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Weekly Newsletter

April, 23 2017

INDEX

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

NANBPWC & NAHJ present the 25th Annual Tribute to the African-American Woman

Unscripted Conversations

Commemorative Lecture:  Nina Davuluri, Miss America 2014

Creating Change Student Forum

Truth Be Told - Alpha Phi Alpha

You're Invited: International Scholar Lecture Series (March 24 & April 7)

The Rainbow Banquet. 

Join the Office of Residence Life for the Syracuse Alumni and Friends Reception at this year's NASPA conference

The 44 Stars of Excellence Awards Gala

Hillel announced that this year's Passover Seder

You are invited to join local English Language Learner (ELL) High School students for an evening dedicated to celebrating their culture in Syracuse.

A new tool at SU for reading and writing (**webinar created only for SU affiliates**)

Poetry Book Fair 2015

HONORS RECEPTION FOR STUDENT VETERANS

SU NEWS

SU NEWS: University Supports Vera House White Ribbon Campaign

Reminder: Call for WGS Graduate Paper Prize Submissions Due 3/20

Nominate someone for the 2015 Rainbow Banquet’s Rainbow Recognition Awards!

Summer Session I, 2015 course: Native Knowledge, Identity, and Learning (CFE 400/600)

2015 “Cripping” the Comic Con: Complete symposium schedule is now online!

Opportunity for SU Faculty and Staff

Blog Posting by Prof. Stephen Kuusisto: Inside My Shirt, or if Dr. Seuss Was Blind

The Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities is seeking volunteers

Call for Nominations: New Student Convocation Faculty Speaker

Off-Campus & Commuter Services Seeks Community Ambassadors

Non-Taxable Remitted Tuition Application

 

OrangeAbility 2015 is now on Facebook!

SUMMER 2015 COURSE OFFERING

Planet of the Blind blog post by Prof. Steve Kuusisto: “Hydra”

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, PARTICIPANTS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Please join The Association on Aging with Developmental Disabilities (AADD) for our 25th Annual Aging with Developmental Disabilities Conference. 

SU Graduate Research Symposium coming up this Friday and Saturday (3/20-21)

Call for papers for the 2015 American Anthropological Association meetings

Call for Study Participants

Call for Study Participants

Call for Papers: The Global Context of Disability

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

OMA’s Cora A. Thomas Gospel Extravaganza featuring Fred Hammond

EDF launches its Alternative Report on the UN CRPD

In his public blog, Prof. Bill Peace responds to recent NYT article on assisted suicide 

CPIT-related theatre group features in prestigious journal

Merits our responses... 

From The New York Times: Birth of a Freedom Anthem

ADA Legacy Tour: Update

Of interest: new book and new series

Note from the Education from the Inside Out Coalition

LOCAL EVENT OF INTEREST

Article of Interest: Mom With Disabilities and Daughter Reunited After Two-Year Court Battle

Disability Scoop 3.17.15

New Blog Post from B*tch on Wheels: Why Disabled Canadians should care about Bill C – 51

Disability Scoop 3.13.15

National Center for Cultural Competence Accepting Applications for Leadership Academy

When Mentally Ill Students Feel Alone

Summer Teaching and Facilitator Job Opportunities for SU students

Disability Scoop 3.10.15


SU HAPPENINGS

NANBPWC & NAHJ present the 25th Annual Tribute to the African-American Woman

Saturday, March 21 ,2015
Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium located in Newhouse III at 5:00pm
 
The 25th Annual Tribute to the African-American Woman is an event hosted by the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Club, Inc. in collaboration with the National Association of Hispanic Journalists where we honor three deserving women of color for their outstanding accomplishments and efforts both on Syracuse University's campus and in the Syracuse community. The honorees include one faculty member, one community member and one Syracuse University Senior. The event will take place in the Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium located in Newhouse III at 5:00pm and tickets are currently on sale at Schine Box Office for $3.00.
 
For more information, contact bgardn01@syr.edu or any NANBPWC member.

Unscripted Conversations

Wednesday, March 25
Schine Student Center, Jabberworky Café  |  8pm
 
“Unscripted Conversations” is a campus wide dialogue opportunity for students to engage in conversations about issues of contemporary and social relevance. Our first dialogue conversation will be on Wednesday, March 25th at 8 pm in the Jabberworky Café. The theme for that conversation is “Language Bias.” Food and beverages will be served. Please RSVP to aoboahen@syr.edu by Friday, March 20th.
 
For more information, and if you need accommodations for this event, please contact Afua Boahene by Thursday March 19th at (315) 443-4555.

Commemorative Lecture:  Nina Davuluri, Miss America 2014

Tuesday, April 14, 2015
Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium located in Newhouse III, 7pm

Creating Change Student Forum

 
You’re invited to attend the Creating Change Student Forum! Friday, April 10th, 2:30 – 4:30. Hall of Languages 107. Student delegates to the 27thNational Conference on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans* Equality: Creating Change will share experiences, insights, and reflections gleaned from their attendance. Refreshments will be provided. American Sign Language will be provided.
 
The LGBT Resource Center
Syracuse University
750 Ostrom Avenue
(315) 443-3983
lgbt.syr.edu

Truth Be Told - Alpha Phi Alpha


Please join 
Alpha Phi Alpha, Delta Zeta chapter on Wednesday, March 25th for our 4th Annual: Truth Be Told speaker series, as world renowned actor, philanthropist and activist Forest Whitaker takes the stage to shed light on the truth behind opportunity in our society. The topic of the talk will be: The New American Opportunity. We will ask Whitaker to offer a candid and critical address on this concept and how he fits into the narrative. Tickets are $1 at the Schine Box Office and will be available Monday March 16, 2015. Should you have any questions, feel free to reach me: Ronald Taylor atrterrytaylor@gmail.com

You're Invited: International Scholar Lecture Series (March 24 & April 7)


Message from Prof. Arlene Kanter:
 
Re: the International Scholar Lecture Series: featuring some of this year’s LLM Students. This Lecture Series is organized by Andrew Horsfall,Assistant Director of the LL.M. Program for Foreign Law Graduates & Associate Director of Admissions. You also may  be interested to learn that one of our LLM Students, Milanoi Koiyiet, who is  an Open Society Foundation Disability Law Fellow, presented with me on a panel at the UN last week as part of the  Commission on the Status of Women Annual meeting.  Best wishes, Arlene Kanter
 
 
Syracuse University College of Law and the LL.M. Program in American Law Present:
 
Spring 2015 International Scholar Lecture Series -
Selected Mini-Lectures on International Law Topics
 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015
Room: 360, Feinberg Lecture Hall, Dineen Hall, 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.
 
·         Violence Against Women with Disability: A Perspective from Kenya
Milanoi Koiyiet, Kenya, LL.M. ‘15
·         Perspective from Sudan: The Sudanese Conflict and Beyond
Tarig Ibrahim, Sudan, LL.M. ‘15
·         The Plight of Refugees with Disabilities in Syria
Roula Jneid, Syria, LL.M. ‘15
 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Room: 360, Feinberg Lecture Hall, Dineen Hall, 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.
 
·         The Threat of ISIS in the Oil-Rich Kurdistan Region
Ridwan Zebari, Kurdistan Region of Iraq, LL.M. ‘15
·         Tidal Wave: “Climate Change” Refugees
Samet Tatar, Turkey, LL.M. ‘15
·         Ethiopia’s Responsibility to Protect: The Story of The Oromo People
Amsalu Mayessa, Ethiopia, LL.M. ‘15
 
Light refreshments provided.
Follow the conversation on @SyracuseLawLLM
#PowerofOrange #SyracuseLaw #DineenHall

The Rainbow Banquet. 

Thursday, April 23, 5:30 PM. Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel & Conference Center. If you are graduating, fill out the graduating student survey by April 20th to ensure that your name is in the program and that you receive a rainbow cord.

Join the Office of Residence Life for the Syracuse Alumni and Friends Reception at this year's NASPA conference

 The reception isTuesday, March 24, from 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. in the Chart Ballroom, Hilton Hotel, New Orleans.  Staff planning to attend should RSVP to Shaun Crisler, associate director in the Office of Residence Life.  *Invite attached

The 44 Stars of Excellence Awards Gala

recognizes individual students and recognized student organizations for their outstanding work on campus and in the community during the academic year.  The Office of Student Activities is currently accepting nominations for recognition at this year's gala.  Nominations will be accepted from now until March 27.  Descriptions of each award as well as a link to nomination forms can be found on the Student Leadership 44 Stars page.  Please note, there is a separate nomination form for each award.

Hillel announced that this year's Passover Seder

will be held in the Carrier Dome on Friday, April 3 at 6:00 p.m.  The Seder is open to students, staff, and faculty.  Tickets are now available for purchase at the Winnick Hillel Center (102 Walnut Place), Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.  Tickets are $18 and can be paid via cash, check, or credit card.  Students can also use a meal swipe or SUpercard.

You are invited to join local English Language Learner (ELL) High School students for an evening dedicated to celebrating their culture in Syracuse.

 
March 19, 2015 from 5 – 7 p.m.
Sharon Jacquet Education Commons
School of Education, Huntington Hall
 
Pass by to talk with students about their culture.
 
Sponsored by the Teaching English Language Learners Program
Reading and Language Arts Department
 
Zaline Roy-Campbell



A new tool at SU for reading and writing (**webinar created only for SU affiliates**)

You and your colleagues are invited to a one-hour webinar to learn about a powerful new tool designed to help students, faculty and staff at Syracuse University more readily understand digital text, gather information for research, and create, organize and proof written work.
 
Information Technology and Services (ITS), working with student, faculty, and staff support units, is pleased to announce the availability of TextHelp’sRead&Write Gold. All active Syracuse University students, faculty, and staff can download and install the customizable toolbar that integrates with common applications giving users access to reading, writing, studying, and research tools. The software can take scanned documents and camera images into a format that enables interaction with the content. The software will soon be installed on the computers in the ITS public computer labs and can now be installed on users’ University- and individually-owned computers. Acquisition of this software is funded through the support of George Hicker, ’68 and contributions to theBrian McLane Legacy Fund, which was created to expand access and opportunities for students with disabilities. 
 
About the software
 
Award-winning Read&Write Gold helps all individuals succeed regardless of ability or learning style. Users can access the reading, writing, studying, and research tools they need at school, home, or work. Having text read aloud with dual color highlighting, along with additional support tools, helps every learner gain confidence and work independently at their pace.
 
The discrete, customizable toolbar works with numerous file types and applications to make digital content understandable and accessible.  Read&Write integrates with Microsoft ® Word, Google Docs™, PDFs, Mozilla Firefox®, Internet Explorer®, Safari, Chrome™, and more.
 
Read&Write Gold is especially helpful for those challenged with the increased demands of college, including: 
  • Those with learning disabilities, such as dyslexia
  • Students trying to balance the demands of extracurricular activities with their course work
  • First-generation college students 
  • English as a Second Language learners
  • International students
  • Adult learners with full-time jobs and families
  • And all others who have difficulty reading and writing
For more information, and a download link, visit the TextHelp Read&Write Gold page in Answers.syr.edu. Contact your local IT support team for assistance installing the software on your University-owned computer.
 
About the webinar
 
ITS has arranged for presentation of a live, one-hour webinar that will take you on a thorough tour of Read&Write Gold, and help you understand how the application can help those you support. Kimberly Nix, M.Ed., TextHelp’s Senior Professional Development Manager in North America, will discuss key tools for empowering university students to maximize their time and effort. She will focus on the areas of accessing digital text, working through reading, creating study guides, gathering information for research, organizing and proofing, paper writing, and more.  A demonstration of how tools function will be interspersed with practical application suggestions to help different kinds of learners with strategies for success. There will be ample opportunity for questions and answers.
 
The webinar will be presented live on March 25, 2015 from 11:00 a.m. to noon (Eastern time). It will be recorded  by TextHelp for later viewing, availability date TBD.
 
You can attend the webinar in room 1-218 in the Center for Science and Technology. Or, you and your team can participate online from a computer at your office location. There are a limited number of log-ons available for the live webinar, and multiple people can watch from a single logged-in location (a conference room or classroom, for example). 
 
Interested?  Please pre-register here.
 
This invitation was sent to those on campus with leadership responsibilities related to: accessibility and disability accommodations; academic advising; teaching of writing; tutoring and student support; international students; English to Speakers of Other Languages; student retention; student development; new student orientation; and information technology. You can see the distribution above. Please feel free to share this with your colleagues, on-campus networks, and others who will find it useful.
 
Questions? Want more information?
 
Please send an email to accessibility@syr.edu, and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.
 
Thank you!

Poetry Book Fair 2015

 
Attention all poets! Point of Contact is hosting its fourth POETRY BOOK FAIR to showcase books by poets from the central New York region. This is an opportunity for local poets to showcase and sell their published work. Part of Cruel April, an annual poetry event presented by Point of Contact, the Poetry Book Fair will kick off on April 2nd and continue throughout the month of April. Poetry books will be left on display at the gallery during poetry events throughout the month and are available for purchase to all visitors.   
 
Poets interested in having their published work showcased at the Poetry Book Fair should email or call the Point of Contact Gallery by March 27th. For more information about the poetry events during Cruel April, or to register for the Poetry Book Fair contact Point of Contact’s administrative and marketing coordinator Amanda Sterling at amsterli@syr.edu.  

HONORS RECEPTION FOR STUDENT VETERANS


Friday, March 27, 2015

6 p.m.
Goldstein Alumni and Faculty Center
2nd floor, 401 University Place
Recognizing student veterans who have earned a GPA of 3.0 
or higher for 12 or more credits completed.
Questions? Call 315-443-0358


SU NEWS

SU NEWS: University Supports Vera House White Ribbon Campaign


Reminder: Call for WGS Graduate Paper Prize Submissions Due 3/20

 
 
Women’s & Gender Studies Department
Graduate Paper Prize for 2014-2015
 
The Women’s & Gender Studies program announces it is now accepting entries for its Toni Taverone
Graduate Paper Prize. The deadline is March 20, 2015. The award amount is $150.
 
Eligibility
Currently enrolled graduate students at Syracuse University who have not previously won the
graduate paper prize may submit papers written in any WGS courses during Spring 2014,
Summer 2014, or Fall 2014.
 
Guidelines
1. Papers are to demonstrate scholarly competence in a subject matter relevant to women’s
and gender studies. Specifically, papers will be selected based on: general excellence; intersectional
gender analysis or use of feminist theory; and interconnections between theory and activism.
2. Faculty may nominate students, or students may enter their own papers.
3. A detachable cover sheet indicating the entrant’s name, the paper title, and the source of
the paper (course title and professor). Also include local address, phone number and email.
4. Two copies of each paper—running header should only contain the paper title and page
numbers (no personal identification).
5. Authorship of papers may be individual or collaborative.
6. Paper may be no more than 25 pages in length.
 
Review Process
Papers are read and ranked (without author identification) by the paper prize committee, which
is established by the Women’s & Gender Studies Department faculty.
 
Please send entries NO LATER THAN March 20, 2015 to the Women’s & Gender Studies Department,
Paper Prize Committee, 208 Bowne Hall.
 
Electronic submissions will be accepted, please send to sademock@syr.edu.
For further information please contact Susann DeMocker-Shedd at 443-3560 or sademock@syr.edu

Nominate someone for the 2015 Rainbow Banquet’s Rainbow Recognition Awards!

 
The 2015 Rainbow Recognition Awards, which will be presented at the Rainbow Banquet, acknowledge and recognize those who have made a significant contribution to people with marginalized genders and sexualities by embodying one of four core values: awareness, community, integrity, and social justice. Please complete the Rainbow Recognition Award nomination form to nominate someone for one of the following awards:
 
The Awareness Award
The Community-Building Award
The Integrity Award
The Social Justice Award
The Emerging Leader Award
 
Nominations are open to all members of the Syracuse University, SUNY-ESF, and greater Syracuse communities. Nominations must be submitted by 11:59 PM on Monday, March 30th to be considered.

Summer Session I, 2015 course: Native Knowledge, Identity, and Learning (CFE 400/600)

 
Online 5/19-6/27
3 credits
 
In this course we propose to explore indigenous knowledges in the local Haudenosaunee communities then contextualize these knowledges in broader sociological and philosophical conversations. Using a cross-disciplinary methodology our course will draw from indigenous oral histories, narrative, history, disability studies, sociology, and philosophy. This course will challenge students to re-think knowledge systems within higher education using exposure to ideas, discourses, and theories that have been commonly shut out or negatively anthropologized in the academy.
 
Kelsey John
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow 
Ph.D. Student 
Cultural Foundations of Education 
Syracuse University
305 Huntington Hall 

2015 “Cripping” the Comic Con: Complete symposium schedule is now online!

 
 

Opportunity for SU Faculty and Staff

 
Celebrate and Welcome Spring
 
The University Wellness Initiative is sponsoring a free Spring Wellness Series for faculty and staff. Join Nicole Christina, L.C.S.W., author of BreatheSavorTaste.com and co-leader of SU’s Mindful Eating Series in discovering how practicing gratitude and eating mindfully can impact your wellness in profoundly positive ways.
 
Gratitude may be one of the most overlooked tools that we all have access to every day. Cultivating gratitude doesn’t cost any money and doesn’t take much time, but the benefits are enormous. Learn simple, fun and scientifically proven ways to become happier, calmer, more optimistic, energetic and generous!
Friday, March 27
Noon-1p.m.
South Campus, Skytop Office Building, Large Conference Room, 2nd fl
Tuesday, March 31
Noon-1p.m.
500 Hall of Languages
 
Mindful eating is not just what you eat, but why. Learn how to savor the experience of eating and develop a healthier relationship between food and your body. Learn how to recognize your body’s hunger and satisfaction cues, which will lead to a simpler, more satisfying approach to eating.  This is not a diet; it is a new way to approach food and eating which has many proven benefits.
Enjoy light refreshments and get a chance to win a gratitude or mindfulness gift basket.
Thursday, April 23
Noon-1p.m.
500 Hall of Languages
Tuesday, April 28
Noon-1p.m.
South Campus, Skytop Office Building, Large Conference Room, 2nd fl
To register: Contact the University Wellness Initiative Office at wellness@syr.edu or call 315-443-5472   
Seats are limited, pre-registration is required. Register for one or both presentations.   

Blog Posting by Prof. Stephen Kuusisto: Inside My Shirt, or if Dr. Seuss Was Blind


The Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities is seeking volunteers

Volunteer staff members and graduate assistants to facilitate the Decision-Making Workshops for the fall 2015 semester.  The workshop is an educational sanction assigned to students who violate the Code of Student Conduct.  Goals include: promoting positive student development in the area of decision-making; providing a safe space for students to express their thoughts and practice in the decision-making skills they learn; and promoting civility and citizenship within the Syracuse University community.  OSRR will provide detailed information on the curriculum, conduct an information session with facilitators, and will schedule workshops based on your schedule.

For more information or to express your interest, please email 
Latisha A. Burke byWednesday, April 1.


Call for Nominations: New Student Convocation Faculty Speaker

The New Student Convocation Planning Committee, co-chaired by Carrie Grogan Abbott in First-Year and Transfer Programs, is seeking nominations for the 2015 New Student Convocation faculty speaker.  The selected speaker will give the faculty address to the incoming undergraduate students.  The committee seeks nominations of dynamic and engaging faculty members to deliver this welcoming message that sets the University's academic expectations and provides advice for personal success.

Nominations and questions can be submitted to 
Carrie until April 10.

Off-Campus & Commuter Services Seeks Community Ambassadors

The Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services is seeking student applicants for the 2015-16 Community Ambassador program.  These students serve as ambassadors and role-models to the residents of the street they live on, provide a point of contact for student-residents, and ease the transition to off-campus living by providing access to resources and build community.  Students can apply through the Off-Campus and Commuter Services website until Monday, March 23.

Non-Taxable Remitted Tuition Application

Are you a staff member currently taking graduate courses at Syracuse University?  Did you know you can apply to have your remitted tuition benefit be non-taxable if it fits certain criteria?  Read more about the application for non-taxable remitted tuition here.

OrangeAbility 2015 is now on Facebook!

 
Please help spread the word about OA15 on Facebook! Join, and if you are comfortable, share with friends.
 

SUMMER 2015 COURSE OFFERING


CFE/SPE 400 & 600 - Equity and Access in Education: A Critical Examination of Inclusive Education on Five Continents Summer Session I: May 18 to June 26, 2015
 
This course provides  an interactive, online experience for participants to engage with critical perspectives on educational opportunities for students who have been labeled with a disability. Students will investigate current transnational themes and events in the field of inclusive education using weekly video-lectures from Disability Studies and international scholars. Class members will engage in readings, online discussions and writing to address international policies and practices on five continents: Africa, South America, North America, Europe and Asia.  
 
The weekly themes include: Pathways to school access and inclusion; History and current issues in special education systems; Disability rights movements, transnational law and policy;  Higher and post-secondary education; Current challenges for equity; CRITICAL disability studies in education in the global south.  

Register at: http://myslice.syr.edu

REGISTRATION STARTS MARCH 18

Questions? Please contact: Lauren Shallish (LeShalli@syr.edu) or Fernanda Orsati (ftorsati@syr.edu)

Planet of the Blind blog post by Prof. Steve Kuusisto: “Hydra”



CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Please join The Association on Aging with Developmental Disabilities (AADD) for our 25th Annual Aging with Developmental Disabilities Conference. 

 This year AADD is hosting at a new venue, with ample space and amenities, offering new online registration, and has new online hotel booking, plus the continuation of high-quality educational conference content on aging with developmental disabilities!
 

SU Graduate Research Symposium coming up this Friday and Saturday (3/20-21)

 
(A collaborative effort between the Future Professoriate Program and the Graduate Student Organization)
 
On Friday afternoon,n the symposium meets jointly with the Graduate History Conference in Tolley, Eggers, and Maxwell Halls – check out the complete lineup for their exciting event at http://historyfpp.syr.edu. Highlights include a keynote address by Catherine Tumber (Northeastern University), “Big Questions about Small Cities in the Mega Age” (2:00 pm in Maxwell 204). Saturday’s program takes place in the Life Sciences Building. In addition to the panels and conference “skill-building” seminars, the poster session (11:15 am-12:45 pm in LSB Atrium) will showcase 16 research projects from across campus. Capping off the event is the finals of the 3-Minute Thesis competition (4:30 pm in LSB 105), followed by a social hour in the Sheraton’s Sitrus lounge.
 
Register for the event by emailing gradresearch@syr.edu with your name and department (or other academic affiliation).
 
Also, today (3/18) is the official deadline to propose a session at the FPP conference, May 14-15! Email me (glwright@syr.edu) with your idea(s) or to request an extension.
 
Best,
Glenn
 
Glenn Wright
Director, Graduate School Programs
The Graduate School

Call for papers for the 2015 American Anthropological Association meetings

 
21st Century Anarchisms
 
After the peak of global justice movements in the late 1990s and early 2000s, many activists around the world have been redefining their activism to work on carving out new life-paths, ideologies, and practices for themselves. In this historical context, practices, ideologies, and forms of organizing that draw from an anarchist tradition seem to be increasing in a diversity of local contexts around the world. Why are these anarchist forms arising now? How do these new forms of activism draw from and/or depart from the movements for global justice? What are the relationships between new anarchisms and the principles of horizontality and autonomy that emerged through the movements for global justice? In what ways do contemporary practices subvert, transgress, reinvent, or re-purpose ‘traditional anarchisms’ from the early 20th century? What new forms is anarchism taking in different social, political, and cultural contexts? What roles do ideology and ethical practice play in the formation of new anarchist subjectivities? How are these movements using transnational social movement networks, electronic media, visual and graphic arts, or indigenous political strategies? How can we use ethnography to investigate these issues? This panel seeks a diverse set of papers that explore 21st Century anarchisms around the world.
 
Send 250 word abstracts to Liv Stone: lkstone@ilstu.edu by April 1, 2015.
 
Dr. Liv Stone
Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology
Dept. of Sociology & Anthropology
Illinois State University
(309) 438-5850

Call for Study Participants

Isabel Rodriguez, a doctoral student at the University of Rhode Island, is conducting a study on people who identify as sexual minorities and also identify with a racial/ethnic minority group (IRB #HU1415-021). To participate, please complete this survey. If you have any questions or concerns, please email Isabel.

Call for Study Participants

 
Jane Zhao, a graduate student in Newhouse studying Media Studies, is seeking participants for her research project entitled Being Told How to Look vs. How I look is Who I Am: How Media Shapes the Experience of Physical Appearance for Lesbian Women in America. If you would like to be interviewed for this project, please email Jane.

Call for Papers: The Global Context of Disability

Volume 3, No. 2, April 15, 2016
 
Global Education Review http://ger.mercy.edu  is a themed international journal that reports on approaches to educational practice and the influence of social, economic, and political forces on educational practice in different countries or global regions.  
 
For this issue we seek papers that help to develop a better understanding of the issues and challenges associated with design and implementation of services for children and youth with disabilities in a variety of global contexts.
 
If you are working on a paper that fits within these parameters, please send an abstract in 12 point font of no more than 250 words toclang@mercy.edu  or rvallice@mercy.edu by June 15, 2015.
 
The full call is attached to this email.
 
Sincerely,
Mel Wermuth, Editor
 
 
 
Recognition that children and youth with special needs have the right to education has been established through a series of international agreements, beginning with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations, 1948) and including the Salamanca Statement and Framework for Action on Special Needs Education (UNESCO, 1994) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (United Nations, 2006). As a result of these agreements, many countries have adopted national policies supporting the right of students with special needs to receive an education.
Even with such policy initiatives, there is considerable variation in the capacity of various nations to respond to the needs of children and youth with disabilities and there are often gaps between official policies and the actual implementation of such initiatives (Winzer & Mazurek, 2014). In many areas of the globe, individuals with disabilities remain highly vulnerable. It has been estimated that of the 15% of the world’s population who live with a disability (World Health Organization, 2011), 80 percent live in developing countries (Barron & Nuebe, 2010). Moreover, the literature suggests that in low and middle-income countries, individuals with disabilities are highly marginalized. Children and youth with disabilities are less likely to attend school (Filmer, 2008) and individuals with disabilities are more likely to live in poverty (Mitra, et al, 2013).
This issue of Global Education Review is focused on developing a better understanding of the variation in providing services to individuals with disabilities around the globe. Specifically, we are interested in papers that highlight the issues and challenges associated with design and implementation of services for children and youth with disabilities in a variety of global contexts.
Please send an abstract in 12 point font of no more than 250 words to clang@mercy.edu or
rvallice@mercy.edu by June 15, 2015. Abstracts will be reviewed for fit. You will be informed if the article is invited for review. Full manuscripts are due by September 1, 2015.


NEWS AND ANNOUNCMENTS

OMA’s Cora A. Thomas Gospel Extravaganza featuring Fred Hammond

Sunday, April 19, 2015
Bethany Baptist Church, 149 Beattie Street, Syracuse NY 13224
Doors Open 4, Event Start 4:30pm

EDF launches its Alternative Report on the UN CRPD

 
Below is a report on CRPD implementation in the EU.  For a look at how the CRPD and ADA compare come to Arlene Kanter's session at Multiple Perspectives http://ada.osu.edu/conferences/2015Conf/2015agenda.html 
 
EDF LAUNCHES ITS ALTERNATIVE REPORT ON THE RIGHTS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
 Brussels, 18 March 2015 | EDF is very happy to announce that it has submitted its Alternative Report on the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with disabilities (UN CRPD) in Europe to the United Nations Committee.
EDF Alternative Report has been prepared in the frame of the review process of the EU by the UN Committee in Geneva. During its 13th session on 2 April 2015, the UN Committee will examine for the first time the report that the EU has submitted describing the work it has done to put in practice the principles of the UN CRPD since its ratification in 2010.
EDF Alternative Report comes to give the view of 80 million Europeans with disabilities on the enjoyment of their political, civil, economic, social and cultural rights. The report is the result of a collective work with EDF’s members, civil society organisations and other stakeholders. Giving a clear view on the situation of persons with disabilities all over Europe would not have been possible without their contribution and expertise. The purpose of EDF’s Alternative Report is to inform the UN Committee about how the UN CRPD has been implemented by the European Union and its institutions, agencies and bodies. The report based its analysis on the gaps in the EU Report on the Implementation of the UN CRPD that the EU submitted to the UN Committee on 5 June 2014 and seeks to complement it where relevant with information received by EDF members and other stakeholders.
WHAT COMES NEXT?
- April: The Committee will adopt the ‘List of Issues’, which is a list of additional questions and requests for clarification that the UN Committee has, and the EU will reply. 
- Last week of August 2015: The Committee will hold its ‘Constructive Dialogue’ with the EU and will adopt its final observations and recommendations on how the EU can improve the situation of 80 million persons with disabilities in Europe. 

In April and August 2015, EDF will be in Geneva to defend its report and express to the UN Committee its main concerns on the implementation of the Convention by the EU. 
DID YOU KNOW THAT…
The UN CRPD is first human rights treaty to ever have been ratified by a regional organisation, like the EU?
 
 
 

In his public blog, Prof. Bill Peace responds to recent NYT article on assisted suicide 


CPIT-related theatre group features in prestigious journal


Merits our responses... 


From The New York Times: Offering a Choice to the Terminally Ill Health care providers in states where assisted suicide is illegal face wrenching decisions.
http://nyti.ms/1CgHrMn

From The New York Times: Birth of a Freedom Anthem

The long, biracial history of “We Shall Overcome.”
http://nyti.ms/1DkJRer

ADA Legacy Tour: Update


Thanks, Prof. Wendy Harbour, who said: "Interesting volunteer opportunity to be a 'co-pilot' on the ADA Legacy Tour.  It requires a two-day commitment, but it's a once-in-a-lifetime thing.  See email below and attachments if you're interested."  Attachments are available at the DCC.  If you need access to information and are not in Syracuse, please email sudcc@syr.edu.  Thank you.

> PLEASE spread the word about copilots, we need more help on the bus.

> Dear Tour Hosts,

> After a stop in Boulder/Longmont today, the Tour is headed to Topeka.  

> Attached is a list (work in progress) of copilots.  Co-pilots are an essential part (hard labor) of the Tour.  The ADA Legacy Project wants to THANK Joe Tate from Austin, TX.  Joe (some call him Joey), copiloted from Orlando-Austin back in early February and has been with the Tour since February 28th, San Antonio-Boulder.  Job WELL done.

> Please note the remaining openings for copiloting, minimum, 2 day commitment. If interested or you know someone who is interested, contact Dave, davefulton@me.com, ASAP, he can explain duties.  In some cases, a passenger who can do heavy lifting would be helpful.

> FYI,

> -In addition to the copilot, Tom and Joy, Daily Activity Coordinator are on the Bus.
> -Joy will be more available after today, especially after Topeka to wrap up details related to your stop.  REMEMBER, it's mandatory to post your stop/itinerary on a web based platform (FB, website, etc.).  Send the address to Holly, holly@portlight.org.

> I've attached updated materials regarding the exhibit (displays), tees, swag, posting.  Use these guidelines going forward.

> Thanks,

> Mark Johnson
> Director of Advocacy
> 404-350-7490
http://www.shepherd.org <http://www.shepherd.org/>

> LIKE http://www.facebook.com/ADALegacy 
> <http://www.facebook.com/ADALegacy>

Of interest: new book and new series

 
Look for the new book published by Peter Lang Publishing, Relational and Responsive Inclusion: Contexts for Becoming and Belonging edited by Mere Berryman, Ann Nevin, Suzanne SooHoo, and Therese Ford and with a foreword by Susan Gabel and Scot Danforth.

Abstract: We challenge traditional paradigms that marginalize or dehumanize those with whom we seek to include by looking at the issues of becoming and belonging through culturally responsive, relational and critical eyes. Socially unjust circumstances are perpetuated by ongoing inadequate classroom, school and system-level responses to social justice imperatives that continue to marginalize populations of Indigenous and minoritized peoples and keep power-sharing solutions to educational disparities closed out.  These disparities continue to influence society in general. The authors propose instead a relational and culturally responsive framework from within a critical and indigenous paradigm that is more likely to lead to one’s sense of becoming and belonging in the world with people, and thus their inclusion. Praxis such as this challenges traditional paradigms that marginalize or dehumanize those with whom we should be seeking to work. Social justice in education must b!
e concerned with recognizing, respecting and being inclusive of the diversity of all students. Social justice is about valuing and including all children for the potential they arrive with and for the families that stand beside them, rather than on what we might aspire to change and mould them into being.

About the series: Inclusion and Teacher Education ISSN: 2373-695X 
Susan Gabel and Scot Danforth (Series Editors)
Historically, inclusive education developed as a reaction to the exclusion of students of minoritized identity groups marked by race, language, sexual orientation, disability, etc. Our position in this series is that inclusion can and should be more. It can be understood as embracing and planning for difference, building relationships across difference, teaching and learning that acknowledges and supports difference while also minimizing the use of identity categories as the foundation for arguments about inclusion. In other words, the silos of educational discourse based on identity categories need to be broken down, little by little, to reconceptualize inclusion as just, compassionate, and creative ways of living, teaching, and learning in a complex and diverse world. Inclusive teaching depends on deeply respectful relationships between teachers, students, and community members. Books in the series must make clear connections between theory and practice. Both are necessary!
 ingredients for inclusion. This series will help teacher educators prepare teachers to be knowledgeable and skillful in teaching all students, regardless of their differences.


Susan L. Gabel, PhD
Professor
Teacher Education & Special Education
College of Education
Wayne State University
289 Education Building
Detroit, MI 48202
Phone: 313-577-6382
Email: susan.gabel@wayne.edu

Note from the Education from the Inside Out Coalition

 
Dear Friends:
 
I am pleased to share with you the great editorial that appeared in Sunday's New York Times (March 15) that calls for colleges and universities to remove application questions that are barriers to college admission for people with criminal records. The editorial cites information from the Center for Community Alternatives' (CCA) report, "Boxed Out" that nearly two thirds of SUNY applicants who checked the "yes" box regarding past felony convictions never completed the application process.
 
Working with the Education from the Inside Out Coalition, CCA will continue to advocate for the complete elimination of criminal background checks in the college admissions process.
 
To read the New York Times Editorial click editorial.
To learn more about the Education from the Inside Out Coalition, click  here.
 
Best,
 
Marsha Weissman, Ph.D. 

LOCAL EVENT OF INTEREST

 
Performing Black Masculinities and Same-Sex Desires: A Spring Symposium Event. Pouring Tea: Black Gay Men of the South Tell Their Stories. March 18th, 7 PM. Community Folk Art Center, 805 East Genesee Street. Breakfast Seminar on Black Queer Studies. March 19th, 9:30 AM, 304 Tolley. Sexual Discretion: Black Masculinity and the Politics of Passing. March 19th, 5:30 PM, 123 Sims.

Article of Interest: Mom With Disabilities and Daughter Reunited After Two-Year Court Battle


Disability Scoop 3.17.15


New Blog Post from B*tch on Wheels: Why Disabled Canadians should care about Bill C – 51


Disability Scoop 3.13.15


National Center for Cultural Competence Accepting Applications for Leadership Academy


Applications are being accepted for the first in a series of five annual leadership academies offered by the Georgetown University National Center for Cultural Competence. This program is a component of the Leadership Institute for Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence, and is funded by a cooperative agreement with the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, part of ACL.

This learning experience is designed for individuals who currently hold, or are interested in taking on, leadership roles to advance and sustain cultural and linguistic competence and cultural diversity in the network of programs that support individuals with developmental and other disabilities.

The academy involves self-reflection, experiential learning, coaching, and mentoring experiences with an emphasis on leading change.  The onsite learning opportunity will take place from June 22-25, 2015 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. To apply, visit http://nccc.georgetown.edu/.

When Mentally Ill Students Feel Alone

The Atlantic; Andrew Giambrone, 3/2/2015
 
On January 25, 2015, Luchang Wang swiped into her residential college at Yale for the last time. It was a Sunday—a day that many Yale students spend in the library, stressed as they prepare for the week ahead. At some point in the next two days, Wang, a sophomore math major, left New Haven and boarded a plane for San Francisco, using a one-way ticket she had ordered online. She would not be coming back. At 1:26 p.m. on Tuesday, January 27, Wang posted a worrying status on Facebook that sent students and administrators frantically searching for her whereabouts. It read, in part:
Dear Yale: I loved being here. I only wish I could’ve had some time. I needed time to work things out and to wait for new medication to kick in, but I couldn’t do it in school, and I couldn’t bear the thought of having to leave for a full year, or of leaving and never being readmitted. Love, Luchang.
About five hours later, Jonathan Holloway, the dean of Yale College, informed the school via email that Wang had died in "an apparent suicide." A subsequent report by the Yale Daily News stated that a "despondent female" had jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge into San Francisco Bay. Although a backpack left on the bridge appeared to belong to Wang, the California Coast Guard couldn’t recover a body and thus couldn’t confirm that she had jumped. Remembered for her compassion, she was 20 years old.
"Upon release from the hospital … my Yale ID was confiscated, as was my room key. I was given one evening to pack up my entire life."
In the weeks following Wang’s death, Yale students have expressed grief and frustration—the latter because of the school’s withdrawal and readmission policiesThese policies, some say, make it especially difficult for students with mental-health issues to feel comfortable leaving campus, even when taking time off from school may improve their wellbeing. According to several Yale undergraduates, some of whom asked for anonymity, there is a significant fear on campus that the administration will force mentally ill students to leave; there’s also a related fear that sick students will not be allowed to return. As a result, students suffering from anxiety, depression, and other disorders may not be getting the treatment they need. And for many of those who are, the question soon becomes: "How much should I open up?"
"The fact that [Wang’s] suicide note specifically mentioned the role of withdrawal and readmission policies was pretty inflammatory among undergraduates," said Caroline Posner, a sophomore at Yale who has advocated for mental-health reform on campus. "There are a number of people who are not seeking out help because of the threat that they will be withdrawn or hospitalized for their conditions. There’s no clear standard established that says exactly what students will get involuntarily hospitalized or withdrawn for. So people will lie to their therapists." (Wang had already withdrawn from and been readmitted to Yale once; the school’s policies state that a second readmission will only be considered "under unusual circumstances, ordinarily of a medical nature.")
To be sure, the complexities of college mental-health policies are not unique to Yale, which serves roughly 5,500 undergraduates. Ivy League schools like BrownPrinceton, and the University of Pennsylvania, as well as other elite schools like Duke and the University of California, have, at times, come under fire for how their bylaws affect mentally ill students. (UPenn, for example, has seen a spate of student suicides in the past two years.) Indeed, the mental health of college students is a perennial concern—and one that only seems to be getting worse.
But for various reasons, including Wang’s death and the media attention it received, the shortcomings of such policies are becoming increasingly visible at Yale. Last week, dozens of students at the Ivy League university confronted school officials at a town hall on mental health, framing their complaints in terms of fundamental fairness and transparency. Ultimately, what’s brewing at Yale illustrates that while individual experiences differ, school policies risk exacerbating students’ existing mental-health battles. At best, that can mean deepened uncertainty; at worst, it can mean being cut off from one’s college community.
Yale’s current policies state that undergraduates in good academic standing have until the 10th day of the semester to petition for a one- or two-term leave of absence. For students who wish to spend that time traveling or completing an internship, this provides an easy option to transition on and off campus: There’s no need to apply for readmission. But if a student has to leave Yale after that deadline, they must formally withdraw. (It doesn’t make a difference if they’re leaving for medical or personal reasons; it can be a diagnosis of cancer, a family emergency, or an onset of major depression.) Furthermore, if a student eventually wants to come back to Yale—a decision he or she may not be ready to make at the time—that person must satisfy several requirements after withdrawal.
For at least a decade, these requirements have caused a good deal of consternation among many Yale students. The bylaws use vague language demanding that students be "constructively occupied" and maintain "a satisfactory standard of conduct" while away from campus—but fail to explicitly define what that means. Typically, though, this translates to undertaking a job or completing college courses. On top of that, students who withdraw for mental-health reasons may be required to seek counseling. Any undergraduate who applies for readmission must return to campus for interviews, which "are normally conducted just prior to the beginning of the term" that the student has reapplied for. Although these students are evaluated by a separate readmissions committee, their chances of getting back in may be affected by the general-applicant pool: Yale’s regulations state that the school can cap the number of students it readmits to control total undergraduate enrollment. (The readmissions-committee chairwoman, Pamela George, couldn’t be reached for comment.)
A Yale spokesman, Tom Conroy, declined to specify the percentage of withdrawn students who are readmitted each year. But the school is more than happy to share how few students are accepted in the first place. Last year, Yale’s admissions rate for the class of 2018 was 6.26 percent—fewer than 2,000 high-schoolers were admitted from a pool of more than 30,000 applicants. This rate was in line with those at other elite schools: HarvardPrinceton, and Stanford accepted an average of 6.1 percent of applicants. Conroy indicated that the acceptance rate for readmission is much higher than that of regular applicants: "The way the policies play out is that the vast majority of students who withdraw are readmitted," he wrote in an email. "The purpose of the readmission process is to determine that the issue or issues that led to a withdrawal have been resolved and that the student will return and be successful and have a rewarding experience."
Still, students who have gone through Yale’s readmission process claim that it is mired in financial and logistical uncertainties. Outside courses cost money, and many schools will offer little or no financial aid to withdrawn students because they are typically only enrolled part-time. Moreover, students with mental illnesses may be required to seek specialized treatment, which can cost thousands of dollars, to prove they are healthy enough to return. As Alexa Little, a junior at Yale who left in 2013 and came back this past fall, recently told Bloomberg"Students who get sick later in the term, or whose chronic health issues flare up unexpectedly, are treated as if they chose to fall ill and punished severely with financial burdens and this complicated process."
On paper, Yale’s readmission requirements seem reasonable, if a little vague. And the bylaws may be vague for a reason: They allow for individual circumstances to be taken into account. Meanwhile, studies show that students who leave school for mental-health reasons should generally seek treatment to get better. And the school has a valid interest in admitting people who can handle their coursework and graduate in a timely manner: Many high-schoolers compete in and outside of the classroom to get in.
Yet, a more cynical interpretation voiced by some students is that Yale effectively treats those with serious mental-health conditions as liabilities rather than as members of the community. A junior studying psychology at Yale who asked to remain anonymous said that the way Yale deals with mental health "creates a culture of shame and silencing and self-silencing," which makes it hard to "feel that you can speak openly and be heard as a student about mental-health issues." She added that Yale’s withdrawal and readmission policies make undergraduates unwilling to be open, above all in regards to suicidal thoughts, self-destructive behavior, and debilitating depression. Discussing these conditions, the student said, may lead officials to question whether a student should be at—or is fit for—Yale.
"It is almost taken as a given that no matter how distressing the thoughts [of self-harm] are, or how productive it might be to talk about them in a therapeutic session, bringing them up will most often result in hospitalization, unless you’re very delicate with your words," she said. "I know students who have been hospitalized involuntarily, or asked to take medical leave. When it happens involuntarily, the assumption is that you’re not capable of protecting yourself, or handling yourself, or even evaluating the state of affairs [you find yourself in] reasonably."
Yale’s policies state that the school can force students to withdraw for medical reasons when they pose "a danger to self or others," or refuse to cooperate with the administration’s efforts to make such a determination. This is standardacross colleges and universities around the country. Yale refuses to comment on specific cases for confidentiality reasons, but student accounts of compulsory withdrawals in op-eds and online forums describe harrowing nights spent at Yale-New Haven Hospital, where undergraduates are taken in emergencies, as well as the various administrative and psychological challenges they faced when trying to return to campus. Last year, Rachel Williams—then a readmitted freshman at Yale—published an essay in the student newspaper recounting her experience of being hospitalized under school’s orders after cutting herself. She was eventually told she would have to withdraw from Yale and go home, with no guarantee of readmission. "Upon release from the hospital … my Yale ID was confiscated, as was my room key," Williams wrote. "I was given one evening to pack up my entire life." She returned to school in January 2014.
"There’s no clear standard ... that says exactly what students will get involuntarily hospitalized or withdrawn for. So people will lie to their therapists."
Although Williams's case may be extreme, such an outcome is what many students likely fear when meeting to discuss mental-health issues with school officials, such as a Yale clinician or academic dean. Tammy Pham, a senior who was friends with Luchang Wang, said many students at elite schools are so driven to succeed that taking a leave of absence does not feel like an option, even if doing so could be beneficial. As at similar schools, there is pressure at Yale to always appear happy or "okay." Pham added that she hopes Yale will remove obstacles to withdrawal and readmission for students, such as the requirement to take courses while away from Yale and the need to declare a leave of absence within the first 10 days of any given semester.
"Basically, the only difference between a leave of absence and withdrawal is foresight, and yet it has massive repercussions," she said. "Ten days seems arbitrary and restrictive."
For its part, Yale in December formed a six-person committee to start reviewing its withdrawal and readmission policies. And in late January, just days after Wang’s death, the university sent a letter to recently readmitted students asking for their "feedback and advice" about the entire withdrawal and readmission process. (It’s unclear whether the letter was sent in direct response to Wang’s death; it was leaked by a readmitted student on Facebook in early February, and the committee’s chairman deferred comment to Conroy, Yale’s spokesman.) Among the questions included in the letter: "Was your decision to withdraw from Yale College affected by your concern for readmission?" and "Did you understand the conditions, if any, of readmission, such as the holding of a job, enrollment in college courses, or therapeutic or medical treatment?" Conroy could not say how long the review will take.
Students have called for changes to Yale’s mental-health policies, resources, and environment for some time now. But undergraduates like senior Geoffrey Smith have recently amplified those calls, supporting a boycott of the annual senior-class fundraising campaign until Yale makes its procedures for withdrawal and readmission less stringent; the campaign has seen an 18.6 percent drop in fundraiser participation this year as compared to 2014. In an email, Smith pointed to recommendations made by student leaders last March as "a precise set of serious and reasonable reforms" for how Yale could ease the burden of taking time off. These include allowing students to take a voluntary leave of absence at least until midterm; for comparison, Harvard College allows students to do so until the seventh Monday of the term. Other reforms include determining requirements for return "tailored to the students’ needs," considering students’ financial means on a case-by-case basis, and informing students of whether they’ve been readmitted to Yale at least one month before their return. If students who withdraw could return to campus more easily, Smith wrote, the fear of involuntary withdrawal would be less "existential," and would not "throw students into [a] terrifying mess."
"Unfortunately, sometimes it takes a death for people to come together and realize there’s a problem. But now, we need to focus on those who are still living."
The debate at Yale comes at a time when mental-health issues are on the rise at schools nationwide. A recent UCLA survey of more than 150,000 college freshmen nationwide found that nearly 10 percent of respondents had "frequently" felt depressed in the past year, up from 6.1 percent in 2010; additionally, respondents rated their emotional health at an average of 50 percent, the lowest level in the survey’s five-decade-old history. Likewise, in 2012, the Association for University and College Counseling Directors revealed that 70 percent of officials who completed its annual member survey said that the number of students on their campus with "severe psychological problems" had increased since the year before. It’s worth noting that at Yale, nearly 40 percent of undergraduates use the school’s mental-health resources before graduating—a demand that, some students claim, has caused long wait-times for appointments and is believed to take a toll on the quality of care.
Victor Schwartz is a psychiatrist who has been studying the mental health of young adults for years. As medical director of the Jed Foundation—a nonprofit devoted to preventing suicide among students enrolled in higher-ed institutions—Schwartz knows of many schools that provide excellent mental-health resources but aren’t doing enough to market and promote them. The popular perception of withdrawal and readmission policies, he added, is as important as the policies themselves: If students believe that they’re punitive or rigid, fewer people will come forward with their problems. "The school has an obligation to offset that negative information," Schwartz said. "Schools are at a disadvantage here for confidentiality reasons; they can’t go out there and say that a particular student’s situation is completely inaccurate in what’s been reported in the school newspaper. But if you’ve accepted a student, you’ve made a certain type of commitment to make sure the student gets to the finish line."
Pham, the Yale senior who knew Wang, says students shouldn’t focus on assigning blame to the school; instead, they should work toward fostering a more positive environment on campus for their peers’ emotional wellbeing. This solution would certainly require updating Yale’s withdrawal and readmission policies, she said. But she believes that students’ concerns can be addressed—at least in part—by improving peer-support systems and promoting education about mental health: a mental-health fellows program, increased communication from the school’s health officials, and workshops during freshmen orientation, for example.
"Yale has the opportunity to lead the way universities treat mental health," Pham said. "It has a lot of power, a lot of visibility. Unfortunately, sometimes it takes a death for people to come together and realize there’s a problem. But now, we need to focus on those who are still living."

Summer Teaching and Facilitator Job Opportunities for SU students

 
Contact Community Services is looking to hire 50 summer students (undergraduate and graduate). The deadline for applications is Friday, April 3, 2015.
 
 
Contact Community Services is looking for
Academic and Enrichment Facilitators for the Summer Bridge Program!
 
The Summer Bridge Program is designed to support children in the retention of their education over the summer.  The program will provide Math and ELA academic assistance along with exciting & engaging “FUN”tivities to groups of 15 - 22 elementary or middle school youth.
 
Candidates must be available to work;
·         Last week of June for Orientation and Planning (days and hours TBA).
·         July 6 - August 7, 2015 (depends on position, see hours).
·         Week of August 10 - 14 for inventory and clean-up (various days and hours TBA).
 
Pay Rate
·         Academic and Enrichment Program Aides will be paid $12/hr.
·         Lead Academic Graduate students will be paid $16/hr.
·         Enrichment Facilitators will be paid $20/hr.
·         Lead Academic Teachers (certified) will be paid $28/hr.
 
 
Positions
 
 
Lead ELA and Math Facilitators (certified teachers and graduate students)
·         Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 11:00 am.
·         Instruct Math or ELA independently.
·         English Language Arts (ELA) Facilitators must have basic knowledge of literacy (reading, writing, and vocabulary) for various grades 3-8.
·         Math Facilitators must have basic knowledge of number and operations, expressions, equations, measurements, and data analysis and geometry for various grades 3-8.
·         The curriculum will be provided.
·         Lead Facilitators will be required to create and implement their own lesson plans.
 
Lead Enrichment Facilitators (undergraduate and graduate students)
·         Monday - Friday 11:30 am - 2:30 pm.
·         Instruct creative activities independently.
·         Activity should be based on the facilitator’s skill or talent that complement students’ academic learning by allowing students to engage in more enjoyable and fun activities.
·         Examples include dance, cooking, sewing, arts & crafts, martial arts, music, creative writing, drumming, basketball, football, photography, cosmetology and more!
·         All supplies and materials will be provided.
·         Lead Facilitators will be required to create and implement their own lesson plans.
Academic and Enrichment Program Aides (undergraduate students)
·         Monday - Friday 7:30 am - 2:30 pm.
·         Assist with the facilitation of ELA, Math and Enrichment activities.
  • Assist with behavioral issues, paperwork, data system and other duties that are associated with program.
  • General set-up and clean-up of activities.
  • Providing supervision and monitoring of program participants in a safe and educational environment.
  • Attend required meeting, trainings/workshops and special events.
  • Help provide safe boarding or disembarking on the school bus.
 
Additional Requirements
·         Provide supervision at all times, including lunch duty.
·         Provide a safe environment by setting up and cleaning classroom daily.
·         All candidates must be comfortable working with diverse groups of students in
grades 3 to 8 in Syracuse and North Syracuse School Districts.
·         Background checks and daily reliable transportation are required.
 
 
To Apply: Submit cover letter & resume by email to: sbequer@contactsyracuse.org by Friday, April 3, 2015

Disability Scoop 3.10.15



Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS