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Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

INDEX

SU HAPPENINGS

Tickets are now on sale for the First Year Players spring musical, Rent!

Training Opportunity: There will be an open Safer People, Safer Spaces training

OrangeAbility 2014: Accessible Athletics Expo

Pink Out 2

InclusiveU/P2P Lecture Series Sponsored by The Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education

SU NEWS

Summer Course Offering

Fast Forward Competition:

CALLS FOR PAPERS, PARTICIPANTS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS

Request for Research Participants

The Fourteenth Annual Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability

Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies - Call for Papers Special Issue: "Disability and Blood: Blood and the Crips"

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Consortium for Culture and Medicine Seminar

Future of Video Accessibility According to Google

Vera House "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes" Event

Disability Related Articles for the Week

SENS. WARREN AND HATCH INTRODUCE BIPARTISAN TEACH ACT

Michigan Lt. Gov. Brian Calley likens 'retarded' to racial slur: 'It should make you cringe'

A sign of the times: The story of deaf students at Georgetown - The Georgetown Voice


SU HAPPENINGS

Tickets are now on sale for the First Year Players spring musical, Rent!

 The show runs at 8 PM in Goldstein Auditorium on April 10th, 11th, & 12th. Tickets are on sale now in Schine student center for $7 general admission, and $4 with valid student identification. Rent is the Tony award-winning musical that tells the story of a group of young artists, musicians, and lovers struggling to survive in the bohemian boroughs of New York City under the shadow of HIV/AIDS. During the show, donations will be accepted for Friends of Dorothy, a local organization that aims to support people with AIDS, predominantly through hospice care. We hope to see you there!
 

Training Opportunity: There will be an open Safer People, Safer Spaces training

Thursday, March 20th, from 2 – 5 PM.
Safer People, Safer Spaces is a 3 hour training on marginalized genders and sexualities that is as close to comprehensive as the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Resource Center can provide in that time. Safer People, Safer Spaces will incorporate many different activities and provide participants with a variety of ways to engage and develop their sense of Allyship with a mixture of content and context-based outcomes. Due to the intensive structure of this training, it is limited a minimum of 10 participants and a maximum of 30 participants.
Email the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Resource Center by Friday, March 14th to reserve your spot! Location will be provided once a minimum of 10 participants are signed up.

OrangeAbility 2014: Accessible Athletics Expo

DATE: Sunday, March 30, 2014
TIME: 1-4pm
LOCATION: Flanagan Gymnasium on the Syracuse University Campus
Come experience wheelchair basketball, power soccer, sled hockey, relays, and more!
You don’t have to be able-bodied to play, and you don’t have to have a disability to play accessible sports!
Drop by to join in, or sign up early to:
-Volunteer
-Table with a Group
-Request specific Accommodations
Please use form located at: www.goo.gl/X1xww
Free and open to the public.
Parking will be available on site.
ASL interpretation will be provided.
CONNECT WITH US: orangeability@gmail.com, Facebook, Twitter (@orangeabilitySU, please use #Orange4Allc)
SPONSORED BY: SU Disability Cultural Center, SU Department of Recreation Services, Move Along, Inc, SU Disability Student Union, SU Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee 

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Pink Out 2

Cancer is a drag, but the fight against it can be fabulous! On Sunday, March 9th, come to Rain Lounge to help raise money for CancerConnects and Personal Ink (P.INK). Pink Out 2 will feature singing, dancing, parodies, vaudeville entertainment, a photo booth, and a few surprises! Tickets are $25 at the door and $15 in advance.

InclusiveU/P2P Lecture Series Sponsored by The Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education

 
iPad Technology: Supporting Inclusion in Higher Education
              
Lori Cooney
Project Coordinator & Universal Instructional Design Specialist
Institute for Community Inclusion at
the University of Massachusetts Boston
 
Lori holds a Master of Education in Instructional Technology from Lesley University and a Bachelor of Science in Speech from Emerson College. Additionally, Lori has received the 2012 MassCUE Pathfinder award, a Technology Humanist Award from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is recognized as a Christa McAuliffe Teacher by the Challenger Learning Center at Framingham State University. Lori is also the parent of two children with complex health care needs and administers a group of over 2,750 parents and families online.
 
Location: Sharon Haines Jacquet Education Commons Huntington Hall, Syracuse University
Date: Wednesday, March 19, 2014
Time: 7:00 PM
 
American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation, Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART), and gluten-free food provided. For other accommodation requests, please email dlkatovi@syr.edu.
 
Future InclusiveU/P2P Lectures:
·         March 28: Teaching Inclusively in Higher Education
·         April 12: The Student Perspective on Inclusion in Higher Education
·         April 30: An Overview of the Peer to Peer Project: Partnering for Success with Inclusion
 
About the InclusiveU/P2P Lecture Series
 
The InclusiveU/P2P Lecture Series is the culmination of a three-year grant awarded to the Taishoff Center from NIDRR to study the topic of higher education for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities, with a focus on:
 
•             Partnerships with traditionally enrolled undergraduates
•             Exploring the use of current technology (iPads) on campus inclusion
 
This project is sponsored by a development grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) and the U.S. Department of Education (Project #H133G100226) to the Lawrence B. Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University. 


SU NEWS

Summer Course Offering

SPE & CFE 400/600 (*online)
 
Equity and Access in Education: A Critical Examination of Inclusive Education on Five Continents
 
Summer Session I: May 19 – June 27, 2014
 
This course provides an interactive, online experience for participants to engage with critical perspectives about educational opportunities for students who have been labeled with a disability. Students will investigate current themes and events in the field of inclusive education using weekly video-lectures and podcasts from Disability Studies and international education scholars and activists. Reading reflections and online discussion groups will be required along with writing assignments that address international policies on five continents: Africa, South America, North America, Europe and Asia.
 
To register: visit MySlice.syr.edu
 
Questions? 
 
Please contact Lauren Shallish (LeShalli@syr.edu) or Fernanda Orsati, Ph.D (Ftorsati@syr.edu)

Fast Forward Competition:

 The Chancellor has recently announced the Fast Forward Competition! This competition will enable any student at Syracuse University to video record a pitch for an idea they would like funded. There will be up to 12 winners and they can each be granted an award of up to $1,500. The deadline for submission is March 31st.


CALLS FOR PAPERS, PARTICIPANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS, CONFERENCES

Request for Research Participants

 
Study funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research
 
Principal investigator: Dr. Yang Wang, SU School of Information Studies
 
To make inclusive cloud and web computing a reality, it is critical to develop accessible authentication mechanisms that anyone can use, but current authentication systems prove to be a big challenge for people with disabilities. In particular, for those who are with different kinds of disabilities, there is no system inclusive or adaptive enough that could solve the authentication problems simultaneously. This research attempts to find the current difficulties for people with disabilities in using authentication systems and proposes accessible, secure, fast, usable, and privacy-preserving authentication mechanisms that anyone could use, regardless of what specific types of disabilities people might have. It will on one hand increase the awareness toward difficulties faced by people with disabilities and on the other hand reveal the defects of current authentication systems, and provide references to future authentication mechanism design. We will use qualitative methodology to probe the difficulties people with different kinds of disabilities face in using authentication systems and propose a prototype of an authentication mechanism that everyone could use. To understand how participants are currently using computer systems and authentication mechanisms in their natural environment, we adopt a contextual inquiry approach by which we will visit participants' homes or public places (e.g. public library) where they use computers.
 
Participants will be invited to participate in our research, and based on their availability and consent, researchers will observe the difficulties they encounter with computer systems, particularly those with authentication mechanisms. Researchers will also interview them about their experiences. Participants will be asked to complete a pre-test survey and a post-test survey on their perception towards accessibility challenges, authentication systems, ideal modes of authentication, and demographics on health, disability, technology use, and attitudes. No personally identifiable information will be collected during these surveys.
 
Respectfully,
Bryan Dosono
 
PhD Student, Information Science and Technology
 
Syracuse University, School of Information Studies
 

The Fourteenth Annual Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability

April 16 - 17, 2014 The Ohio State University’s Columbus Campus
 
We recently marked the fortieth anniversary of passing of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the disability community is beginning to plan for the  25th anniversary of the ADA in 2015.  Both past and future seemed present when reviewing thirteen years of Multiple Perspective’s conference, this quote from Earl C. Kelly inspired this year’s theme, More Important Things.
 
“We have not succeeded in answering all our problems - indeed we sometimes feel we have not completely answered any of them. The answers we have found have only served to raise a whole set of new questions. In some ways we feel that we are as confused as ever, but we think we are confused on a higher level and about more important things.” 
 
The quote and the theme speak to the progress we have made and the journey still ahead.  What have we learned?  Where are we going? What are the important questions for the next 25 years?
 
 
FEATURED SESSIONS:
 
Ela Louise Armstrong Public Lecture in Disability Art & Culture:
Ann Silver: ONE WAY, DEAF WAY. The life and art of Ann Silver; Ann Silver & Jim Van Manen 
The presentation will discuss the book and describe Ann Silver, one of the founding members of the Deaf Art Movement. Born Deaf, this self-taught artist's work addresses issues of discrimination, politics and human rights. She will be discussing her life with Jim Van Manen, Ph.D., the author of her art-o-biography. He is a native ASL user, a CODA who is hard of hearing in one ear. He is a college professor at Columbia College Chicago, an author who lives in Chicago, and is co-artist with Ann Silver on Silver Moon Brand artwork.
 
Artist's Statement
Rumors of my scribbling artwork on the walls inside of my mother's womb could not be confirmed. Born genetically Deaf, I was blessed with art as a native language-—or it enabled me to communicate with the hearing folk long before I acquired other languages, namely English and American Sign Language [ASL]. Does that make me trilingual?
               My language of art has, over the years, metamorphosed from pictorial grammar to creativity and critical thinking. I turn to art (1) as an artistic expression of the Deaf Experience—i.e., culture, language, identity and heritage; (2) as a Zen meditation and an aesthetic recreation of the contemplative state in which it allows my thoughts to drift by without grasping at them; (3) as an emergency back-up whenever the English language gives me semantic anxiety; 94) as an academic study vis-à-vis Deaf Studies; and (5) as a visual weapon to deal with polemical issues and concerns such as stereotyping, inaccessibility, paternalism, inequality and discrimination on the basis of hearing status (a.k.a. audism).
               No matter how you look at it—protest art, political satire, victim art or graphic wit, I do not shy away from ethical questions or controversy. Having fused scholarship, creativity and sociopolitical philosophy, I truly believe that my being Deaf-with-a-capital-D gives me
 
The Ken Campbell Lecture on Disability Policy
Disability: A Global Perspective on Policy, L. Scott Lissner, ADA Coordinator, The Ohio State University
This year’s conference theme “More Important Things”  was drawn from Earl Kelly quote “We have not succeeded in answering all our problems - indeed we sometimes feel we have not completely answered any of them. The answers we have found have only served to raise a whole set of new questions. In some ways we feel that we are as confused as ever, but we think we are confused on a higher level and about more important things.”   From one perspective we have been answering questions about disability rights in the US for roughly 25 years (the ADA), from another 40 years (Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act) and from yet another for 228 years when the Continental Congress provided half pay for officers and enlisted men who were disabled in service.   Beyond our borders and further back in history disability policy in UR was captured  on 5000 year old clay tablets.  Has what constitutes the “important” questions has
 
changed over time and with locale .  This presentation combine a brief history of disability, current events and recent  travels to set the stage for a discussion of important global trends and emerging policy challenges at home.   These  include: access for individuals with print disabilities and international property rights; the role of accessible technology and facilities infrastructures in economic participation and development and global rights for a global society under the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities.
 
 
CONCURRENT SESSONS INCLUDE:
·         Access to Education: Benefitting From the Student Perspective
·         The Path to College: Narrative Experiences of Students with Disabilities
·         From Impairment to Empowerment: A Longitudinal Medical School Curriculum onDisabilities
·         Toward the Transformative Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in STEM Fields
·         Embracing Neurodiversity in Higher Education: Overcoming Attitudinal Barriers for Individuals with Autism
·         Questioning the Art of Education: Anxiety, Autism, and Depression Answer
·         Access To Higher Education: Topics in Enforcement from the Staff of Department of Education’s Office For Civil Rights
·         Rights of People with Disabilities under Fair Housing Laws
·         Rights of People with Disabilities in Transition from Education to Employment
·         How does Disability Align with the EEOC's Strategic Enforcement Plan
·         Looking back and Thinking Ahead:  OSU’s practical guide to accommodations in the workplace 
·         Doing Business: Providing Access to Facilities and Services 
·         Culture Shift: Moving Beyond Compliance To Full Membership In Higher Education
·        Strategies for the Inclusion of accessibility and universal design in a Post-2015 global development
·         Fit for Freedom: Disability and Racism in Nineteenth-Century African American Literature
 
SAVE THE DATES (APRIL 16 & 17) REGISTRATION WILL OPEN SOON.
VISIT HTTP://ADA.OSU.EDU FOR UPDATES
 
To be on the mailing list for the conference, send e-mail to ADA-OSU@osu.edu
 
The Multiple Perspectives Conference is made possible thanks to the generosity of the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation Endowment Fund and ongoing support from The Ohio State University’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion.
 

Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies - Call for Papers Special Issue: "Disability and Blood: Blood and the Crips"

Guest Editors: Michael Davidson (UCSD) and Sören Fröhlich (UCSD) 

Since the HIV/AIDS blood feuds of the 1990s, scholarship into social and cultural definitions of blood has provided much-needed insights into statistical (Tukufu Zuberi), economical (Catherine Waldby and Robert Mitchell), and medical constructions of what blood was, is and how it can function (Keith Wailoo). This special issue of the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies (JLCDS) aims to close a gap in considerations of disability and blood. What does blood mean in cultural constructions of disability? How are disability and the body's fluid tissue related in literary and cultural productions? Blood seems omnipresent in cultural representations, ranging from mass-murderers and pure-blooded wizards, vampires, and the undead, to ritual uncleanness, illegitimate Presidential offspring, and pre-natal diagnostics. Be it in the blood work chart and diagnostics, in statistics of pathology, or in other definitions of individuals through blood, 'abnormalities' in the blood constitute disability just as disability qualifies blood itself. Yet blood always transgresses boundaries and destabilizes categories; it simultaneously defines and defies constructions of disabled and disability. We invite submissions from scholars who consider how blood functions in the construction of disability. Is it stable or fluid, definable or contagious, visible or hidden? How does blood make the crip, and how does the crip change the blood? How is either or are both abjected from the 'normal' to create what Lennard J. Davis calls a "diverse sameness?" 

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
-       The female body as disabled, menarche, menstruation, birth,
-       Race as disability, disability as race, the "one-drop rule," 
-       Scientific racism, racial historiography and disability,
-       Eugenics in cultural productions,
-       Gendered disability, gendered blood, 
-       Medical discourses,
-       Blood in treatments, procedures, and as medical commodity, 
-        Contagion and infection, conversely, immunization and vaccination,
-       Purity and pollution as disabling discourses,
-       Disability and blood in religious discourses, 
-       Containment and rupture as definitions of disability,
-       Pathology and normalization of blood,
-       Migration, exile, asylum and definitions of blood,
-       Indigeneity, inheritance, lineage and disabilities,
-       Representations of bleeding and blood.

Please email a one-page proposal SFrohlic@ucsd.edu by June 1, 2014. 
Contributors can expect to be selected and notified by August 1, 2014. (Full drafts of the selected articles will be due on February 1, 2015). Please direct any questions to Sören Fröhlich. 

For further information about JLCDS please contact: 

Dr David Bolt
dbsw@HOPE.AC.UK


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Consortium for Culture and Medicine Seminar

 
 
 
Friday, March 28, 2014
4 to 5 pm
Room 1507/1508 Setnor Academic Building
766 Irving Ave
 
 
“Does Lethal Language lead to Lethal Treatment? End-of-Life Issues”
 
William J. Peace, PhD
 
 
We will discuss the decision-making strategies that take place immediately after devastating injuries, focusing in particular on decisions to remove patients from life-sustaining treatment. Of particular interest are patient autonomy, the notion of dignity, terminal sedation, and VSED (voluntary suspension of eating and drinking).  The story of Timothy Bowers, the hunter who was taken off life-sustaining treatment twenty-four hours after experiencing a devastating spinal cord injury, will serve as a test case.
 

Future of Video Accessibility According to Google

 
One of Google's top objectives is to make information universally accessible. YouTube has embraced this directive by making video accessibility a priority from the top down. In this session recorded at the Streaming Media West conference, Google provides insights into the future of accessible video, why universal accessibility is important to Google, and how captions and subtitles enhance content discoverability (Google even reveals test results showing the SEO benefits of captions).
  • How Google is building accessibility into YouTube
  • Google's test results showing the SEO benefits of captions
  • Future of YouTube's automatic captions
  • Why YouTube creators should caption their videos
  • How to take advantage of YouTube's international growth through translation and subtitles
  • How Google is addressing the challenges of accessible mobile video
 
Free and open to the public
 
Access
Wheelchair accessible; ASL interpreter provided upon request (contact Lois Dorschel atdorschel@upstate.edu).
 
Information
For information, contact Consortium Coordinator Lois Dorschel at dorschel@upstate.edu or Executive Director Rebecca Garden, PhD, at gardenr@upstate.edu or 315-464-8451.
 
Consortium for Culture and Medicine Faculty Seminars
The Consortium for Culture and Medicine is collaboration among Le Moyne College, Syracuse University, and Upstate Medical University that brings together faculty and students from disparate fields to teach and conduct research on social, ethical, and cultural aspects of health care.  The Consortium’s Seminar Series encourages faculty, students, and interested community members to speak across disciplinary boundaries on urgent topics that interweave discourses and professional and social perspectives. For more information, see: http://upstate.edu/ccm.
 
Location
The Setnor Academic Building is an extension on the north side of Weiskotten Hall, 766 Irving Ave., at the intersection of Waverly and Irving, on the west side of Irving, just north of Waverly. 
 
Parking
There is limited metered parking on Elizabeth Blackwell Street near University Hospital, and along Irving Avenue near Weiskotten and Silverman Halls and the Health Sciences Library. Visitors may wish to park at one of two public garages on Irving Avenue. (Take Adams Street to Irving Avenue. Turn right. The garages are on the left side of the street between Adams Street and Waverly Avenue.)

Vera House "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes" Event

Join us in Clinton Square at 12 noon on March 28th to participate in "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes"®, the White Ribbon Campaign Kick-Off Walk.  After a brief program we will walk from Clinton Square to the Armory Square District where we'll tie white ribbons around trees and lamp posts in recognition of the 20th Annual White Ribbon Campaign.
Visit our White Ribbon Campaign Kick-Off Walk website for more information.

Disability Related Articles for the Week

Dr. Nora's Top Articles:
1.   “Three Plead Guilty to Abusing Disabled Ala. Woman” --- Prosecutors say three people accused of repeatedly raping a developmentally disabled woman who was being held against ... --- WTVY --- February 25, 2014  (ALABAMA)   http://is.gd/3yXwD8
2.   “Former CHP Officer Found Guilty of Sexual Battery” --- A former CHP officer, arrested last summer for touching a young disabled man in a bathroom at the Arden Fair mall while also touching himself, has ... --- KFBK --- February 22, 2014   (CALIFORNIA)  http://is.gd/UuCdex
3.   “Federal Agencies Weigh in on Bay Area Juvenile Hall Lawsuit” --- The U.S. Departments of Justice and Education have weighed in on a federal lawsuit that alleges teens with disabilities were kept ... --- Los Angeles Times --- February 18, 2014  (CALIFORNIA)   http://is.gd/PhPmSl
4.   “North Bay Social Worker Arrested on Embezzlement Charges” --- Salk worked with developmentally disabled adults, helping them manage their lives. But investigators say he helped himself to their Social Security ... --- KTVU San Francisco --- February 18, 2014  (CALIFORNIA)  http://is.gd/uClRjX
5.   “Student Held Down, Locked Away, 858 Times Last Year” --- It's unclear if children not in special education were restrained, as schools are ...Middlesex Middle School had the highest number of restraints and ... --- Darien Times --- February 20, 2014  (CONNECTICUT)  http://is.gd/DVCYzD
6.   “Watertown Police: Maintenance Worker Sexually Assaults Disabled Resident” --- A man who police said sexually assaulted a disabled woman at an apartment building where he does maintenance work was ... --- FOX CT --- February 18, 2014  (CONNECTICUT)  http://is.gd/AR0f6J
7.   “The Shocking Story of a Bipolar Woman Stuck For Years in Prison Without Ever Being Convicted ...” ---  A 51-year-old mentally ill grandmother recently secured a $1.6 million settlement from a New Mexico county that she says jailed her for more than two ... --- San Francisco Chronicle --- February 17, 2014  (NEW MEXICO)  http://is.gd/CoQhsr
8.   “Forced Labor Alleged in House” --- The mentally challenged woman who is the accuser in a federal labor-trafficking case took the stand yesterday and described how ... --- Columbus Dispatch --- February 25, 2014  (OHIO)   http://is.gd/2O7dSl
9.   “SC Special Olympics Coach Pleads Guilty to Sex Assault of Disabled Teen” --- Cornelius Davis was teacher and a Special Olympics coach in Mt. Pleasant, on Tuesday he pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a disabled girl in ... --- WBTW --- February 25, 2014  (SOUTH CAROLINA)  http://is.gd/HyvoJ8
10.   “Guide Dog Reported Stolen from Blind Woman” --- A guide dog has been missing for a week, after it was reported stolen from a blind woman. The dog, a Rottweiler named Diamond, was put outside on ... --- Dayton Daily News --- February 24, 2014  (OHIO)  http://is.gd/gQLQLN 
11.   “Training to Help Police Respond to People with Autism” --- ... recognize and handle situations involving people who have autism, autism spectrum disorder such as Asperger's syndrome, and similar conditions. --- Pittsburgh Post Gazette --- February 20, 2014  (PENNSYLVANIA)   http://is.gd/Dk0Kbp
12.   “Adult Abuse Registry” --- Steve Beshear joined top legislative leaders to express support for an adult abuse registry in Kentucky, the state Senate on Thursday approved a bill ... --- The Courier-Journal --- February 20, 2014  (KENTUCKY)   http://is.gd/xNFOmT 
 

SENS. WARREN AND HATCH INTRODUCE BIPARTISAN TEACH ACT

Legislation would Strengthen Accessibility of Higher Education Technology for Students with Disabilities
WASHINGTON, DC – United States Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) today introduced the Technology, Education, and Accessibility in College and Higher Education (“TEACH”) Act, bipartisan legislation that would help strengthen the accessibility of educational technologies for college students with disabilities. Senator Warren announced her introduction of the legislation this morning at a Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) hearing on “Promoting College Access and Success For Students With Disabilities.” Video of Senator Warren discussing the TEACH Act with disability experts and announcing its introduction is available here.
“It’s critically important that university services and course materials remain accessible to students with disabilities as technology advances and changes the way we communicate and learn,” Senator Warren said. “I’m pleased to join Senator Hatch to introduce the TEACH Act, which would help promote the use of educational technologies that meet the needs of all students."
“Technological advances have increased educational opportunities for everyone but especially for students with disabilities. However, in order to benefit from these new technologies students need to be able to access them,” said Senator Hatch. “The TEACH Act promotes the development of guidelines to assist educational institutions in selecting and offering course materials and services that students of all abilities can benefit from, and as someone who helped write the Americans with Disabilities Act, I’m proud to support it.”
Currently, not all technologies used at colleges and universities are accessible to students with disabilities, even though non-discrimination laws require accessibility. Federal non-discrimination laws were drafted long before the use of electronic instructional materials and other technologies on college campuses became widespread, and they do not contain the performance criteria or specifications that are necessary for accessible electronic materials.
The TEACH Act would require the United States Access Board to develop guidelines for the accessibility of electronic instructional materials and information technologies at institutions of higher learning. The legislation would help colleges select and adopt technologies that can be used by all students, and help create a better market for accessible technologies.
The TEACH Act was previously introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Congressman Thomas Petri (R-Wis.). It has been endorsed by disability rights organizations, including the National Federation of the Blind, Association of American Publishers,  American Association of People with Disabilities, National Council on Independent Living, National Center for Learning Disabilities, American Council of the Blind , Association for Education and Rehabilitation, Association on Higher Education and Disability, DAISY Consortium, CAST Universal Design for Learning, and Hearing Loss Association of America.
 
 
 

Michigan Lt. Gov. Brian Calley likens 'retarded' to racial slur: 'It should make you cringe'

| MLive.com#incart_river
 
 


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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