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Weekly Newsletter

April, 23 2017

INDEX

The articles, opportunities, and events described in the DCC Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the Disability Cultural Center, Syracuse University Division of Student Affairs, or Syracuse University.  The objective of the DCC Newsletter is to provide a centralized and comprehensive resource, which describes current activity in disability and diversity scholarship, cultural activities, and general news. Please direct any concerns about content directly to the DCC and the specific posting organization.  Also, the DCC welcomes relevant submissions.  

Please email sudcc@syr.edu  by 9AM each Thursday with your submission.

SU HAPPENINGS

FALL 2015 SOULFUL SIT-DOWNS

Public Lecture in Memory of Sari Knopp Biklen - Prec(ar)ious Knowledge: Adolescent Wisdom Borne in Neoliberal Blues

Join us for a SOULscape weekend!

Upcoming Events: 2015 Deaf Awareness Week and 2015 Disability Awareness Month

UNSCRIPTED CONVERSATIONS

Dr. Kathy Obear Speaks on Inclusivity and Lead Student Diversity Summit Training Oct. 2 & 3

Humanities Center: Internal Grant Program

SU NEWS

Marc Lamont Hill Named 2016 MLK Keynote Speaker

Employment Opportunity at the Taishoff Center

CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Workforce Recruitment Program for College Students with Disabilities (WRP)

Critical Questions in Education Conference - deadline extended

Call for proposals: 4th Annual Critical Theories in the 21st Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

Revisiting Peace, Equity and Friendship - Free conference on the Onondaga Nation 9/24/15

Call for Papers - Special issue: Jounal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Prof. Steve Kuusisto - Of Blindness, Miami University and its Happy Trolls

DEAF AWARENESS WEEK: Consortium for Culture and Medicine: Communication and Healthcare - Preventing disparities

NYTimes: Antidepressant Paxil Is Unsafe for Teenagers, New Analysis Says

Framing Perceptions Exhibition

Free webinar on Improving Employment Opportunities and Outcomes for People with Disabilities

Increasing Access and Making Practice More Inclusive through Disability Awareness Training

Chronicles of Higher Education - Ask Me: What LGBTQ Students Want Their Professors To Know

Chronicles of Higher Education - Students' Requests for Trigger Warnings Grow More Varied

 
 


SU HAPPENINGS

FALL 2015 SOULFUL SIT-DOWNS

Thursday evenings at 7 p.m. in 204 Tolley


What are Soulful Sit-Downs? A series of student-run conversations about life’s big questions and themes like passion, gratitude, and vulnerability. Weekly discussions intend to help participants seek a higher expression of themselves and develop a deeper understanding of their life’s purpose. 

Dinner provided each week. Space is limited, so let Sydney or Zack know if you plan on attending by emailing healthpromotion@syr.edu 


 

Public Lecture in Memory of Sari Knopp Biklen - Prec(ar)ious Knowledge: Adolescent Wisdom Borne in Neoliberal Blues


Prec(ar)ious Knowledge: Adolescent Wisdom Borne in Neoliberal Blues

An Essay Written While Dancing on Sari's Generous Shoulders

A Public Lecture, Presented by Michelle Fine - Thursday, February 18, 2016; 4:00 pm, Location TBA

In Memory of Sari Knopp Biklen

With introduction and remarks from: Nicole Nguyen, Assistant Professor of Social Foundations & Education, University of Illinois-Chicago; Heidi Pitzer, Visiting Assistant Professor of Education, St. Lawrence University

Michelle Fine is a Distinguished Professor of Critical Psychology, Women’s Studies, American Studies and Urban Education at the Graduate Center, CUNY. She is a university teacher, educational activist and researcher who works on social justice projects with youth, women and men in prison, educators and social movements on the ground. She writes on the injustice of high stakes testing, the racial abuse of mass incarceration of people of color and queer youth, and loves to conduct research with young people who know intimately the scars of injustice and the laughter of surviving the streets of New York. A pioneer in the field of youth Participatory Action Research, and a founding faculty member of the Public Science Project, Fine has been involved with a series of participatory studies with youth and elders, from across different racial, ethnic and social class backgrounds, to investigate circuits of dispossession, and circuits of critical resistance.

Sari Knopp Biklen passed away in Burlington, VT on September 16, 2014 at the age of 68.

In May 2014, Sari retired from Syracuse University after 38 years of service where she was the Laura and Douglas Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence in Cultural Foundations of Education. She was a specialist in popular culture, qualitative research methods and youth culture. She was a dedicated teacher and scholar, earning numerous prestigious awards. She tirelessly served the university in various capacities, and was a beloved mentor and friend to many students and faculty.

Sari is remembered as an indomitable organizer, feminist, and social justice activist. Above all, she is remembered for her warmth, her passion for hosting friends and family, and her enthusiasm for life.

The Douglas Biklen Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series

The Harry S. and Elva K. Ganders Memorial Fund Lecture

 


 

Join us for a SOULscape weekend!

October 10th-11th at Minnowbrook Conference Center

Application Deadline: Friday, September 25

Join us for a once-in-a-lifetime experience of powerful transformation and inspiration surrounded by the beauty of the Adirondack Mountains.

Featuring
• In-depth conversations about life’s big questions and themes like passion, gratitude, and vulnerability
• Introduction to basic practices of meditation and yoga
• Activities and exercises designed to help participants find a greater sense of meaning, purpose, and self understanding in their lives

Includes
• All-inclusive one-night stay at Syracuse University’s Minnowbrook Conference Center in Blue Mountain Lake
• Round-trip transportation

SOULscape is free for students, but limited spaces are available. You can apply for the weekend by visiting soulscape.syr.edu. The deadline to apply is Friday, September 25. Any questions? Contact Sydney or Zachary at healthpromotion@syr.edu 

Co-sponsored by the Office of Health Promotion and Hendricks Chapel

Below are what some students said about our last SOULscape weekend: 

“It's cheesy, cliche, whatever you wish to call it, but allowing oneself to be completely open and honest to not only a group of 21 beautiful strangers but yourself, is a very scary feeling, but, as I learned this weekend, vulnerability does not mean your weak, it means your human.”

“SOULscape was one of the best decisions I could have made this year at Syracuse. I left the weekend with just an overwhelming sense of calm and confidence coming back to campus. I felt that I carried myself differently. I was happier. I was able to breathe.”

“I don't think I realized how much I needed this weekend, until I took that breath, really inhaled and felt that thing inside of my chest telling me it's
alright to feel lost and a mess.”


 

Upcoming Events: 2015 Deaf Awareness Week and 2015 Disability Awareness Month

A Deaf Awareness Week Panel: Communication & Healthcare: Preventing Disparities  

Panelists: Monu Chhetri, Michael Schwartz, Jennifer Wissman, and Roman Kazragis. Rebecca Garden – Moderator  

Tuesday, 9/22, Pizza at 5 pm / Panel 5:30 to 7 p.m., Medical Alumni Auditorium, 1st floor, 766 Irving Avenue, SUNY Upstate Medical University  

Pizza & refreshments served. Free and open to the public. Sign language interpreters will be present. The auditorium & nearby bathroom are wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Consortium Coordinator Kathleen Szczech at KSzczech@upstate.edu or 315.464.5404 or Executive Director Rebecca Garden, PhD, at gardenr@upstate.edu or 315.464.8451. Co-sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion Upstate Medical University

During Deaf Awareness Week (week ending 9/25): “Crash Course” in American Sign Language, with Kate Pollack of the Disability Cultural Center (hosted by the Disability Student Union and the DCC).  For more details, contact Christy Kalebic: cqkalebi@syr.edu

4th Annual Disability Cultural Center (DCC) Open House

Friday, 10/2, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., 105/106/108 Hoople. (ASL interpretation provided; inclusive snacks on-site!) 

ORANGE AFTER DARK / DCC SCREENING OF INSIDE OUT

Friday, 10/2, 10 p.m., The critically acclaimed Pixar film, INSIDE OUT, will be screened (with open captions) on the QUAD, courtesy of the ORANGE AFTER DARK team, in collaboration with the Disability Cultural Center. (ASL interpretation provided; inclusive snacks on-site!) Event details can be found here: http://oad.syr.edu/event/inside-out-screening-on-the-quad/

A Place at the Table: Celebrating the ADA at 25, and Continuing the Conversation re: Food Justice and Disability Rights

Friday, 10/16, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hoople 106 – a “lunch and learn” panel with Professors Anni Bellows, Evan Weissman, and Arlene Kanter, moderated by Diane Wiener. More details forthcoming. (ASL interpretation provided; inclusive lunch on-site!)  Cosponsored by the Disability Cultural Center, the Disability Student Union, and Health Services.  Made possible through the Co-Curricular Departmental Initiatives Program within the Division of Student Affairs.

 

Interfaith Dialogue Dinner Series (with time for mindful meditation): Disability Culture, Faith, and Secularism

Wednesday, 10/21, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Noble Room, Hendricks Chapel. (ASL interpretation and inclusive dinner provided!) Cosponsored by Hendricks Chapel and the Disability Cultural Center. Made possible through the Co-Curricular Departmental Initiatives Program within the Division of Student Affairs.

AND, please join us for the final event in the Interfaith Dialogue Dinner Series, this fall, in November:

Interfaith Dialogue Dinner Series (with time for mindful meditation): Sanctuary and Safer Spaces

Wednesday, 11/18, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Noble Room, Hendricks Chapel. (ASL interpretation and inclusive dinner provided!). Cosponsored by Hendricks Chapel and the Disability Cultural Center. Made possible through the Co-Curricular Departmental Initiatives Program within the Division of Student Affairs.

Stay tuned for information about the 12/1/15 campus-wide celebration of the ADA @ 25…and details re: the next installment of Disabilities as Ways of Knowing: A Series of Creative Writing Conversations!

  


 

UNSCRIPTED CONVERSATIONS

raw. real. relevant.

"Unscripted Conversations" is a campus wide dialogue series for students to engage in conversations about issues of contemporary and social relevance. Join us on September 30th, immediately following the screening of the documentary "I Learn America" for a riveting conversation on education, immigration, resistance, and struggle. The conversation will take place at 9:00 pm at the Dialogue House, 113 Euclid Ave. 

Food and drinks will be served! Please RSVP at: http://intergroupdialogue.syr.edu.

Sponsored by the Intergroup Dialogue Program


 

Dr. Kathy Obear Speaks on Inclusivity and Lead Student Diversity Summit Training Oct. 2 & 3

The Division of Student Affairs is pleased to bring Dr. Kathy Obear to campus for a keynote address and training on Oct. 2 and Oct. 3. 

The keynote address on Friday, Oct. 2, is scheduled from 3:30 – 4:00 p.m. in Hendricks Chapel, with a community social and refreshments to follow in the Noble Room (lower level of Hendricks Chapel).  ASL interpretation and Communication Access Real-time Translation (CART) will be available.

Dr. Obear has more than 30 years’ experience as an organizational development consultant and trainer specializing in creating inclusion, team, and organizational effectiveness.  Her focus for the keynote address, staff training, and student training is “Awareness Skills and Tools toward the Creation of a Sustainable and Inclusive Campus Community.”

On Oct. 3, Dr. Obear will lead the DSA Student Diversity Summit, providing students with an opportunity to have meaningful conversations with Obear and each other, and to learn awareness skills and tools to create a sustainable and inclusive campus community.  Students interested in attending can register on the DSA Student Diversity Summit page spaces are limited to 150 students.  The on-campus workshop runs 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. and includes breakfast and a break for lunch.  ASL interpretation and Communication Access Real-time Translation (CART) will be available. A session with Dr. Obear is a great opportunity for students from all over campus to engage in conversations about diversity and inclusion.

For more information, contact Shaun Crisler at scrisler@syr.edu.


 

Humanities Center: Internal Grant Program

Humanities scholars are invited to learn more about new funding initiatives available through the Office of Research’s Internal Grant Program

Trish Lowney will present an informational session in the Humanities Center -- Room 304 in the Tolley Building -- on Friday, September 25th, at 1:30pm.  You're encouraged to review the online application form and FAQs before attending.



SU NEWS

Marc Lamont Hill Named 2016 MLK Keynote Speaker

http://news.syr.edu/marc-lamont-hill-named-2016-mlk-keynote-speaker-47432/

 

 

Employment Opportunity at the Taishoff Center

The Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University is seeking an Internship and Employment Coordinator.  The Coordinator will develop and implement new internship opportunities and teach career skills to college students with intellectual or developmental disabilities through our InclusiveU services.  

https://www.sujobopps.com/postings/60998

Please share far and wide and contact Beth directly (bemyers@syr.edu) if you have any questions.  

 

 


CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONFERENCES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PARTICIPANTS

Workforce Recruitment Program for College Students with Disabilities (WRP)

The Workforce Recruitment Program for College Students with Disabilities (WRP) is a recruitment and referral program that connects college students and recent graduates with disabilities to US Government and private sector employers nationwide. An annual database is compiled by December which federal and other employers then use to identify and further interview qualified persons for paid positions.

Students and recent graduates in all fields and levels of study may market their abilities to a wide variety of potential employers across the United States, sharpen their interviewing skills during a required phone interview with a WRP recruiter, and gain valuable skills, experience, and contacts on the job.

Applicants for the program must:

-          Must have an intellectual, physical, or mental health disability which makes the candidate eligible to use the Schedule A hiring authority

-          AND be a U.S. citizen

-          AND be currently enrolled in an accredited institution of higher education on a substantially full-time basis (unless the severity of the disability precludes the student from taking a substantially full-time load) to seek a degree

-          OR be enrolled in such an institution as a degree-seeking student taking less than a substantially full-time load in the enrollment period immediately prior to graduation

-          OR have graduated from such an institution since April of the past year (2015).

WRP 2015-16: How to Participate

  1. Visit the WRP web site, click on the Student Registration button, and furnish the required information. If the information is complete, the WRP Campus Coordinator, Chuck Reutlinger, will approve your initial registration.
  2. WRP will then email you a link to visit where you must upload by October 16 a Word resume, a transcript and optional documents that may represent you well.
  3. A schedule of phone interviews will then be formulated and, if successful, you will be entered into the database described above.

SU Career Services coordinates the WRP at Syracuse in partnership with the Office of Disability Services and the Office of Veteran and Military Affairs. Contact the WRP Campus Coordinator, Chuck Reutlinger, for more information on program details by sending an email to clreutli@syr.edu.

TAKE ACTION TODAY FOR A REWARDING TOMORROW!

Students need to complete the full, two-stage registration process by October 16 to participate this year.


 

Critical Questions in Education Conference - deadline extended

 

People have been asking for more time to prepare a proposal for the Critical Questions in Education Conference to be held March 7—9, 2016, in San Antonio, Texas. We have extended the deadline until October 5th

This year we have three theme questions—about teaching in the academic disciplines, about reading serious books, and about what schools can and should be doing in response to racially charged incidents in our country. In addition, we have an Open Topic category at this national, blind peer-reviewed conference. 

We also send this message to announce a new Academy book that might interest you and your students: Blame Teachers: The Emotional Reasons for Educational Reform. This brand new book summarizes why we blame teachers for what is taken to be the poor state of our schools, then thinks through the strange assumptions about teaching, teaching effectiveness, and the purposes of education that come when the resentment of teachers is at the heart of educational reform.  A good supplemental text for teacher education students and graduate students in foundations, curriculum and instruction, and educational administration.

If you have any questions, please call: Steven P. Jones, Academy Director:  417-836-5982. Please visit the Academy for Educational Studies website: http://academyforeducationalstudies.org/


 

Call for proposals: 4th Annual Critical Theories in the 21st Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

Proposals due Sept. 27 to cmalott@wcupa.edu

Conference: Nov. 6-7

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Keynotes: Bill Ayers and Dave Hill

Musical performances by: Marcel Cartier, Magik, and Squid Brothers, Inc.

More information here: http://ct21st.org/


 

Revisiting Peace, Equity and Friendship - Free conference on the Onondaga Nation 9/24/15

Hosted  by the Onondaga Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy presents:  Revisiting Peace, Equity and Friendship

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 24TH Onondaga Nation WILC Village Event Tent.

9am "Peace" - "Peace building in the context of cultural sustainability"

10am "Equity" "Equity and fairness in incorporating indigenous knowledge in modern-day society; seeking true justice in treaty and land matters; restoring gender balance."

1:30 "Friendship" "Building lasting friendships between neighbors; issues of governance, jurisdiction, food sovereignty and economic justice."

3:30 "Consciousness Now" "What has been achieved since 1977? What still needs to be done to ensure peace, equity and friendship for many generations to come?"

Parking at Green Hills Plaza $5 – Free shuttles run up to tent.  

 

Hugh Burnam hburnam@syr.edu Christopher Weiss cjweiss@syr.edu

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY | SCHOOL OF EDUCATION


 

Call for Papers - Special issue: Jounal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, published by Liverpool University Press, is pleased to announce a special issue…

Drama, Theatrical Performance, and Disability

Guest editors: Ann M. Fox and Carrie Sandahl

This special issue of /JCLDS /will consider the representation of disability in drama and theatrical performance.

The performance of disability in film, television, and popular culture has received considerable attention within disability studies.  But what of the representation of disability in drama and other theatrical performance, that is, the persistent presence of disability in embodied, spoken/signed performances created specifically for the stage? From /Philoctetes /to /Pyretown/, from Deaf West to Wry Crips, plays and performers have engaged the disability experience in multivaried ways.
These representations sometimes have been complex, problematic, or contradictory, revealing how disability is situated and constructed in a particular place and time.  They have sometimes created space for the new; for example, in the forthcoming volume /Disability, Avoidance, and the Academy: Challenging Resistance /(Routledge, 2015) Ann Fox has coined the term “fabulous invalid” to denote the presence of a disabled character in mainstream drama whose presence recasts old ideas about disability, deploying it as creative and generative. Theatrical performance has likewise been a site for disabled performers to tell their stories and insist on visibility.  It has been ten years since Carrie Sandahl and Phillip Auslander’s /Bodies in Commotion/ and Victoria Ann Lewis’s /Beyond Victims and Villains/. Both these anthologies included discussions of drama and theatrical performance.
This special issue of JLCDS extends and focuses these efforts to critical disability studies analyses of play texts and live performance that is explicitly theatrically framed. The guest editors are also interested in pieces that explore central concerns of theater and performance artists who are creating new work or reviving canonical texts that feature representations of disability experience.  Please note that this issue is focused on texts and performances that are specifically shaped for theatrical performance, and not on the performance of everyday life or “invisible theater.”

Contributions might consider but need not be limited to:

·Disability representations in dramatic literature in any time period.
Please note global literatures are welcome, but must be written about in English translation.

·Creating disability culture through performance.

·Creating Deaf culture through performance.

·Intersectional identities in drama (e.g., what might crip and camp have to say to one another? How do race and disability interrelate on stage?).

·The disabled body configured in theatrical spaces.

·Disabled or Deaf playwrights, actors, theater companies, and performance artists.

·Writing across the disabled/nondisabled “divide” or the hearing/Deaf “divide.”

·Community-based theaters that engage disability topics and disability aesthetics.

·Disability and solo performance.

·“Deaf gain” and “Disability gain” in dramatic performance and writing (for a discussion of “Deaf gain,” see the introduction to /Deaf Gain:
Raising the Stakes for Human Diversity /(U of Minnesota P, 2014)).

·The politics and possibilities surrounding disability and casting.

·Disability aesthetics in drama and performance.

·The social, political, and/or aesthetic implications of recent initiatives to make theatre more accessible.

·The aesthetics of disability “accommodations” (traditional and innovative).

·Training and professional development for disabled playwrights, actors, and performance artists.



Important dates:

January 15, 2016: submission of a 500 words proposal and a one-page curriculum vitae to guest editors at anfox@davidson.edu <mailto:anfox@davidson.edu> and csandahl@uic.edu <mailto:csandahl@uic.edu>.

February 15, 2016: prospective authors notified of proposal status.

August  1, 2016: final versions of selected papers due to editors.

November 1, 2016: Decisions and revisions on submissions sent to authors.

February 1, 2017: Final, revised papers due.

 


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Prof. Steve Kuusisto - Of Blindness, Miami University and its Happy Trolls  

Blog post from our friend and colleague, Prof. Steve Kuusisto

http://stephenkuusisto.com/2015/09/15/of-blindness-miami-university-and-its-happy-trolls/

  

DEAF AWARENESS WEEK: The Consortium for Culture and Medicine: Communication and Healthcare - Preventing disparities 

Deaf people who use sign language are a sizeable minority in the United States and yet they experience disparities in medical care.  Communication barriers contribute to those disparities.  Learn about the barriers and the outcomes, how to improve communication and avoid medical error, and the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Join the conversation with our panelists—a deaf Nepalese New American who interprets for the refugee community, a deaf law professor, an international sign language interpreter, & a deaf educator—as well as members of the Deaf community. The knowledge and skills that clinicians gain from this informative conversation can translate into improved communication—and thus better healthcare—for all sorts of people, whatever their culture and communication modality.

A Deaf Awareness Week panel

Panelists: Monu Chhetri, Michael Schwartz, Jennifer Wissman, and Roman Kazragis. Rebecca Garden – Moderator  

Tuesday, 9/22, Pizza at 5 pm / Panel 5:30 to 7 p.m., Medical Alumni Auditorium, 1st floor, 766 Irving Avenue, SUNY Upstate Medical University  

Pizza & refreshments served. Free and open to the public. Sign language interpreters will be present. The auditorium & nearby bathroom are wheelchair accessible. 

For more information, contact Consortium Coordinator Kathleen Szczech at

KSzczech@upstate.edu or 315.464.5404 or Executive Director Rebecca Garden, PhD, at gardenr@upstate.edu or 315.464.8451. 

Co-sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion Upstate Medical University.


NYTimes: Antidepressant Paxil Is Unsafe for Teenagers, New Analysis Says


Framing Perceptions Exhibition

The opening of Framing Perceptions exhibition was energetically welcomed by the UN community, including encouraging and celebratory words from Ambassador Oh Joon, Permanent Representative of Republic of Korea, Ambassador Bogusław Winid, Permanent Representative of Poland, Mr. Inigo Lambertini, Deputy Permanent Representative of Italy, and Ms. Daniela Bas, Director of the Division for Social Policy and Development of UN DESA. IDA's Executive Director, Vladimir Cuk, spoke about the historic inclusion of disability rights in the new Sustainable Development Goals, and the work ahead for the global disability movement to consolidate and implement these victories.  

Follow this link for the video of part of the Executive Director's speech:

https://youtu.be/LHa6miLEwCg

Further details about the exhibition:

http://internationaldisabilityalliance.org/en/article/exhibition-celebrate-historic-opportunity-and-achievement-persons-disabilities 

http://internationaldisabilityalliance.org/en


Free webinar on Improving Employment Opportunities and Outcomes for People with Disabilities

Register now! 

http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=767afbe8bd6db50de03889b40&id=91ce3dbaca&e=a7cf404c96

Improving Employment Opportunities and Outcomes for People with Disabilities: Implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) made significant changes to the workforce programs administered by the Employment & Training Administration as well as the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that have the potential to assist people with disabilities to become and remain employed. This webinar will provide an overview of the changes made by WIOA and highlight two provisions that made changes to the responsibilities and procedures governing state VR programs and the implementation of those provisions.

Date:

September 29, 2015

Time:

12:30 - 1:30PM EST

Cost:

Free!

The webinar will feature:  

*             Overview of the provisions of WIOA impacting people with disabilities including: 

*             Improving vocational rehabilitation services to students and youth with disabilities 

*             Limitations on the use of subminimum wage 

*             Questions and Answers



Increasing Access and Making Practice More Inclusive through Disability Awareness Training

 

 

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Chronicles of Higher Education - Ask Me: What LGBTQ Students Want Their Professors To Know

Chronicle of Higher Education (video and article with video transcript link included)

http://chronicle.com/article/Ask-Me-What-LGBTQ-Students/232797/

 

 

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Chronicles of Higher Education - Students' Requests for Trigger Warnings Grow More Varied


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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