Weekly Newsletter

Follow Us Like Us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube Follow us on Tumblr

Weekly Newsletter

May, 27 2017

INDEX

SU HAPPENINGS

Comparative Settler Colonialisms in Conversation

América's Home Film Screening

Cold Case Justice Initiative Conference

Training Opportunity: There will be an open Safer People, Safer Spaces training

Free Income Tax Assistance:

Do you have a story to tell? Be a human book!

ITS "Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI"

Inclusion of People with Disabilities Around the Globe Through Law and Education

Film Screening  FIXED:  The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement

VIGIL IN REMEMBRANCE OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES MURDERED BY FAMILY MEMBERS AND CAREGIVERS

2014 Jacobus tenBroek Disability Law Symposium

Please encourage your students to attend the Equity and Social Justice Conference at the Sheraton on March 1.

SU NEWS

Needed: Student Volunteers for Voiceovers

Microaggressions at Syracuse University Facebook page

Recruiting Mentors for Dimensions

University Union has announced its first Syracuse University Film Festival!

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, PARTICIPANTS

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology

*Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies* Call for Papers: French and Francophone World Disability Studies Guest editors: Tammy Berberi and Christian Flaugh

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Help us find these participants of the 1977 San Francisco 504 Protests!

DEADLINE APPROACHING, 3/15/14: Summer Field School in Deaf Geographies

NEW: Anthropology of Disability Blog: Disability Fieldnotes

FCC Acts to Help Emergency Responders Locate Wireless 911 Callers

Independent Study Course Including People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs in Disaster Operations

Autism  Campus Inclusion Summer Leadership Academy application extension

APPLICATIONS OPEN FOR 2014-2016 EMPIRE STATE FELLOWS PROGRAM

Participate in Equality-themed music video:

EXCITING NEW OPPORTUNITY FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES – ESPECIALLY STUDENTS SEEKING EMPLOYMENT, POST-GRADUATION

Aloha, Review of Disability Studies (RDS) readers: survey

New Blog on DisabilityandAbuse website: "Hyperbole does not help!"

Disabilities Related Articles

Hearing Voices Groups survey

 

 


SU Happenings

Comparative Settler Colonialisms in Conversation


Indigenous Critique, Alliance Politics, and Decolonized Futures
Monday March 17, 2014
4:00pm
Peter Graham Commons, Bird Library
Scott Morgensen, Professor, Gender Studies, Queen's University, ON
Jodi Byrd, Associate Professor, English and American Indian Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Dana Olwan, Assistant Professor, Women's and Gender Studies, Syracuse University
Hayley Cavino, Doctoral Candidate, School of Education, Syracuse University
The growth of settler colonial studies has created opportunities for rethinking familiar modes of theorizing colonialism, racism, and empire. This field allows us to draw comparisons and interrogate state practices and social activism across settler colonial sites. Drawing on critical race, indigenous, and postcolonial feminist studies, this panel brings together indigenous and allied scholars to theorize old and new imperial formations. Participants will engage in a conversation about the uses, challenges, and possible pitfalls of theorizing settler colonialism as a way toward indigenous critique. Together the panelists will draw on their work to demonstrate their stakes in just political alliances and decolonized futures.

América's Home Film Screening


Thursday April 3, 20144:00pm
Shemin Auditorium
 
América’s Home is the story of América Sorrentini-Blaut, a feisty Puerto Rican woman in her 70′s and her fight against developers intent on bulldozing her community and her family’s historic home. Her story is one of many tales of resistance against rampant greed, gentrification and displacement taking place all across the American Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and on the mainland.  América lives on fixed income in Chicago and struggles to restore her mother’s historic home in Santurce, a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood of the “new” San Juan.  Aided by a group of her contemporaries, the youngest of whom is 65, these “retired” construction workers and artisans painstakingly restore the house and transform it into Casa Sofia, a cultural center named in honor of América’s mother.  When developers offered her $2 million dollars to knock down Casa Sofia so that they could build exclusive condos, she refused. As one activist observes, “Not everything of value is for sale.”

Cold Case Justice Initiative Conference


Looking Back, Moving Forward: 50th Anniversary Commemoration of the Civil Rights Movement 1964-2014
March 20-23, 2014
Participants include Rosa Morris Williams (granddaughter of Frank Morris) and Shelton Chappell (son of Johnnie Mae Chappell), who are family members of 1964 victims of civil rights era cold cases; and Donald Washington, the former US Attorney for the Western District of Louisiana, whose office was responsible for implementing the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Era Crimes Act.  Participants also include leading civil rights activists Diane Nash and Rev. C.T. Vivian, who were principal organizers of the Freedom Rides and Freedom Summer; John Steele, civil rights activist from Philadelphia, Mississippi where civil rights activists Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schwerner were murdered by the Klan; Dorothy Gilliam, the first Black woman reporter for the Washington Post, who covered the civil rights movement; and Phillip Agnew, Exec. Director of the Dream Defenders, a youth-led organization that brought attention to Trayvon Martin’s death and demanded action by the Florida State Legislature. Prof. David Crane’s exhibit, “Making the Movement: Objects, Objectives, and Civil Rights,” will be on display at the Community Folk Art Center during the conference.  On Saturday night, March 22d, there will be an awards dinner which will feature a performance by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, a founder of the Freedom Singers and the a capella group Sweet Honey in the Rock, and her daughter Toshi Reagon, a musical artist and social justice activist in her own right. 
Conference events are free and the public is invited to attend.  Registration is required, however.  The full conference program description and registration materials are on the CCJI website at http://www.syr.edu/coldcaselaw/.  In addition, see the links for the Civil Rights Essay Contest and the Poetry Jam for Civil Rights.  Please contact Prof. Paula Johnson, Prof. Janis McDonald or Sheila Welch at (315) 443-5019 and swelch@law.syr.edu for more information.

Training Opportunity: There will be an open Safer People, Safer Spaces training

on Thursday, March 20th, from 2 – 5 PM.
Safer People, Safer Spaces is a 3 hour training on marginalized genders and sexualities that is as close to comprehensive as the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Resource Center can provide in that time. Safer People, Safer Spaces will incorporate many different activities and provide participants with a variety of ways to engage and develop their sense of Allyship with a mixture of content and context-based outcomes. Due to the intensive structure of this training, it is limited a minimum of 10 participants and a maximum of 30 participants.
Email the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Resource Center by Friday, March 14th to reserve your spot! Location will be provided once a minimum of 10 participants are signed up.

Free Income Tax Assistance:

Accounting students in the Whitman School of Management will offer free income tax assistance to Syracuse University students, faculty and staff on February 28th, March 21st, and March 28th from 10 AM – 3 PM. The Beta Alpha Psi Free Tax Assistance group will be in the Flaum Grand Hall located in the Whitman Building on these days.

Do you have a story to tell? Be a human book!


Wednesday, April 9th, 3 – 6 PM
Bird Library
At Syracuse University’s first annual Human Library event, people volunteering as “human books” lead 20 minute, small group conversations about their area of expertise, cultural background, or life experiences. The purpose of the event is to promote tolerance, challenge assumptions, and celebrate diversity within our community.
To find out more about the Human Library project and the experiences of other communities, see the Human Library website. If you’re interested in becoming a human book, complete the registration form by March 7th.

ITS "Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI"

You’re invited! And bring your colleagues.
But act quickly.
Information Technology and Services (ITS) is offering a new training course, Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI”. There are still seats open in the April sessions.
All staff and faculty are welcome. SU’s goal is to have at least one person with responsibility for organizational communications and at least one person from the IT support team from each school, college and administrative unit take this training.
About the course
This course was developed in partnership with New Horizons Computer Learning Centers of Syracuse in response to demand from across campus for face-to-face training to build faculty and staff awareness of and competency with using technology to ensure the accessibility of course materials, presentations, events, documents, web sites, and online resources.  Personnel from numerous SU schools, colleges and departments provided insights and expertise to help shape this program.  See the course overview, below.
Each of the four half-day training classes will have twelve participants and be held as follows:
Date
Time
Location
Thursday, April 10, 2014
Session 1: 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Session 2: 1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
ECM Training Center
621 Skytop Road
Tuesday, April 22, 2014
Session 1: 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Session 2: 1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
ECM Training Center
621 Skytop Road
Parking will be available.
Seating is limited, so register early! There is clearly high demand for this training, so registration is on a first submitted, first enrolled basis.
Please share this invitation as appropriate with others in your organization, particularly personnel involved with organizational, employee and student communications, event planning/management, and IT support.
If you have any questions, please send an email to accessibility@syr.edu.
 
 
Accessibility Fundamentals for Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI
Course Overview
This 3-hour workshop is designed to provide a fundamental overview of creating accessible documents in Microsoft Office 2013 and Adobe Acrobat XI. At successful course completion students will be able to:
·         Explain and demonstrate the importance of creating accessible documents
·         Understand basic concepts for creating accessible documents including:
o   Reading order
o   Alternative text
o   Styles
o   Heading structure
o   Titles
o   Tags
·         Understand best practices for creating accessible Office and Acrobat documents
·         Remediate legacy Office and Acrobat documents to make them accessible
·         Utilize the Office accessibility checker
·         Specify common accessibility errors
·         Utilize Adobe Acrobat XI’s accessibility checker

Inclusion of People with Disabilities Around the Globe Through Law and Education


Panel Discussion Featuring
Judith E. Heumann, Special Advisor for International Disability Rights, U.S. Department of State

March 5, 2014
5:00-6:30 pm
Room 101
McNaughton Hall
College of Law

This panel also includes members of the SU community in a discussion about the development of disability rights internationally, with a Welcome by College of Law Dean Hannah Arterian and moderated by Bond, Schoeneck and King Distinguished Professor of Law Arlene Kanter.

Panel Members include: Judith E. Heumann, School of Education Interim Dean Joanna Masingila, Professor Alan Foley, and Doctoral Students Brent Elder and Michelle Damiani from the School of Education; Professor Stephen Kuusisto, Director of the Reneé Crown Honors Program; and the College of Law’s Disability Law LLM OSF Fellows Iñaki Regueiro and William Oluchina.
A reception will follow the panel in the hallway adjacent to Room 101.

This panel is free and open to the public. Parking is available at Irving Garage for a fee. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) and American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided, courtesy of the Office of Disability Services. For more information, please contact Brent Elder at bcelder@syr.edu.


Judith E. Heumann’s visit is the result of a university-wide collaboration and is co-sponsored by Dean Hannah Arterian, Disability Law and Policy Program, LLM Program, Reneé Crown Honors Program, SU Disability Cultural Center, Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education, School of Education Dean’s Office, Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, Slutzker Center for International Services, The Fulbright Association CNY Chapter, SU Abroad, SU Center on Human Policy, Law, and Disability Studies, and Disability Law Society.

Film Screening  FIXED:  The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement

What does "disabled" mean when a man with no legs can run faster than most people in the world?
What does “normal” mean when cosmetic surgery procedures have risen over 450% in the last fifteen years?
If you could augment your body's abilities in any way imaginable, would you?
 
FIXED: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement
 
Tuesday, March 4, 2014
Watson Hall Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue, SU Campus
 
Film Screening at 7:00pm
Q&A with Producer and Director Regan Pretlow Brashear at 8:00 pm
Reception to Follow
 
Free and open to the public. CART open captioning services provided.
 
Presented by the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee.
Co-sponsored by Teaching and Leadership Programs, Cultural Foundations of Education, Composition and Cultural Rhetoric Graduate Circle, Disability Cultural Center, and Marketing Communication and Events.


VIGIL IN REMEMBRANCE OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES MURDERED BY FAMILY MEMBERS AND CAREGIVERS

 
On March 6, 2012, 22-year-old Autistic man GEORGE HODGINS was MURDERED BY HIS OWN MOTHER,  who then killed herself.
 
The media sympathized with his mother and those who identified with her desperation, DOWNPLAYING the very existence of HER SON and the CRIME OF ENDING INNOCENT LIVES.
 
Deaths like this happen all the time without you ever knowing.
 
But we know. And we won't forget.
 
On MARCH 1, JOIN US and the rest of the nation in the third annual CANDLELIGHT VIGIL TO REMEMBER HIM and ALL disabled people who have been murdered.
 
Help us MAKE A STAND AGAINST VIOLENCE  against Autistics and other people with disabilities!
 
TIME:  Saturday, March 1st
3:00-4:00 pm
PLACE: Hoople Building
805 S Crouse Avenue
 
ASL interpretation will be provided.
 
Sponsored by
the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee (BCCC),
the Disability Student Union (DSU),
the Disability Law Society ( DLS),
the SU Disability Cultural Center, and
Disabled in Action of Greater Syracuse, Inc.
 
The Counseling Center (443-4715), Hendricks Chapel (443-2901), the Faculty and Staff Assistance Program (443-1087), and the Office of Student Assistance (443-4357) are available on campus to Syracuse University community members needing additional support.  Peer support from members of Disabled in Action of Greater Syracuse, Inc. will also be available on-site as well as by phone (455-9626).
 
Find more information on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/415777751889948/

2014 Jacobus tenBroek Disability Law Symposium

 
 
Hear Jenny Hatch and Jonathan Martinis talk about "Justice for Jenny"
 
at the
 
2014 Jacobus tenBroek Disability Law Symposium
 
Disability Rights in the 21st Century: Creative Solutions for Achieving the Right to Live in the World
 
April 24-25, 2014
at the
National Federation of the Blind Jernigan Institute
Baltimore, Maryland
 
2014 theme keynote speakers Jenny Hatch and Jonathan Martinis will talk about the landmark case in which Ms. Hatch won the right to make her own decisions through supported decision-making rather than being forced into a guardianship that she did not want and that would make all decisions for her.
 
The 2014 Jacobus tenBroek Disability Law Symposium will consist of plenary sessions and workshops facilitated by distinguished law professors, practitioners, and advocates who will discuss topics such as: disability discrimination in the criminal and juvenile justice systems, next steps in Olmstead litigation, rights of parents with disabilities, supported decision making as an alternative to guardianship, and how to work with the media to get the disability rights message across.
 
2014 plenary session presenters:
 
  • Michael W. Bien, managing partner, Rosen, Bien, Galvan & Grunfeld, LLP;
  • Peter Blanck, university professor, Syracuse University, and chairman, Burton Blatt Institute;
  • Christopher S. Danielsen, director of public relations, National Federation of the Blind;
  • Matthew W. Dietz, president and Litigation Director, Disability Independence Group, Inc.;
  • Maureen Henry, former executive director, Utah Commission on Aging;
  • Talila Lewis, founder and president, HEARD;
  • Carrie Ann Lucas, executive director, Center for Rights of Parents with Disabilities;
  • Jonathan Martinis, legal director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities;
  • Robyn Powell, attorney advisor, National Council on Disability;
  • Barry Taylor, vice president for civil rights and systemic litigation, Equip for Equality;
  • Joseph B. Tulman, professor of law and director, Took Crowell Institute for Youth; and
  • Theresa Vargas, staff writer, The Washington Post.
 
The luncheon keynote will be given by Catherine Lhamon, assistant secretary, Office for Civil Rights, United States Department of Education.
 
2014 workshop facilitators:
 
·         Samuel Bagenstos, professor of law, University of Michigan Law School
·         Ira Burnim, legal director, Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
·         Gregory P. Care, Associate, Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP
·         Marc Charmatz, senior attorney, National Association of the Deaf
·         Andrew D. Freeman, partner, Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP
·         Elaine Gardner, attorney advisor, Disability Rights Office, Federal Communications Commission
·         Arlene S. Kanter, Bond, Schoeneck, & King Distinguished Professor; Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence; professor of law; director, College of Law Disability Law and Policy Program; and co-director, SU Center on Human Policy, Law and Disability Studies; Syracuse University
·         Sharon Krevor-Weisbaum, partner, Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP
·         Christopher Kuczynski, assistant legal counsel, United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
·         David L. Lee, principal, The Law Offices of David L. Lee
·         Jennifer Mathis, deputy legal director, Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
·         Laurence Paradis, executive director and co-director of litigation, Disability Rights Advocates
·         Luciene Parsley, senior attorney, Maryland Disability Law Center
·         Karen Peltz Strauss, deputy chief, Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, Federal Communications Commission
·         Rebecca G. Pontikes, principal, Pontikes Law, LLC
·         Kenneth Shiotani, senior staff attorney, National Disability Rights Network
·         Mehgan Sidhu, general counsel, National Federation of the Blind
·         Victoria Thomas, staff attorney, University Legal Services--Protection & Advocacy
·         Michael Waterstone, associate dean for research and academic centers, and J. Howard Ziemann Fellow and Professor of Law, Loyola Law School
  • Lauren Young, director of litigation, Maryland Disability Law Center
 
Documentation for CLE credits will be provided.
 
Registration fee: $175
Student registration fee: $25
 
To learn more about the symposium and symposium sponsorship opportunities, view the agenda, and register online, please visit https://nfb.org/law-symposium .  You may also download from this Web site a registration form to mail or fax.  Hotel information is also available on the symposium Web site.
 
For additional information, contact:
 
Lou Ann Blake, JD
Law Symposium Coordinator
Jernigan Institute
NATIONAL FEDERATION OF THE BLIND
200 East Wells Street
at Jernigan Place
Baltimore, Maryland 21230
Telephone: 410-659-9314, ext. 2221

BACK TO TOP

Please encourage your students to attend the Equity and Social Justice Conference at the Sheraton on March 1.

The conference theme is Social Justice Education Out of Bounds: New Frameworks and Alliances and includes breakout sessions from SOE faculty and graduate students as well as groups from The College of Saint Rose, SUNY Cortland, University of Rochester, the Syracuse community, and more.  
 
The registration fee for students is $25 and includes breakfast, lunch, and an evening reception. More information and the full schedule can be found at http://esj.syr.edu.


SU News

Needed: Student Volunteers for Voiceovers

 
The SU anti-Bias Education Team will be producing a video sampling of our Who Are You? postcards again this year, and need student volunteers to do voice-overs (reading postcards). The students who will be doing the recording and producing will do so before spring break (so, last week of February and first week of March).
 
Please encourage interested students who are good readers (and who are reliable) to call Radell Roberts at: 315-443-4424, evenings or weekends, and leave a voicemail with their contact info and availability. Radell will then have a sample of their voices, and will help schedule their participation. FYI: The student producer will be recording Monday mornings and mid to late Tuesday afternoons.
 
Thanks! (from Radell)

Microaggressions at Syracuse University Facebook page

Check out a new Syracuse University Microaggressions Facebook page. Moderated by a Syracuse University student, this page chronicles microaggressions that members of the Syracuse University community experience every day.

Recruiting Mentors for Dimensions

Dimensions Mentoring Program is now recruiting Peer Mentors for the 2014-2015 year. Applications are available at the Office of Multicultural Affairs, 105 Schine Student Center, or online at the Dimensions website.  Applications are due March 3rd, 2014.
Approaching its 10th Year, Dimensions Mentoring Program is a women of color mentoring program. Dimensions serves first-year and upper-class students with an emphasis on African American/ Black, Asian and Pacific American, Latino/ Hispanic, and Native students. Dimensions addresses issues that impact women from diverse backgrounds through facilitated dialogues where our women can support each other, engage with one another, and acquire leadership and professional development skills.
Join the Dimensions Sisterhood and help make a difference!
For more information contact Valerie Martinez.

University Union has announced its first Syracuse University Film Festival!

It will be held April 4 – April 6.  Student submissions will be accepted through March 9 in four categories: trailers, animation, music videos and short films. All submissions should be sent to the Film Submissions Email.
Winners will receive gift cards and other prizes, as well as a plaque with their placement and category.


Calls for Papers, Conferences, Scholarships, and Participants

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology


Issue 8: Gender, Globalization and the Digital

Edited by Adeline Koh and Roopika Risam


We invite contributions to a peer-reviewed special issue that investigates the conditions of women and gender studies within digital spaces and cultures around the world. According to the popular internet meme “On the Internet, no one knows you’re a dog,” digital spaces offer a playing field free from the restraints of race, class, gender and disability. Yet, as Lisa Nakamura, Alondra Nelson and Anna Everett have shown, digital interfaces, worlds, hardware and software still recycle and replicate racialized and gendered frameworks from the “real” world. Additionally, the idea that many scientific and technological fields suffer from a “gender gap” is a prevalent one, manifesting in underrepresentation of women in STEM fields, the lack of female editors that are active on Wikipedia, the masculine “brogramming” cultures in Silicon Valley, and the limited representation of women in video games.

In this issue we seek essays that explore gender and sexuality concerns in digital spaces and cultures, as well as academic fields such as the digital humanities and computational sciences. Possible topics include: what is the shape of the global “gender gap”? Where are digital products produced and consumed and how do these reveal economic, social and structural inequalities? How do global flows of capitalism construct uneven modernities around the world? How do race and ethnicity intersect with the structure of gendered, global digital communities and diasporas? How does the digital provide and police spaces for organizing around trans issues? What are the networks of affect, intimacy and sexuality that grow out of digital cultures?  How are operations of interface, output and input structured by ideas of gender, sexuality and language? How do access and ableism structure issues of gender and sexuality in digital spaces?


Essays might include topics such as


●      Gender and the “digital divide”

●      Gender and the digital humanities/humanities computing/computer science

●      Global Digital Feminisms

●      Race, gender and online communities

●      Possibilities and pitfalls of digital spaces for *trans concerns

●      Affect, sexuality and the digital world

●      Digital capitalism and gender

●      Computer/Human languages and gender

●      Gendered construction of software/hardware/platforms

●      Disability studies, gender and computing

Please send essays (max. 3000 words) to adelinekoh[at]gmail[dot]com and rrisam[at]gmail[dot]com by 30th September 2014 for consideration. Contributions in formats other than the traditional essay are encouraged; please contact the editors to discuss specifications and/or multimodal contributions. Please send questions and queries to adelinekoh[at]gmail[dot]com and rrisam[at]gmail[dot]com. For more information, please check Ada submission guidelines here.


Peer Review and Ada

Ada is an online, open access, open source peer reviewed journal. The journal’s first issue was published online in November 2012 and has so far received more than 150,000 page views. All work published in Ada will go through four rounds of review: Pre-Review, Expert Review, Community Review and Public Review. More on the Ada Review policy here.
 

Dates

●      Essays due: 30th September 2014

●      28th November 2014: First round of essays accepted, sent for Level 1 Review (expert peer review)

●      20th January 2015: Second round of essays sent for Level 2 Review (Fembot community review)

●      1 May 2015: Issue published to general public.

*Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies* Call for Papers: French and Francophone World Disability Studies Guest editors: Tammy Berberi and Christian Flaugh


With this special issue of the *Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies*, editors wish to explore both long-standing and contemporary contributions to disability studies in the humanities from French-language world regions.  In essays spanning the French Enlightenment and colonial expansion to the present, this issue seeks to reevaluate the impact of French and Francophone world thought on disability studies and the influence that questions of bodily abilities have had on intellectual and philosophical transformations.  It aspires to restore foundational disability studies texts to the cultural and theoretical contexts that gave rise to them as well as to explore new potential revealed by this remapping.  This issue will provide a means for articulating the field of French and Francophone world disability studies as it situates it in a global geography and humanity of disability studies.  It will also examine the transnational and trans-regional intersections between disability studies broadly conceived, continental French studies, and Francophone world studies.

Essays on *any* aspect of French and Francophone world disability studies will be considered, but might usefully explore:

- what it means to "be," to live, or to write from a disabled perspective

- the role of disability in shaping its intellectual histories

- the ways these histories and cultural traditions have informed each other
- disability activism past and present
- notions of disability--or disability studies--and how these have brought about shifts in the modes and motivations of representation in aesthetics, literature, cinema, performance, or the arts

- the impact of disability in canonical texts written in French
- disabling patterns and practices of exploitation and how these intersect with disability
- emerging scholarship written in French
- new subjectivities and shifts in ethical paradigms brought about by disability activism and disability studies



*JLCDS* is an English-language journal. While initial abstracts are welcome in either French or English, full submissions accepted for publication must be submitted in English.


*Key dates*:
June 1, 2014: prospective authors submit brief proposals (1-2 pp.)  and a one-page curriculum vitae to guest editors October 1, 2014: prospective authors notified of proposal status April 1, 2015: final versions of selected essays due to editors June 1, 2015: Decisions and revisions on submissions sent to finalists August 1, 2015: Final essays due

Questions may be directed to guest editors: berberit@morris.umn.edu and cflaugh@buffalo.edu

Please delete the message that you are replying to. Doing this will allow people who subscribe to the digest version of the list to receive messages in a condensed form.

When posting articles please only post a link with a brief summary of the article. This is done to respect copyright laws.

Feedback on the list can be directed to Virginia Bemis (vbemis42@gmail.com) and Julie Nack Ngue (nackngue@usc.edu)


News and Announcements

Help us find these participants of the 1977 San Francisco 504 Protests!


The Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability at San Francisco State University is trying to connect with the following individuals who were in the San Francisco Bay Area in April 1977.  We’re eager to interview them about their experiences at the Section 504 Protests when more than one hundred people with different disabilities occupied the San Francisco federal building for over a month, the longest occupation of a federal building by any group in US history.  We are profiling the events in an accessible exhibit “Patient No More! People with Disabilities Securing Civil Rights” that will highlight the Bay Area’s central role in helping pave the way for the Americans with Disabilities Act to launch with its 25th anniversary in 2015.  To learn more, visit the exhibit website: http://longmoreinstitute.sfsu.edu/patientnomore
If you have any information please contact us by phone: 415-405-3528 or email: beitiks@sfsu.edu

PEOPLE WE STILL NEED CONTACT INFORMATION FOR:
Beverly Bertaina
Judith Dadek
Denise Darensbourg
Willie Diggs (Machinist Union - not sure if spelling is correct)
Linda Gill
Jim Gonsales
Sally Gordon
Pat Hall
Margaret (Dusty) Irvine
Chuck Jackson
Joanie Jackson
Jane Johnson
Kathy Kramner
Ray Landers
Jim Leinem
Andy Lennox
Tom Manley
Larry Montoya
Al Pimental
Franco Ramsay
Bonnie Regina
John Roletti
Jonathon Scheuer
Debbie Stanley
Terri Tanaka
Ron Washington
Evan White
Marie White
Jane Wobengai

Catherine Kudlick, PhD
Professor of History and Director,
Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability
San Francisco State University
1600 Holloway Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94132

Longmore Institute
135-136 Humanities 
(415) 405-3528
http://longmoreinstitute.sfsu.edu/

BACK TO TOP


DEADLINE APPROACHING, 3/15/14: Summer Field School in Deaf Geographies


The Field School in Deaf Geographies
June 23 – July 27, 2014
Bader International Study Centre
Queen’s University (Canada)
Herstmonceux Castle
Hailsham, East Sussex
United Kingdom

Now in its second year, the Field School in Deaf Geographies is designed to allow students to participate in an intense, faculty-led, primary research project, including aspects of the research process from data collection to dissemination. In the BISC tradition of learning through direct experience, students’ coursework is designed to support the research project as well as cover the broader topics of analytical and theoretical frameworks of Human Geography, social science research methods, and European Deaf history. The culminating experience will include students attending and presenting their work at an international conference. This school is ideal for those students considering advanced degrees and/or careers in research.

The Bader International Study Centre (BISC), located at Herstmonceux Castle in East Sussex, England, represents a fusion of history and innovation. The setting may be an idyllic 15th century castle, but our focus is solely on developing students who are prepared to lead in the 21st century. Small class sizes, integrated hands-on field studies, primary research-based projects, and a diverse faculty and student population set the foundation for innovative global learning at the BISC.

The application deadline is 15 March. Please see our website for additional information about the school, including the two courses, applying, and costs.
http://www.queensu.ca/bisc/academics/programs/upper-year/specialized-programs-2014/deaf-geographies

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me, or Lynn Sadlowski, our admissions representative (sadlowsl@queensu.ca<mailto:sadlowsl@queensu.ca>).

Thank you for your assistance.
Best wishes,
Mary Beth

Mary Beth Kitzel
Director
Field School of Deaf Geographies
Bader International Study Centre
Queen’s University (Canada)
Herstmonceux Castle
Hailsham
East Sussex BN27 1RP
United Kingdom

BACK TO TOP


NEW: Anthropology of Disability Blog: Disability Fieldnotes


http://disabilityfieldnotes.com

BACK TO TOP


FCC Acts to Help Emergency Responders Locate Wireless 911 Callers


Dear Colleagues;


Marcie Roth, Director of FEMA’s Office of Disability Integration and Coordination, would like to share the attached message. The Federal Communications Commission wants input on increasing location accuracy for 911 emergency responders. The FCC seeks comment on the proposed requirements for more accurate location information of wireless 911 callers, including the cost and benefits of providing more accurate location information.  Please forward the below message to everyone this would be interested in providing comment on this issue.  Please submit comments to the links provided below.
 


Subject: FCC Acts to Help Emergency Responders Locate Wireless 911 Callers

 
On February 20, 2014, the FCC proposed rules to provide 911 emergency call centers with more accurate information about the location of people who call 911 using cellphones or smartphones.
 
FCC rules currently require some outdoor location information about wireless callers to be sent automatically to 911 emergency call centers.  The FCC wants to require more information about the location of wireless callers who are indoors – to identify the building, the floor, and perhaps the room, office, or apartment where the wireless call originated.  These requirements will rely on the advancing capabilities of indoor location technology.
 
Improving location accuracy for wireless calls to 911 may be particularly important for individuals with disabilities and for people who are not able to provide their address or describe their location to the emergency call center. 
 
The FCC seeks comment on the proposed requirements for more accurate location information of wireless 911 callers, including the cost and benefits of providing more accurate location information.
 
Comment deadline dates will be announced after the proposed rules are published in the Federal Register. 
 
Links to a press release about this FCC action: 
 
 
Links to the Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking: 
 

Independent Study Course Including People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs in Disaster Operations

Marcie Roth, Director of FEMA’s Office of Disability Integration and Coordination, would like you to be aware of the online training course that is now live.  Independent Study Course, IS-368: Including People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs in Disaster Operations has been released and is available to take.   The purpose of this course is to increase awareness and understanding of the need for full inclusion of disaster survivors and FEMA staff who are people with disabilities, and people with access and functional needs. The course provides an overview of disabilities and access and functional needs and explains how disaster staff can apply inclusive practices in their disaster assignments.
 
 
Course Objectives:
At the completion of this course, participants should be able to:
 
•Explain the importance of including people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs in disaster operations at the JFO and field locations.
•Describe how JFO and field staff can support and include people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs in disaster operations.
•Describe principles and FEMA initiatives that provide a foundation for the integration of people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs in disaster operations.
•Describe the history of the treatment of and services for people with disabilities.
•Identify laws that provide the legal foundation for issues related to people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs.
•Describe the function of the Disability Integration Advisor.
•Describe personal actions to support the integration of people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs in the JFO and field disaster operations.
Primary Audience
This course is designed for all personnel involved in disaster operations at the Joint Field Office (JFO) and in other disaster facilities and activities.
 
 

Autism  Campus Inclusion Summer Leadership Academy application extension

I am writing to inform you that our organization has extended the deadline for Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) Summer Leadership Academy application submissions to March 7, 2014.
The ACI summer leadership training  prepares Autistic students to create systems change on their college campuses. Participants acquire valuable skills in community organizing, policy formation, and activism. Applicants must be Autistic college students with at least one year remaining before graduation.  
Accepted applicants will participate in advocacy training here in DC from June 8 to June 14, 2014. ASAN covers travel and lodging expenses. ASAN encourages ACI applications from members of traditionally underserved communities, including nonspeaking autistics, autistics with intellectual disabilities, and autistics of color.
 
Interested students can send me completed applications to NRiveraMorales@autisticadvocacy.org with the subject line "2014 ACI Application." The extended deadline for application submissions is March 7, 2014.
Thank you once again for helping disseminate information about ACI!
 
Best wishes,
 
Natalia 

BACK TO TOP


APPLICATIONS OPEN FOR 2014-2016 EMPIRE STATE FELLOWS PROGRAM


Program Prepares New Generation of Policy-Makers to Lead New York State
For more information on the Empire State Fellows program, please visit the Empire State Fellows website. To apply, please email a cover letter, resume, personal statement, and two letters of recommendation to the Empire State Fellows Email. Applications are due by Friday, April 24th.

Participate in Equality-themed music video:

Lesbian band Perpetual Detour are creating a queer-equality themed music video to show the world that love looks the same, no matter who you love. The band is seeking contributions from lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community members in the form of short video clips. For more information, visit Perpetual Detour's website.

EXCITING NEW OPPORTUNITY FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES – ESPECIALLY STUDENTS SEEKING EMPLOYMENT, POST-GRADUATION

 
Introductory note from Dr. Diane Wiener, Director of the SU Disability Cultural Center:
SU alumnus, advocate, and educator John Robinson has launched a new website meant to showcase the skills of people with disabilities and increase an array of career opportunities by making connections between employers and would-be employees.
 
Information from Mr. Robinson:
 
“Our Ability Connect” is a Digital Profile System, and an answer to Section 503 for businesses.  Here’s how it works: http://youtu.be/X96DUoY6vY8
 
Become one of the thousands of talented people profiled on Our Ability Connect!  Major US corporations are hiring today - they can find you here!
Our Ability Connect is tackling a complex problem in today’s world - and making it simple. Individuals can build up upload experience and create Individual Ability Points to support future opportunities!
We are a company owned and operated by People with Disabilities, for People with Disabilities! Use Our Ability Connect to become connected with companies, today!
John Robinson 
President
Our Ability, Inc.
(518) 429-9256

Aloha, Review of Disability Studies (RDS) readers: survey

As we reach the 10th year anniversary of the launch of The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, it is a good time to plan for the next 10 years. In order to best serve our readership, we have developed a brief survey to solicit your feedback and advise for moving forward with the RDS journal. Please take a moment to complete the survey. Thank you!  The RDS Editorial Team. 
 

New Blog on DisabilityandAbuse website: "Hyperbole does not help!"


Disabilities Related Articles

Dr. Nora's Top Articles:
1.   “Antioch Teacher Pleads Guilty in Student-abuse Case” --- An Antioch school teacher charged with abusing special education students has reached a plea agreement. Our media partner, the Contra ... --- abc7news.com --- February 15, 2014  (CALIFORNIA)  http://is.gd/VmGaiX
2.   “Caregiver Kicked, Choked Disabled Boy” --- A former caregiver who was accused of kicking and choking a 16-year-old disabled boy at the Carlton Palms Educational Center in Mount Dora has ... --- Orlando Sentinel --- February 13, 2014  (FLORIDA)  http://is.gd/UqH1Oi
3.   “Agency Fighting Uphill Battle Against Abuse of Disabled Adults” --- While reports of abuse against disabled adults have increased by nearly 20 percent since 2009, the agency charged with ... --- Nashoba Publishing --- February 12, 2014  (MASSACHUSETTS)  http://is.gd/1A945L
4.   “Fear and Hostility Block Treatment for Mentally Ill” --- “There is a mob mentality that is keeping a lot of these projects from moving forward,” said Roberta Opheim, the state ombudsman for Mental Health ... --- Minneapolis Star Tribune --- February 15, 2014  (MINNESOTA)  http://is.gd/MePpuK
5.   “3 LI Hospitals Failed to Help Deaf Patient, Who then Died: Suit” --- A cancer-stricken deaf man died without ever knowing his diagnosis after three Long Island medical facilities failed to get him sign-language ... --- New York Post --- February 16, 2014  (NEW YORK)  http://is.gd/rK0INg
6.   “Plea Deal in RI in Mass. Teen Sex Trafficking Case” --- Authorities say 30-year-old Stephen Ardrey took the developmentally delayed girl from a library in Medfield, Mass., in September. She was found a few ... --- San Francisco Chronicle --- February 14, 2014  (RHODE ISLAND)  http://is.gd/2E2EPG
7.   “High School Student Suspended after Defending Special Needs Classmate from Bullies” --- Educators in Texas are coming under fire for suspending a high school senior who came to the aid of a special needs friend being bullied by another ... --- RT --- February 13, 2014  (TEXAS)  http://is.gd/qEOcCj
8.   “Autistic Child's Mom Wants Cameras in Special Needs Classes” --- Tara Heidinger wants cameras in all special needs classrooms in Ohio. She started this campaign when her son, Corey, came home ... --- WKYC-TV --- February 12, 2014  (OHIO)  http://is.gd/AH7ewM
9.   “Teacher Claims She Was Fired for Standing Up for Student with Special Needs” --- Parents are rallying behind a former Vancouver teacher who claims she was fired for standing up for a student with special needs. Susan Debeck was ... --- CTV News --- February 14, 2014  (CANADA)  http://is.gd/MR2wR4
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
The other 70 stories for this week, as well as newsfeeds from prior weeks, can be found at: http://www.disabilityandabuse.org/newsfeed/contents.htm

Hearing Voices Groups survey

 
LERN is continuing data collection via an anonymous online survey of hearing voices groups facilitators and organizers with the goal of capturing basic data about group values, composition and practices from a larger group of US facilitators or group leaders. You can read about our Hearing Voices Groups initiative here.
You can access the survey here.
An accessible summary and project report will be posted as soon as initial analysis is complete. Presentations will happen both at academic venues and in the community.
Contact: Nev Jones


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

Follow Us Like Us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube

A UNIT WITHIN THE DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS