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Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

INDEX

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  

Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Monday with your submission.

 

SU HAPPENINGS

DEAF-INITELY IRONIC…? “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON 2016 IS HERE!!

The Politics of Disability Identity at ADA +25 - Prof. Samuel Bagentos

SPRING 2016 EVENTS HOSTED OR CO-HOSTED BY THE DISABILITY CULTURAL CENTER (DCC)

Feminist Dialogues on April 1st

Strategies to improve Time Management, Organization and Planning (STOP) group

Moving for Social Justice: Putting Your Whole Self In

Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Children's Book Release & Reading

Department of Anthropology Speaker Series presents: Ken MacLeish

From the LGBT Resource Center

Opportunity For All Doctoral Students: The Productive and Inspired Academic 

ITS adds walk-in consulting and expands workshops for improving the accessibility of documents, web pages, and videos

Maymester 2016 Courses offered

Course listings for the Fall 2016 semester for the Consortium for Culture and Medicine

SU NEWS

Symposium speaker address diversity and inclusion on university campuses

It’s On Us Week of Action Includes Visit by White House Advisor on Violence Against Women

Syracuse University continues work on accessibility, but some say more needs to be done | The Daily Orange – The Independent Student Newspaper of Syracuse, New York

InclusiveU director helps rethink Syracuse University academics | The Daily Orange – The Independent Student Newspaper of Syracuse, New York

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Paid Summer Internship Program at 2Gether-International

Conference 2016: AHEAD & pepnet 2 Co-Convene in July!

Registration open and Featured Public Events for the 16th Annual Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability Conference

Registration is now open online for the 26th Annual Aging with Developmental Disabilities Conference

Participate in a national study of closed captions in higher education

Applications Due April 1st for New Sector's Social Impact Fellowships

Critical Questions in Education--Fall Symposium

NDI-AFP Loan Committee Member Application 

Deadline Extended: Women’s & Gender Studies Department Graduate Paper Prize for 2015-2016

Funding Opportunity: The New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council

Seeking submissions for: Sex, Security, and the Corporate University: The Zine

Call for presentations for the International Society of Ethical Psychiatry and Psychology's 2016 conference

Apply Now to become a Jewish Organizing Fellow

White House Internship Program and D.C. Scholars - Final Application Cycles

The Institute for Teachers of Color #ITOC16 Teacher Education Strand

Request for Research Participants

CFP: "Ethnographies of African Mobilization: Theorizing Evidence from the Political Everyday"

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Western Illinois University’s Disability Resource Center will host Disability Culture Day

New Blog Entry from Sit Down, Fight Back

Law Student Mental Health Day

On Blindness and the Portrayal of Marie-Laure in 'All the Light We Cannot See' - The Toast

European Court: Russia wrong to prevent parent with intellectual disabilities from raising his child

Statement of Solidarity with Students Protestors in India

The Science of Contemplative Practice and the Practice of Contemplative Science

Blackburn News: UW Holds Downs Awareness Walkathon

Red Eye Tournament Doesn't Acknowledge It's Own Ableism

April 21 Webcast: STEM as a Career Option for GI Bill Recipients w/Disabilities

After Brain Injury: Survivor Stories

New issue of GLEANINGS

Disability.gov Update

Disability Scoop

PING CHONG AND COMPANY Summer Training Institute and upcoming Beyond Sacred performances

ACR Health’s 2016 walk/run events

Laverne Cox: Ain’t I A Woman: My Journey to Womanhood


SU HAPPENINGS

DEAF-INITELY IRONIC…? “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON 2016 IS HERE!!

GUESS WHAT?

If you join us at "Cripping" the Comic Con on 4/1/16, you will meet AL, the newest member of the Access Avengers (our team of superheroes with disabilities). AL is very happy and proud to be joining the team to celebrate AAPI (Asian American and Pacific Islander) Heritage Month. ‪#‎cripcon ‪#‎SU_AAPIMonth

2016 “Cripping” the Comic Con Facebook EVENT: https://www.facebook.com/events/1711487872469155/

“Cripping” the Comic Con on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CrippingTheCon/

“Cripping” the Comic Con on Twitter: @CRIPCON

 “Cripping” the Comic Con online registration: http://crippingthecon.com/2016-cripping-the-comic-con-registration/

DEAF-INITELY IRONIC…? “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON 

April 1, 2016, 8:30 am to 8:30 pm

304ABC & Panasci Lounge, Schine Student Center  

Syracuse University

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

COMPLETE PROGRAM WAVAILABLE ON OUR SYMPOSIUM WEBSITE (http://crippingthecon.com)

REGISTER ONLINE OR ON-SITE

REGISTER ONLINE, HERE: http://crippingthecon.com/2016-cripping-the-comic-con-registration/

KEYNOTE: How I Met That Deaf Guy. How I Met That Hearing Girl.

Matt and Kay Daigle, Creators of Webcomic, That Deaf Guy

KEYNOTE: Writing on My Own Behalf: The Creation of El Deafo and Its Impact on Myself and Others

Cece Bell, Newbery Medal Recipient 

Author and Illustrator

PLENARY SESSION: Deaf-initely Ironic...?  Notes from the Field

Moderated by Dr. Diane Wiener, with Matt and Kay Daigle, Kanisha Ffriend, Kate Pollack, Carlisle Robinson, and Gilles Stromberg 

PLUS: A LATE NIGHT SCREENING!

Disney/Pixar’s Inside Out, with open captions and audio description. In collaboration with Orange After Dark (Gifford Auditorium, HBC)

Inclusive Snacks 9:15 

Film 10:00  

Discussion @ Midnight

http://oad.syr.edu

#ORANGEAFTERDARK

FOOD, NERDS, EXHIBITORS, ARTISTS, GAMING, WORKSHOPS, PHOTO BOOTH, QUIET AREA, GREAT PRESENTATIONS, AND MORE!!!

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided for the entire symposium.  Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be provided during the keynote addresses and plenary session.  Other accommodations can be requested using our online registration form by 3/25/16.  Questions (including parking)?  Email: sudcc@syr.edu

This symposium is made possible by the Cocurricular Departmental Initiatives Program within the Division of Student Affairs, and cosponsored by the Disability Cultural Center, the Center on Human Policy, and the Disability Student Union. 

Special thanks to Rachael Zubal-Ruggieri, DSA Technical Services, Student Centers and Programming Services, and the awesome Orange After Dark team in the Office of Student Activities.


 
 

The Politics of Disability Identity at ADA +25 - Prof. Samuel Bagentos

Please join us for a lecture by PROFESSOR SAMUEL BAGENSTOS, the Frank G. Millard Professor of Law at the University of Michigan at 5:00 PM on April 5 in the Collaboratory on the first floor of Dineen HallPlease note the new time!  The title of his lecture is The Politics of Disability Identity at ADA +25. 

Professor Bagenstos will be introduced by Chancellor Kent Syverud.  

PROFRESSOR BAGENSTOS is the Frank G. Millard Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School, focusing his teaching and scholarship on constitutional, civil rights and disability law. From 2009 to 2011, he w served as the principal deputy assistant attorney general for civil rights in the Civil Rights Division of the US Justice Department. He has been on the faculty of Harvard Law School and was a visiting professor at UCLA School of Law. He clerked for the Hon. Stephen Reinhardt on the Ninth Circuit and as a law clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1993, Professor Bagenstos earned his JD, magna cum laude, from Harvard, where he received the Fay Diploma and was articles office co-chair of the Harvard Law Review. He received his BA, with highest honors and highest distinction, from the University of North Carolina.

Professor Bagenstos has published articles in the Yale Law Journal, the Stanford Law Review, the Columbia Law Review, the California Law Review, the Virginia Law Review, the Georgetown Law Journal, and many others. He has published two books: Law and the Contradictions of the Disability Rights Movement (Yale University Press, 2009) and Disability Rights Law: Cases and Materials (Foundation Press, 2010). His articles also have appeared in such non-legal publications as Democracy: A Journal of IdeasThe American Prospect, The Washington Monthly, and The New Republic.

This lecture is part of the Lecture Series in honor of the 10th Anniversary of the Disability Law and Policy Program, co-sponsored by the College of Law, The College of Arts and Sciences, the Women’s and Gender Studies Department, the School of Education and its Cultural Foundation of Education Program, the Maxwell School, the Disability Cultural Center, The Renee Crown Honors Program, the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, the Disability Law Society and the Office of Equal Opportunity, Inclusion, & Resolution Services. Hope to see you there!

Cart and sign language interpreters will be provided.

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SPRING 2016 EVENTS HOSTED OR CO-HOSTED BY THE DISABILITY CULTURAL CENTER (DCC)

FOLLOWING “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON -- on 4/1/16 (!)

http://crippingthecon.com/

A Place at the Table: Community, Food, Access

Co-facilitated by Melda Rodriguez (Brainfeeders) and Christy Kalebic (Disability Student Union) 

Friday, 4/15/16, 106 Hoople, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Inclusive (gluten-free and Kosher) food and American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided. 

For any questions re: accommodations, please contact sudcc@syr.edu by 4/8/16.

Sponsors: Disability Cultural Center, the Disability Student Union, Brainfeeders, Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, the Food Studies Program, and Lisa Thomas at Health Services.

This event is made possible through the Co-Curricular Departmental Initiatives program within the Division of Student Affairs.

Description of the series: Food is an incredibly important part of many cultures around the world. In what ways do cultures shape our relationships with food? What happens when dietary restrictions, allergies, disabilities, ethics, values, principals, religion, and preferences collide with the cultural norms about food and eating? This ongoing luncheon series will explore these questions while also providing a more normalized eating environment for those routinely left out of food culture. In other words, everyone has a place at the table.

OrangeAbility  

Saturday, 4/16/16, 1 to 4 p.m., Women’s Building Gym (1st floor)

All details available at: orangeability.syr.edu

Questions? Email: SUDCC@syr.edu

Disabilities as Ways of Knowing: A Series of Creative Writing Conversations: Disability As Part of the Story

Monday, 4/18/16, 6 to 8 p.m., Watson Theater

Poetry reading with Ona Gritz and Dan Simpson, followed by a reception and book signing.
American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation provided during entire event.  CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) provided during reading.

For other accommodation requests, or if you have any questions, please contact sudcc@syr.edu by 4/11/16.

This event was made possible by the Cocurricular Departmental Initiatives Program within the Division of Student Affairs.  Cosponsored by the Disability Cultural Center and the Renee Crown University Honors Program. 

Common and Diverse Ground: Raising Consciousnesses by Acknowledging the “Hidden” Things that Divide Us

Interfaith Dialogue Dinner Series

Stress and Wellness: What is “Mental Health”?

Wednesday, 4/27/16

6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

NOTE: LOCATION CHANGE: HILLEL

Central to our identity at Hendricks Chapel is our belief in the power of encouraging peaceful discourse across difference. In a nation and world of increasing polarization and conflict, we believe it is essential for us to facilitate and model peaceful discourse for our students. Our interfaith dialogue dinner series seeks to embody this commitment. Exploring the intersections of spirituality, secularism, and timely issues of our day, each interfaith dialogue dinner will encourage intentional dialogue across difference. It is our hope that by gathering together on common ground over a shared meal, we can create a vibrant environment of peaceful and life-giving conversation around important and potentially divisive issues.

Each two hour gathering will include a shared meal, facilitated dialogue, and a time of mindful meditation.  Sessions will be co-facilitated by chaplains, staff, and students.

This series is cosponsored by Hendricks Chapel, the Disability Cultural Center (DCC), the Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA), the LGBT Resource Center, and the Slutzker Center, is made possible through the Co-Curricular Departmental Initiatives program within the Division of Student Affairs.

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and inclusive food will be provided. Requests for accommodations or food queries should be made by 4/20/16 by contacting cpreunin@syr.edu.

Lectures Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Disability Law and Policy Program

(Co-sponsored by the DCC, among many others!)

Questions? Email Prof. Arlene Kanter: Kantera@law.syr.edu or Chris Ramsdell: ceramsde@law.syr.edu

April 5: Professor Sam Bagenstos, introduced by Chancellor Syverud at  5:00-6:30, Collaboratory, 1st floor, College of Law. (For those of you who are attending Madeline Albright's talk at 3 pm that day, there is time to attend both. In fact, both Sam and I will also be at Albright's talk). Sam will speak about the ADA at 25 years.

His bio: http://www.law.umich.edu/FacultyBio/Pages/FacultyBio.aspx?FacID=sambagen

April 13: Professor Sagit Mor,  11:30-1. Collaboratory. She will speak about the intersection of bioethics and disability.

Her bio: http://weblaw.haifa.ac.il/en/pages/home.aspx

April 18: Sue Swenson, Deputy Asst. Sec'y, Special Education, US Dept of Ed, 5-6:30, Collaboratory.

Her bio:http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/swenson-bio.html

NOTE: EVENT TIME MAY CHANGE SLIGHTLY; PLEASE STAY TUNED.

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Feminist Dialogues on April 1st 

WGS invites you to a conversation with Future of Minority Studies alumni Dr. Alaí Reyes-Santos & Dr. Azza Basarudin to a discussion of their research

Friday April 1st, from 4-6 pm at 319 Sims Hall. 

Event Details 

Speaker name: Dr. Azza Basarudin

Affiliation: Research Affiliate Center for the Study of Women, UCLA Talk title: Islam, Feminist Activism and Gender Justice in Malaysia

Discussant: Dr. Carol Fadda-Conrey, Associate Professor, English, SU 

Speaker name: Dr. Alaí Reyes-Santos

Affiliation: Associate Professor University of Oregon - Eugene Talk Title: Our Caribbean Kin: Race and Nation in the Neoliberal Antilles

Discussant: Dr. Silvio Torres-Saillant, Professor, English, SU 

Refreshments will be provided.

For more details please contact: hbhattac@syr.edu​ This event is co-sponsored by WGS & FMS​

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Strategies to improve Time Management, Organization and Planning (STOP) group 

Having trouble with concentration, organization or procrastination?   These problems can lead to difficulty in completing tasks and cause trouble for your school, home and personal life.  We can help!

Our weekly group provides training in effective skills to improve self-control, reduce distractibility and procrastination and encourage adaptive thinking.  

Sessions 1-7: Learning to Self-Control 

Sessions 8-10: Learning to Think Adaptively

Cost: $10 per session for all SU and SUNY ESF students  |   Contact: Call 443.3595 for more information

Syracuse University Psychological Services Center  |   804 University Ave., Suite 201

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Moving for Social Justice: Putting Your Whole Self In 

The Contemplative Collaborative Brownbag and Workshop Series continues on Friday, April 1. We hope you can join us. This event is open to the public and will no doubt be of interest to faculty, instructors, and students.  

Moving for Social Justice: Putting Your Whole Self In

Friday, April 1, 2016 

12-1:30 p.m., 123 Sims

American Sign Language (ASL) Interpretation will be provided. 

Although many of us grew up treating our minds and bodies as separate entities, they are actually one. In this highly participatory session, we will explore ways to move our bodies (with music) as part of our work building community, challenging oppression, and creating new visions. Wear comfortable clothes.   

Mara Sapon-Shevin, Professor of Inclusive Education, is a specialist in diversity and social justice issues, including full inclusion, anti-racism teaching, bullying and harassment, cooperative learning, and using the arts to teach against oppression. Having written more than 200 books, book chapters, and articles, she coordinates a project called Creating Safe and Peaceful Schools and has just completed (along with teachers) a project called Peaceful at the Core, which uses children's literature to end bullying and promote positive interpersonal behavior.  

This event is organized and presented by the SU Humanities Center. Co-sponsors: The Writing Program, Hendricks Chapel, Hendricks Chapel Wellness Fund, and Making a Space, and the Contemplative Collaborative. Queries can be directed to Patrick W. Berry at pwberry@syr.edu or 315-443-1912.

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Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month 

The annual Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month Celebration will officially begin on Thursday, March 31, in the Schine Student Center Atrium. 

Student organizations will table and lunch will be available at noon. 

Events continue throughout the month, including a talk with former US Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta and MSNBC and NBC News Anchor Richard Lui; the commemorative lecture with Christine Ha, first blind contestant and season three winner of MasterChef; and the book club discussion of Mindy Kaling's Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?” 

The month also includes workshops, a documentary film screening, and performances. 

The full calendar will be available on the Office of Multicultural Affairs website and hard copies are available in OMA (105 Schine).  For questions, contact Huey Hsiao

Syracuse University’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Presents: 

Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Commemorative Lecture with Christine Ha 

Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 7 p.m. in Watson Auditorium

Christine Ha, the first blind contestant, is the Season 3 winner of the competitive cooking TV show MasterChef on FOX. She has a master of fine arts from the University of Houston’s Creative Writing Program and served as fiction editor for Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts. Christine’s first cookbook, Recipes From My Home Kitchen: Asian and American Comfort Food was a New York Times bestseller. Featured on NPR and the BBC, she is a co-host on the Canadian cooking show Four Senses and a judge on MasterChef Vietnam. She received the 2014 Helen Keller Personal Achievement Award from the American Foundation for the Blind. 

Questions? Please contact Huey Hsiao at huhsiao@syr.edu or 315.443.9676. 

This event is made possible by Co-Curricular Fee funding and is co-sponsored by the Disability Cultural Center. 

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be provided. 

#SU_AAPIMonth

2016 Cultural Reading Group

Is Everybody Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns)

Mindy Kaling

Friday, April 8, 2016 at 12-2 p.m. in Bird 606

Come join us for a lively discussion of Kaling's book led by Elin Riggs, Director of Off-Campus and Commuter Services and Priscilla Mahabali '16.

Food will be provided. 

Please stop by the front desk of the Office of Multicultural Affairs, Schine 105, to pick up a free copy of the book. A limited number of books are available on a first come, first serve basis. Questions? Please contact Huey Hsiao at huhsiao@syr.edu or 315.443.9676. 

#SU_AAPIMonth

Children's Book Release & Reading

APRIL 5, 2016 @ 8:00PM

LA CASITA CULTURAL CENTER

The children of La Casita's Dual Language Reading Circles, a literacy program that combines reading and writing in English and Spanish with arts education, will be presenting their first publication, a bilingual book to be released in limited edition. The book to be catalogued as part of the permanent collection in La Casita's Bilingual Library, was the focus of a project completed by the children of Nuestro Futuro, a youth program of the Spanish Action League of Onondaga County.

Support for this program comes from in part from the Literacy Coalition of Onondaga County


MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT

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Department of Anthropology Speaker Series presents: Ken MacLeish

When: Thursday, April 7, 2016 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 

Where: Dr. Paul & Natalie Strasser Legacy Room - 220 Eggers Hall

Description: 

"Soldier Suicide, Intimate Governmentality, and the Shape of Military Life" 

Servicemember suicide has for years now been a pressing concern of US military leaders and healthcare providers, politicians and the civilian public, and not least, soldiers themselves. The urgent and sometimes overbearing policy and cultural responses to suicide have themselves become a significant part of soldiers’ everyday life. Conventional sociological and mental-health-based conceptions of suicide tend to treat it as a dysfunction that originates either deeply within individuals or completely determines them from the outside. In Army life these dynamics take the form of psycho-epidemiological efforts to parse the causes of suicide and aggressive, anticipatory monitoring of “risky” behavior believed to be associated with it. But they also metastasize into surprising everyday manifestations: mutual obligations, compelled attachments, intimate aversions, speculative sympathies, fantasies of escape, and labors of survival. This talk draws on ethnographic research in US Army communities to explore everyday ways of talking about, imagining, regulating, and living with military suicide, and it argues for the value of understanding these logics of suicide as simultaneously institutional, interpersonal and subjective 

Dr. Ken MacLeish is an Assistant Professor of Medicine, Health, and Society and Anthropology at Vanderbilt University

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From the LGBT Resource Center:

***Free tickets are now available for the LGBT Resource Center’s 14th Annual Rainbow Banquet.

5:30 PM, Thursday, April 21st, 2016.

Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel & Conference Center.

Get your ticket at the Schine Box Office before they’re gone!

***Complete the Graduating Student Survey!

If you are graduating in 2016, please complete the graduating student survey! This will allow you to have your name printed in the program, to be recognized onstage, to receive a rainbow cord, to sign up to be in the grad video, and/or to sign up to be this year’s student keynote speaker.

***The LGBT Resource Center presents the 5th Annual Trans Day of Liberation featuring Tiq and Kim Milan.

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016, 7 PM. Maxwell Auditorium.

Trans Day of Liberation celebrates the lives, identities, possibilities, and experiences of trans communities. This year’s TDOL will feature Tiq and Kim Milan, who are “partners in life and in their work as educators.” Tiq and Kim will explore the intersections of their identities as queer and trans people of color and highlight the revolutionary power of the love they share.

ASL interpretation provided. Dessert reception to follow.

***Register for QSX 111: Queer Histories, Communities, Politics


Monday and Wednesday, 2:15 – 3:35 PM
Dr. Robin Riley

What does it mean to be LGBT in an age of gay marriage? Is anyone still having sex? What would #BlackLivesMatter transgender activists have to say to Caitlyn Jenner? Will thinking about a shared history help us? Can we imagine a future? If these questions are interesting to you, consider registering for QSX 111 today! 

***Clothing donations will be appreciated for any season, occasion, age, and gender. Please donate any type of clothing, including shirts, pants, shorts, dresses, skirts, belts, swimwear, purses, shoes, binders, undergarments, stockings, hair accessories, and jewelry. Donations will be accepted until April 26th.

Please email Laurie Field for more information.

***Transgender clothing drive. April 29th, 11 AM – 4 PM. 601 East Genesee Street, room 111. Safe area to pick out clothes; private fitting rooms with mirrors. For more information, please email Laurie Field.  

 

 

Opportunity For All Doctoral Students: The Productive and Inspired Academic 

School of Education Professor Julie Causton is offering a series of eight 2-hour seminars during the Spring 2016 semester that aim to provide doctoral students in ANY program with the tools and inspiration to improve their productivity and effectiveness in the world of academia. Sessions will cover everything from engaging teaching strategies in college classrooms, to finishing in-progress writing projects, to issues of vulnerability, happiness, and authenticity. These sessions are designed to create a collaborative community of scholars as we examine and address the real challenges of becoming an academic and a scholar.

Come to one seminar, a few, or all of them - the choice is yours!

All seminars held from 1:30-3:30 p.m. in 056 Huntington Hall

Writing Boot Camp
1 remaining sessions: Tuesday, March 29
This pomodoro-based work session is for seminar members who wish to meet and work in a structured and supportive environment. We will begin with 5 minutes of rule setting followed by a two-hour productive working session.

Landing the Job

Monday, March 28
This seminar session will be centered on thoughtful advice for going on the market and obtaining your dream job. We will discuss everything from CVs to cover letters to job talks. Seminar participants will leave with concrete strategies for planning for and executing a successful job search.

Register for Productive and Inspired Academic Seminars

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ITS adds walk-in consulting and expands workshops for improving the accessibility of documents, web pages, and videos 

SU seeks to ensure that all people regardless of individual ability or disability can effectively access University communications and technology.  Information Technology Services (ITS) is pleased to announce their new Walk-in IT Accessibility Help Desk hours. New this semester, the IT Accessibility Help Desk provides consultation on related topics, including video captioning, remediation of your PDF, PowerPoint, or Word documents to ensure accessibility, and identifying and fixing accessibility issues on your website. This new service is available Mondays and Thursdays, 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the ITS Service Center, in room 1-227 Center for Science and Technology. 

Accessibility training workshops available 

ITS is accepting registrations for three training workshops that will build faculty and staff awareness of, sensitivity to, and proficiency in ensuring the accessibility of information communications and technologies. Creating Accessible Documents focuses on course materials and documents, Evaluating Your Website for Accessibility focuses on websites and online resources, and a new workshop called Video Captioning covers the basics of adding captions to video content. The workshops will help participants understand accessibility, put it into practice on the job, and support Syracuse University’s efforts to ensure accessibility of documents, systems, and communications across campus. 

The workshops will be presented by Sharon Trerise and Kara Patten from ITS’s Academic Services team at the dates, times, and locations shown below. Each session has space for 12 participants. Seating is limited, so register early! There is high demand for this training, so registration is on a first-submitted, first-enrolled basis. Use the links below to register. 

About the workshops 

Register here for any of the workshops 

Creating Accessible Documents   

Overview

This three-hour workshop provides a fundamental overview of creating accessible documents in Microsoft Office and Adobe Acrobat Pro DC on Windows or Mac computers. At successful completion, participants will be able to: 

  • Explain and demonstrate the importance of creating accessible documents
  • Understand basic concepts of creating accessible documents
  • Understand best practices for creating accessible Word and PDF documents
  • Remediate legacy Word and PDF documents to make them accessible
  • Utilize the Office accessibility checker
  • Identify and correct common accessibility errors
  • Use Adobe Acrobat Pro DC’s accessibility checker 

All sessions are held Wednesday mornings from 9 a.m. – noon as follows: 

Operating System     Day and Date                          Location          

Windows                  Wednesday, April 13                Steele Hall, room 001

Windows                  Wednesday, May 25                Steele Hall, room 001

Windows                  Wednesday, June 22                Steele Hall, room 001   

Evaluating Your Website for Accessibility 

Overview:

Designed for anyone who manages, creates or maintains web content, this workshop will discuss relevant concepts and coach participants through evaluating their pages against the accessibility checkpoints. The workshop will cover basic techniques for evaluating web content, including: 

  • Accessibility resources and tools at SU
  • Applicable legislation and compliance
  • Automated accessibility checkers
  • Steps for manually checking web page accessibility
  • A brief introduction to screen readers
  • Design considerations
  • Captioning vendors and tools 

Workshop Dates (all take place Wednesdays from 9 a.m. – noon in Steele Hall 001)

March 30

May 11

June 8

Video Captioning 

Overview:

The video captioning workshop is designed for anyone who manages, creates or maintains video content and is offered in two parts. Part one covers the basics of captioning as well as considerations when purchasing captioning services from third party vendors. Part two is optional and designed for those who wish to know more about creating their own captions. 

Part One: Captioning basics and third party services

  • Audience considerations
  • Caption types and terminology
  • Cost and resource considerations for DIY vs. captioning vendors
  • Vendor comparisons 

Part Two: DIY captioning

  • Hands-on experience with captioning tools
  • Caption file formats
  • Captioning rules and quality control
  • Costs and resources 

All video captioning workshops take place in Steele Hall 001 at these dates and times: 

Workshop Dates           Part 1 (Basics)           Part 2 (DIY)

Friday, April 15             9:30 – 10:45 a.m.        11:00 a.m. – noon

Tuesday, May 24          9:30 – 10:45 a.m.        11:00 a.m. – noon 

Register here for any of the workshops 

Other topics 

If you are interested in learning about ensuring the accessibility of online and mobile applications, or other services and communications, please send an email to accessibleIT@syr.edu with a description of your interest and with any questions. Your input will guide the development of coming programs. 

For more information 

ITS offers a growing variety of resources to ensure accessibility for all members of the Syracuse University community. Visit the Technology Accessibility web page and check out the Accessible Technology Toolkit. If you have any questions about workshops, or other accessibility and technology issues, please send them in an email to accessibleIT@syr.edu.


 

Maymester 2016 Courses offered

Women, Rap, and Hip Hop Feminism

WGS 473 (#74107)/HOM (#74108)/WGS 673 (#74109)

May 16-27; Monday - Friday 1:00-5:00pm

Dr. Gwendolyn Pough

Feminism, rap music, and Hip Hop culture, at first glance, do not appear to be likely cohorts. In the male-driven, testosterone filled world of Hip Hop culture and rap music, labeling oneself a feminist is not a political stance easily taken. Thus, many women involved with Hip Hop culture do not take on the label of feminist even as their actions imply feminist beliefs and leanings. Much of the strong criticisms of rap music have been about the music's sexism and misogyny. And much of the attention focused on sex and gender have been in terms of constructions of Black masculinity, and rap music as a vehicle for Black male posturing. This course links feminism, rap music, and Hip Hop Culture.

Texts for the course include: Close to the Edge: In Search of the Global Hip Hop Generation; When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: A Hip-Hop Feminist Breaks it Down; That White Girl; Pimps Up, Ho's Down: Hip-Hop's Hold on Young Black Women; Home with Hip Hop Feminism.

 

CFE 700: Troubling Silence

May 16th-May 27th, Monday-Thursday, 9:30am-3:30pm

Dr. Dalia Rodriguez

106 Huntington Hall 

Silence has been conceptualized as antithetical to the liberation of oppressed groups. However, some scholars argue that such interpretations fail to recognize the different forms of and meanings silence take, as well as the ways in which speech acts are lim­ited. Educators have yet to understand the com­plexity behind the issue of silence (Montoya, 2000). We also do not understand how both voice and silence work together to illuminate the experiences of marginalized populations (Boler, 2005).  Rather than thinking about silence in opposition to voice, what if we were to think about silence as voice?  In this course we trouble silence by re-theorizing silence as oppression, resistance, and empowerment.  We will grapple with various questions including, but not limited to: What are the multiple meanings of silence in various educational contexts?  How does white silence function to reproduce racial micro-aggressions in predominantly white classrooms, and how can educators disrupt white silence?  How can we complicate how we think about voice and silence—For example when silence is misrecognized as the silence of the excluded other, rather than the silence being in the ears of the powerful.  When is the demand for the racialized “Other” to speak/remain silent considered empowering?  And when can speaking be considered a “strategy of surveillance and exploitation” (Bhabha 1994), reinsuring the authority of the dominant?  How do we listen for silence, and interpret these silences?  How can educators use silence as a form of pedagogical knowledge? 

We will be reading across disciplines to get at the complexity of silence (Lugones, Sherry Marx, Christine Sleeter, Hommi K. Bhabha, Linda Alcoff, Megan Boler, Audre Lorde, Alison Jones, Sherene Razack, Montoya, Lisa Mazzei, Franz Fanon, de Castell, among others), complicating what silence (and voice) means for the racialized “Other.”​

CRS 347: Mindful Communication Skills

Summer Session 1: May 23- June 30

Mon-Thurs Noon– 1:45pm

123 Sims Hall

Professor Diane Grimes

Activities include:

• Yoga

• Journaling

• Daily meditation

• Sharing mindfulness practices

3 credits

For more information:

dsgrimes@syr.edu

http://vpa.syr.edu/academics/crs

AED 400 / 600

Creative Leadership and Social Responsibility

July 5 - July 30

(an online course offering)

 Dr. James Haywood Rolling, Jr.

This online course addresses ways in which leaders and change agents perceive, make sense of, and affect their social worlds through the lens of creative practices emerging from the visual arts, design, and other creative disciplines. Coursework will explore systems for creative organization and activity, as well as metaphors for communicating leadership influence—two significant methods that leaders throughout society employ to grasp complex issues and prompt sustainable change. Moreover, this course is designed to acquaint and equip students with strategies for a socially responsible approach to creative leadership in diverse areas of teaching, leadership, and management. This course is for students interested in expanding and promoting the role of creative leadership in global society grounded in both theory and practice, and assembles the ideas of a community of arts & design educators as well as thought leaders from multiple creative and entrepreneurial sectors.

Creative leadership requires “complicated conversation”—the genesis of new paradigms for living, working, or doing are best aided by multiple perspectives and vantage points.


 

Course listings for the Fall 2016 semester for the Consortium for Culture and Medicine

Consortium for Culture and Medicine

www.upstate.edu/ccm

A Cooperative Program of Le Moyne College, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse University

Fall Courses

August 29 – December 9, 2016

Ethics & the Health Professions

Paul Prescott, PhD

Wednesdays 4:30-7:30 PM                                                

Room: TBD                                             

Upstate Campus

This course examines the origins and the use of ethical theories in the clinical, professional, organizational, and political-economic fields of action in health care. 3 credits

Death and Dying In American Literature

Deirdre Neilen, PhD

Wednesdays 4:15-7:15 PM                                               

Room: TBD                                      

Upstate Campus

This course intends to provoke thoughtful discussion and analysis about how we approach the subject of death and how we actually do or do not prepare ourselves for its actuality. Some controversy surrounding current health care issues is connected to the proposition that physicians should have end of life treatment and goals.  What do people mean when they say, “do everything”? What do physicians mean when they say “treatment would be futile”? What does it mean to be a health care proxy? We will explore these and other questions through our analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, memoir and film. 3 credits

Public Health Ethics

Sandra Lane, PhD, MPH

Mondays 5:15- 8:00 PM                                                      

Room 104 Falk Bldg.                            

SU Campus                         

This course addresses ethical issues in public health.  Public health ethics is a new area of scholarship practice that addresses population-level health issues, such as issues food stamps and health insurance, immunizations, public health research, legal and policy responses to infectious diseases and epidemics, and the role of religious and social values in setting health policy.  3 credits

CCM courses are open to upper division undergraduates, graduate students, faculty from the cooperating institutions, UUP members at Upstate, and members of the public who hold Bachelor’s Degrees.  For members of the public, permission of the instructor is required. 

Registration

Le Moyne students:  WebAdvisor    

Syracuse University students: My Slice

SUNY Upstate Medical University students: MyUpstate                           

Members of the public can register through any of the three institutions.

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SU NEWS

Symposium speaker address diversity and inclusion on university campuses

It’s On Us Week of Action Includes Visit by White House Advisor on Violence Against Women

http://news.syr.edu/its-on-us-week-of-action-includes-visit-by-white-house-advisor-on-violence-against-women-70941/

    

  

 

Syracuse University continues work on accessibility, but some say more needs to be done | The Daily Orange – The Independent Student Newspaper of Syracuse, New York

http://dailyorange.com/2016/03/syracuse-university-continues-work-on-accessibility-but-some-say-more-needs-to-be-done/

 

   

  

 

InclusiveU director helps rethink Syracuse University academics | The Daily Orange – The Independent Student Newspaper of Syracuse, New York

 

 
 


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Paid Summer Internship Program at 2Gether-International

You get things done, bring new energy and are passionate about disability and startups? Apply for our paid summer internship program. 

One billion people have a disability, making disabled people the largest minority in the world and the only one you can instantly become a part of. Yet, while most people learn about different minorities, we don't learn about disability—its movement and culture.
2Gether-International does two things: (1) Teach young people about disability. (2) Unify them to take action on different disability issues.

Apply: here.
Deadline: April 15th (we accept on a rolling basis so apply early!) Questions? Email Internships@2Gether-International.org

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Conference 2016: AHEAD & pepnet 2 Co-Convene in July! 

Toward Equity and Access: Illuminating the Pathways AHEAD 

We are happy to announce that registration is now open for the 2016 AHEAD Conference in conjunction with the pepnet 2 Postsecondary Training Institute(PTI)! Join us July 11-16 at the JW Marriott in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana! 

This year will be full of new information regarding disability resources and services' best practices, legal updates, plenty of time to interact with colleagues from around the globe, and access to the wonderful city of Indianapolis and all it has to offer.  

If you're a first-time attendee, you may want to consider registering for the First-Time Attendee Breakfast (sponsored by Sonocent), Wednesday July 13 at 7:30 am. You can sign up when you register for the Conference.  

In addition to Preconference, Concurrent, Lunch & Learn, and Poster Sessions, we're featuring a Mini-Conference on Students with Intellectual Disabilities in Higher Education. Our colleagues at Think College assisted in the development of this Mini-Conference. Find full details on the Conference website

Click here to register for Conference 2016! 

Important Dates to Remember:

  1. Register for the Conference by May 31, 2016 to receive the very lowest price.
  2. Be sure to place accommodations requests by June 10, 2016. You can make requests in the Conference Registration Portal.
  3. Make your JW Marriott reservations no later than June 14, 2016.

We can't wait to meet you in Indianapolis this July! If you have questions, please contact AHEAD at 704-947-7779 or ahead@ahead.org

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Registration open and Featured Public Events for the 16th Annual Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability Conference

Registration is open for the 2016 Sixteenth Annual Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability held on The Ohio State University’s Columbus Campus April 12-14, 2016

Featured Public Events at the 2016 Multiple Perspectives Conference will include: 

 - April 12th 9:00-5:00pm in the Ohio Union

 - Audio Description: The Visual Made Verbal: Facilitated by Joel Snyder, President, Audio Description Associates, LLC & Director, Audio Description Project American Council of the Blind. Will lead a training in Audio Description, an increasingly important tool in providing access to the wide range of instructional and entertainment media arts (graphics, video, paintings, television, images, performing arts, museums…) for individuals who are blind. 

Registration Requires, Free to OSU Faculty & Staff through generous subsidies from the Offices of Distance Education & ELearning and Student Disability Services.  A Discounted rate of $25 for the general public is made possible by the support of VSA OHIO

 - April 13th 3:00-6:00pm in the Blackwell’s ball room

 - AUTISTEXT: The 2016 Ethel Louise Armstrong Lecture presented by Melanie Yergeau, Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan.  

When autistic people disclose being autistic, we are often met with intrusive questions and hostile responses: Who diagnosed you? When were you toilet-trained? Well, you don't look autistic to me.

Autism disclosure can be taken by others as an opportunity to tally our symptoms, to compare our disclosures against autism stereotypes or misinformed ideas about diagnostic criteria. In this talk, Melanie examines the ways in which disability disclosures are often read as invitations to refute diagnosis. The ability to say, “I have autism,” for example, is often viewed as evidence that one does not have autism — or, at least, not “real” or “severe” autism. As a means of speaking back to these stereotypes, Melanie examines the ways in which autistic bloggers redefine what diagnosis can mean for autistic people.

 - The Ethel Louise Armstrong Student Perspectives Poster Reception  Featuring graduate research & undergraduate research, art & performance, community service and class projects the reception encourages students to network with professionals, the community, and scholars who share their interests in the science, art, culture, politics and realities of disability.

The Ethel Louise Armstrong Lecture and Student Poster Competition are free and open to the public.  Held annually at The Ohio State University's Multiple Perspectives Conference it is made possible through the generosity of ELA Foundation and its founder Margaret Stanton.  The Lecture honors Ms. Stanton's grandmother, Ethel Louise Armstrong, who exemplified self-determination and resistance in the face of socially imposed constraints. As a young woman with a physical disability growing up in Atlanta, Georgia, Margaret was inspired by her grandmother's insistence on excelling in postsecondary education despite social conventions during her time that denied women, particularly those with disabilities, opportunities for school and work. Ms. Staton, a lifelong advocate worked in Washington DC promoting accessibility after earning her M.Ed.  In 1994 she founded the ELA Foundation to promote full inclusion of people with disabilities in the world.

 - April 14th 3:30-5:00pm in Pfhal Hall 140.

 - “Inclusive Cities”  Presented by Victor Santiago Pineda Based on his international work with the disability organizations, city governments and the private sector Victor has developed a conceptual and practical approach to urban planning shaped by the U.N. Convention on Disability.  Distilling the principles of planning, sustainability and social justice into conceptual framework that can be understood as personal narrative. Victor presents a preview of his upcoming book “Inclusive Cities: Governance and the Transformation of Disability Rights”.  

Initiated by the Columbus Advisory Committee on Disability to honor Ken Campbell’s life time of service and advocacy the Ken Campbell Lecture is free and open to the public as a featured event at The Ohio State University’s the Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability. A highlight of the annual conference the Ken Campbell Lecture focuses on disability policy honors Campbell’s life’s work, including over twenty years guiding the City of Columbus’ disability policies as it’s ADA Coordinator.

 - Concurrent sessions include presenters from across the country, Japan, Canada, Australia and the UK  - Registration Required

The Multiple Perspectives Conference, hosted by Ohio State University’s ADA Coordinator’s Office, is made possible in part thanks to the generosity of the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation Endowment Fund and ongoing support from The Ohio State University.

 

Registration is now open online for the 26th Annual Aging with Developmental Disabilities Conference

Registration is now open online for the 26th Annual Aging with Developmental Disabilities Conference

http://us5.campaign-archive2.com/?u=d2043daa38d4f95b4719686f9&id=d9649191d0&e=ad3793483c

 


 

 

Participate in a national study of closed captions in higher education

3Play Media is collaborating with the Ecampus Research Unit at Oregon State University to conduct research exploring two main areas of closed captioning at U.S. institutions of higher education: (1) college students’ experience with, and perceptions of, closed captions and (2) what solutions institutions are implementing to ensure compliance with closed captioning regulations. This study has been approved by the IRB at Oregon State University.

This research includes a survey on institutional use of captions as well as a student survey.

There are two ways to learn more about this study and express your interest:

  1. Fill out a short form to express your interest in participating and provide information about the appropriate institutional contacts.
  2. Attend a webinar to learn more about the study and ask any questions that you have.
  • Friday, April 1 at 9am PDT
  • Monday, April 4 at 1pm PDT
  • Wednesday, April 6 at 12pm PDT

We are looking for institutional partners to fill out the institutional survey and recruit students to share their thoughts and experiences with closed captions. Institutions who participate will have the opportunity to enter a raffle for free captioning hours by 3Play Media and will also receive their institution-specific student data after the research is complete. Student participants will have the opportunity to enter a raffle for one of fifty (50) $25 Amazon gift cards.

If you know of other higher education administrators at your institution or at another institution who might be interested in this study, please consider sharing this information with them. You can also send any questions about this research to Katie Linder, Research Director for Oregon State University’s Ecampus (kathryn.linder@oregonstate.edu).

Thank you for considering participating in this study!

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Applications Due April 1st for New Sector's Social Impact Fellowships 

Passionate about alleviating poverty, closing the achievement gap, engaging in environmental issues, working toward healthier futures, and more? Consider applying to a New Sector Fellowship, a paid intensive opportunity for emerging leaders and students who are committed to the social sector.

New Sector matches committed, interested, and skilled early-career leaders with a nonprofit organization in Boston, San Francisco, Chicago, or the Twin Cities to serve full-time completing projects that allow organizations to more effectively achieve their missions. Fellows join a peer-learning community where they participate in training, mentoring, and coaching to build skills needed for social sector careers. There are both summer and 11-month opportunities.

Dates:

April 1st is the next deadline for all Fellowship programs! 

  • Summer Fellowship: June 6, 2016 - August 19, 2016 or June 13, 2016 - August 26, 2016
  • RISE Fellowships: September 6, 2016 to July 28, 2017

Lean more, connect with us, and apply at http://newsector.org

Critical Questions in Education--Fall Symposium

The demand for “perfection” in education

We send you this Call for Proposals to invite your participation at the Critical Questions in Education Symposium to be held October 3—4, 2016, in Salt Lake City.  This Symposium is an intimate gathering of scholars and interested others designed to “get to the bottom” of a given educational issue or question—with intentions, then, to publish.  This year our question will push us to think through contemporary teacher, student, and school accountability systems—as well as certain pedagogical practices like individualized or computer-assisted instruction—that intend to produce the “perfect” teacher who can produce the "perfect" student in the "perfect" school.  This noble, even quite appropriate ideal still deserves some scrutiny.  And so we ask the following: 

Symposium question

Pressure for perfection:  What is it doing to teachers, students, school communities, and teacher education?

Sub-themes:

Understanding the perfection being demanded

What underlying understandings of “perfection”-- of the flawless teacher, student, and school—seem to be informing so many accountability systems and pedagogical practices?  Are these conceptions reasonable or desirable?  What other conceptions might be better, more noble, or more realistic?

Effect on teachers

What effect does this pressure for perfection have on teachers?  What is its effect on such things as their practices, their morale, or their in-school relationships?

“Perfection” in teacher education programs

How is this drive for perfection exhibited in teacher education programs—in things like CAEP standards, state accreditation, or edTPA?  Might this compelled picture of teaching perfection impact the desire of young people to pursue a career in teaching?

We invite proposals from teacher educators, graduate students, teacher education students, practicing K—12 teachers, school administrators or anyone else who has a perspective to share about our theme question.  Please see the attached Call for Proposals.  Here is more information about the conferences:

When, where, and cost:                

Submission deadline:

JULY 1, 2016  

 Sponsoring organization and website:    


   

NDI-AFP Loan Committee Member Application 

National Disability Institute is ready to offer Assistive Technology (AT) loans in several communities of New Jersey and New York. We hope to identify more servicing banks, credit unions and Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) to cover all of New Jersey and New York within the next year. As NDI solicits more lending partners it will be important to begin to issue loans and establish a 94% to 98% repayment rate, demonstrating this project’s success.  

As an initial step, the Alternative Finance Project is recruiting persons interested in serving on the loan committee. The loan committee members have the opportunity to review a summary of loan applicants’ income, expenses and credit histories. Every two weeks, a team of loan committee members will meet via telephone conference and discuss the submitted loan applications. The loan committee makes recommendations and either pre-approves or denies loan applications. 

A Loan Committee Member Training will take place in the next few weeks. NDI will then move forward, announcing the availability of the loan program. 

The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services stipulates that Alternative Finance Project loan committees be comprised of a diverse representation of the population of New Jersey and New York who are knowledgeable of Assistive Technology (AT) and Financial Capability as it relates to the needs of persons with disabilities. Recommended representation includes members such as advocates, case managers, educators, rehabilitation counselors, AT vendors, home modification inspectors and persons with disabilities. The Loan Committee composition requires that more than 50% of the committee members have a disability. Therefore, the Loan Committee Application invites loan committee applicants to self-disclose if they have a disability. This information is confidential and reflected through aggregate reporting.

Please share this application link with individuals who may be interested in serving on the committee:

https://ndiinc.formstack.com/forms/loan_committee_application 

Please submit this application by Monday, April 4th, 2016.


 

Deadline Extended: Women’s & Gender Studies Department Graduate Paper Prize for 2015-2016

The Women’s & Gender Studies Department announces it is now accepting entries for its Toni Taverone Graduate Paper Prize. The deadline in March 11, 2016 APRIL 4, 2016. The award amount is $150.00. 

Eligibility:

Currently enrolled graduate students at Syracuse University who have not previously won the graduate paper prize may submit papers written in any WGS courses during Spring 2015, Summer 2015, or Fall 2015. 

Guidelines:

1. Papers are to demonstrate scholarly competence in a subject matter relevant to women’s and gender studies. Specifically, papers will be selected based on: general excellence; intersectional gender analysis or use of feminist theory; and interconnections between theory and activism.

2. Faculty may nominate students, or students may enter their own papers.

3. A detachable cover sheet indicating the entrant’s name, the paper title, and the source of the paper (course title and professor).  Also include local address, phone number and email.

4. Two copies of each paper—running header should only contain the paper title and page numbers (no personal identification).

Electronic submissions will be accepted, please send to sademock@syr.edu.

5. Authorship of papers may be individual or collaborative.

6. Paper may be no more than 25 pages in length. 

Review Process

Papers are read and ranked (without author identification) by the paper prize committee, which is established by the Women’s & Gender Studies Department faculty.

Please send entries NO LATER THAN March 11, 2016 APRIL 4, 2016 to the Women’s & Gender Studies Department Paper Prize Committee, 208 Bowne Hall. 

For further information please contact Susann DeMocker-Shedd at 443-3560 or sademock@syr.edu

Funding Opportunity: The New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council

Youth Advocacy and Leadership Forum: DDPC announces funding to select one grantee to develop and support a New York State Youth Advocacy and Leadership Network which will include replication of the National Youth Leadership Forum, provide ongoing advocacy skill development and mentoring for transition-aged youth with developmental and other disabilities ages 14-24 and provide related training for family caregivers.
 
DDPC also announces funding to select one grantee to provide support, technical assistance, evaluation and sustainability planning to the grantee developing the New York State Youth Advocacy and Leadership Network.

The full funding announcement can be found at: http://ddpc.ny.gov/council_funding_announcements_responsive

If you have questions or comments regarding this funding announcement, please contact Robin Hickey at 518-402-3478 or email robin.hickey@ddpc.ny.gov

Seeking submissions for: Sex, Security, and the Corporate University: The Zine

Calling all poets, artists, writers, dog walkers, and feminists! Sex, Security, and the Corporate University: The Zine.

Seeking submissions of poetry, illustration, prose, doodles, frescoes, rants, diatribes, tirades, scans of your cat who fell asleep on the copy machine, etc.

Email all submissions and inquiries to The Zine by April 13th, 2016.

Topics may include (but are not limited to): sexual assault and campus rape culture, institutional responses (or lack thereof) to sexual violence, law enforcement and the politics of race and disability in education, neoliberalism and the gendered body, public security of the private sphere, strategies for resisting invisibility and silence, victim/survivor dichotomies and alternative narratives.

Call for presentations for the International Society of Ethical Psychiatry and Psychology's 2016 conference

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Apply Now to become a Jewish Organizing Fellow

Regular Application Deadline: April 6th, 2016 

JOIN for Justice's Jewish Organizing Fellowship is recruiting for our year-long, paid community organizing training program in Boston. The Fellowship trains Jewish young adults (ages 21-30) to organize with both privileged and oppressed communities to effectively fight against structural injustice and inequality. If not already employed, Fellows apply for pre-approved full-time paid jobs as community organizers. 

We seek to build a Fellowship class with people who are eager to explore the connections between their unique Jewish identities and working for social change. We also seek to build an inclusive community in which Jews of color, Jews with disabilities, Jews with working-class backgrounds, and trans and gender non-conforming Jews find a supportive environment that is focused on their leadership. JOIN is interested in actively recruiting and supporting Jews with marginalized identities in our fellowship as part of our efforts to work against replicating the oppressions which prevent these individuals from being their full selves. 

For more information, visit www.joinforjustice.org or contact Tali Smookler at tsmookler@joinforjustice.org or 617-350-9994 ex 208.

 

White House Internship Program and D.C. Scholars - Final Application Cycles

Last chance to apply for the White House Internship Program and the D.C. Scholars Program at the White House in the Obama Administration

Do you know leaders interested in interning at the White House for the Obama Administration?  Encourage them to apply today for the Fall 2016 White House Internship Program – the final internship opportunity in the Obama Administration.  This select group of young men and women from across the country dedicate their time, talents, energy, and service to better the White House, the community, and the nation.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens, 18 years of age or older before the first day of the internship, and meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • Currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate degree program at a college, community college, or university (two-to-four year institution)
  • Graduated from an undergraduate or graduate degree program at a college, community college, or university (two-to-four year institution) no more than two years before the first day of the internship
  • A veteran of the United States Armed Forces who possesses a high school diploma or its equivalent and has served on active duty, for any length of time, in the two years preceding the first day of the internship

Every summer since the start of the Obama Administration in 2009, graduating high school seniors from public and charter high schools in the District of Columbia have been invited to apply for a part-time summer internship opportunity at the White House through the D.C. Scholars Program at the White House. 

Additional information on both programs, including eligibility requirements, application materials, and internship timelines are available on our website: https://www.whitehouse.gov/participate/internships/about

How can you help?

  • Promote the White House Internship Program at your alma mater.  Email internship_info@who.eop.gov for more information.
  • Encourage eligible applicants to apply before the deadline – the final intern application cycle in the Obama Administration! The Fall 2016 White House Internship Program application cycle closes on Sunday, April 17, 2016 at 11:59 PM, EST and the application for the D.C. Scholars Program at the White House closes on Sunday, April 24, 2016 at 11:59 PM EST. 
  • Application questions should be directed to intern_application@who.eop.gov and DCScholar_Info@who.eop.gov.
  • Distribute the attached flyers to potential applicants and other contacts who may be interested in the program.

 


 

 

The Institute for Teachers of Color #ITOC16 Teacher Education Strand 

The Institute for Teachers of Color (ITOC) is a professional development space for critical teachers of Color. ‪#‎ITOC16 invites teacher educators of Color who are committed to racial justice to apply to the inaugural teacher educator strand at ITOC. This year we will select 10-15 attendees to build alongside critical teachers of Color. 

Applications are due April 9!

For more information please visit the ITOC site: 

http://www.instituteforteachersofcolor.org/teacher-educators-of-color-strand.html

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Participate in a national study of closed captions in higher education

3Play Media is collaborating with the Ecampus Research Unit at Oregon State University to conduct research exploring two main areas of closed captioning at U.S. institutions of higher education: (1) college students’ experience with, and perceptions of, closed captions and (2) what solutions institutions are implementing to ensure compliance with closed captioning regulations. This study has been approved by the IRB at Oregon State University.

This research includes a survey on institutional use of captions as well as a student survey.

There are two ways to learn more about this study and express your interest:

  1. Fill out a short form to express your interest in participating and provide information about the appropriate institutional contacts.
  2. Attend a webinar to learn more about the study and ask any questions that you have.
  • Friday, April 1 at 9am PDT
  • Monday, April 4 at 1pm PDT
  • Wednesday, April 6 at 12pm PDT

We are looking for institutional partners to fill out the institutional survey and recruit students to share their thoughts and experiences with closed captions. Institutions who participate will have the opportunity to enter a raffle for free captioning hours by 3Play Media and will also receive their institution-specific student data after the research is complete. Student participants will have the opportunity to enter a raffle for one of fifty (50) $25 Amazon gift cards.

If you know of other higher education administrators at your institution or at another institution who might be interested in this study, please consider sharing this information with them. You can also send any questions about this research to Katie Linder, Research Director for Oregon State University’s Ecampus (kathryn.linder@oregonstate.edu).

Thank you for considering participating in this study!

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Request for Research Participants 

From Kevin Mintz, a doctoral student at Stanford University, and a friend of a DCC constituent: 

I would greatly appreciate your help with my basic research project for the Institute for the Advanced Study of Human Sexuality. It is a 20-minute anonymous survey of people with various disabilities. I was thinking you could help me distribute it to any disabled people you might know. It's related to sexuality.  There is also a $10 Amazon Gift Card for people who finish it. Please also circulate widely to any disabled folks you might know. 
Thanks for your help.  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/F8P59NM

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CFP: "Ethnographies of African Mobilization: Theorizing Evidence from the Political Everyday"

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association (November 16-20, 2016), Minneapolis, MN

Organizers:

Tayo Jolaosho, University of South Florida

Angela Storey, University of Arizona

CFP

This panel seeks to consider African political subjectivities and collective mobilization in dialogue with interdisciplinary and cross-regional social movement theory. With studies often rooted in Europe and the Americas, the advancement of international social movement theory based on African experiences has historically been rare (Mamdani and Wamba‐dia‐Wamba 1995; Brandes and Engels 2011; but see Ellis and van Kessel 2009; Robins 2008; Currier 2012). As an increasing number of studies address protests and political mobilization across Africa, it remains important not to assume conceptual alignment otherwise we risk assessing collective politics on the continent through analytical perspectives developed elsewhere. Can social movements be understood as a global phenomenon or should geographical and historical specificities markedly alter the conceptualization of political action? How might ethnography help to account for African political formation across multiple scales—specifically in examining those actions that do not neatly conform to established categories of social movement analysis? Given the potential of “ethnographic refusal” (Ortner 1995; Simpson 2007) to efface African lived experiences, how can ethnography foreground African political landscapes as lived through and contested by those seeking transformation? Furthermore, how can ethnographic attention help to transcend the pitfalls of binary thinking (e.g. resistance vs. accommodation; movement success vs. failure)?

In addition to accounts of activism and organized movements, we are interested in ethnographies of arenas that have not been conventional to our understanding of political mobilization, including in religious organizations and ethnic movements. We are also interested in exploring the interstices of political formation by addressing themes such as:

o   the relationships between movements and the communities in which they are embedded

o   temporal hiatuses between collective action and dissipation,

o   work that endeavors to balance between engagement with and opposition to state power (e.g. Oldfield and Stokke 2007).

For panel consideration, please submit a paper proposal with an abstract of no more than 250 words by Monday April 4th to both astorey@email.arizona.edu and jolaosho@usf.edu. Please note that if your paper is chosen for the panel, you will have to register for the AAA conference and submit your abstract online before 15th April 2016.


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Western Illinois University’s Disability Resource Center will host Disability Culture Day (4/6/16)


 

New Blog Entry from Sit Down, Fight Back

 

Law Student Mental Health Day

VIDEO (captioned) | Questions of Discrimination

Currently, 41 states include questions in their bar exam application asking about the applicant’s mental health history, diagnosis or treatment. If an applicant answers "yes" to these questions, they are required to fill out a form revealing private information and may be forced to turn over confidential treatment records before being allowed to take the bar exam. In this new Rooted in Rights video, launched on Law Student Mental Health Day, the impact these Questions of Discrimination on applicants and the diversity of the legal profession is explored. 

Watch the video now and share it with your friends.

 

   

 

On Blindness and the Portrayal of Marie-Laure in 'All the Light We Cannot See' - The Toast

 

   

 

European Court: Russia wrong to prevent parent with intellectual disabilities from raising his child

For the first time in its history, the European Court of Human Rights has ruled that stripping parental rights on the basis of a mental disability breaches international human rights law. The landmark ruling comes after a man, Vitaliy Kocherov, was denied custody of his daughter for the first six years of her life, solely because both he and his wife have disabilities. 

In 2007, Mr Kocherov had a child with his wife whilst living at a social care institution in St. Petersburg, Russia. Soon after the child was born, the authorities took their daughter away and placed her in a children’s home. The Russian Government asserted that the marriage between them had been ‘void’ as Mr Kocherov’s wife had been placed under guardianship, so the father was therefore prohibited from exercising his parental rights, which he wanted to do. 

Mr Kocherov took legal action to be reunited with his family. In an attempt to secure custody of his daughter, Mr Kocherov, with help from lawyer Dmitri Bartenev, secured his release from the social care institution in 2011 and moved into an apartment.

Despite this, the children’s home refused to allow the father to raise his child. A local court in Russia agreed, and removed Mr Kocherov’s right to parent in 2012.  

The Mental Disability Advocacy Centre (an international human rights NGO) and Russian lawyer Dmitri Bartenev issued proceedings at the European Court of Human Rights in 2013 on behalf of Mr Kocherov and his daughter. 

Today the European Court held unanimously that Russia had breached the Kocherov’s right to respect for family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Referring to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Court said that the Russian Government had taken a “formalistic” approach, resulting in a child being needlessly and unlawfully being separated from her parents. 

On hearing the Court’s judgment today, Mr Kocherov said:

“Anna is a great kid and we were so happy to be finally able to live as a family in our flat. We saw stories of other residents of the social care institution who could not save their families. Thanks for supporting us these years!”  

Lawyer Dmitri Bartenev said:                                                     

“Today’s decision of the Court is yet another milestone in recognition of equality of people with mental disabilities. The Court emphasised the paramountcy of state obligation to aim at reuniting a natural parent with his or her child. I am happy that Mr Kocherov’s long battle for the reunification of his family was successful and hope it will serve as guidance for the Government in implementing the standards of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which Russia ratified in 2012.”  

Ann Campbell, MDAC Litigation Director, said:

“Russia’s discriminatory laws meant that Mr Kocherov was prevented from being a father only because he was a social care resident. MDAC is delighted that the Court has recognised this as a violation of the Kocherov family's right to private and family life and ordered redress. The judgment makes clear that a formalistic approach to determining parental rights is not sufficient. A full determination must be done to ensure the best interests of the child while not violating the rights of parents.” 

MDAC calls on Russia to stop separating parents from their children on the basis of stereotypes and prejudice against people with mental disabilities, by amending Article 73(2) of the Family Code to remove references to “mental illness” and “dangerousness” which perpetuate stereotypes against parents with disabilities, in breach of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

·         Today’s judgment can be found here: http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/eng?i=001-161760

·         A more detailed description of the case can be found on MDAC’s website here.

·         The Mental Disability Advocacy Centre (MDAC) and Russian lawyer Dmitri Bartenev represented Mr Kocherov and his daughter at the European Court of Human Rights.

·         The International Disability Alliance, European Disability Forum, Inclusion International and Inclusion Europe all made third party interventions in the case.

·         MDAC is an international non-governmental organisation which advances the human rights of people with mental disabilities using the law. It conducts strategic litigation and advocacy in Europe and Africa. For more information, please visit www.mdac.org.

·         For further information about the case, interviews or images, please email mdac@mdac.org.

 
 

   

 

Statement of Solidarity with Students Protestors in India

Many of you may be aware of the ongoing and progressively worsening police brutality against students in India. Please consider signing the statement of solidarity below, expressing support for students and faculty of Hyderabad Central University (HCU) and student protesters in Mumbai who have most recently been violently attacked and detained by the police despite peacefully protesting a number of injustices being committed on university campuses across the country. We think it is important for this statement to be circulated not just to extend support to our peers, but also because the regional, national and international media are largely maintaining blanket silence on the issue. It is only through informal networks that some of these events can be made known concerned others.

Please also note that this statement supports a call for a statute to end caste discrimination in educational institutions in India.  

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1hNmlZ-56e-ZjIMb2u4rnqGMV4p7Fkqqkml4An619D2s/edit?usp=sharing_eid&ts=56f70755


   

The Science of Contemplative Practice and the Practice of Contemplative Science


  

Blackburn News: UW Holds Downs Awareness Walkathon

 

  

Red Eye Tournament Doesn't Acknowledge It's Own Ableism 


https://thegatewayonline.ca/2016/03/red-eye-tournament-doesnt-acknowledge-its-own-ableism/

 
 


  

April 21 Webcast: STEM as a Career Option for GI Bill Recipients w/Disabilities 

Virginia Commonwealth University - Rehabilitation Research and Training Center invites you to join them on the STEM as a Career Option for GI Bill Recipients with Disabilities webcast on April 21, 2016 at 3:00 PM.

This webcast will summarize some of the findings of a NSF funded research study (Grant No.1246492) that investigated the perceptions of GI Bill recipients with disabilities of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) careers. College students with disabilities are vastly underrepresented in STEM fields despite being a valuable talent source. The goal of this study was to study a specific population, GI Bill Recipients, to identify the underlying issues that impact recruitment, enrollment, participation, and retention of this population in higher education STEM programs and to recommend strategies to support their participation in STEM. Data were collected through a statewide survey as well as follow-up qualitative interviews. The presenters will review the quantitative and qualitative results of the study and make recommendations on further research to investigate the assets and barriers to STEM participation for GI Bill recipients with disabilities.

For more information and to register online for free go to: http://www.worksupport.com/training/webcastDetails.cfm/367

 


  

After Brain Injury: Survivor Stories

After Brain Injury: Survivor Stories was launched in 2014 to meet the need for a series of books aimed at those who have suffered a brain injury, their families and carers, and professionals who are involved in neuropsychological rehabilitation. Brain disorders can be life-changing events with far-reaching consequences. 
  

 
 

New issue of GLEANINGS

Spirituality, Religion, and Disability Resources from the Religion and Spirituality Division of the AAIDD.

http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=b0a1f47f37f438a033455997f&id=031c2d8bf9&e=cde227e068

  

Disability.gov Update

“Ticket to Work” Virtual Job Fair for People with Disabilities

Social Security Webinar on Gaining Financial Independence

10 Things to Know about Nutrition

Disability.Blog: Voice Rising: The Accidental Advocate by Guest Blogger Xian Horn

Disability.Blog: A Passion for Accessibility in the Performing Arts  - This blog was cross-posted from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Blog. 

Disability.Blog: What It Means to Be Right-Footed  by Jessica Cox, Right Footed

Disability.Blog: My Jenga-Block Wrist by Guest Blogger Iris Pedowitz

Disability.Blog: The Foundation for Inclusion: The Interactive Process by Guest Blogger Lou Orslene, Co-director, Job Accommodation Network (JAN)

Disability.Blog: The CEED Project: The Potential of Entrepreneurship by Guest Blogger Kate Caldwell, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Disability and Human Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Disability.Blog: Tea Cures Captchas: Accessible Online Job Applications are More Than a Best Practice  - This blog was cross-posted from the Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT) 


Disability Scoop

Disability Scoop 3.25.16

PING CHONG AND COMPANY Summer Training Institute and upcoming Beyond Sacred performances 

Summer Training Institute: Now Accepting Applications
AUGUST 9-14, 2016 in Queens, NY

The Ping Chong + Company Summer Institute is designed to engage and inspire artists, teachers, students, and community practitioners interested in developing unique performance projects that explore oral history, art, and community engagement. This intensive week-long workshop, led by Ping Chong, Sara Zatz, and Ryan Conarro will explore Ping Chong + Company's innovative community-based performance and documentary theatre practices, with specific focus on the award-winning Undesirable Elements series.

Hosted by LaGuardia Performing Arts Center's Stages of Change
A LaGuardia Community College/CUNY Institute of Theatre for Social Transformation

Applications due April 18, 2016 - APPLY HERE
Tuition: $750 - limited financial aid available.
For more information,contact training@pingchong.org 

Upcoming Beyond Sacred performances in April and May

Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity

The New York Times calls Beyond Sacred "a lesson in human understanding, drawn from real lives" and a "probing and persuasive new work of interview-based theater" (Read full review)

Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity is an interview-based theatre production by Ping Chong + Company exploring the diverse experiences of Muslim communities within New York City. The five young participants in Beyond Sacred vary in many ways, but share the common experience of coming of age in a post-9/11 New York City. The goal of Beyond Sacred is to use theater and personal testimony to foster greater understanding among Muslim and non-Muslim communities in New York and beyond. Watch a short documentary about Beyond Sacred HERE.


April/May Performances:

Wednesday April 6, 2016
SUNY Stony Brook
Charles B. Wang Center

Saturday, April 9th, 2016
Brooklyn Public Library
Central Library, Dweck Center

Additional National 2016 Dates Coming Soon

Beyond Sacred was commissioned as part of LPAC's 2014-15 Beyond Sacred season with the generous support of APAP and the Doris Duke Foundation Building Bridges Grant. 2015-2016 presentations are supported by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.

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ACR Health’s 2016 walk/run events 

ACR Health’s 2016 walk/run events are now open for registration!

Events include April's AIDS Hike for Life in the Utica/Mahawl Valley, June's AIDS Walk/Run in the Syracuse/CNY area, August's Bubble Blast Run at The New York State Fair, and October's First Frost AIDS Walk/Run in the Watertown/North Country area. Signing up early helps increase fundraising for ACR Health's programs & services. Please consider participating!

Laverne Cox: Ain’t I A Woman: My Journey to Womanhood

Presented by SUNY Jefferson.

Saturday, May 7th, 8 PM.

JCC McVean Gym

For more information call 315 786 2431 or go to www.sunyjefferson.edu

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Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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