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Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

INDEX

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

Special Pre-Theater-Release Screening of "Autism in Love"

The Annual Year of Queer Undergraduate Conference

he OutCrowd’s Coming Out Party

Please join us for a roundtable discussion with the 2014-2015 contributors to Metathesis.

Safer People, Safer Spaces


SU NEWS

Library support for SU graduate students 

Summer jobs for undergraduates from last week in June through the end of July

Congratulations to all of the SU “Student Start Up” Winners!!

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, PARTICIPANTS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Fulbright Scholar Program Opportunities in Education

CFPs: April 25: Deadline for Proposals to Accessing Higher Ground

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

WIU Holds Disability Culture Day

Disability 101 – part 4 – Disability as Art

Grand Rapids Festival Features Artists with Disabilities

News re: new book from activist and author, Bonnie Burstow

Disability Scoop 4.21.15

The Syracuse Peace Council (SPC) is seeking interns

Voting Rights Bill Advances in California

Medical Decision-Making Bill Advances in Nevada

“THROUGH OUR EYES”

Intersectionalities: A Global Journal of Social Work Analysis, Research, Polity, and Practice has just published its latest article in the 2015 rolling issue 

Disability Scoop 4.17.15

Disability and Colonialism- JOURNAL SPECIAL ISSUE OUT NOW

Netflix introduces audio descriptions for visually impaired 

A "Rule Out Abuse" Campaign for Physicians

Recent article of interest from New York Times (fraud in clinical trials for psychiatric drugs)

Disability Rights International (DRI) research reveals shocking dangers and violence faced by children living in orphanages


SU HAPPENINGS

Special Pre-Theater-Release Screening of "Autism in Love"

 
The movie will premiere at Syracuse University on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 @ 7:00 pm, Watson Theater
 
FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
 
Note from the DCC: The event organizers have been contacted by Director Diane Wiener regarding whether the film is captioned and/or has audio description, and whether ASL interpretation will be provided during the Skype session.  We await a response.     

The Annual Year of Queer Undergraduate Conference

Wednesday, April 29th, 12:30 PM
Kittredge Auditorium
 
Please save the date for the 9th annual Year of Queer Undergraduate Conference. This is a wonderful opportunity for students to share the work that they have produced in this year’s LGBT Studies courses. Full program details forthcoming. Lunch will be served.

The OutCrowd’s Coming Out Party


Tuesday, April 28
th, 7 – 9 PM
LGBT Resource Center, 750 Ostrom Avenue
The OutCrowd Magazine, Syracuse University’s queer and trans publication, is having aComing Out Party! Come celebrate the launch of the Spring 2015 issue of The OutCrowd Magazine! There will be food, music, copies of the magazine, friendly faces, and much queer fun to be had! Whether you're magazine staff, a member or ally of the queer and trans community, or want to schmooze with the editors for next year, join us for an end-of-semester celebration!

Please join us for a roundtable discussion with the 2014-2015 contributors to Metathesis.

Panelists will discuss feminism, theories of gender, and public scholarship. Refreshments provided. Friday, April 24th. 4 – 5:30 PM. Hall of Languages 107.

Safer People, Safer Spaces

Thursday, April 30th, 6 – 9 PM
 
Safer People, Safer Spaces is a 3 hour training that is as close to comprehensive as we can provide in that time. Safer People, Safer Spaces will incorporate many different activities to provide participants with a variety of ways to engage and develop their sense of allyship. Stickers will be provided at the end of this training. To register, please email the LGBT Resource Center.


SU NEWS

Library support for SU graduate students 


Services tutorials
The Research Data Services program of the Syracuse University Libraries offers a broad range of services related to the identification, collection, management, analysis, and curation of quantitative and qualitative research data. Among their most recent offerings are two series of tutorials on creating and managing research data and using Qualtrics online survey software.
Aimed at those with some basic knowledge of research methods or statistics, the Data Training series helps users work with research data in a methodical and efficient manner. Graduate students who are in the early stages of planning their thesis or dissertation would benefit most from this series. Modules are designed to be used as a series, but can also be used for reference. Topics include Planning Your Research, Working with Variables, Documenting Your Research, Collecting Your Data, Cleaning Your Data, and Analyzing Your Data.
The Qualtrics series enables new users to design and build a first-rate survey using the Qualtrics online survey software. Topics covered in these tutorials include: Planning Your Qualtrics Survey, Backing Up and Documenting Your Survey, Variables and Values, Anonymity in Qualtrics, and Randomization in Qualtrics.
Other services offered by Research Data Services include:
assistance with research methodology, instrument design, and quantitative and qualitative data analysis;
instruction in use of specialized software, such as SAS, Stata, SPSS, and ArcGIS;
assessment of data management needs;
assistance with data management plans required by NSF, NIH, and other funders;
consulting in research methods, study design, survey and interview design;
assistance in locating and using other sources of quantitative, qualitative; and GIS data;
identifying appropriate repositories for long-term access to research data.
SU Libraries can also generate and assign a permanent data identifier (DOI) to your datasets to facilitate citation and attribution of shared datasets.
For more information on Research Data Services, contact Paul Bern at 315.443.1352 or email phbern@syr.edu.

Summer jobs for undergraduates from last week in June through the end of July

 
Employment opportunities for undergraduate students who are interested in working with students in Grades K-5 through the Say Yes to Education Summer Program: https://www.sujobopps.com/postings/58806

Congratulations to all of the SU “Student Start Up” Winners!!



CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Fulbright Scholar Program Opportunities in Education

 
We are writing to inform you of exciting Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program grant opportunities inEurope and Eurasia and in the Middle East and North Africa in the field of education. Applications for the 2016-17 academic year are currently being accepted from all levels of faculty and professionals, including early career.
We are soliciting applications for a broad range of awards in your field, including but not limited to:
Applicants must be U.S. citizens and, as specified by the individual award description, hold a PhD or appropriate professional/terminal degree at the time of application. The application deadline is August 3, 2015.
In addition, All Disciplines awards are available in many countries and can be a good option if no discipline-focused award matches your expertise. Please visit the 2016-17 Catalog of Awards to learn more about the opportunities available in this year's competition. For most awards, English is sufficient for teaching and foreign language proficiency is only needed to the extent required by the proposed research project.
For eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines and review criteria, please follow this link. You may also wish to register for one of our webinars or join our online community, My Fulbright, a resource center for applicants interested in the program.
Please feel free to share this message with members of your listservs, newsletters or social media. For further information about specific awards, please contact the program staff listed in the award description.
Regards,
Europe/Eurasia and Middle East and North Africa Fulbright Scholar Program Team
Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES)

Institute of International Education (IIE)

http://www.cies.org/us-scholar-programs


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

WIU Holds Disability Culture Day


Disability 101 – part 4 – Disability as Art


Grand Rapids Festival Features Artists with Disabilities


News re: new book from activist and author, Bonnie Burstow

 
Just wanted to make sure people know that my new book and without question my magnum opus  is now out (released this month)--Psychiatry and the Business of Madness: An Ethical and Epistemological Accounting (a Palgrave Macmillan Publication which one reviewer describes as “a milestone in the antipsychiatry effort and…a monumental challenge to psychiatry’s continued existence as a branch of medicine”). Unlike Scull, alas, I could not get a mainstream publication like Scientific American to consider doing a review of this book—a problem that most of us face.  That said, a review of the book did come out Mad in America.  In this regard, if interested, see http://www.madinamerica.com/2015/04/book-review-psychiatry-business-madness-ethical-epistemological-accounting/

Disability Scoop 4.21.15


The Syracuse Peace Council (SPC) is seeking interns

who are enthusiastic and PASSIONATE about working to create a world of peace, compassion, equality, and social justice and who are MOTIVATED to take ACTION to end military aggression and all forms of oppression. By interning in our office, you'll have the opportunity to learn about important issues of our day as well as the basics of grassroots organizing from outreach to publicity to fundraising. Fill out the internship application online HERE!
Summer 2015 Internships in Activism:  
·         Anti-War Outreach and Organizing
·         Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation - Outreach and Organizing 
·         No More Hiroshimas - Peace Now! 
·         Website Content and Maintenance
·         Bikes 4 Peace
·         Peace Newsletter: Print and Digital Media
Interns work alongside SPC staff and members to offer support and leadership in our organizing work. Scroll down for more detailed descriptions. This summer we are able to provide one, twenty hour per week internship with a stipend in addition to 4 unpaid internships. To be considered for the stipend, please apply by Wednesday May 6. 
 
Interns at the Peace Council need to be self-starters, comfortable operating in a grassroots environment. Hours, start date and length are flexible. Prospective interns are invited to approach us with proposals which to do not fall into the positions described below.
 
Time Varies from week to week, but generally requires an average of ten hours per week. Time will be split between business hours and evening and weekend events. Interns seeking college internship credit should consult their institution for guidlelines.
 
Supervision & evaluation Interns will be supervised by the Peace Council staff person relating to their area of work. The intern would be evaluated on their level of responsibility in following through effectively on tasks, their ability to work cooperatively with others and where applicable, their role in the success of projects. 
 
To apply, go to http://www.peacecouncil.net/internships-in-activism or contact ourr office for an application and return it to with a current resume and contact for two references to: 2013 East Genesee St, Syracuse, NY 13210 or email to spc@peacecouncil.net
 
Anti-War Outreach Assist with the Peace Council's Anti-War organizing, including organizing to expose killer drone attacks, Boycott Divestment and Sanctions (BDS), and organizing in response to current events. Specific tasks may include: conducting research on critical sociopolitical issues; creating posters, fliers, and banners; attending meetings, rallies, and demonstrations; organizing and staffing outreach tables; participating in conference calls; as well as phone banking and data entry. Experience with social change organizing would be helpful but not necessary. An interest in educating and organizing to end US militarism is required. 
 
No More Hiroshimas – Peace Now! 2015 mark 70 years since the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki resulting in horrific destruction and loss of life. This summer, we will be organizing actions and events aimed at strengthening the local anti-war movement and deepening an understanding of the human toll of U.S. militarism. Expanding community participation in the annual Hiroshima Day commemoration on August 6 will be a key focus. Intern(s) will work alongside SPC staff and volunteers, in the office and in the community.
 
Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation Outreach and Event Organizing  Intern will work the with Peace Council committee, Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation, any ally organization that works to educate about and support the traditional government of the Onondaga nation. In Summer 2015, we will be promoting a new educational book documenting the relationships, between the Onondaga, allies and the government.
 
Bikes 4 Peace  Assist with the Peace Council's summer youth bike repair project. Tasks may include outreach to partner organization, volunteer recruitment and designing and distributing materials. Interest in promoting cycling and working with youth is essential. Basic bicycle maitenance skills helpful (or a willingness to learn!)
 
Fundraising and Development Assist with the Peace Council's fundraising/development efforts, including mail, phone and web-based fundraising (and/or other events that are planned). Requires the desire to help with the infrastructure work required for a community organization to succeed; ability to follow up on contacts, build connections and carry out tasks effectively; and good communications skills.
 
Communications and Web Maintenance Assist with the Peace Council's website development work, including e-communications, web-based fundraising and integrating social media. Requires knowledge of, or interest in learning, data management web programs, the desire to help with the infrastructure work required for a community organization to succeed and an interest in grassroots, online communications. 
 
Peace Newsletter, Print and Digital Media  Intern would work with the Peace Newsletter editorial committee to develop the Peace Newsletter's web presence. Interest in print and digital media essential. 

Voting Rights Bill Advances in California

Senate Bill 589 was approved yesterday by the Senate Elections Committee in California.  SB 589 adds additional protections for the voting rights of people with developmental disabilities in conservatorship proceedings.
The voting rights complaint we filed with the Department of Justice last July is having a domino effect. First there was the passage of AB 1311 which was signed by the Governor last October.  I am informed that judges have been more hesitant to take away voting rights of limited conservatees in view of that new law.
Now there is SB 589.  It replaces the “literacy test” under California law with a new standard for voting competency.  If SB 589 is enacted, a judge would have to find by clear and convincing evidence that a conservatee cannot express a desire to participate in the voting process before a disqualification order can be granted.  What a major change.
The committee report (http://disabilityandabuse.org/sb589-committee-analysis.pdf) credits our [Disability and Abuse Project] complaint with the DOJ for the passage of AB 1311 and as the impetus for SB 589.  That is very gratifying to know.  If SB 589 is enacted into law, its passage could make our complaint with the DOJ unnecessary and therefore moot.  We will know more about the fate of this bill in the coming months.

Medical Decision-Making Bill Advances in Nevada

The state Assembly in Nevada has passed AB 128 after it was amended to address some of the concerns that were raised by the Disability and Guardianship Project. 
In its original form, the bill would have transferred authority to make medical decisions from an adult with an intellectual disability to another person as soon as the power of attorney form was signed.  We raised many objections to this automatic transfer of authority. For background information on AB 128 and our previous objections, click here.
Proponents of the bill considered our objections and addressed our concerns by amending the bill before it was presented to the full Assembly for a vote.  The amended bill is part supported decision making and part power of attorney.  If the patient can communicate, the patient makes the medical decisions in consultation with a chosen supporter.  If the patient cannot communicate, the chosen supporter is the agent who makes the medical decisions.  The patient can never be required to have medical procedures to which the patient objects.
We are pleased with the amended bill and are glad that we were able to have an impact on its provisions.  We will continue to follow its progress and will report what happens when further votes are taken. 
 
Kudos to [Disability and Abuse] Listserv member and Project Advisor Mark Olson for alerting us to the bill and for bringing our concerns to the attention of the proponents of the measure and to the Legislature.  Mark’s measured actions were a manifestation of professionalism and diplomacy. 

“THROUGH OUR EYES”

 
As you can see, PREVENTION is identified in the second paragraph:  the many important activities that come AFTER the abuse.  Why are they not discussing what to do BEFORE the abuse??????  Am I missing something?  Wouldn’t it be important to have the word “Prevention” mean “prevent?”  I naively, FOR YEARS thought that to prevent something meant to make it not happen.   As you can see, I was wrong.
But that is why, in 1988, I wrote the Parents Guidebook: A Risk Reduction Guidebook for Parents…to Reduce the Risk of Abuse.  And then last year published the Workbook for Parents and others to learn more about the complexities and realities of abuse, then to design their own Individualized Response Plan, in case something felt “off” or they were victimized.  What I learned from my clients who did their plans was that by having a plan, the impact of the abuse was significantly reduced, and a sense of empowerment actually strengthened.
 
I recommend you get a copy of “A Risk Reduction Workbook for Parents and Service Providers for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.”  The Workbook works for kids without disabilities as well.  Let’s encourage more work at the “front end” to avoid/reduce the need for responsive efforts….not to reduce the responsive efforts but the need for them.
Through Our Eyes:
Children, Violence, and Trauma 
 
Too many children have been exposed to crime, abuse, and violence in their homes, schools, and communities. These experiences can lead to serious, long-term problems.

 
Early identification, intervention, and treatment are key. The Federal Government has a responsibility to act, but our efforts cannot succeed without local law enforcement, child and family services, community leaders, educators, coaches, and parents. Everyone plays a role in identifying, protecting, and treating children exposed to violence.

 
Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma videos in this series compel all of us to join our neighbors and the growing ranks of professionals who have made it their life's work to help traumatized children heal and thrive.
 
 
In honor of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, the 
National Children's Advocacy Center  
spotlights child abuse prevention resources, ideas, and information  
throughout the month.
 
Find additional resources on the NCAC website

Intersectionalities: A Global Journal of Social Work Analysis, Research, Polity, and Practice has just published its latest article in the 2015 rolling issue

at http://journals.library.mun.ca/ojs/index.php/IJ
We invite you to read the article:

"ID Politics: The Violence of Modernity"
http://journals.library.mun.ca/ojs/index.php/IJ/article/view/1518/1213
by Essya M. Nabbali

Abstract

Scholarship in feminism, anticolonialism, Disability and Mad studies, have repositioned storytelling as instructive to the present and to the ethics of care. Emplotted with time and space, like the acts and lives of others, stories make discernible those everyday encounters, sites of practices, and material conditions that usher power and pain. They destabilize essentialism, so, too, the asymmetries that ensue, and are therefore pivotal in the politics toward self-definition. It has even been argued that the concept of the story garners much of the attention once assigned to that of identity. But here, I juxtapose, I entwine, no, I exbody competing multivalent social scripts, each a verse in itself, to nuance—albeit creatively—the story in this current age of governmentality and concomitant surveillance technologies. Paying homage to Patricia Hill Collins, I evoke intersectionality and endeavour to bring us back to identity politics … analytically.

http://journals.library.mun.ca/ojs/index.php/IJ/article/view/1518/1213

Disability Scoop 4.17.15


Disability and Colonialism- JOURNAL SPECIAL ISSUE OUT NOW

Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture-

Special Issue: Disability and Colonialism: (Dis)encounters and Anxious Intersectionalities

Edited by Karen Soldatic (UNSW) & Shaun Grech (The Critical Institute)  

Issue OUT NOW http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/csid20/current#.VS6krdyUcrU 

Editorial- Disability and colonialism: (dis)encounters and anxious intersectionalities Shaun Grech & Karen Soldatic pages 1-5

Decolonising Eurocentric disability studies: why colonialism matters in the disability and global South debate Shaun Grech pages 6-21

Orientalising deafness: race and disability in imperial Britain Esme Cleall pages 22-36

‘Let them be young and stoutly set in limbs’: race, labor, and disability in the British Atlantic World Stefanie Kennedy pages 37-52

Postcolonial reproductions: disability, indigeneity and the formation of the white masculine settler state of Australia Karen Soldatic pages 53-68

WHO's MIND, whose future? Mental health projects as colonial logics Tanya Titchkosky & Katie Aubrecht pages 69-84

All articles here http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/csid20/current#.VS6krdyUcrU

Netflix introduces audio descriptions for visually impaired 


A "Rule Out Abuse" Campaign for Physicians

The Disability and Abuse Project is launching a "Rule Out Abuse" campaign for medical doctors.  Dr. Nora Baladerian is spearheading the campaign after years of noticing that, when presented with patients with disabilities who have traditional symptoms associated with abuse, doctors generally do not consider such a diagnosis as a possibility to rule out.  For Part 1 of the literature (an overview), click here.  For Part 2 of the literature (detailed information), click here.


Disability Rights International (DRI) research reveals shocking dangers and violence faced by children living in orphanages

 
https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101116784221/T.pngKiev, Ukraine -- April 16, 2015 -- Today DRI released its groundbreaking report, No Way Home: The Exploitation and Abuse of Children in Ukraine's Orphanages, the result of a three-year investigation into the country's egregious human rights violations, perpetrated against its most vulnerable citizens - children locked away in orphanages, institutions, boarding schools and other segregated facilities.
 
The report found children - both with and without disabilities - exposed to life-threatening neglect, physical and sexual violence, forced abortions and at-risk for being trafficked for sex, labor, pornography and organs. Locked away in remote facilities and with reported numbers of institutionalized children varying greatly, from 82,000 to 200,000, no one really knows how many are detained in them.   
 
"When most countries are closing institutions and supporting children to live in communities and with families, Ukraine keeps rebuilding institutions and orphanages. We know they are dangerous on so many levels and they violate children's most basic human rights," said DRI Associate Director Eric Mathews and lead researcher/author of the report, "and international donors to Ukraine's orphanages have greatly exacerbated this problem."  
 
"For children with disabilities, they are often the most abused and neglected and most will die in institutions. Children who are let go or "graduate" from facilities at the age of 15 or 16, are sitting ducks for traffickers as they face life on the streets alone," said DRI President Laurie Ahern. "And children caught in the cross-fire of the current armed conflict in Eastern Ukraine are especially at risk of being abandoned and disappearing from institutions." 

Click here to read the report on our website.

Read press coverage of the report in the 
New York Times
.    
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Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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