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Weekly Newsletter

September, 25 2017

INDEX



The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

Disabilities as Ways of Knowing: A Series of Creative Writing Conversations

The Moral Injury Project Conference

Matt Sheppard is a Friend of Mine. Thursday, April 9th. 8 PM. Newhouse 3, room 141. Free!

A PLACE AT THE TABLE

SU Event: Disability Rights are Human Rights: Global Perspectives

KELLY MCGONIGAL LECTURE

Speculations: Science Fiction, Chronopolitics, and Social Change

Upcoming Democratizing Knowledge Event

Feminist Reflections on Class, Social Mobility and Black Identities in Colombia

Wednesday April 8, 2015 7:00pm Watson Theater

You’re invited to attend the Creating Change Student Forum! Friday, April 10th, 2:30 – 4:30 PM.

Indigeneity and the Radical Legacy of Anti-Colonialism in Asian American Studies

SU NEWS

SU Ph.D. student Steve Singer: Personal Nonfiction published in Salt Hill Journal, "Come or Go What May"

SU NEWS: Finding the Right Words with the Writing Center

SU NEWS: Comment Period for Academic Strategic Plan Runs Through 4.10.15

Intergroup Dialogue Fall 2015 Courses. Intergroup Dialogue on Race/Ethnicity,

If you are a transfer student and you’d like to be a mentor to incoming transfer students,

Call for Nominations

SU NEWS: University Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Focus / Self-reflect / Relate better / Improve performance / Encourage Peace/ Calm down / Focus / Relate better / Improve performance/

DAILY ORANGE ARTICLE ON ORANGEABILITY 2015

Prof. Steve Kuusisto's Blog: Fake Cripples Coming Soon to a Theater Near You

Student Volunteers and Performers Needed

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, PARTICIPANTS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Public Events at the 2015 Multiple Perspectives Conference

Call for Papers: Lingua – International Journal of Linguistics, Literature and Culture

Call for Participants

Call for Research Participants

CFP: Accessing Higher Ground: April 25th Submissions Deadline Approaching

Call for papers for proposed panel at AAA 2015 – Denver, CO November 18-22

NOTE: THIS CALL CALLS FOR CRITIQUE… (!)

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

NEW BLOG on Disability and Abuse: WHERE ARE THE ADVOCATES?

Position Announcement

New York Lawyers for the Public Interest is hiring a Community Organizer

Disability Scoop 4.3.15

End Child Sexual Abuse Workshop.

Central New York Pride presents an HIV awareness and prevention event.

Mad in America Blog Posting: Pilots Crashing on Antidepressants: A (Not So) Brief History

Disability Culture Day at Western Illinois University

UN rights experts-Discrimination against autistic persons, the rule rather than the exception

The World Premiere of the highly anticipated Tap Waterz,

Disability Scoop 3.31.15

UN Human Rights Council approves landmark Resolution on the right of persons with disabilities

Free Assistance Preparing Your Tax Returns for People with Disabilities and Other Eligible Parties

Disability and Abuse Project News for March 30, 2015

Disability Scoop 3.27.15

New Toll-Free Number for Reporting AODA Violations (Ontario)

Fulbright Webinar for Education Scholars: Teach and/or Research Abroad in 2016-17

Coming soon!: Dialogues on Disability

Article of Interest: New White House receptionist is a West Wing pioneer: 'Deaf people can do anything'

KidFest


SU HAPPENINGS

Disabilities as Ways of Knowing: A Series of Creative Writing Conversations

 
I Dream a World
 
Performance by Nora Johnsen
 
April 16, 2015
Schine Student Center 304ABC
Performance 5:30 to 6:30 PM
Reception 6:30 to 7:30 PM
 
I Dream a World is based on personal interviews with Nora Johnsen, a native Utican, disability rights advocate, and storyteller. Nora was born with Williams Syndrome, a rare genetic condition that causes developmental and physical disabilities. Nora's real-life experiences are condensed and shaped into an artful stage production. Interwoven throughout the piece are flashback scenes where Nora re-enacts childhood memories. Her story is in her own words, as she describes vividly what it was like to grow up longing for peer affection, dignity, and equality. We learn about her struggles, her triumphs, and her dreams. The piece is a must for anyone interested in understanding the experience of living in our world with a disability, and for those interested in educating children about the painful impact of bullying and the lasting imprint of love. I Dream a World was written by Shannon Enders, with Nora Johnsen and Heather Johnsen.
 
American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided during both the performance and the reception. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be provided during the performance.
 
If you require accommodations or need information on parking for this event, please contact sudcc@syr.edu or call 315-443-4486 by 4/10/15.
 
This event is made possible by the Cocurricular Departmental Initiatives Program within the Division of Student Affairs, and cosponsorship by the Disability Cultural Center, the Reneé Crown University Honors Program, the Center on Human Policy, the Disability Student Union, the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, and the Disability Law Society.

The Moral Injury Project Conference

What Did You Fight For, What did you Bring Home: Moral Injury in the Lives of Military Veterans”  
April 18th 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Syracuse University
500 Hall of Languages
On April 18th the Moral Injury Project at Hendricks Chapel will hold a conference entitled: “What Did You Fight For, What did you Bring Home: Moral Injury in the Lives of Military Veterans” in 500 Hall of Languages.
This conference will bring local, regional, and national scholars, clinical practitioners, writers, and artists to address the psychological, spiritual, and artistic dimensions of Moral Injury among veterans. Moral Injury is the damage done to one’s conscience or moral compass when one perpetrates, witnesses, or fails to prevent acts that transgress one’s own moral and ethical values/codes of conduct/understanding.
 
In addition to specific panels, the conference will include an art exhibit by veterans at 914 Works on 914 E. Genesee Street on April 17th from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. and on April 18th from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and a literary reading by members of the Syracuse Veterans’ Writing Group as well as other guest writers on April 18th at 5:30 p.m. at the Goldstein Alumni and Faculty Center.
 
For more information click on the links below. Registration is free and open to the public. Parking is available on street and in University lots free of charge on April 18th.
Press contacts and other queries about the conference should be directed to the Moral Injury Project Coordinator, Andrew Miller anmiller@syr.edu.

The Power of Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). April 9th, 1:30 – 4:30 PM, Whitman School of Management, Milton Room. This event will empower and encourage female STEM majors and highlight the variety of professional opportunities available in these fields. Free for students, $20 for public.Register for The Power of Women in STEM online by April 3rd!

Matt Sheppard is a Friend of Mine. Thursday, April 9th. 8 PM. Newhouse 3, room 141. Free!


 

A PLACE AT THE TABLE

 
Food Justice; Disability Rights
 
with Dr. Anne Bellows, Graduate Program Director,
Food Studies Professor at Syracuse University and Dr. Evan Weissman, Assistant Professor,
Food Studies at Syracuse University
 
Moderated by Steven Singer, Ed.M.
Disability Cultural Center Graduate Assistant
Ph.D. Student, Cultural Foundations of Education/C.A.S. Disability Studies
Syracuse University
 
Date: Friday, April 17th
Time: 12:00-1:30PM
Location: Hoople 106
 
American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and gluten free food will be provided.
 
Please indicate any accommodation requests by 4/10/2015 to sudcc@syr.edu by email or 443-4486 by phone.
Sponsors: Disability Cultural Center, Lisa Thomas at SU Health Services, and the Disability Student Union.
This event is made possible through the Co-Curricular Departmental Initiatives program within the Division of Student Affairs.
 
A Place at the Table
Food is an incredibly important part of many cultures around the world. In what ways do cultures shape our relationships with food? What happens when dietary restrictions, allergies, disabilities, ethics, values, principals, religion, and preferences collide with the cultural norms about food and eating? This ongoing luncheon series will explore these questions while also providing a more normalized eating environment for those routinely left out of food culture. In other words, everyone has a place at the table.

SU Event: Disability Rights are Human Rights: Global Perspectives

Join us for pizza and conversation!
Professor Stephen Kuusisto, Director of The Renée Crown University Honors Program and Mirjahon Turdiyev, a Hubert H. Humphrey Visiting Scholar from Uzbekistan, will be discussing the triumphs and problems faced by disabled citizens around the world. This will be an informal give and take session open to anyone who has an interest in human rights, hosted by two globally recognized disability advocates.   Mirjahon Turdiyev is visiting the Maxwell School this year, studying partnerships between academia and disability organizations.
When and Where:
Thursday, April 9 @ 3:30 PM
Honors Program Suite
306 Bowne Hall
More about Mirjahon Turdiyev from The Maxwell School:

He joins the Maxwell School from Uzbekistan. Previously, he was the Consultant on Disability Affairs for the Japan International Cooperation Agency. While holding this position, he consulted Japanese experts on disability affairs in developing strategy and worked on collaborative projects encouraging action towards disability inclusive policy.  Prior to joining the Humphrey Fellowship Program, Mr. Turdiyev served as a Consultant on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities for UNDP Uzbekistan where he most recently acted as the focal person between the UN in Uzbekistan and the Disabled People’s Organizations (DPO) in order to strengthen the collaboration between the two.  During his Fellowship, he wants to learn about the role of partnerships between academics and disability organizations, as well as advocacy and inclusion of the disabled in policy development.  Mr. Turdiyev holds a Bachelor’s degree in English-Philology from Karshi State University in Uzbekistan.

kELLY MCGONIGAL LECTURE

TUESDAY April7 7:30 p.m. Grewen Auditorium, Grewen Hall Stress is unavoidable, but is it always harmful? Stanford psychologist and award-winning author Kelly McGonigal, Ph.D., offers a surprising new view of stress – one that reveals the upside of stress, and how to capitalize on its benefits. The latest science shows that with the right mindset, stress can make us smarter, stronger, and more resilient. Stress can even help you connect with what you care about most and strengthen close relationships. This talk will explore both what makes stress good for you, and what you can do to get good at stress. The new science of stress resilience will give you a renewed sense of optimism about your own ability to handle whatever challenges life brings. McGonigal is a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University, as well as a fitness instructor and meditation teacher. Her work has been included in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, TIME, Psychology Today, Reader’s Digest, and O, The Oprah Magazine, as well as on NPR and MSNBC. Her research has appeared in publications such as Motivation and Emotion, the Journal of Happiness Studies, and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. McGonigal lives in Palo Alto and New York City

Speculations: Science Fiction, Chronopolitics, and Social Change

April 7, 2015: Performance, Conversation, Screening @ 6:30 p.m.

Upcoming Democratizing Knowledge Event

American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs


Film Screening and Discussion 

Jun Okada, SUNY Geneseo

Derek Chang, Cornell
Tuesday April 21, 2015
4:30pm

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons
Grace Lee Boggs is a 98-year old Chinese American woman, writer, activist, and philosopher rooted for more than 70 years in the African American movement. This film plunges us into Boggs’s lifetime of vital thinking and action, traversing the major U.S. social movements of the last century; from labor to civil rights, to Black Power, feminism, the Asian American and environmental justice movements and beyond. Revolution, Boggs says, is about something deeper within the human experience – the ability to transform oneself to transform the world. Watch the trailer here.
Co-sponsors: African American Studies, Asian/Asian American Studies, Labor Studies Working Group, Women’s and Gender Studies
Free and open to the public. 
Please contact Mary Rose Go (
mmgo@syr.edu, 315-443-8750) if you require accommodations. 

DK Co-Sponsored Events

Feminist Reflections on Class, Social Mobility and Black Identities in Colombia

Lecture by Mara Viveros Vigoya,
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies,
National University of Colombia
Save the date!
Tuesday April 14
4pm

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Bird Library
Sponsored by The Department of Women's and Gender Studies. 

Wednesday April 8, 2015 7:00pm Watson Theater

We shift our focus from remembrance towards liberation, as we present a campus speaker who will give voice to the lives, identities, possibilities, and experiences of trans* communities. 

This year, Kye Allums will be our Trans* Day of Liberation Speaker - Kye Allums is an artist, athlete, activist, and human being. After publicly coming out about his identity in 2010, Kye became the first division I, openly transgender athlete in the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association). After graduating from George Washington University with a degree in Fine Arts, Kye began sharing his trans* experience with other colleges, and universities across the United States. 


Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Resource Center, The Division of Student Affairs

For more information contact: 
lgbt@syr.edu

You’re invited to attend the Creating Change Student Forum! Friday, April 10th, 2:30 – 4:30 PM.

Hall of Languages 107. Student delegates to the 27th National Conference on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans* Equality: Creating Change will share experiences, insights, and reflections gleaned from their attendance. Refreshments will be provided. American Sign Language will be provided. 

Indigeneity and the Radical Legacy of Anti-Colonialism in Asian American Studies


A Skype Discussion with Dean Saranillio, NYU
Friday April 17, 2015
12PM

Hillyer Room (Bird 606)
This session will examine the important “separate and distinct, but interconnected” logics of labor exploitation, war and settler colonialism. By examining the intersection of these three issues, we will question the overlapping but non-equivalent histories of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Asking not just how we might be oppressed, but where we might be simultaneously positioned as oppressed and oppressive, we will together examine how we might better organize within our own communities by reactivating a historical legacy of anti-colonial thought in Asian American communities. Please read the attached PDF for this discussion.
A part of the Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month. #SU_AAPIMONTH
For more event details or questions, please visit multicultural.syr.edu or contact Huey Hsiao at 315-443-9676 or 
huhsiao@syr.edu


SU NEWS

Ph.D. student Steve Singer: Personal Nonfiction published in Salt Hill Journal, "Come or Go What May"

A nonfiction narrative about acquiring disability and self-determination.
Journal available for purchase:  http://salthilljournal.net/
OR
contact Singer directly for access to the piece: sjsinger@syr.edu

SU NEWS: Finding the Right Words with the Writing Center


SU NEWS: Comment Period for Academic Strategic Plan Runs Through 4.10.15


Intergroup Dialogue Fall 2015 Courses. Intergroup Dialogue on Race/Ethnicity,

Tuesdays, 3:30 – 6:15. Women’s Dialogue on Race & Gender, Wednesdays, 3:45 – 6:30. Dialogue on Sexuality and Gender, Thursdays, 3:30 – 6:15. To register,[intergroupdialogue.syr.edu]apply for Intergroup Dialogue online.

If you are a transfer student and you’d like to be a mentor to incoming transfer students,

this is the perfect opportunity! You must be a sophomore by Fall 2016, have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, have no current academic or judicial sanctions, and be willing to make a commitment for the entire fall semester.[Newtosu.syr.edu]Apply to be a transfer mentor today! Applications due April 1st.

Call for Nominations

 
The New Student Convocation Planning Committee is seeking nominations for the 2015 New Student Convocation faculty speaker. The selected speaker will give the faculty address to the incoming undergraduate students during the Convocation on August 27th.  Nominations and questions can be emailed to Carrie Abbott until April 10.

SU NEWS: University Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month


Focus / Self-reflect / Relate better / Improve performance / Encourage Peace/ Calm down / Focus / Relate better / Improve performance/

 
A Syracuse University academic course that includes meditation and yoga!!
 
CRS 347 Mindful Communication Skills
May 18th – June 25th (Summer Session 1)
3 credit course / Registration code 73350
Monday – Thursday / Noon – 1:45
 
Activities include:
Yoga**
Journaling
Daily meditation practice
Readings, lecture and discussion
Application to concrete communication skills such as listening
Review of the benefits of meditation and mindful communication
Sharing student-developed practices and exercises
 
**Tuesday/Thursday 12-12:40 yoga class with alignment-based
yoga specialist Dara Harper. More info about her background
and other classes at http://yogawithdara.com/
(sponsored by Hendricks Chapel).
 
 
SU employees—consider auditing the course!
 
Questions? Want the syllabus? Contact Dr. Diane Grimes, dsgrimes@syr.edu       

DAILY ORANGE ARTICLE ON ORANGEABILITY 2015


Prof. Steve Kuusisto's Blog: Fake Cripples Coming Soon to a Theater Near You


Student Volunteers and Performers Needed

 
On April 12, more than 500 high school students will arrive on campus with sleeping bags and high hopes for the third annual Own the Dome overnight event.  They have all been admitted to SU, but many are still deciding which college they will attend in the fall.  This event provides the students with a fun-filled night of activities, entertainment, and camaraderie.  Student volunteers are needed to welcome newly-admitted students, help with check-in and team-building activities, and provide general support.  Students can apply to be a volunteer through the Own the Dome volunteer page.  Students are also needed to perform during the event.  Students can sign up to audition on the Own the Dome student performer page.

If you know students who would be great volunteers or performers, please encourage them to participate!  If you have questions, please email 
ownthedome@syr.edu or visit the Own the Dome website.


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Public Events at the 2015 Multiple Perspectives Conference

 
Celebrate Our Past - Write Our Future: Public Lectures at the 2015 Multiple Perspectives Conference
 
April 13th  3:00 p.m. - The Ken Campbell Lecture on Disability Policy "The Stories We Tell: The Americans with Disabilities Act After 25 Years"   presented by Lennard J. Davis. Based on his forthcoming book, Enabling Acts,  Davis tells the human story of the passage, successes and failures of the ADA as it applies to employment, education, commerce andshifting social attitudes.  Followed by Student Perspectives a reception and student poster competition encouraging students, faculty and the community to share their interests in disability.  
 
April 14th  3:45 p.m. - The Ethel Louise Armstrong Lecture on Disability Art & Culture “The Hearing World Around Me” presented by Trix Bruce reflects culture clash and connection, contact and confusion, and the many ways which language and identity can shape our perceptions. 
 
Thanks to the generous support from the Ethel Louise Armstrong Fund and The Ohio State University’s ASL program, Student Life Disability Services and Officer of Diversity and Inclusion these event are free and open to the public.  For more information or conference registration: http://ada.osu.edu/conferences.htm

Call for Papers: Lingua – International Journal of Linguistics, Literature and Culture

 
The “Lingua – International Journal of Linguistics, Literature and Culture” (Linqua-IJLLC) is a peer reviewed journal which accepts high quality research articles. It is an annual journal published each August.
 
“Linqua-IJLLC” is available to all researchers who are interested in publishing their scientific achievements focusing on theories, methods and applications in Linguistics, Literature and Culture. We welcome submissions focusing on theories, methods and applications in both articles and book reviews.  All articles must be in English.
 
Regular publications of the “Linqua- IJLLC” are uploaded on our website. Moreover, the European Scientific Institute, the publisher of the “Lingua Journal” mails printed copies of the journal to the authors of the papers.

For any other information please send us e-mail on:
 

Call for Participants

 
Tired of all the negative stereotypes associated with the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans* (LGBT) community? Want to educate people? Help us! This Communications 346 project seeks to educate people with true representation of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans* community. All students who identify within these communities and are willing to share their stories & experiences are welcome. If you’re interested, please contact Sarah MartinezAudrey Heurlin, or Katie Woelfel.

Call for Research Participants

Maria Brown, a Syracuse University professor, is conducting a study called Social Support and Sexual Minority Women with Breast Cancer. Adult women of all ages and from all walks of life who identify as a member of a sexual minority (lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, or women who have sex with women) are invited to share their breast cancer experiences. If you’re interested in participating, you may take the survey online.

CFP: Accessing Higher Ground: April 25th Submissions Deadline Approaching


Call for papers for proposed panel at AAA 2015 – Denver, CO November 18-22

 
Belief Systems, Sexualities, Queer Subjectivities
                          
This panel examines the relationships between belief and sexuality as lived/experienced/expressed by queer subjects. The tensions between established religious traditions and non-normative sexualities are well documented in the anthropological literature (Boellstorff 2005; Chapman 2008; Erzen 2006, Shokeid 2002). Evidenced in these works, many individuals and organized religious groups have found ways to overcome the dissonance between seemingly disparate cultural realms. In addition to those queer subjects who engage with traditional religion, there are others whose religious/spiritual practices lay outside of the mainstream. For many individuals, these practices form complex relationships with sex and sexuality.   For example, gay-identified men who have sexualized the worship of “Satan,” elder trans-women reworking earth-based (wiccan/pagan) spiritualties, gay porn stars for whom tattooing plays a predominant role in their spiritual lives, the resurrection and reworking of ancient religious practice in queer sexual contexts, the relationships between ‘new age’ spirituality and queer sexual communities.
 
We welcome proposals that seek to examine the relationships between religious/spiritual/belief systems and non-normative sexual subjectivities.  
 
Please submit a proposal title, an abstract up to 250 words, full name, and affiliation to rfphillips@bsu.edu and brianat73@gmail.com by Friday, April 10.

NOTE: THIS CALL CALLS FOR CRITIQUE… (!)

CALL FOR PAPERS
114th AAA Annual Meeting (Denver, Colorado; November 18th - 22nd, 2015)
Panel Title: Biocultural Perspectives on Normal, Physiologic Birth
Panel Organizers: Nicole Falk-Smith (University of South Florida), Courtney Everson (Oregon State University), and Melissa Cheyney (Oregon State University)
Please submit abstracts for consideration by April 7th.
Questions or to submit abstracts, please email us at:
Nicole Falk-Smith: nfalk@mail.usf.edu
Panel Abstract:
Evolutionary anthropologists have argued that human childbirth is unique relative to other primates in at least two major ways. The mechanisms of labor in humans tend to be more complex as the encephalized fetal head and broad shoulders must navigate the bipedal pelvis, and humans tend toward assisted, rather than solitary, births. This combination of complexity and assisted delivery in humans has been hypothesized to have set humans on a trajectory toward cultural intervention in birth, with one of the more glaring examples of this seen today in the United States where $98 billion per year is spent on the provision of high-tech, low-touch maternity care. Even so, the US currently ranks 47th in the world for maternal mortality and 51stfor deaths occurring during the first year of life. As a result, researchers have begun to question whether there exists a sufficient understanding of what constitutes normal, physiologic labor, birth and early postpartum processes. As obstetric care grows more costly it is important to understand when to intervene and when to allow birth to unfold under the power of the woman's own body, how to prevent postpartum mood and attachment disorders, and when and how to support families when these cannot be avoided.
Research on normal, physiologic birth is now a major area of research in medical and reproductive anthropology with significance across many fields, including clinical, public health and social justice arenas. Anthropological research on childbirth has the potential to improve women’s and infants’ experiences and outcomes cross-culturally by helping to grow our understanding of normal physiologic birthing processes and the impediments to those processes that may disrupt evolved, hormonal and psychosocial adaptations of human childbirth. Women’s experiences of and outcomes in childbirth vary widely based on cultural norms, access to resources, parity, maternal age, social race, socio-economic status, and place of birth and attendant type. As such, complex methods and theoretical models are needed to study the ways evolved biology, cultural performance, and political-economic inequities combine to influence global patterns in maternal and infant health.  
We seek papers that take a biocultural approach to examining normal, physiologic birth across varied cultural settings and use a wide array of experimental and established methods. We invite students, developing, and established researchers at various stages of project design and publication to submit abstracts for consideration.  By including a multiplicity of voices, we hope to elucidate research past, current, and yet to come as we explore together anthropology’s contribution to normal physiologic childbirth research.


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

NEW BLOG on Disability and Abuse: WHERE ARE THE ADVOCATES?


Position Announcement

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Center for Students with Disabilities
Adaptive Technology Specialist/Disability Services Coordinator
 
Job Opening ID:  10349
Posting Title:  Adaptive Technology Specialist/Disability Services Coordinator
 
The Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater seeks applicants for an Adaptive Technology Specialist (ATS)/Disability Services Coordinator. This is a 100%, 12 month position.
 
 
 
The ATS supports the integration of students with disabilities into the UW-Whitewater community by ensuring equal access to all university print and electronic instructional materials. The ATS is responsible for providing adaptive technology interventions to ensure educational access for a broad array of disability populations including, but not limited to, individuals with visual impairments, language and learning disabilities, traumatic brain injuries, hearing loss, and motor and dexterity barriers. The Adaptive Technology Specialist will coordinate the production and distribution of alternative format materials including Braille, e-text, Kurzweil 3000/Firefly, audio-text, large print and tactile graphics to eligible students. Additionally, the ATS works with faculty and staff to assist in maintaining an accessible learning environment.  This position is a leadership position in the area of adaptive technology and is expected to function as a resource to both campus and community stakeholders.
 
The ATS also works as a Disabilities Services Coordinator (DSC) with a caseload of students. Service Coordination includes reviewing disability documentation, determining appropriate accommodations, fostering students’ self-advocacy, and other related case management duties. 
 
Qualifications:
 
Required: Minimum of a bachelor’s degree in rehabilitation engineering, rehabilitation technology, computer science, vocational rehabilitation, special education, social work, or related field with work the field of education or disability services and direct services required in the position.
Preferred: Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Technology, Rehabilitation Engineering, Computer Science, Rehabilitation Counseling, Counseling Psychology, Social Work, Special Education, or a related field strongly preferred with a minimum of two years working with Adaptive Technology in the field of education or disability services.
 
A complete application package must include a letter of application, vita including all relevant professional experience and a list of five professional references. Only complete applications will be considered.  Unless confidentiality is requested in writing, lists of applicants must be released upon request.  Finalists cannot be guaranteed confidentiality. Finalist will need to provide copies of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts.
 
Please send application materials to:
Patty Beran
2002 Andersen Library
800 W. Main St
Whitewater, WI 53190
[beranp@uww.edu]beranp@uww.edu
Phone: 262-472-4711
 
Applications received by April 26, 2015 are given preferred consideration; the position is considered open until otherwise noted.  For questions please contact Scott Ritter, ritters@uww.edu
 
AA/EOE. Women, members of minority groups and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

New York Lawyers for the Public Interest is hiring a Community Organizer

 
 
New York Lawyers for the Public Interest is hiring a community organizer in our Health Justice program.
 
The Health Justice program brings a civil rights and immigrant rights focus to health care advocacy in New York City. In partnership with individuals and community-based organizations, we use a wide range of advocacy tools to challenge health disparities and ensure access to high quality health care for people from medically underserved neighborhoods. Current campaigns focus on immigrant access to health care, language access, the impact of hospital closings on low-income communities of color, and access to physical education in schools.
 
The Community Organizer will be an integral part of the Health Justice team, working alongside attorneys and advocates to develop and implement the program’s campaigns and cases. In addition to community outreach, the organizer will be responsible for helping to develop community campaigns; lobbying; building coalitions of community members and community-based organizations and taking a leadership role where necessary; communicating about advocacy campaigns to diverse audiences; convening trainings and meetings; creating outreach materials; assisting with factual development for litigation; providing technical assistance to community leaders and activists; and educating the public, elected officials and the media about health justice issues.
 
 
Applications will be accepted until April 30, 2015.
 
LAURA F. REDMAN
Director, Health Justice Program
N Y L P I     
New York Lawyers for the Public Interest
151 West 30th Street, 11th Floor, New York, NY 10001-4017
tel: (212) 244-4664  fax: (212) 244-4570

Disability Scoop 4.3.15


End Child Sexual Abuse Workshop.

Fee of $15. Register for one of the following dates. Tuesday, April 7th, 11:30 – 2:00 PM at Vera HouseThursday, April 9th, 4:30 – 7:00 PM at Vera House. Thursday, April 16th, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM at Child Care Solutions. Saturday, April 18th, 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM at Downtown YMCA. Tuesday, April 21st, 5:30 – 7:30 PM at McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center. Wednesday, April 29th, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM at McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center. EmailVera House to register for sessions at that location. Email Child Care Solutions to register for sessions at that location. Email the Downtown YMCA to register for sessions at that location. Call 315-701-2985 to register for sessions at the McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center.     
 

Central New York Pride presents an HIV awareness and prevention event.

Speaker: Ann Janeski, Executive Community Liaison to Gilead Sciences. April 13th at noon, upstairs at Dinosaur Barbeque, 246 West Willow Street. Respond to Central New York Pride by March 27th to reserve your spot.

Mad in America Blog Posting: Pilots Crashing on Antidepressants: A (Not So) Brief History


Disability Culture Day at Western Illinois University


UN rights experts-Discrimination against autistic persons, the rule rather than the exception

 
For World Autism Awareness Day - Wednesday 2 April 2015 

Discrimination against autistic persons, the rule rather than the exception – UN rights experts


GENEVA (30 March 2015) – Two United Nations human rights experts today  called for an end to discrimination against autistic persons and a celebration of diversity. Speaking ahead of World Autism Awareness Day, the Special Rapporteurs on the rights of persons with disabilities, Catalina Devandas Aguilar, and on the right to health, Dainius Pūras, noted that about one per cent of the world’s population -some 70 million people- is estimated to be on the autism spectrum worldwide. 

“As part of human diversity, autistic persons should be embraced, celebrated and respected. However, discrimination against autistic children and adults is more the rule rather than the exception. 

In many countries, autistic persons lack access to services which would support, on an equal basis with others, their right to health, education, employment, and living in the community. When available, services are too often far from human rights friendly or evidence-based. 

Autistic persons are particularly exposed to professional approaches and medical practices which are unacceptable from a human rights point of view. Such practices – justified many times as treatment or protection measures – violate their basic rights, undermine their dignity, and go against scientific evidence. 

Autistic children and adults face the proliferation of medicalized approaches relying on the over-prescription of psychotropic medications, their placement in psychiatric hospitals and long-term care institutions, the use of physical or chemical restraint, electro-impulsive therapy, etc. This may be particularly harmful and lead to the deterioration of their condition. All too often, such practices amount to ill-treatment or torture. 

The autism spectrum should be understood from a broader perspective, including in research. We call for caution about enthusiastic attempts to find the causes of autism and ways to ‘cure’ autism through sophisticated but not necessarily ethical research. Autism as a condition is a critical challenge for modern health systems, in which we need to ensure that the practice and science of medicine is never again used to cause the suffering of people. 

More investment is needed in services and research into removing societal barriers and misconceptions about autism. Autistics persons should be recognized as the main experts on autism and on their own needs, and funding should be allocated to peer-support projects run by and for autistic persons. 

It is about providing individuals and families with the necessary skills and support to have choice and control over their lives. It is also about equal opportunities, access to inclusive education and mainstream employment to achieve equality and rights enjoyment by autistic persons. It is about promoting their independence and respecting their dignity. 

Autistic persons should be respected, accepted and valued in our societies, and this can only be achieved by respecting, protecting and fulfilling their basic rights and freedoms.” 

ENDS 

Ms. Catalina Devandas Aguilar (Costa Rica) was designated as the first Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities in December 2014 by the UN Human Rights Council. Ms. Devandas Aguilar has worked extensively on disability issues at the national, regional and international level with the Strategic Partnerships with the Disability Rights Advocacy Fund, the UN unit responsible for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the World Bank. Her work has focused on the rights of women with disabilities and the rights of indigenous peoples with disabilities. Learn more, log on to: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Disability/SRDisabilities/Pages/SRDisabilitiesIndex.aspx 

Mr. Dainius Pūras (Lithuania) was appointed as the Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health by the UN Human Rights Council in June 2014. Mr Pûras is a Professor and the Head of the Centre for Child psychiatry social pediatrics at Vilnius University. He is also a human rights advocate who has been actively involved during the last 30 years in the process of transforming public health policies and services, with special focus on the rights of children, persons with mental disabilities, and other vulnerable groups. Learn more, visit: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Health/Pages/SRRightHealthIndex.aspx 

The UN Special Rapporteurs are part of what is known as the ‘Special Procedures’ of the Human Rights Council. Special Procedures, the largest body of independent experts in the UN Human Rights system, is the general name of the Council’s independent fact-finding and monitoring mechanisms that address either specific country situations or thematic issues in all parts of the world. Special Procedures’ experts work on a voluntary basis; they are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work. They are independent from any government or organization and serve in their individual capacity. 

For more information and media requests, please contact Krista Orama (+41 22 928 9286 / korama@ohchr.org) or Dolores Infante-Cañibano (+ 41 22 917 9768 / dinfante@ohchr.org

For media inquiries related to other UN independent experts: 
Xabier Celaya, UN Human Rights – Media Unit (+ 41 22 917 9383 / xcelaya@ohchr.org)   

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Check the Universal Human Rights Index: http://uhri.ohchr.org/en
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he World Premiere of the highly anticipated Tap Waterz,

in studio Interview & performance on the "HOT BOX", with Hot 97's legendary dj, DJ Enuff!! CLICK ON THE LINK & WATCH NOW...

http://thatsenuff.com/2015/03/30/tap-waterz-inspires-and-drops-knowledge-in-the-hot-box-video/?wt=3

Disability Scoop 3.31.15


UN Human Rights Council approves landmark Resolution on the right of persons with disabilities

NOTE: Unclear if webcast is captioned or audio described. Please direct queries to tfleury@ida-secretariat.org.
Geneva, 27 March 2015 – The Human Rights Council approved a landmark Resolution on the right of persons with disabilities to live independently and be included in the community on an equal basis with others.
In a joint voice along with over 50 co-sponsors, Mexico introduced the proposal Resolution on the right of persons with disabilities to live independently and be included in the community on an equal basis with others to the Human Rights Council recalling that persons with disabilities represent 15% of the world population, and stressing that one of main existing challenges is to combat discrimination faced by persons with disabilities, which often deliberately brings them to exclusion and segregation.
The Resolution - approved last Thursday without vote by the Human Rights Council - recalls the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol and stresses the need for persons with disabilities to be guaranteed the full enjoyment of their rights and freedoms without discrimination.
Legal capacity or forced institutionalization
Following the spirit and letter of the CRPD, the Resolution emphasises the deep concern expressed by UN States to the negative impact of laws or practices on the rights of persons with disabilities that deprive them of their legal capacity or allow for their forced institutionalization on the basis of a real or perceived disability.
In that sense, the Resolution urges States parties to, inter alia, (a) guarantee equal recognition before the law of persons with disabilities and ensure that they have the opportunity to exercise control over their lives on an equal basis with others; (b) prevent isolation or segregation, and take further measures towards their deinstitutionalization; and (c) provide persons with disabilities with access to a range of support services that are responsive to their individual choices, wishes and needs, including for their deinstitutionalization.
In addition, the Resolution emphasises that access to physical environment, transportation, information and communications, as well as other services and facilities provided to public, are a key to independent, autonomous living and equal participation in society by persons with disabilities.
Women and girls with disabilities
The UN States parties expressed deep concerns that girls and women of all ages with disabilities are subject to multiple, aggravated or intersecting forms of discrimination, with particular risk of segregation, violence and abuse. To respond to this, the Council urges States to take all appropriate measures to eliminate discrimination against women and girls with disabilities and to promote gender equality, in order to ensure the equal enjoyment of their rights, in particular to live independently and be fully included and participate in the community on an equal basis with others.
International cooperation
The Council recognizes the importance of international cooperation and its promotion in support of national efforts to promote the rights of persons with disabilities, including the right to live independently and be included in the community on an equal basis with others without discrimination, and in this regard encourages the mobilization of public and private resources on a sustainable basis to mainstream disability in development and underlines the need to promote and strengthen international cooperation at all levels, the exchange of good practices and partnerships for disability-inclusive development. Furthermore, the Council encourages States to engage in international cooperation efforts aimed at enhancing their national capacities to fully guarantee the right of persons with disabilities to live independently and be included in the community on an equal basis with others, and invites the Office of the High Commissioner and relevant United Nations agencies to consider ways to foster international cooperation activities in this regard.
The Council also calls upon States to ensure that all international cooperation is inclusive of persons with disabilities and does not contribute to creating new barriers for them.
Marrakesh Treaty
Following the efforts of other international bodies, the Council calls upon States to consider becoming party to the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired, or Otherwise Print Disabled.
Mainstream disability within the Council’s agenda
The Resolution urges States to consider further integrating and mainstreaming the perspective and rights of persons with disabilities into the work of the Human Rights Council and, for that, encourages more involvement and participation of representative organizations of persons with disabilities, civil society, national monitoring bodies and human rights institutions.
Decisions
1. The next annual interactive debate on the rights of persons with disabilities will be held on March 2016, and will be focused on article 11 of the CRPD, on situations of risk and humanitarian emergencies with provision of international sign interpretation and captioning.
2. The Resolution on the rights of persons with disabilities will be biennial, starting from 2017; which means thatthis resolution will be presented by New Zealand and Mexico every two years, and no more in an annual basis. New Zealand explained in the introduction of the Resolution that this decision aims to minimise duplication with the UN Third Committee and to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the Council’s work.
Eight States expressed in a joint statement delivered by Brazil that, while they support the rationalization of the work of the Council, including the possibility of reducing the frequency of certain resolutions, they believe that such actions should be the result of a comprehensive exercise, where all countries and relevant stakeholders have the opportunity to participate and contribute to the deliberations. Further, they requested to be included in the record that they reserve their rights to introduce such a resolution at any given time.
We expect that the final text of the Resolution will be published early next week and it will be circulated to this list. Further, we are preparing a detailed report disability-related on the 28th Human Rights Council session, which will also be circulated soon.
The presentation of the Resolution by New Zealand and Mexico to the Council can be watched at
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Free Assistance Preparing Your Tax Returns for People with Disabilities and Other Eligible Parties

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) offers free tax preparation help through two programs. The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, or VITA program, is usually limited to people who make $53,000 or less, individuals with disabilities and the elderly, and people who speak limited English. Trained volunteers can help you prepare your tax returns and help you find out if you may be eligible for special credits such as theEarned Income Tax Credit or Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled. In addition, theTax Counseling for the Elderly program offers free tax help for all taxpayers, particularly those who are 60 years of age and older. This program specializes in tax issues like retirement and pensions that are unique to seniors.
For more information be sure to check out this post on Disability.Blog, “Services at the IRS for People with Disabilities.”

Disability and Abuse Project News for March 30, 2015

 
Sexual assault is in the news:  Check out who are the perpetrators in stories online#s 11,13, 33, 48 and 111 - ages 22 to 73, both men and women, including authorized school staff (teachers and teacher aides), a city official working at a storage facility (48) and a city bus driver (111). Both men and women. Physical assault by teens #7, middle ager #26Murder  by starvation of 67 year old #14 by 25 year old.
And , strangely, a woman with a measured IQ of 52 is charged with a murder-for-hire plot #16.  And, some good news, too:    #76: convicted sex offenders to be separated from people with disabilities in group homes#105 - campaign for cameras in special education classrooms
 
The Disability and Abuse Project of Spectrum Institute supports this newsfeed. These are articles involving people with disabilities across the life span, any type of disability and any type of maltreatment, abuse, crime or, articles regarding law enforcement issues and individuals with disabilities. We have a particular focus on individuals with developmental disabilities. We welcome your input and feedback regarding this feature of our CANDO List. Please note that the articles are listed in alphabetical order by state, so you can easily scan through the articles for those within your state or other states in which you have a particular interest.

Disability Scoop 3.27.15


New Toll-Free Number for Reporting AODA Violations (Ontario)


Fulbright Webinar for Education Scholars: Teach and/or Research Abroad in 2016-17

Tuesday, April 7, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT (with live Q&A) – REGISTER ONLINE
 

Coming soon!: Dialogues on Disability


Beginning on April 15, join me at the Discrimination and Disadvantage blog (http://philosophycommons.typepad.com/disability_and_disadvanta/2015/03/coming-soon-dialogues-on-disability.html)  on the third Wednesday of every month for “Dialogues on Disability,” an exciting new series of interviews I will conduct with disabled philosophers in a variety of positions and situations vis-à-vis philosophy: students and faculty, untenured and tenured, unaffiliated and affiliated.  Read the interviews and learn about the philosophy that these philosophers write and why they write it, how they do philosophy and why they do it, their efforts to improve the climate of philosophy, the forms of institutional and personal prejudice that they confront, the future of philosophy of disability, and much, much more! If you would like to nominate someone to be interviewed (including yourself!), please feel free to write me at s.tremain@yahoo.ca<mailto:s.tremain@yahoo.ca>.

Mark your calendars!

Shelley Tremain

Article of Interest: New White House receptionist is a West Wing pioneer: 'Deaf people can do anything'


KidFest



The Syracuse University Volunteer Organization (SUVO) is looking for volunteers for the 25th annual Kidfest, which is scheduled for Friday, April 17th tentatively from 3:00 - 5:00 PM in Flanagan Gymnasium. Kidfest brings Syracuse kids from after-school programs and Syracuse University students together for a fun carnival-type event. You and your organization are invited to coordinate an activity for Kidfest. We encourage you to pick an activity that is related to your student organization.

On the day of Kidfest, we ask that between 5-7 people be present to supervise your activity. Each student organization also has a table available to use. If you would like to have more volunteers, you may coordinate shifts with your organization. If you decide to do so, we must be notified of the shifts. Each volunteer will receive a free Kidfest volunteer t-shirt.
For more information about Kidfest or to sign up your organization, please send an e-mail toshawcenter@syr.edu or stop by the Mary Ann Shaw Center for Public and Community Service, located at 237 Schine Student Center down the hallway between Cash Operations and the Box Office. SUVO will meet with organizations that have signed up a week prior to the event, in which one person from each organization must attend. Thank you for your interest in Kidfest, and we look forward to hearing from you!


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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