
 
* Well, you might be disappointed if you don’t appreciate how thoughtful and/or hysterical I am.

Flexibility & Its DiscontentsRethinking Disability in Academic Spaces

 
What does it mean to create access in institutional spaces?
 
A free lecture featuring
 
Margaret Price
Associate Professor of English, Spelman College
 
Stephanie Kerschbaum
Assistant Professor of English, University of Delaware
 
Monday, March 2
7:00pm
Walsh Building, Room 495
Georgetown University
1221 36th Street NW, Washington D.C. 20057
 
 
 
What does it mean to create access in institutional spaces? In architecture and education, "universal design" has been put forth as one important strategy. Margaret Price and Stephanie Kerschbaum will elaborate--but complicate--universal design approaches to "disability access in higher education" by touching on examples of their own scholarship and activism in the academy. Ultimately, they aim to create a participatory environment in which attendees imagine more accessible possibilities for the institutional spaces they inhabit and help build.
 
Stephanie L. Kerschbaum is an assistant professor of English at the University of Delaware. Her book, Toward a New Rhetoric of Difference, was recently awarded the 2015 Advancement of Knowledge Award from the Conference on College Composition and Communication. She has published on disability disclosure and access in venues including Profession, Academe, Kairos, and Rhetoric Review. The recipient of a 2014-2015 American Fellowship from the American Association of University Women, she is currently at work with Margaret Price on a collaborative interview study of disabled faculty.
 
Margaret Price is an associate professor of English at Spelman College, where she teaches rhetoric, composition, and creative nonfiction. Her areas of specialization include disability studies, qualitative research methodologies, and digital accessibility. Her book Mad at School: Rhetorics of Mental Disability and Academic Life (University of Michigan Press) won the Outstanding Book Award from CCCC. Reviews, annotations and commentary have appeared in College Composition and Communication; the Literature, Arts, and Medicine Database; Disability Studies Quarterly; the Social Science Research Network; and Composition Forum. She holds a PhD in rhetoric/composition from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, an MFA in fiction writing from the University of Michigan, and a BA from Amherst College. 
 
Access Information: 
ASL Interpretation will be provided! Building is wheelchair accessible, but there is only one elevator and it is slow. NO flash photography at any time. Please refrain from wearing scented/fragranced products for the safety and comfort of others. 
 
This panel is sponsored by the Lecture Fund of Georgetown University, the Doyle Program: Engaging Difference (Film & Culture Series), the Lannan Center for Poetics & Social Practice, the Georgetown University Department of English, the Lecture & Performance Series on Disability Justice, the Center for New Designs in Learning & Scholarship, Leaders in Education About Diversity (LEAD), the Engelhard Program, and the Academic Resource Center.

Disability Rights International (DRI) research reveals shocking abuses against women with disabilities in Mexico City

 
Washington, DC -- February 25, 2015 -- Today DRI released a groundbreaking reportAbuse and Denial of Sexual and Reproductive Rights of Women with Psychosocial Disabilities in Mexico, the result of a study by DRI and the Women's Committee of the Colectivo Chuhcan - the first advocacy group in Mexico run by people with psychosocial disabilities.

The report found that an appalling 40% of the women interviewed - all with psychosocial or psychiatric disabilities - had been forcibly, surgically sterilized or had been coerced by their families to undergo the procedure. Additionally, over 40% also reported being abused by their gynecologist, which included sexual assault and rape.


"These are egregious human rights violations perpetrated against women with disabilities - violations of their sexual and reproductive rights which have long been ignored," said Priscila Rodriguez, DRI's Director of the Women's Rights Initiative for the Americas. 


In 2014, DRI found an institution for children with disabilities in Mexico, Casa Experanza, which had a policy of forced sterilization of every girl admitted to the facility.  DRI brought this practice to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which condemned Mexico for the practice of sterilizing women with disabilities and denying them the legal right to make choices for themselves.


"After over two decades of investigating abuses against people with disabilities, it is DRI's experience that the main reason for forced sterilization is to cover up sexual abuse against women and girls by preventing pregnancy," stated Eric Rosenthal, founder and Executive Director of DRI.  "We are calling on the government of Mexico to address this urgent matter and guarantee that women have access to safe and consensual reproductive health care."


Click here to read the report. 

Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry

Assessment of 2014, Looking Forward to 2015
(you can open or save this WORD document, directly from this link)

Keith A. Alford Honored for Activism and Service

 
Last fall, Social Work Degree Guide published a listing of its“30 Most Influential Social Workers Alive Today.” The magazine, which provides information and guidance on social work education and careers, described the honorees as “experts who instigate awareness and advocate for those affected by social disadvantage, such as poverty, abuse, illness, disability or social injustice.” Falk College Associate Professor of Social Work Keith A. Alford was listed ninth on this compilation that includes educators, activists, authors and public servants.
 
Alford teaches undergraduate and graduate-level courses in human diversity, social work intervention, field instruction, family mental health and social work practice with black families. His students and colleagues also recognize him as a community advocate with leadership service to organizations that include board membership with the Onondaga County Public Library and AccessCNY (formerly Enable/TLS), which provides support for children and adults with disabilities. He facilitates the Community-Wide Dialogues on Race sponsored by InterFaith Works of Central New York, an organization that builds bridges of understanding among people of different religions and across racial divides, where he also sits on the board of directors.
 
In recognition of his ongoing community service and advocacy, he will receive the 2015 Harriet Tubman Spirit Award from the Bethany Baptist Church on Thursday, Feb. 26, at 7 p.m. at 149 Beattie St. The award presentation is part of the church’s annual Turning Another Page (TAP) Festival, taking place Feb. 26-28 in commemoration of Black History Month. On Feb. 28, Alford will be a featured panelist discussing the film “The House I Live In,” which will be shown that evening at 6 p.m. in the church sanctuary. The documentary offers a detailed look at the profound human rights implications of the war on drugs.
 
Earlier this year, Alford’s co-edited book, “Rural Families and Reshaping Human Services,” was released, providing essential strategies and programs to address the needs of families in rural communities in a time when services are being dismantled and diminished. Originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Family Social Work, the book organizes its chapters by identification of the needs of rural families, addressing disparities in rural areas, practice in rural communities and human service organizations and professionals. It includes a chapter by Falk College professor of social work Deborah Monahan  titled “Family Caregivers for Seniors in Rural Areas.”
 
Alford’s areas of research specialization include mental health service delivery to children and families, culturally specific programming for children in out-of-home care, contemporary rites of passage programming and loss/grief reactions among African American families. He currently serves on the editorial review board of the Journal of Brief Therapy and the Journal of Family Social Work. He received his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University and is a licensed independent social worker for the state of Ohio. He is an active member of the Council on Social Work Education and the National Association of Social Workers as well as an affiliate member of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.
 

Atlantic article from the past; recently recirculated: Understanding Deafness: Not Everyone Wants to Be 'Fixed'


Education – Restraint and Seclusion Bill Introduced in the House of Representatives

Representative Don Beyer (D-VA) introduced the Keeping All Students Safe Act (H.R. 927) on February 12.  This bill would establish minimum standards that: prohibit elementary and secondary school personnel from using any physical, mechanical, or chemical restraint that restricts breathing or aversive behavioral intervention that compromise student health and safety; prohibit school personnel from using physical restraint or seclusion, unless there is imminent danger of physical injury to the student or others; require school personnel to receive crisis intervention training and certification; prohibit physical restraint or seclusion from being written into a student's education plan, individual safety plan, behavioral plan, or individual education program (IEP) as a planned intervention; and require schools to establish procedures to notify parents in a timely manner if physical restraint or seclusion is imposed on their child.

Canadian Restaurant Hires All Deaf Waitstaff, Makes Customers Order In Sign Language (Video)


New Book of Interest: Becoming a Person: The Biography of Robert Martin


The 6th Annual Arts Experience: A Festival Celebrating Inclusion & the ArtsMarch 30-April 10, 2015


http://www.hws.edu/festival/

All activities take place on the Hobart & William Smith Colleges campus and are free, accessible, and open to the public.


Online registration will be open soon at 
http://www.hws.edu/festival/. A follow up email will announce when it is available.
Some sessions have a maximum capacity and may fill up quickly, so please register online early.

The ARTS Experience cultivates and embraces the spirit of inclusion through participation in the arts, artistic performance, and celebration.
 The festival is a partnership of Hobart and William Smith Colleges and the Collaborative of the Finger Lakes, Inc (representing 12 NYSARC chapters providing supports to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities).

For more information, please contact co-coordinators Roseann Moffe and Mary Kelly at
 ARTSFESTIVAL@hws.edu or 315-781-4590

Co-sponsors: HWS Office of the Provost - Global Initiative on Disability, The Collaborative of the Finger Lakes, Inc., HWS Education Department, HWS Dance Department

Disability Scoop 2.20.15


Help Reform ADA TAP

 
ADA TAP reform legislation did not make it into the governor’s budget.  However, all is not lost and the fight has just begun.  Our strategy is to first try to get a legislative remedy by having them recommend that changes to the ADA TAP program be included in the final passage of the negotiated 2015-16 NYS budget.   We can do so very easily by generating emails and letters and phone calls to our state representatives.
What is ADA TAP?
Established in 1998, ADA TAP recognizes the population of TAP eligible students who, because of disability-related reasons, are unable to attend college full-time, and makes it possible for them to receive a partial award if they are enrolled in as few as three credits.
 
Why are we pushing for ADA TAP Reform?
Unfortunately, the present TAP implementation rules have the unintended consequence of making the program practically inaccessible to the very students the ADA TAP program was designed to support. Currently the same progress standard is used for both part-time and full-time students, making it impossible for ADA TAP students to attain the required pursuit and completion rates necessary to remain eligible, since they are enrolled in fewer credits. This is what we seek to change!
 
WHAT CAN YOU DO?
Please connect to the following link and input your home address and information. Your letter will be automatically generated to the appropriate representatives in your home district.
If you do not know your zip code go to https://tools.usps.com/go/ZipLookupAction!input.action
This takes two minutes!!!
 
OR you can send an individual letter
To determine your NYS Assembly and Senator you simply can go to:  http://www.elections.ny.gov/district-map/district-map.html  enter your address (home) and zip code and then press go.  Click both on both the Senate and Assembly separately for each member’s email address, and other contact information.   Letters, emails and phone calls and local office visits.   
You can also send a letter to these key players for greater impact! 
Kenneth Lavalle  - Chair of the Senate’s Committee on Higher Education, lavalle@nysenate.gov
Deborah Glick, - Assembly, Chair, Higher Education Committee, GlickD@assembly.state.ny.us
David Weprin- Disability TASK Force ,  NYS Assembly weprind@assembly.state.ny.us

ACTION ALERT: Responses to NYTimes Op-Ed Needed (“call” courtesy of the Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law)

 
February 20, 2015 - An op-ed headlined "The Modern Asylum" in The New York Times this week has sparked much discussion and concern in the mental health and disabilities communities. The piece endorses ideas put forth recently in a JAMA editorial subtitled "Bring Back the Asylum." In addition to repeating the call for reverting to long-term institutionalization for people with mental illness, the Times op-ed proposes including people with intellectual disabilities as well. You can read it here:
 

 There are many responses to the op-ed in the comments section. It would be helpful for as many people as possible to offer their comments about what a bad idea this is.

 IT ALSO WOULD BE VERY USEFUL FOR AS MANY ORGANIZATIONS AS POSSIBLE TO SEND A SHORT LETTER TO THE EDITOR RESPONDING TO THIS OP-ED.  LTEs should be 150-175 words - only a couple of paragraphs.  The more LTEs they get opposing the ideas that are promoted in the op-ed, the more likely they are to publish some of these.  Also it's important for the editorial board to hear from a ton of people in order to understand how far out of the mainstream and widely rejected the idea of expanding long-term institutionalization is. 

 PLEASE SUBMIT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.  Instructions for submitting a letter to the editor are here:

Points the letters can make include:
  • We have years of experience with community services that work, and the problem is that they are under-funded and in short supply, not that people with disabilities belong in institutions
  • Public policies should emphasize proven treatment that promotes recovery and services and support that empower people to make their own life choices and participate fully in their communities
We should not go back to the failed policies of long-term institutionalization that cannot provide individualized care and lead to restraint and seclusion, over-medication and other abuses

DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: February 15-21, 2015

 
From DREAM: Disability Rights, Education, Activism, and Mentoring
Sponsored by the Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University
 -------------------------------
Weekly Email Update on Issues Related to Disability and Higher Education 
Week of February 15-21, 2015
-------------------------------
 Disability and higher education in the news (in no particular order):
* Student complaints have prompted an Office of Civil Rights investigation at Boston College into whether the campus has systematically discriminated against people with disabilities, including poor accessibility in new construction and inadequate responses to complaints:http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/18/boston-college-disability-access_n_6708034.html  (more information about the Disability Awareness Committee of Boston College is at https://www.facebook.com/BC.disabilityawareness)
 
* For many college students with disabilities, apps are becoming a necessity for academics and campus life:http://college.usatoday.com/2015/02/13/mobile-apps-giving-disabled-students-more-academic-independence/
 
* Advice for prospective college students with mental or emotional health-related disabilities and their parents:http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-hlth-0218-mental-illness-college-20150212-story.html#page=1
 
* Kevin Butler’s muscular dystrophy led him to pursue a career as an engineer designing robotics and adaptive technology for disabled people, but the transfer from accessible Palomar College to inaccessible California State Polytechnic University Pomona has been a challenge academically and personally: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2015/feb/20/engineering-student-uses-disability-to-help-others/
 
* The National Disability Institute has partnered with other national organizations to create an ABLE Resource Center, to provide information about the ABLE Act: http://www.realeconomicimpact.org/News.aspx?id=476
 
* The most expensive private college in the U.S.?  It’s Landmark College, which is exclusively for students with diagnoses of learning disabilities, including dyslexia and ADHD: http://www.takepart.com/photos/10-most-expensive-private-colleges-america/1-landmark-college
 
* A new study in the UK finds 50% of college student leaves (called “intermissions”) are health-related, but many campuses are treating medical and emotional issues like disciplinary concerns: http://www.cherwell.org/news/oxford/2015/02/13/investigation-student-intermission
 
* Chanel Washington writes about all the inaccessible social events she’s invited to attend as a senior at Harvard University – only 12 of the dorms (“houses”) are even accessible, and she can’t get in most restaurants, either: http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2015/2/20/senior-bars-perpetuate-exclusive/
 
* Critics of Virginia’s bill to prevent campus suicides continue to gain attention, with the legislation requiring schools to report suicidal tendencies to parents;  see The Chronicle of Higher Education (article only available by subscription at http://chronicle.com/article/Should-Colleges-Report/190017/?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en), The Tennessee chapter of the Association on Higher Education And Disability (https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?id=179600572066328&story_fbid=1060710203955356), and the newspaper of the University of South Florida (http://www.usforacle.com/news/view.php/861000/EDITORIAL-Reporting-students-suicidal-te)
 
* Astrophysicist Matthew Schneps is researching how dyslexics’ innate abilities may be attributes in the sciences, and how they should be entering higher education and STEM fields: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/7-things-you-wont-know-dyslexia-liz-dunoon
 
* New federal legislation proposes requirements informing parents about all the implications of alternative diplomas, which usually lower academic expectations and make higher education almost impossible: http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2015/02/18/lawmakers-alternative-diplomas/20072/
 
* How does a Deaf scientist navigate the hearing scientific community?  Chemistry professor and researcher Dr. Dan Lundberg shares his experiences: http://www.asbmb.org/asbmbtoday/201502/Features/SignLanguage/
 
* Student Lydia Brown has created a 10-question survey for Georgetown University Student Association candidates to share their views on disability (and, in at least one case, to “out” themselves as having a hidden disability): one sample of responses is athttp://www.autistichoya.com/2015/02/sara-ryan.html
 
* Despite being accepted into Terra State Community College’s nursing program, using disability services, and having a 3.7 GPA, just weeks after arriving, the program dismissed Shirley Parrott-Copus for being hard-of-hearing: http://www.toledonewsnow.com/Clip/11109045/hearing-impaired-woman-denied-in-nursing-program
 
* The University of California, Davis has created a safe space for undocumented college students to get legal assistance, mental health counseling, and other services: http://diverseeducation.com/article/69848/?utm_campaign=Diverse%20Newsletter%203&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua&elq=552d9d2102c140e9b21cafb50cd3dd96&elqCampaignId=415
 
* College student Emma Pretzel decided to respond to a Twitter campaign of Autism Speaks, celebrating its 10th anniversary – joining neurodiverse people in taking the campaign in a VERY different direction that the marketing campaign intended.  Emma’s posts are athttps://emmapretzel.wordpress.com/2015/02/21/once-upon-a-time-on-twitter/ and you can follow #AutismSpeaks10 to see everyone’s tweets.
 
* A new report in Ireland says 60% of disability services providers there believe academics do not do enough to include students with disabilities in courses, and rates of students with disabilities are falling: https://uk.news.yahoo.com/college-lecturers-accused-not-doing-enough-students-disabilities-191652624.html#sXZGkgO
 
* A bill in the Florida Senate would set up state-wide higher education programs for students with intellectual disabilities, with a state center to coordinate them: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/politics/political-pulse/os-college-plan-for-disabled-students-advances-in-legislature-20150216-post.html
 
* Deaf professor Dr. Barbara Kannapell explains how her work created an understanding of Deaf people using American Sign Language as “bilingual” people (video not captioned or audio described for non-Deaf viewers, but there is a link below the video that leads to a full transcript):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzwKg8LczSM
 
* Angela Braden, who also blogs and does motivational speaking about being African-American and blind, received an Adjunct Faculty Excellence Award from Lone Star College: http://www.yourhoustonnews.com/kingwood/news/blind-college-professor-at-lsc-kingwood-honored-with-faculty-excellence/article_61ef55a9-e36e-5c12-a18e-4b4b72551771.html
 
* After struggling to frame mental health issues positively, students at the University of Virginia create a Harry Potter themed Patronus Project and discuss mental illness through an “everyone has dementors” framework to try to reduce stigma for the university’s first mental health week:http://www.dailyprogress.com/news/local/uva/harry-potter-themed-program-at-uva-takes-aim-at-mental/article_abb9073a-b7d9-11e4-a211-cf7951658506.html
 
* One student spends her gap year before college raising a guide dog for Maine’s Guiding Eyes for the Blind:http://www.qconline.com/life/south_of_20/chicago-teen-sees-gap-year-success/article_2e523b5a-677c-5e40-ad5d-75f4b150a593.html
 
* Did you know Helen Keller was the first deafblind person to graduate from college?  Seven other fascinating facts about this woman who is more complicated than most people realize: http://www.perkins.org/stories/blog/seven-fascinating-facts-you-probably-didnt-know-about-helen-keller
 
And a few related items of possible interest to college students:
* Obama’s minimum wage order will include workers with disabilities: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2014/02/12/obama-disabled-workers-subminimum-wage/5409927/
 
* A cool new ad from Comcast illustrates the Wizard of Oz as imagined by a young girl who is blind (video has captions and is audio described by the girl herself): http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2015/02/20/academy-awards-ad-pitch/20079/.  And here’s an article about how more Oscar-nominated movies are being audio described, even though we have a long way to go:http://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/movies/2015/02/19/oscarsblind/UPGHe0Os7xAUgqPctQLIzM/story.html
 
* 21 problems only people with asthma will understand, from “It Ain’t Easy Bein’ Wheezy”: http://www.buzzfeed.com/candacelowry/problems-only-people-with-asthma-will-understand#.op7NMK5aZ
 
* Frustrated trying to get the Windows 8 software’s voices and language packages just right?  Here’s an online tutorial for you (for Windows 8 and 8.1): https://sellfy.com/p/3SpB/
 
* Despite a nationwide crackdown on witch doctors who believe their body parts are necessary for potions, Albino Tanzanians continue to be kidnapped and killed (trigger warning: descriptions of violent killings; video not captioned or audio described): http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-31518397
 
* A 13-year old blind boy convinces Australia to print tactile banknotes: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-02-18/13yo-blind-boy-successfully-campaigns-for-tactile-banknotes/6144262
 
* The story of Lucy Glennon’s death in the UK, and how her battles with the effects of welfare reforms show the real effects of budget cuts for people with disabilities: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/feb/17/lucy-glennon-disability-activist-real-effects-of-cuts
 
* Painter Jeremy Sicile-Kira is autistic and has synesthesia, where emotions, numbers, words, or sounds can be experienced as colors, smells, or other senses: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/chantal-sicile-kira/its-not-easy-being-green_b_3652680.html
 
* A Dwarf Fashion Show debuted last year in Paris, and this year it arrived in NYC: http://www.glammonitor.com/2015/02/13/dwarf-fashion-show-debut/
* Following up on Valentine’s Day, a few disabled people in the UK discuss awkward disability-related moments in dating:http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-ouch-31421248
 
* Many college students, staff, and faculty with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome have to fight to get accommodations for their controversial illness, but a new panel says it’s definitely a disease and it should be called “Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease” to reflect its seriousness:http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/02/11/385465667/panel-says-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-is-a-disease-and-renames-it?sc=17?f=1128&utm_source=iosnewsapp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=app
 
* Melbourne writer and TV presenter Carly Findlay has a serious chronic skin condition called Ichthyosis, and every day for the past six months she’s been taking pictures of what she wears as part of an Australian “Syling You” campaign to show “the real you” in women’s everyday clothing:http://carlyfindlay.blogspot.com/2015/02/why-i-post-photos-of-my-every-day-style.html
 
* The volunteer-based Museum Access Consortium in New York City is working to improve disability access and inclusion for all of the city’s museums, and you can help: http://www.cityaccessny.org/mac.php
 
* One blogger and journalist suggests that FCC decisions about net neutrality could have radical implications for people with disabilities (http://serotalk.com/2015/02/18/why-killing-net-nutrality-will-hurt-the-disabled/), which is interesting timing since the FCC just set up an advisory panel to help them better serve people with disabilities (http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2015/02/17/fcc-focus-disabilities/20065/)
 
 
* The BBC receives numerous complaints after changes to its Internet radio programs left many listeners unable to access stations, including people who are blind and visually impaired: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-31487515
 
* A new reading software targeting students with dyslexia, ADHD, and visual impairments is starting trials in higher education, offering disability services offices free software for students: http://www.beelinereader.com/
 
* You know about LGBTQ marriage equality, but what about marriage equality for people with disabilities?  Here’s a video of one couple sharing their story of wanting to be married without losing Medicaid services (video not captioned or audio described): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGk3yRTSF2k
 
* Wheelchair skateboarding?  Yeah, that’s a thing…and it’s pretty cool (video not captioned or audio described):https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=705553159558019&set=vb.690005867779415&type=2&theater
 
* A new book proudly shows Japanese women amputees, who are traditionally perceived as objects of shame instead of beauty:http://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/2015/02/06/lifestyle/amputee-women-japan-proudly-step-forward/#.VOis-S73SXc
 
* One activist’s disturbing story about trying to get help for his bipolar affective disorder in Uganda (video not captioned or audio described; trigger warning for violent responses to mental and emotional differences: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-31557295
 
* A new pen can create 3-D images, so imagine the possibilities for blind and visually impaired people (video not captioned or audio described):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emUlHFWcHck
 
* Neurologist Dr. Sandra Block discusses how ADHD is becoming more “normal” in children, but why we need to talk about ADHD in adults – which prompted her to write a mystery novel where the protagonist is a psychiatrist with ADHD: http://www.livescience.com/49832-adhd-is-the-new-normal.html
 
* Life with a traumatic brain injury – one woman writes about life a year after her injury, and tells her story so people realize it was not “just a concussion”: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amy-zellmer/life-with-a-traumatic-brain-injury_b_6580812.html
 
 
 
For more information about DREAM or the Taishoff Center, contact:
Wendy Harbour (wharbour@syr.edu)
Or check out the DREAM website at http://dream.syr.edu
To subscribe or unsubscribe to the DREAM email list, fill out the form at http://dream.syr.edu/contact-us.html and ask to join or leave the listserv.
 
By the way, please don't presume DREAM, the Taishoff Center, or Syracuse University agree with everything in these links we send out - we're just passing along the information so you can form your own opinions.  Thanks.

Why Disability Advocates Say No to Doctor-Assisted Death


Two analyses of AB 128 (Nevada's proposed medical power of attorney for people with intellectual disabilities)

 
Disability and Abuse Project: Disability and Guardianship Project
Below is an excerpt taken from the “What’s New” page of the website of the Disability and Abuse Project.
The legal critique was sent to members of the listserv on Friday.  However, the clinical critique by Dr. Baladerian was not.  This is new.  In my opinion, Nora’s comprehensive review of the bill is the more powerful of the two.  It raises serious concerns about the implications of AB 128 and how it increases the risk of abuse to members of this vulnerable population.
Analysis of AB 128 (Nevada bill on medical powers of attorney)
Two separate analyses are being published by our projects about Assembly Bill 128, a proposal to authorize a new form to be used for medical powers of attorney for adults with intellectual disabilities.  The bill is being heard on February 23 in the Assembly Judiciary Committee of the Nevada Legislature.
An analysis by attorney Thomas F. Coleman raises legal concerns about the bill.  A critique by Dr. Nora Baladerian raises clinical concerns. 


Boston’s busing history to be taught in schools: Painful chapter now in class plan


Working with People Who Have Experienced Domestic/Sexual Violence & Chemical Dependency.

Tuesday, March 10th. Peck Hall, 601 East Genesee Street, Syracuse, New York. Part 1, 9 AM - noon, addresses dynamics of domestic and sexual violence as well as addiction awareness. Part 2, 1 - 4 PM, enables participants to develop clinical skills and supportive practices. $25 for Part 1 or Part 2, $55 for both. For more information, email Ashley Skolky or call 315-425-0818 extension 254.

Mobility International is Hiring

 
MIUSA is seeking a full-time Chief operating officer who is passionate about disability rights and international issues. Please assist us to reach leaders interested in being part of a high-impact, cutting-edge organization located in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. The full posting is online at www.miusa.org/employment.


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS