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Weekly Newsletter

September, 25 2017

INDEX



The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

School of Education Event

DK Co-sponsored Event with LGBT Studies

Cold Case Justice Initiative Event

Invitation to participate in faculty and graduate student of color dialogue

Upcoming Campus Event (Cosponsored by DCC)

SU Schedule of Free Movies for the remainder of the semester.

SU NEWS

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program is seeking applicants for a Teaching Assistant for the academic year 2015 - 2016.

LGBT Concerns Committee of Syracuse University Senate Seeks New Members

SU NEWS: Brownbag Series Concludes with 'Mindfulness Goes to School'

SU NEWS: Chancellor's Award for Public Engagement and Scholarship

Link to FREE FOOD @ SU Facebook group.

2015 "Cripping" the Comic Con registration is now open!

 Updated DCC Inclusive Events Guide

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Now accepting proposals: ACCESSING HIGHER GROUND 2015

CFP Reminder, InVisible Culture Issue 24: Vulnerability

Call for Study Participants

Summer 2015 Research Program

CFP - Special Issue of *Jeunesse* on Mobility

Multiple Perspectives Registration Open: 27 sessions

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Involving Families in LGBT Youth Suicide Prevention featuring “Always My Son,”

DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: February 22-28, 2015

Rule Out Abuse Campaign

NEWSFEED Listserv members,

Shaping the Future of Syracuse Parks: New Directions in Parks Planning

Disability.gov Seeks Participants for Its Third “No Boundaries” Photo Project

Disability Documented: Powerful Films for Educators

CONSORTIUM FOR CULTURE AND MEDICINE SEMINAR

Disability Scoop 3.3.15

An exciting series from the HBCU Disability Consortium and AHEAD - starting March 11, 2015!

Virtual Career Fair for People with Disabilities - April 14th (Full-time, Intern, & Co-op Jobs)

Disability Scoop 3.4.15

Advocacy Outcry Over New York Times Op-Ed Touting Return To Institutions

Smart buildings: Architects using brain science for design guidance

As High-Tech Teaching Catches On, Students With Disabilities Can Be Left Behind

Are you a student with a disability?

Employment Opportunities at the Center for Disability Rights

Disability Studies Quarterly Vol 35, No 1 (2015) is now available at the following link: 

Disability Scoop 2.27.15

Creating a Mindful Campus 2015: Mindfulness in Action

Immediate Action Needed! ADA TAP Reform


SU HAPPENINGS

School of Education Event

Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz and Lalitha Vasudevan 
"Youth, Media and Educational Justice: Cultivating Wellbeing Through Collaborative Inquiry"
Monday, March 16 
4pm Maxwell Auditorium, 
Access to sound educational opportunities continues to be a challenging goal for young people who are already embroiled in the complicated systems of foster care and juvenile justice, whom we identify as court-involved youth. In this talk, we share examples from our experience as co-teachers of a yearlong, participatory seminar in which we bring together graduate students and court-involved youth in an attempt to create opportunities for inquiry, understanding, and support of the young people’s educational wellbeing.
Lalitha Vasudevan is Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Program in Communication, Media, and Learning Technologies Design at Teachers College, Columbia University. She studies the narrative and communicative practices of adolescents and focuses particularly on the lives young people involved the juvenile justice system. Recently, she co-edited Arts, Media, and Justice: Multimodal explorations with youth (2013, Peter Lang) and is currently writing a book about education, multimodal play, and belonging in the lives of court-involved youth.
Dr. Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz is an Assistant Professor of English Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Concerned with Equity Pedagogy, her work examines the racial literacy knowledge of teachers, the development of culturally responsive pedagogy, and the literate identities of Black and Latino male high school students.
This event is free and open to the public. Free parking available in the University Avenue Garage. CART Open Captioning Services will be provided. Accessible poster attached.

DK Co-sponsored Event with LGBT Studies

Performing Black Masculinities and Same-Sex Desires 
A Humanities Center Spring Symposium
Wednesday, March 18-Thursday March 19
E. Patrick Johnson, Carlos Montezuma Professor of Performance Studies and African American Studies, Northwestern University
Jeffrey Q. McCune, Associate Professor of Performing Arts and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Washington University, St. Louis.
Pouring Tea: Black Gay Men of the South Tell Their Tales
Performance by E. Patrick Johnson 
Wednesday, March 18
7:00pm Community Folk Art Center, 805 East Genesee St.
CART TRANSCRIPTION WILL BE PROVIDED FOR HEARING ACCESSIBILITY
Breakfast seminar on Black Queer Studies
Thursday, March 19 
9:30am 304 Tolley
Professors Johnson and McCune will facilitate an informal seminar on the state of black queer studies, including discussion of issues around methodological innovation and professionalization. 
Thursday, March 19 - Sexual Discretion: Black Masculinity and the Politics of Passing
5:30pm, 123 Sims 
Lecture by Jeffrey Q. McCune
CART TRANSCRIPTION WILL BE PROVIDED FOR HEARING ACCESSIBILITY

Cold Case Justice Initiative Event

Photographer Matt Herron
“I’m Walking for Freedom: The Selma March and Voting Rights”
Monday March 23
Maxwell Auditorium 

4:30-6:30 pm. 

Free and all are welcome. 

Co-sponsored by the Cold Case Justice Initiative, The Department of History, Lightworks, and the Community Folk Art Center in the Department of African American Studies.

Invitation to participate in faculty and graduate student of color dialogue

 
Presumed Incompetent: A Conversation on Navigating Academia
Wednesday March 25, 2015
6pm
HLL 111
 
Dinner will be provided. Attendees must RSVP to Mary Rose Go (mmgo@syr.edu) by Friday March 20, 2015.

Upcoming Campus Event (Cosponsored by DCC)

 
“Unscripted Conversations” is a campus wide dialogue opportunity for students to engage in conversations about issues of contemporary and social relevance. Our first dialogue conversation will be on Wednesday, March 25th at 8 pm in the Jabberworky Café. The theme for that conversation is “Language Bias.” Food and beverages will be served. Please RSVP to kareneau@syr.edu by Friday, March 20th.

SU Schedule of Free Movies for the remainder of the semester.

All movies start at midnight and are shown in Gifford Auditorium:

March 20—Big Hero 6
March 21—The Hobbit – The Battle of the Five Armies

March 27—Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb

March 28—Inherent Vice

April 3—Birdman

April 4—American Sniper

April 10—The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water

April 11—Unbroken

April 17—Hot Tub Time Machine 2

April 18—The Wedding Ringer

April 24—50 Shades of Grey

April 25—50 Shades of Grey


SU NEWS

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program is seeking applicants for a Teaching Assistant for the academic year 2015 - 2016.

 
Applicants must be advanced doctoral students who have completed all coursework and thus do not need tuition scholarship. The position comes with a stipend and standard graduate assistantship benefits (except for tuition credits) for the academic year. The Teaching Assistant will work with LGBT Studies faculty on the two core courses in the minor, QSX111 Queer Histories, Communities, Politics (Fall 2015) and QSX112 Sexualities, Genders, Bodies (Spring 2016).
 
Applicants must be matriculated in a PhD program at Syracuse University and have strong qualifications in the humanities and/or social sciences. In addition to a resume/CV and the name and email address of an SU faculty member who can serve as a reference, applicants should provide a cover letter briefly describing prior teaching experience, pedagogy/philosophy of teaching and background in LGBT Studies.
 
Please email all inquiries and applications to  Roger Hallas, Director, LGBT Studies Program. The deadline for applications is Friday, March 6, 2015.

LGBT Concerns Committee of Syracuse University Senate Seeks New Members

 
The LGBT Concerns Committee of the Syracuse University Senate seeks new members for the Fall 2015-Spring 2016 academic year.  Faculty and staff members as well as graduate and undergraduate students are welcome to participate and need not be elected members of the Senate to take part. The Committee has championed initiatives to increase academic and social programming, to guarantee partner benefit equity, and to make student services and housing more welcoming of people with diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.  Our current campaign focuses on improving the climate for student-athletes and athletic department staff members.  If you are interested in joining the committee, please contact one of the co-chairs, Rachel Fox von Swearingen or Francine D'Amico.

SU NEWS: Brownbag Series Concludes with 'Mindfulness Goes to School'


SU NEWS: Chancellor's Award for Public Engagement and Scholarship


Link to FREE FOOD @ SU Facebook group.

All members of the Syracuse area community are welcome to join. Admin required to approve request as a preventative measure against spam.

2015 "Cripping" the Comic Con registration is now open!

 
Registration for "Cripping" the Comic Con 2015 is now open!  You can register now at:
 
For more information on our scheduled keynotes, visit our website at:


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Now accepting proposals: ACCESSING HIGHER GROUND 2015

April 25 Deadline for Proposals
Accessing Higher Ground: Accessible Media, Web & Technology Conference
November 16 - 20, 2015

CFP Reminder, InVisible Culture Issue 24: Vulnerability



Please take a look at the CFP for InVisible Culture Issue 24: 
"Vulnerability," on our website. Attached, you can find our new CFP in pdf. Feel free to share and circulate it widely!

“Vulnerability” – Issue 24

For its twenty-fourth issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly

articles and creative works that explore the concept of vulnerability.

Almost two weeks after Thomas Eric Duncan’s plane landed in Dallas from Liberia in late September, the

Centers for Disease Control announced the first case of Ebola in the United States. News feeds

immediately jumped at the report, the Dow Jones plunged 266 points and petitions to ban flights from

Ebola-stricken countries have since been circulating across social media platforms. From ISIS to the crisis

in Ukraine to employment security, the media’s pronouncement of threats posed by vulnerabilities (and

certain invisibilities) are ubiquitous. It is worth considering, however, what the stakes are in maintaining

such rhetoric, and whether it is possible to imagine alternatives. As urgency slips into a normative state

of being, for Issue 24, we would like contributors to explore the various meanings of vulnerability. Are

there critical practices which uniquely encourage or discourage vulnerability? Can we imagine

vulnerability as a position of power? How does visual culture hold accountable social or political

processes that produce states of precarity? What are the stakes in protecting technological

vulnerabilities? How does the diffusion of images enable personal and social vulnerabilities?

We welcome papers and artworks that further the various understandings of vulnerability. Possible

topics of exploration include, but are not limited to:

• Vulnerability in artistic or scholarly production

• Labor, shelter, healthcare, and economic precarities

• Biological, affective, and political contagion

• Climate change and the environment

• International trade and policy agreements

• Network and technological vulnerabilities

• Sharing and distribution of personal information

• Political transparency

• States of emergency, endangerment, crisis, war, and risk

Please send completed papers (with references following the guidelines from the Chicago Manual

of Style) of between 4,000 and 10,000 words to ivc[dot]rochester[at]gmail[dot]com by March

20th, 2015. Inquiries should be sent to the same address.


Many thanks!

InVisible Culture
503A Morey Hall
University of Rochester
Rochester, NY 14627

Call for Study Participants

If you are 18 or older, identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB), and reside in the United States or a US territory, please participate in a national and anonymous on-line survey study on LGB strengths and positive aspects of being LGB. The study (IRB#2015-051) is being conducted by Dr. Darrell Greene and Dr. Paula Britton, through John Carroll University and the JCU Counseling Department. The study will take about 20 minutes to complete. Benefit to you as a participant involves contributing to our knowledge of how to better measure LGB strengths. Complete the survey, and be eligible to win from $10 to up to $50 in gift cards. If interested, please complete the following survey.

Summer 2015 Research Program

 
The Syracuse University Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) Research Program is a paid summer research opportunity that provides undergraduate scholars with the opportunity to work with distinguished faculty and staff as well as network with others in their field of interest. Student scholars have the opportunity to conduct and present research over a ten-week period under the direction of a faculty research mentor at Syracuse University. Applications must be submitted by March 6th. For more information, please check out the Summer 2015 Research Project online.

CFP - Special Issue of *Jeunesse* on Mobility


Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures invites essay submissions for a special issue addressing mobility in relation to youth texts and culture(s). We welcome essays that consider registers of race, class, gender, and disability. Essays should be between 6,000 and 9,000 words in length and prepared for blind peer-review.

Mobility invites us to think about bodies, identities, and agency from diverse disciplinary and methodological perspectives. Im/mobility can be many things: geographic, physical, ideological, imaginative, temporal, social. What are some of the ways that we might analyze this amorphous—in fact, mobile—topic in light of young people, their texts, and their cultures?

Submissions are requested by: 30 June 2015.

Topics may include:

- Dancing children

- Border crossings and home(land) security systems

- Movement as performance/choreography

- Narratives of upward/downward mobility

- Transformations through mobility/mobilizing transformations

- Mobile audiences and audiences of mobility

- Movement as affect and affect as “being moved”

- Planes, trains, and automobiles

- Immigration and generations

- Ability and impairment

- Kinesthetics or kin-aesthetics

- Mobilizing youth polities

- Digital movement and mobile communication

- Play and playgrounds

- Containment and freedom of movement

Inquiries may be directed to Larissa Wodtke, Managing Editor: 
l.wodtke@uwinnipeg.ca

Further information about submission guidelines is available at: 
http://jeunessejournal.ca 

Multiple Perspectives Registration Open: 27 sessions

 
STUDENTS ARE INVITED!
 
2015 Multiple Perspcetives Conference: Celebrate Our Progress – Write Our Future History  April 13-14.
 
 
Public Plenaries at Multiple Perspectives:
·         Ken Campbell Memorial Lecture: "The Stories We Tell: The Americans with Disabilities Act after 25 Years" presented by Lennard J. Davis
·         The Ethel Louise Armstrong Memorial Lecture: “The Hearing World around Me” presented by Trix Bruce
·         Student Perspectives Ethel Louise Armstrong Student Poster Presentations and Reception. 
 
Concurrent Sessions
Law:
·         Update from The Department of Education’s Office For Civil Rights.
·         Update from The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Cheryl Mabry-Thomas, Director, The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Cleveland Field Office.
·         ADA Questions and Answers: The Center for Disability Empowerment (CDE) Answers Your Questions.
·         Understanding Reasonable Accommodations under the ADAAA and Emerging Issues in the Law.
·         Barrier Free Healthcare: A Recent Point of Emphasis 25 Years in the Making.
·         The ADA at 25: How does it Measure up to The UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities?
·         Toward Universal Suffrage: Voting and People with Intellectual or Cognitive Disabilities
 
Education:
·         Access Abroad: International Study for Students & Scholars with Disabilities.
·         Paving the Path to College Success: Experiences of Students with Physical Disabilities
·         Student Veterans with Psychological and Physical Wounds: Enhancing Access and Inclusion.
·         Going to College: Integrated Employment and Academic Opportunities for Students with Intellectual Disabilities.
·         At the Intersections of Disability and Feminist Theories: Toward the Transformative Inclusion of Diverse Students with Disabilities in STEM Fields.
Electronic and Communications Technology
·         Information and Communications Technology: An Accessibility Strategy for a Large University.
·         Disability & Accessibility as a Matter of Course in University Life
·         Communicating and Instructing Faculty on Accessibility Considerations for Web or LMS Content..
·         Collaborating to Create Audio Access for Digital Image Collections.
·         P.E.A.C.E: Communication Access through Universal Design Principles.
Community & Culture:
·         The ABC's of YLF (Youth Leadership Forum).
·         Inter-Ability Marriage: How Love is Lame.
·         Eric Garner in Historical Perspective: Interrogating “Ableist Criminality”. 
·         Topics in Community Integration for People with Disabilities
·         A Problematic Hurdle: Soft Skills to Seek and Keep a Job.
·         Health Status and Disparities among People with Disabilities in Ohio.
Perceptions and Attitudes toward People Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing among College Students.
At the Expense of Joy: Human Rights Violations in Applied Behavioral Analysis.
On Teaching the R-Word: A Dialogue about Inclusive Language and Inclusive Spaces.


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Involving Families in LGBT Youth Suicide Prevention featuring “Always My Son,”

a documentary about one family’s journey to support their gay son. March 10th, 5:30 – 7:30 PM. Ramada Inn, 2 River Street, Cortland, New York. This is a 2-hour program designed to help parents, educators, clergy, and other adults who interact with young people to understand the critical role that families play in reducing suicide risk and promoting well-being for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth. To register for this free event, please contact Leah Calzolaio.

DREAM Weekly Email, Disability and Higher Education in the News: February 22-28, 2015

 
From DREAM: Disability Rights, Education, Activism, and Mentoring
Sponsored by the Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University
 -------------------------------
Weekly Email Update on Issues Related to Disability and Higher Education 
Week of February 22-28, 2015
-------------------------------
 Disability and higher education in the news (in no particular order):
* Peter Railton, distinguished philosophy professor from the University of Michigan, is trying to spur discussion and understanding about mental health issues by disclosing his own depression:https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/02/25/professors-reflections-his-battle-depression-touch-many-recent-disciplinary-meeting
 
* The case against Rutgers-Newark University professor Anna Stubblefield is going to trial, alleging that she sexually abused a disabled research partner who has cerebral palsy.  The judge will not allow experts on to testify about the man’s ability to give consent to sex via facilitated communication, saying it is an “unrecognized field of science:”http://www.nj.com/essex/index.ssf/2015/02/judge_bars_defense_testimony_on_victim_analysis_at.html
 
* The University of Texas at Austin is adding accessible buses to its safe ride program:http://www.dailytexanonline.com/2015/02/25/sg-plans-to-add-ada-accessible-vehicles-to-safe-ride-program
 
* An article explores the inaccessibility of Columbia University, and how easy it is for nondisabled people to ignore the problems: http://features.columbiaspectator.com/eye/2015/02/25/access-denied/
 
* Georgetown University will have a new disability cultural center, thanks to efforts by student Lydia Brown: http://blog.georgetownvoice.com/2015/02/26/gusa-announces-creation-of-disability-cultural-center/
 
* Bethel University is creating a new two-year program for students with intellectual disabilities like Down syndrome: https://www.bethel.edu/news/articles/2014/september/build
 
* Physical “accessibility” at Yale University is open to interpretation, and not all the students are happy with the status quo: http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2015/02/24/wheelchair-accessibility-leaves-much-to-be-desired/
 
* Several buildings at the University of Minnesota-Morris are on the National Register of Historic Places, making it difficult and expensive to do campus renovations aimed at improving disability access: http://www.mndaily.com/news/campus/2015/02/23/morris-buildings-cause-accessibility-debate
 
* Spurred on by visually impaired students on campus, Santa Fe College’s student senate voted to improve campus navigation for visually impaired students after renovations eliminated textured maps and poles: http://www.alligator.org/news/sfc/article_cfe7883c-bbe1-11e4-b8dc-1be3082b87c2.html
 
* Engineering students from high schools and colleges across the U.S. met in Washington, DC, for SourceAmerica’s Design Challenge, to show off their designs to improve disability access in workplaces: http://www.usnews.com/news/stem-solutions/articles/2015/02/26/engineering-design-competition-connects-stem-skills-with-social-change
 
* Visually impaired college students in India area protesting the lack of accessible housing:http://www.punemirror.in/pune/civic/Hostels-blind-to-our-issues-say-students/articleshow/46347886.cms
 
And a few related items of possible interest to college students:
* What we really need for Black History Month is a little Black disability history: http://www.ncwd-youth.info/blog/?p=928
 
* The New York Times published an article calling for a return to asylums, despite the fact that many notable people over the centuries (like Dorthea Dix, Burton Blatt, and the Kennedy family) also called for nicer cleaned-up safe institutions and then realized there is no such thing:http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/18/opinion/the-modern-asylum.html?_r=0 (see one activist’s response at http://www.autistichoya.com/2015/02/no-modern-asylum-call-to-action-in-new-jersey.html)
 
* The Oscars have brought a lot of attention to how Hollywood rewards certain views of disability – and only when nondisabled people are doing the acting:
Ø  Washington Post article asks why the majority of best actor winners were portraying sick or disabled people: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/02/23/since-rain-man-majority-of-best-actor-winners-played-sick-or-disabled/
Ø  Why nondisabled actors should stop portraying people with disabilities, even if it wins them Oscars: http://www.mamamia.com.au/entertainment/disability-oscar/
Ø  Check out clips from the upcoming “Code of the Freaks” looking at images of disability in film (captioned but no audio description): https://vimeo.com/20531038
 
* A new lawsuit against PF Chang’s notes that food allergies and celiac disease are explicitly covered under the ADA, and says restaurants shouldn’t charge patrons more for gluten-free food:http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/02/14/should-celiac-be-called-a-disability.html
 
* Deaf Latino Leah Katz-Hernandez is the new receptionist at in the West Wing of the White House:http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/politics/2015/02/23/white-house-staffer-leah-katz-hernandez-is-pioneer-on-reception-desk/
 
* April 15 is approaching, so learn about IRS services for people with disabilities:https://usodep.blogs.govdelivery.com/2015/02/25/services-at-the-irs-for-people-with-disabilities/
 
 
* Deaf rappers fight for legitimacy in a field dominated by the idea that rappers can only be hearing (some videos captioned – none audio described): http://www.wonderingsound.com/feature/deaf-rappers-prinz-d-polar-bear-wawa/
 
* Stephen Hawking’s software reads subtle facial expressions to help him communicate, and now it’s open source and available to everyone:http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/02/23/how-to-speak-with-facial-expressions.html
 
* “You were just photobombed during a selfie?  SMH while I fall into a food coma.”  Now how do you sign that?  An article with videos discusses how American Sign Language evolves right alongside the Internet (no audio description):http://www.hopesandfears.com/hopes/now/internet/168477-internet-american-sign-language
 
* Technology is forcing people with disabilities to upgrade their bodies, instead of finding ways to change the environment for diverse users:http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2015/02/technology_and_disability_design_lacks_the_imagination_to_make_the_world.html
 
* “I am not your teachable moment” (transcript available at the bottom of the cartoon):http://everydayfeminism.com/2015/02/i-am-not-your-teachable-moment/
 
* The First Lady of NYC talks about changing the mental health system to better serve people like her daughter, who struggled to find help when she needed it:http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/guest-column-shatter-mental-illness-stigma-article-1.2129792
 
* Washington, DC has 30 schools that only have students with disabilities, and over 80 private schools that don’t have any students with disabilities – why are Obama’s children attending a segregated school without any disabled kids? http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/education/208066-why-do-president-obamas-children-go-to-a-segregated-school
 
* African American Deaf actress Michelle Banks is winning accolades for her performances in Atlanta – we just wish Fox had thought to caption their news story so Deaf people could learn about her work (it isn’t audio described, either):http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/Clip/11149491/meet-michelle-banks
 
 
* An article in the Boston Globe suggests cities should crack down on abusers of disability parking, although we noticed it assumed users all have visible disabilities that never change in any way:http://www.bostonglobe.com/magazine/2015/02/11/more-cheaters-use-handicapped-parking-than-you-think/ENuOcYjfbmPKGRc0Sn6kZO/story.html
 
* A Finnish punk band is set to win Eurovision this year – all the band members happen to be people with intellectual disabilities (called “learning disabilities” in Europe):http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2015/feb/27/finnish-punk-band-take-punt-eurovision-title

* David Peter blogs about being the only Deaf man he has ever met in tech fields, and the way hearing nondisabled culture shuts out people with disabilities by making them invisible, tokens, or an inspirational fairy tale: https://modelviewculture.com/pieces/the-hearing-monoculture-rejects-those-who-cant-hear
 
 
* A Sign 3D project has created a computerized Avatar that can sign ASL, International Sign, British Sign Language, and other signed languages from around the world (captioned but no audio description): https://vimeo.com/89629973
 
 
For more information about DREAM or the Taishoff Center, contact:
Wendy Harbour (wharbour@syr.edu)
Or check out the DREAM website at http://dream.syr.edu
To subscribe or unsubscribe to the DREAM email list, fill out the form athttp://dream.syr.edu/contact-us.html and ask to join or leave the listserv.
 
By the way, please don't presume DREAM, the Taishoff Center, or Syracuse University agree with everything in these links we send out - we're just passing along the information so you can form your own opinions.  Thanks.

Rule Out Abuse Campaign


NEWSFEED Listserv members,

 
To our knowledge, this is the only weekly newsfeed in the nation that focuses on abuse of people with disabilities.  By providing this service, the Disability and Abuse Project is documenting and creating an archive of abuse cases throughout the nation – even internationally – that are reported in newspapers.  The newsfeed contains, on average, more than 100 news stories per week.  That means more than 5,000 per year.  We all know that the vast majority of abuse cases do not make the news and the majority are probably not even reported to authorities.  Therefore, the newsfeed is the tip (news stories) of the tip (reported cases) of the iceberg of disability and abuse cases.
 
Putting together this newsfeed is a lot of work! Anne Kincaid finds the stories and captures the title, author, newspaper, and link.  This takes many hours per week.  She then sends a list to us.  Nora then reads through all of them so that she can identify the ones that she thinks should receive the primary focus for the current week.  Listserv members would otherwise be overwhelmed to just receive a newsfeed with 100 news stories each week.  Instead, due to Nora’s screening and analysis, you receive a list of 10 to 12 stories, with a link to the webpage where the other 100 or so can be accessed.  After Nora does her review and makes her picks, I create a new webpage for this week’s stories and upload them to the website.  I then prepare and send out an email to the listserv with Dr. Nora’s Top Articles and a link to the webpage.  All of this work is done without compensation, except for Anne Kincaid who receives a very modest stipend.  The stipend is paid by Nora out of her personal checkbook, not by the project, because the project has been operating on a volunteer basis, without government or foundation funding and with very few small private donations.
 
Our work to expose abuses by guardianship systems and to promote the reform of those systems has consumed hundreds of hours of volunteer time.  As a result, we have less time for the newsfeed.  However, we believe that the newsfeed serves an important function.  To keep it going, but to release some time to the guardianship reform movement, I will be sending out the newsfeed in a different format.  The email you receive will not contain the summaries and links of Dr. Nora’s Top Articles.  Instead, it will contain the numbers of the articles that Nora has selected, some of them with comments from her, and with a link to the webpage where all of the articles can be found.  You can read Dr. Nora’s Top Articles by going to that webpage and scrolling down to the number of the articles in that category.  We hope you understand the need for this change in formatting and that you will support the decision to reduce the time it takes to bring you the newsfeed.
 
Nora and I believe this newsfeed serves an important function in the field of disability and abuse.  We would appreciate hearing from you as to whether you find the newsfeed of value and if so how it affects the work you do.  You can contact Nora at:nora@disability-abuse.com or me at tomcoleman@disabilityandabuse.org.
 
You can see the new format below.
 
Thanks.
 
Tom Coleman
 
p.s.  You can make a donation to the project, and help support the newsfeed and other activities, with a credit card through the Paypal website.  For access to the Paypal donation page, click on this link/  http://disabilityandabuse.org/contact.htm
 
 
NEWSFEED for March 2
 
To access this week’s newsfeed, and prior newsfeeds, click on this link:http://disabilityandabuse.org/newsfeed/contents.htm
Articles are listed in alphabetical order by state, so you can easily scan through the articles for those within your state or other states in which you have an interest.
Dr. Nora's Top Articles:
1,3,17,26,31,59 and those with comments below
Please take special note of these articles, as they identify a wide variety of abusers and their relationship to their victims:
4 (pornography makers seek prey at skate-board park, offer modeling jobs...one with two adopted kids, no criminal record)
5 (bus driver forces boy to urinate in front of other kids and molests him while the others watch)
8 (acquaintance of man with disabilities murders him in his own residence)
9 (restraint of children in school is rampant and unrestrained...harms the children, terrified and becoming suicidal)
10 (sexual molestation by MRI operator)
15 (child with autism starved to death by cousin, care-giver article emphasizes difficulty of caregiving, not child's needs)
36 (worker with disabilities tortured by owner's brother for years, too scared to say anything)
Other Categories:
Abuse/Crime related:
Seeking Improved Support
Proposed Legislation and New Laws
International Articles

Shaping the Future of Syracuse Parks: New Directions in Parks Planning

 
F.O.C.U.S. FORUM
 
WHEN: FRIDAY, March 20TH
TIME: 7:30 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.
WHERE: CITY HALL COMMONS, 201 E. WASHINGTON ST., FIRST FLOOR
GUEST PRESENTERS: MAREN KING, Director of the Center for Community Design Research (CCDR) at the SUNY ESF; SARAH KRISCH a candidate for Master’s Degree in Landscape Architecture at SUNY ESF; GLEN LEWIS, an administrator in the City of Syracuse, Department of Parks, Recreation and Youth Programs.
“SHAPING THE FUTURE OF SYRACUSE PARKS: NEW DIRECTIONS IN COMMUNITY PARKS PLANNING”
The Syracuse Parks Department, the SUNY ESF Center for Community Design Research (CCDR) and a working group of neighborhood residents and organization representatives collaborated to organize a Community Parks Study that explored the value and vital role of Syracuse’s Elmwood, Kirk and Onondaga Parks in healthy lives, neighborhoods and the entire community. The panel will present some of the study findings and discuss the analysis that led to recommendations that will help guide the Parks Department in new actionable projects and contribute to ongoing ones, such as the second phase of the Onondaga Creekwalk. While of interest to those who enjoy and are concerned about the future of our parks, this program is also geared towards those interested in how we can make strategic sustainable investments in reviving our cultural and environmental resources, and how we can use participatory planning and our diversity to build a stronger community.
MAREN KING works with students, community members, faculty, design professionals, agencies and organizations on applied research projects that have direct benefits for those involved and the broader community. While the topics are diverse and settings of the projects cover urban, rural and suburban communities, they all involve public participation to understand people and place and build local capacity to address complex issues. Many of her current projects fall within the theme of resiliency and involve strategies for response and adaptation to various types and scales of change. Maren is a licensed landscape architect with 14 years experience in community design education and research and 20 years in private practice landscape architecture, architecture and planning firms in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
SARAH KRISCH currently works as a graduate assistant at the Center for Community Design Research where she has contributed to projects ranging from an online Community Leadership Training Program to community engagement for the Lower Onondaga Park Family Activity Area. Prior to attending SUNY ESF, Sarah received a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and Urban Planning from the City University of New York, Hunter College where she was a Public Service Scholar. She has worked at the New York Industrial Retention Network which works to maintain a diverse economy through retention and modernization of the industrial landscape in New York City. Sarah lives in the Strathmore neighborhood of Syracuse, and is a proud and frequent user of the neighborhood’s great parks.
GLEN LEWIS for the past 15 years has staffed Park’s planning and development office. He directs the department’s capital improvement, grants and historic preservation programs.  During the past five years Glen has devoted a great deal of attention to the community engagement process associated with projects in the city’s largest parks including Syracuse Parks’ Onondaga Botanical Garden and Arboretum initiative.
EVERYONE IS WELCOME

Disability.gov Seeks Participants for Its Third “No Boundaries” Photo Project


Disability Documented: Powerful Films for Educators

 
Hello, 

I'm writing to let you know about two documentaries which might make great additions to your media library: The Collector of Bedford Street and Body & Soul: Diana & Kathy.  These films focus on people with physical and developmental disabilities who have made meaningful contributions to their communities, while navigating the complex spheres of self-advocacy and independent living.  The Collector of Bedford Street follows Larry Selman, a community activist with an intellectual disability, and his neighbors, who come together to establish an adult trust fund to allow him to live independently.  Body & Soul: Diana & Kathy introduces us to Diana Braun and Kathy Conour, two women with developmental and physical disabilities who vowed to live independent lives after meeting in a sheltered workshop three decades ago.  They have been fighting for disability rights ever since.

Both films are objective, honest, and respectful portraits of life with disability, and are great discussion starters around issues of self-advocacydisability rightsindependent livingcare-giving, and inclusion.  

Both films have been highly honored, including an Academy Award nomination for The Collector of Bedford Street and a PBS broadcast for Body & Soul: Diana & Kathy.  I'd like to offer you 15% off of the institutional rate via the code: CHANGE.

Study guides are available for both films, and curriculum correlations are available for 
The Collector of Bedford Street.  Both are classroom-friendly in length - The Collector is just 34 min. and Body & Soul is 40 min. - making them versatile teaching tools for courses in:
 
Disability Studies | Developmental Psychology | Human Rights & Social Justice | Sociology | Women's Studies | Social Studies | Social Work | Anthropology | Humanities
 
For more information, to see clips, or to purchase DVDs or streams of the films, please visit my website, welcomechange.org.

If you're interested in watching a 
free preview of either film in its entirety, please send me an email.

Feel free to email at this address if you have any questions.


Thank you,

 
Alice Elliott
Director
Welcome Change Productions
107 Bedford Street, Upper Unit
New York, NY  10014
www.welcomechange.org 
212-924-7151

CONSORTIUM FOR CULTURE AND MEDICINE SEMINAR

 
 
Border Crossings:
Communication Across Cultures & Languages in Health Care
 
Jeremy Brunson, PhD
Sociology and Interpretation
Gallaudet University
 
Monu Chhetri
Founder and Advocate
Deaf Refugee Coalition – Syracuse
 
Jennifer Wissman
Interpreter
Master’s Candidate, European Master in Sign Language Interpreting
 
Thursday, March 19, 2015
4 to 5:30 pm
1507/1508 Setnor
766 Irving Ave. (at intersection of Waverly and Irving)
Upstate Medical University
 
A professor of sociology and sign language interpretation, a Deaf Bhutanese woman who leads the community-wide Deaf Refugee Coalition in Syracuse, and a sign language interpreter with international experience discuss issues of cultural and linguistic differences in health care and best practices for cross-cultural communication and collaboration.
 
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE/ASL INTERPRETERS
 
For more information, contact Consortium Coordinator Lois Dorschel at dorschel@upstate.edu
or Executive Director Rebecca Garden, PhD, at gardenr@upstate.edu or 315.464.8451.
 
Consortium for Culture and Medicine:

Disability Scoop 3.3.15


An exciting series from the HBCU Disability Consortium and AHEAD - starting March 11, 2015!

 
Are you working in a small disability services office? Are you a newer professional in the field? Have you been looking for ways to make your office more welcoming and inclusive? Interested in better serving African American Students?  
 
If you said yes to ANY of these, a new and exciting webinar series - offered at a REDUCED COST may be for you. It's designed to help you build a toolkit of skills, from experts working on diverse campuses around the country.
 
The HBCU Disability Consortium and AHEAD present
"Building Up Your Disability Services Toolkit"
 
Continuing its long tradition of professional development through webinars, AHEAD is partnering with the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Disability Consortium to bring you a series of 90-minute webinars designed to talk about disability services for smaller offices, for newer professionals, and for anyone interested in improving services to African American students on campus. This series is partially funded through the HBCU Disability Consortium*, which means this webinar is available at extremely reduced prices!
Here's what you need to know:
  • The cost for each webinar is FREE to any HBCU site, only $79 to any site for AHEAD members, and $99 for any non-AHEAD members, with a quantity discount if you register for 5 or more!  This fee is FOR EACH SITE (not each person) - to make it even cheaper, you can set up a site and then have many people listening in or watching.
  • All webinars are from 1:00-2:30 Eastern Standard Time on Wednesdays.
  • Full instructions are sent prior to each session. All webinars are captioned in real-time. Have a slow computer? You can just call in and listen!
  • Online registration is open now by visiting the Building Up Your DS Toolkit page.If you choose the "bill me" option, AHEAD will send you an invoice via e-mail, payable within 15 days or your registration.
Topics include:         
 
  • Running a small disability services office
  • What all DS providers need to know about serving African American students' mental health needs
  • Working with faculty
  • Universal design 101
  • Realities of interpreting and CART
  • Handling evolving technology needs
For more information and to register please visit the HBCU Webinar page the Building Up Your DS Toolkit page. We're always happy to answer your questions at hbcu@ahead.org.
 
* The HBCU Disability Consortium is funded by a grant from the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), U.S. Department of Education (Project #P116B100141). This information is available in alternative formats upon request by contacting hbcu@ahead.org.


Virtual Career Fair for People with Disabilities - April 14th (Full-time, Intern, & Co-op Jobs)

 
Please circulate to as many colleagues and students as possible. The sponsoring organization has long been a promoter, supporter and significant player in bettering the employment prospects for individuals with disabilities. Questions can be directed to Chuck Reutlinger (315-443-3616; clreutli@syr.edu) or to the contact information noted in announcement (link below).
 

Disability Scoop 3.4.15


Advocacy Outcry Over New York Times Op-Ed Touting Return To Institutions

 
NYAPRS Note: Several weeks ago, recovery advocates launched a furious counter campaign against a recent Times Op Ed’s view that we should return to build more ‘modern asylums. This week, Mental Health Weekly ran the piece below that included comments from a number of groups, including our NYAPRS Board Presidents Alison Carroll and Carla Rabinowitz (included input from board member Brian Hollander).  
 
 
From: Mental Health Weekly  March 2, 2015
 
Members of the mental health and disability communities are up in arms over comments in a New York Times op-ed and in JAMA that suggest a solution for patients with mental illness and developmental disabilities who cycle between emergency hospitalizations and inadequate outpatient care is to be cared for in “modern asylums.” Many have followed up with letters to the New York Times.
 
In the February 18 New York Times op-ed, “Modern Asylum,” Christine Montross, M.D., Rhode Island Butler Hospital staff psychiatrist, writes in response to a JAMA article by Dominic A. Sisti, Ph.D.; Andrea G. Segal, M.S.; and Ezekiel Emanuel, M.D., Ph.D., ethicists from the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania.
 
In JAMA, the aforementioned authors write that well-designed community-based programs are often inadequate for a segment of patients who have been deinstitutionalized. “For severely and chronically mentally ill persons, the optimal option is long-term care in a psychiatric hospital, which is costly,” Sisti, Segal and Emanuel wrote.
 
“For persons with severe and treatment-resistant psychotic disorders, who are too unstable or unsafe for community-based treatment, the choice is between the prison-homelessness acute hospitalization-prison cycle or long-term psychiatric institutionalization,” they wrote. “The financially sensible and morally appropriate way forward includes a return to psychiatric asylums that are safe, modern and humane.”
 
Montross in her NYT op-ed said that “the movement to deinstitutionalize the mentally ill has been a failure.” Patients with chronic, severe mental illnesses are still in facilities — only now they are in medical hospitals, nursing homes and, increasingly, jails and prisons, places that are less appropriate and more expensive than long-term psychiatric institutions, Montross wrote.
 
Montross said a new model of long-term psychiatric institutionalization, as the JAMAcontributors suggested, would help patients with mental illnesses. She noted that group homes for the mentally disabled are established to provide long-term housing while preserving community engagement. Rigorous regulations evolved to ensure patient safety and autonomy have “backfired,” Montross wrote.
 
“Modern asylums for the severely mentally disabled would provide stability and structure,” she wrote, adding that sensory issues often accompany severe intellectual disability, so rooms with weighted blankets, relaxing sounds and objects to squeeze would help patients calm themselves.
 
Advocates respond
The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, in response, issued policy alerts February 20 urging the field to write 150–170 words to the NYT editor to oppose those ideas espoused in the op-ed. “It’s important for the editorial board to hear from a ton of people in order to understand how far out of the mainstream and widely rejected the idea of expanding long-term institutionalization is,” the Bazelon alert stated.
 
Among the points to be made is that public policies should emphasize proven treatment that promotes recovery and services and support that empower people to make their own life choices and to participate fully in their communities, according to the alert.
 
“We think it’s a bad idea for people with mental health and developmental disabilities to go to long-term institutions,” John Head, spokesperson for the Bazelon Center, toldMHW. “It’s a policy that failed in the past.”
 
Despite the authors’ discussion of a “modern asylum,” the problem is the very nature of these large institutions that keep people there in the long term, Head said. “The institutions don’t provide individual care,” he said, adding that the problems there include overmedication, seclusion and abuse, he said.
 
The JAMA contributors would have one believe that institutions can provide patients with mental illness peace and rest, he said. Those are “idealized versions” of what large scale institutions are like, said Head.
 
He pointed to the JAMA article, which referenced the Massachusetts-based Worcester Recovery Center and Hospital — a “transformed” state hospital with 320 rooms that provides treatment services, psychiatric research and medical education programs. The hospital costs $300 million to build and $60 million a year to operate, said Head.
 
How many states, noted Head, could afford that amount to build and $60 million annually to operate it? The discussions do not indicate the need for investments in community-based services, said Head. Community-based mental health services continue to be underfunded, said Head. “We’re not stepping back,” he said. Head noted the recently established Recovery Now! Campaign, formed to advance recovery-focused care and supported by such organizations as the National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery, the Bazelon Center and Mental Health America (see MHW, Feb. 23). “We had a discussion among coalition members about what a bad idea this is,” he said. If there are enough comments on this perspective, the New York Times will feel it should publish the letters from this perspective, Head said. Calls to the NYT editorial department went unreturned.
 
The Bazelon Center wants the letters to point out that the field has years of experience with community services that work, and the problem is that they are under-funded and in short supply, not that people with disabilities belong in institutions.
 
NYAPRS
Bazelon officials believe it would be more effective for organizations and individuals to submit their own letters to the NYT rather than sign on to one letter as a coalition, said Head. “The number of letters from a broad spectrum of organizations will provide The New York Times with a better sense of how strongly people feel about it,” said Head.
 
Alison Carroll and Carla Rabinowitz, providers and co-presidents of the New York Association of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services (NYAPRS), told MHW they are very concerned over the “disturbing” articles calling for the establishment of “modern asylums” and increased use of court-ordered treatment.
 
“We are also very troubled that these regressive trends are also extending to Congress, where proposals to build more institutional beds are joined with those to erode personal rights, including a push to expand coercive community treatment and near-elimination of Protection and Advocacy Organizations — the administrative and legal recourse for allegations of abuse, neglect and violation of the civil rights for individuals with disabilities,” they said. “We must not support taking away both a person’s community and their voice.”
 
Carroll and Rabinowitz added, “The answers don’t lie in rebuilding institutions or forcing the same care that has failed people in the first place: they are to be found by directing the resources necessary to better deploy and train our staff and to create a more adequate and innovative continuum of community options.”
 
Disability rights
“As a disability legal organization, so often our main response is to protect individuals from abuse and neglect, including individuals with live-in facilities,” Elizabeth Priaulx, senior disability legal specialist at the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN), toldMHW. Montross’ assertion that institutions can provide security and stability is wrong, she said. “The ‘modern asylums’ are no panacea to abuse and neglect,” said Priaulx. “It comes down to neglect.”
 
David Card, NDRN spokesperson told MHW that the organization submitted a response to the Times but has not received word if they plan to run it. “We are also encouraging all of our member protection and advocacy agencies to respond. We are coordinating with like-minded organizations like the Bazelon Center,” he said.
 

Smart buildings: Architects using brain science for design guidance


As High-Tech Teaching Catches On, Students With Disabilities Can Be Left Behind

By Casey Fabris
February 25, 2015
Educational innovations like the flipped classroom, clickers, and online discussions can present difficulties for students with disabilities.
The issue was highlighted this month, when Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology were sued for allegedly failing to provide such students with closed captioning for online lectures and course materials.
Peter Blanck, chairman of the Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University and author of eQuality: The Struggle for Web Accessibility by Persons With Cognitive Disabilities (Cambridge University Press, 2014), said blind and deaf students need to be considered when shifting core parts of teaching to the Internet.
"So far, it’s been kind of an incremental struggle by persons with disabilities to have full and equal access to the web," he said.
Though many colleges have set up procedures for converting traditional teaching materials, like printed textbooks, into accessible formats for students with disabilities, colleges are still figuring out how to adapt online materials. Mr. Blanck recalled the struggles of blind students he wrote about in his book. Courtney, for example, couldn’t take classes that required significant library research, and Blair couldn’t read certain texts for his physics classes.
"Presumably, universities should be at the forefront of these changes," Mr. Blanck said.
Here are some of the teaching methods and technologies that present new challenges to students with disabilities.
Videos and Flipped Classrooms
The flipped-classroom model, in which students are asked to watch video lectures outside of class, is catching on. A recent survey of professors found that 46 percent had tried or adopted the approach. Assignments that direct students to watch videos are popular, too. But classroom flipping and video viewing can present problems for students with disabilities, particularly those who are deaf.
The National Association of the Deaf has received complaints from students who were assigned to watch videos that are inaccessible, said Andrew S. Phillips, a lawyer with the association, by email.
Some professors respond to the problem promptly and personally, captioning the videos themselves, he said. Others submit the videos to their university’s internal system for captioning, though that process can take a while and cause students to lag behind. But sometimes, students are expected to just figure it out themselves or, worse, be excused from the exercise, a solution that Mr. Phillips called "just leaving them out of an important learning opportunity."
Christian P. Vogler, director of the technology-access program at Gallaudet University, an institution for the hearing-impaired in Washington, D.C., said he would not use videos without captions. That policy can be limiting, he said, but it’s important that he lead by example. "When I’m looking for any video, that’s a requirement," he said through an interpreter. "The first thing I check is to make sure it’s captioned."
Another problem, he said, is textbooks with accompanying videos that lack captions. Mr. Vogler said more pressure should be applied to publishers to make all of their educational materials accessible.
Rather than adding captions to videos upon request, Mr. Phillips said, the association would like captioning of online lectures and other course materials to be standard practice. It would promote accessibility and spare students from having to request accommodations, which may be uncomfortable for some of them.
Mr. Vogler said putting captions on videos would also make it easier to create transcripts for blind students.
Clickers
Asking students to answer questions in class via clickers can also present problems for students who are blind or deaf.
In 2012, Florida State University settled a lawsuit brought by two blind students who said their mathematics class used inaccessible technology, including clickers. The students received $75,000 each in the settlement.
In classes where clickers are used on a competitive basis or where students are given a limited amount of time to submit their answers, deaf students are at a disadvantage. Even with efficient translation, there’s often a lag time, and it may cause students who are deaf to submit their answers more slowly, Mr. Phillips said.
For deaf students, the problem can be easily solved by giving a sufficient amount of time for everyone to respond, Mr. Phillips said.
Digitized Readings
Digitized reading materials that professors provide to students are not always compatible with software that blind students rely on to read text to them on a computer.
The PDF format can be particularly difficult. Mr. Vogler said he and others who conduct accessibility-related research avoid PDFs. The scholars try to make everything accessible to students who are blind or have low vision by screen reader, often providing a Microsoft Word document in addition to PDFs when they must be used.
"Sometimes I just wish that PDFs had never been invented," he said. "I know that it’s causing a lot of problems."
Copyright regulations can also thwart efforts to make digitized works and videos accessible to people with disabilities. However, Mr. Vogler said, the fair-use doctrine should allow such works to be reproduced in a format accessible to disabled students, without violating copyright law.
Syracuse’s Mr. Blanck cited the Authors Guild Inc. v. HathiTrust lawsuit as a positive step toward making digitized works accessible to students with disabilities. A number of colleges teamed up with Google to create a digital library called the HathiTrust Digital Library, but the Authors Guild said digitizing the works constituted copyright infringement. HathiTrust won the lawsuit and was allowed to digitize the texts and make them accessible to people with print-related disabilities.
Class Blogs and Discussion Boards
In some courses, students are asked to regularly post on a class discussion board or blog. In those forums, students sometimes post links to videos or other content that may not be accessible to their classmates with disabilities, Mr. Blanck said.
Discussion boards were just one of the problems listed in a complaint of disability discrimination submitted by student at the University of Montana at Missoula to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. Since the complaint was filed, in 2012, the university has beenworking to make its electronic and information technology accessible, said Marlene K. Zentz, senior instructional designer and accessibility specialist at UM Online.
"There’s more and more complaints across the country, and students are speaking up," Ms. Zentz said. "Students have to use technology to get an education, so it’s more and more critical that campuses are using technologies in accessible ways."

Are you a student with a disability?

Are you interested in building on your leadership skills? Do you want to meet other professionals and network with global companies? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then the U.S. Business Leadership Network (USBLN) Student Advisory Council (SAC) is right for you. We are seeking, high school upperclassmen, college, and graduate students to join our Council and learn from a diverse group of professionals in a variety of fields. If you or any one you know wants to grow professionally, please consider applying to the USBLN by March 2.
Now Accepting Applications

to Join the

US Business Leadership Network®

Student Advisory Council

The US Business Leadership Network® (USBLN ®) is currently seeking new members for their national Student Advisory Council (SAC). The USBLN is a national non-profit that helps business drive performance by leveraging disability inclusion in the workplace, supply chain, and marketplace. The USBLN serves as the collective voice of nearly 50 Business Leadership Network affiliates across the United States, representing over 5,000 businesses. More information about the USBLN can be found at 
www.usbln.org.
The SAC informs, educates, advises and assists the USBLN®, its corporate members and affiliates on the ways in which to effectively engage students with disabilities. They provide insight and direction on advancing the inclusion of students with disabilities in corporate programs and activities affecting the workplace, marketplace, and supply chain. More information about the SAC can be found at 
http://usbln.org/about-us_sac.html.
SAC Duties & Responsibilities 

• Assist the USBLN® in providing training, technical assistance, and workshops on student-related topics. 

• Assist in identifying key contacts, programs, resources and best practices that are beneficial to businesses.

• Increase the visibility of the USBLN® and the SAC to individual students, schools, other student focused organizations and their own individual networks. 

• Provide a connection between BLN affiliates and schools, including universities and community colleges.

• Test marketing strategies from a student viewpoint and suggest types of products that should be developed to enhance marketing and customer service, and to promote entrepreneurship/ self-employment to students with disabilities. 

• Contribute to USBLN® publications, briefs and website.

SAC Commitments

• Attend monthly conference calls.

• Attend Annual USBLN® Conference – September 28 – October 1, 2015

• Plan and coordinate youth/student focused workshop session at the Annual USBLN® Conference.

• Support USBLN® and SAC defined projects.

• Be actively involved in the BLN affiliate in their local area, where possible.

Benefits to Participation

• Development of soft skills such as leadership, communication, public speaking, and decision-making.

• Opportunity to develop a broad professional network of business and disability leaders, 

• Informal mentoring opportunities.

• Travel support to the USBLN® Conference and other activities as required.

• Have a direct effect on the employment of people with disabilities.

• Help shape a national initiative focused on supporting business involvement in the outreach and employment of youth with disabilities.

Desired Council Member Background and Capabilities

• Attends high school, college or university preferably on a full-time basis.

• Has a disability.

• Able to work collaboratively with individuals, from a range of settings representing diverse organizations and experiences.

• Actively involved in the disability community. 

• Is interested in employment, entrepreneurship, self-employment, marketing, workforce development, disability public policy, and/or leadership.

• Possess innovative ideas to help increase the inclusion of people with disabilities in the workplace, marketplace and supply chain.

• Strong desire to network and participate. 

• Can devote 4-8 hours per month on SAC activities.

Eligibility

Candidates must be a current student at the time of application and at the time appointment if selected. While the program is targeted towards undergraduate and graduate students, high school students are eligible to apply beginning in their junior year.

Application Materials and Due Date

Applicants must submit the following documentation for review:

1. Resume

2. Essay responses to the following questions. (250 words max per question) 

a. Why are you interested in being a part of the USBLN® Student Advisory Council?

b. What is one accomplishment relating to advocating for individuals with disabilities that you are the most proud of and why? Also, how do you see yourself promoting disability advocacy and inclusion moving forward?

c. Tell us about one time when you were on a team. What were some of the challenges your team faced and what did you do to help the group overcome those challenges? 

d. What are some skills that you can bring to the council? What roles did you play in the past that you could use to help contribute to this council? 

3. Letter of Recommendation

Application materials must be submitted no later than March 2, 2015 at 5:00pm PST to Mylene Padolina, USBLN Student Initiatives Program Manager via email at mylene@usbln.org with the subject heading “USBLN® Student Advisory Council Application.” Only e-mail submissions will be accepted. Application status will be provided by March 6, 2015. Contact mylenepadolina@hotmail.com if you have any questions.

Employment Opportunities at the Center for Disability Rights

The Center for Disability Rights, Inc. (CDR) is a not-for-profit, community-based advocacy and service organization for people with all types of disabilities. 

The secret of CDR’s success is no secret. CDR’s services and advocacy are controlled by people with disabilities. CDR’s Board of Directors and management staff are primarily people who themselves have disabilities. CDR is in the best position to respond to the needs of people with disabilities because CDR is composed of people with disabilities, as well as those without.


CDR, with its focus on consumer control and mission of integration, independence and civil rights, continues to win advocacy victories on behalf of the disability community as it continues to grow in size and strength as a service provider. There is not, and there will not be, any dull moments in the future of the Center for Disability Rights, Inc.

Disability Studies Quarterly Vol 35, No 1 (2015) is now available at the following link: 


Disability Scoop 2.27.15


Creating a Mindful Campus 2015: Mindfulness in Action


Immediate Action Needed! ADA TAP Reform

From: Paula Possenti-Perez
 
 
The NYSDSC (NY State Disability Services Council) www.nysdsc.org   is an organization of college disability services professionals.  We are an advocacy and professional development group and made up of disability service professionals from  SUNY, CUNY, Independent , and proprietary colleges. We have been heavily involved advocating for improvements to the ADA TAP program and need your help.
 
We are seeking  a legislative remedy to reform  the program  by asking our state representatives to  recommend that changes to the ADA TAP program be included in the final passage of the negotiated 2015-16 NYS budget.  This can be accomplished by  generating emails, letters, and phone calls to  our state representatives.   
 
Please connect to the following link and input your home address and information. Your letter will be automatically generated to the appropriate representatives in your home district.
Please connect to the following link and input your home address and information. Your letter will be automatically generated to the appropriate representatives in your home district.
 
 
An alternative to determine your NYS Assemblyperson  and Senator you simply can go onto  http://www.elections.ny.gov/district-map/district-map.html  enter your address (home) and zip code and then press go.  You must click both on the senate and assembly separately to get both You can then click on the website for each individual member for their email address, and other contact information.   Letters, emails and phone calls will all help along with any local office visits. 
 
The idea is to drive as noise on this issue as possible by:  
1.       Generating letter,  phone calls and office visits in  support
2.       Getting as many people involved as possible
3.       Using technology and smart phones  Forming coalitions of support ,  Independent Living Centers,  Rehab Council, Veterans support,
4.       Making alliances with student groups, clubs student government
5.       Financial organizations,  TAP councils etc.
6.       NYPIRG
7.       Lobby at any program or special event you may be participating in.
 
HINT: cell phones,  smart tablets, i PADS are a great way to get this done.  It takes less than 2 minutes.
 
Who are the key players to target?  This is really essential. 
 
Kenneth Lavalle  - Chair of the Senate’s Committee on Higher Education
Deborah Glick, -- Assemby Chair of the Higher Education Committee
David Weprin-Assembly Chair of Disability TASK Force
Plus people that represent your home district. Remember, all politics is local.
 
We need professionals, people with disabilities, and parents of students to call their legislators before March  6st to assist with getting this back into the governor’s budget for this year.  Please forward to your advocacy networks, Listserv(s), and related agency connections to assist this  cause.
 
If you have any questions feel free to call me or e-mail.  I will be up in Albany on Monday lobbying.
 
Thanks Paula
cell- 845-656-3439


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

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A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS