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Weekly Newsletter

April, 23 2017

Su Events

The Art Of Listening: A Reading By Poets Ilya Kaminsky And Stephen Kuusisto

Thursday, October 24, 7 p.m.
Downtown YMCA
340 Montgomery Street

When we think of poetry, we often think of the music of language. This reading, featuring two internationally acclaimed poets, will demonstrate that the poet’s act of listening is a more complicated, intricate matter. For more information, visit syracuse.ymca.org/dwc.html


CO-SPONSOR: THE YMCA’S DOWNTOWN WRITERS CENTER


Disabilities as Ways of Knowing

A Series of Creative Writing Conversations

Lives Worth Living

A Discussion with

Adrienne Asch, Bill Peace, and Stephen Kuusisto

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

SU College of Law, MacNaughton Hall, Room 104

Presentation 5:30 to 6:30 pm

Reception and book signing from 6:30 to 7:30 pm in the Heritage Lounge, Room 366 White Hall

This discussion will address people with and without disabilities as all having "lives worth living," by considering creative writing, quality of life issues, the multicultural "disability imaginary," and issues of ethics, science, medicine, and disability rights.

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided during both the discussion, and the reception/book signing. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be provided during the presentation.

If you require accommodations or need information on parking for this event, please contact sudcc@syr.edu at 443-4486 by 10/22/13.

This event is made possible by the Cocurricular Departmental Initiatives Program within the Division of Student Affairs, and cosponsorship by the Disability Cultural Center, the Renee Crown University Honors Program, the Center on Human Policy, the Disability Law and Policy Program, the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, the School of Education, the LGBT Resource Center, Cultural Foundations of Education, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Disability Student Union, the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, the Disability Law Society, and Verbal Blend.

As aspects of variance and diversity, disability cultures and identities enrich the tapestry of life on and off the SU campus.


First Year Career Events

first-year students are invited to attend, but space in each session is limited.

RSVP via OrangeLink by clicking on the ‘Career Fairs, Workshops & Information Sess ions’ tab.

OCT. 15

True Colors Workshop

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. | 500 Hall of Languages

Gain insight into your own communication style. Understanding

your interpersonal style as well as the differences between

people’s way of communicating leads to more constructive and

meaningful relationships, both personally and professionally.

*must be available for entire session

AWARENESS

OCT. 23

Major Mixer & Panel Discussion

4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. | Career Services, 235 Schine

Hear from your peers in a no-stress atmosphere about their

experiences deciding a major. These students will share their

stories about factors with changing a major, picking up a dual

major or minor, and choosing their own path.

MAJORS

NOV. 4 - 8

Resume Review Blitz Week

12:15 p.m. - 12:45 p.m. | Career Services, 235 Schine

Learn the basics of putting together your first

professional resume.


Resume Review Live

Employers spend

10 seconds OR LESS deciding whether your resume lands in the yes, no, or maybe pile.

Think your resume has what it takes?

Tuesday, Oct. 22 5:30 p.m. Watson Auditorium

Reception with refreshments to follow

Recruiters and HR professionals representing the following companies will critique student resumes live!

Co-sponsored by the Graduate Student Organization and SU Career Services.

To RSVP:

Log into My Slice-> click Orangelink -> RSVP for Workshops -> Resume Review Live To have your resume critiqued: Send your resume to palatham@syr.edu by Tuesday, Oct. 15. (Your name and address will be removed prior to the event and an identifying number will be sent to you instead.)

*Please note, while all resumes will assessed and placed in a yes, no, or maybe pile, due to time constraints not all resumes will be critiqued live.


Out at Work

How to navigate LGBTQ identities and your job search
Making decisions about when to come
"out,"
how to be "out," or if you should be "out"
about your sexuality and/or gender can add
stress to career considerations. Our panel of
LGBTQ executives and SU community members
 
will share their experiences to provide
guidance, diverse perspectives, and career options.
All students, staff and faculty are welcome to join us:
Monday, October 28
6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
304 Schine (upstairs)
#SUOutAtWork
No RSVP required
A dessert reception will follow the panel.

 

Poet, author, and activist Nikki Giovanni prides herself on being "a Black American, a daughter, a mother, a professor of English." Giovanni remains committed to the fight for civil rights and equality. Her focus is on the individual, specifically, on the power one has to make a difference in oneself, and thus, in the lives of others. She published her f irst book of poetry, Black Feeling Black Talk, in 1968, the year she graduated f rom college. Her autobiography, Gemini, was a finalist for the National Book Award. She was the first recipient of the Rosa L. Parks Woman of Courage Award and received the Langston Hughes Medal for poetry. One of Oprah Winfrey’s 25 "Living Legends" and the author of some 30 books for both adults and children, Nikki Giovanni is a University Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech.



 

10 th Annual Well sLink Transitions Ceremony

Key note Address by
Nikki Giovanni

Friday

November 1, 2013

4 p.m.

Syracuse University

Hendricks Chapel

Questions? Please contact Huey Hsiao at huhsiao@syr.edu or 315- 443-9676.

Poet, author, and activist Nikki Giovanni prides herself on being "a Black American, a daughter, a mother, a professor of English." Giovanni remains committed to the fight for civil rights and equality. Her focus is on the individual, specifically, on the power one has to make a difference in oneself, and thus, in the lives of others. She published her f irst book of poetry, Black Feeling Black Talk, in 1968, the year she graduated f rom college. Her autobiography, Gemini, was a finalist for the National Book Award. She was the first recipient of the Rosa L. Parks Woman of Courage Award and received the Langston Hughes Medal for poetry. One of Oprah Winfrey’s 25 "Living Legends" and the author of some 30 books for both adults and children, Nikki Giovanni is a University Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech.


Study with Artist-in-Residence, Master Dancer

Oct 9—Nov 12

Biboti Ouikahilo

from the Ivory Coast

CONTACT BIBOTI AT wacheva@gmail.com

MUSIC BEYOND BORDERS

African Dance Workshop

& Performance!

Open to All Students

Workshop Dates & Venues

Wednesdays 9 to 10 p.m.

Oct: 9, 23, 30, Jabborwocky Café, Schine Student Center

Oct. 16, Schine Underground

Wednesday Nov. 6, Schine 304 ABC

Performance Date!

Tuesday, Nov 12 Schine Underground 6-8PM


Disabilities as Ways of Knowing: A Series of Creative Writing Conversations: Lives Worth Living

 
A Discussion with Adrienne Asch, Bill Peace, and Stephen Kuusisto
 
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
SU College of Law, MacNaughton Hall, Room 104
Presentation 5:30 to 6:30 pm
Reception and book signing from 6:30 to 7:30 pm in the Heritage Lounge, Room 366
White Hall
 
This discussion will address people with and without disabilities as all having “lives worth living,” by considering creative writing, quality of life issues, the multicultural “disability imaginary,” and issues of ethics, science, medicine, and disability rights.
 
American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided during both the discussion, and the reception/book signing. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be provided during the presentation.
 
If you require accommodations or need information on parking for this event, please contact sudcc@syr.edu at 443-4486 by 10/22/13.
 
This event is made possible by the Cocurricular Departmental Initiatives Program within the Division of Student Affairs, and cosponsorship by the Disability Cultural Center, the Renee Crown University Honors Program, the Center on Human Policy, the Disability Law and Policy Program, the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, the School of Education, the LGBT Resource Center, Cultural Foundations of Education, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Disability Student Union, the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, the Disability Law Society, and Verbal Blend.
 
As aspects of variance and diversity, disability cultures and identities enrich the tapestry of life on and off the SU campus.

Disabilities Awareness Month Events

 
Monday, Oct. 28, 2013,12:00 – 1:30 pm.
 
Student luncheon with Ethiopian disability rights activists (Rachel's at Sheraton)  
Student luncheon with Ethiopian disability rights activists, Wesenyelesh Admasu (Ethiopian Women with Disabilities National Association) and Meseret Mamo Kombolcha (Ethiopian Human Rights Commission). Cosponsored by the Disability Cultural Center, the Slutzker Center for International Services, the Disability Rights Clinic, and the Disability Law and Policy Program. 12:00 to 1:30 p.m. at Rachel's in the Sheraton Hotel. American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation provided. Please RSVP (including any accommodations requests) to sudcc@syr.edu by Oct. 21.
 
Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013,5:30 – 7:30 pm.
 
Disabilities as Ways of Knowing: A Series of Creative Writing Conversations, Part 3: Lives Worth Living (MacNaughton and White Halls, COL)  
Disabilities as Ways of Knowing: A Series of Creative Writing Conversations, Part 3: Lives Worth Living with Adrienne Asch, William Peace, and Stephen Kuusisto. SU College of Law, MacNaughton Hall, Room 104 at 5:30 p.m.; reception and book signing at 6:30 p.m. in Heritage Lounge, White Hall, Room 366. American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) will be provided during the presentation; ASL interpretation will be provided during the reception and book signing. This event is made possible by the Cocurricular Departmental Initiatives Program within the Division of Student Affairs, and cosponsorship by the Disability Cultural Center, the Renee Crown University Honors Program, the Center on Human Policy, the Disability Law and Policy Program, the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, the School of Education, the LGBT Resource Center, Cultural Foundations of Education, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Disability Student Union, the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee, the Disability Law Society, and Verbal Blend.
 
Public parking available in the Irving Garage. Guests requiring accessible parking may also use the Q1 parking lot. For assistance with parking questions, please call: 315-443-4486 or email sudcc@syr.edu.
 
Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013,11:30 to 12:30 p.m.
 
Student Luncheon with Adrienne Asch, William Peace, and Stephen Kuusisto (Rachel's at Sheraton)
Student Luncheon with Disabilities as Ways of Knowing, Part 3 presenters, at Rachel's in the Sheraton Hotel. American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation provided. Please RSVP (including any accommodations requests) tosudcc@syr.edu by Oct. 23.
 
Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013,12:00 – 1:00 pm.
 
Recognizing Death While Affirming Life: A Disability Perspective on End-of-Life Questions  (SUNY Upstate Medical University Campus Room 1507/1508 Setnor Academic Building 766 Irving Ave.) 
 
Sponsored by the Consortium for Culture and Medicine, this seminar's discussant, Dr. Asch, asks: How can health care practitioners and bioethicists benefit from the views of disability scholars and activists? This seminar takes a disability rights perspective on now-famous end of life cases and current debates about the end of life and assisted suicide. Dr. Adrienne Asch is the Edward and Robin Milstein Professor of Bioethics and Director of the Center for Ethics at Yeshiva University and professor of epidemiology and population health and family and social medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Her work focuses on the ethical, political, psychological, and social implications of human reproduction and the family. She has authored numerous articles and book chapters and is the co-editor of Prenatal Testing and Disability Rights and The Double-Edged Helix: Social Implications of Genetics in a Diverse Society.
 
Co-sponsors: Syracuse University's Disability Cultural Center & Renee Crown University Honors Program
 
For more information, contact Lois Dorschel (dorschel@upstate.edu; 315-464-8451)
 
Access: The presentation space is wheelchair accessible (wheelchair-accessible bathroom on the same floor). ASL interpreter provided.
Consortium for Culture and Medicine Faculty Seminars: The Consortium for Culture and Medicine is a collaboration among Le Moyne College, Syracuse University, and Upstate Medical University that brings together faculty and students from disparate fields to teach and conduct research on social, ethical, and cultural aspects of health care. The Consortium's Seminar Series encourages faculty, students, and interested community members to speak across disciplinary boundaries on urgent topics that interweave discourses and professional and social perspectives.
 
Location: The Setnor Academic Building is an extension on the north side of Weiskotten Hall, 766 Irving Ave., at the intersection of Waverly and Irving, on the west side of Irving, just north of Waverly.
 
Parking: There is limited metered parking on Elizabeth Blackwell Street near University Hospital, and along Irving Avenue near Weiskotten and Silverman Halls and the Health Sciences Library. Visitors may wish to park at one of two public garages on Irving Avenue. (Take Adams Street to Irving Avenue. Turn right. The garages are on the left side of the street between Adams Street and Waverly Avenue.)


Syracuse and Regional Events

Comedy Show

ANDERSON

TWINS

COMEDY

SHOW

For more information and to buy tickets, contact Rebecca Dadey

at dadeyr@sunyocc.edu or (315) 282-5210. Tickets can also be

purchased through the Box O

!

ce at OCC by calling (315) 498-2772

during business hours Monday through Friday.

OCTOBER 19, 2013 • 7 PM

STORER AUDITORIUM • ONONDAGA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Tickets are $5 per person (children 5 and under are free)

PERFORMANCE IS IN AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE.

SPOKEN ENGLISH INTERPRETATION WILL BE PROVIDED.


Consortium for Culture and Medicine Seminar

(http://www.upstate.edu/ccm/) Wednesday, November 6, 2013

12 to 1 pmRoom 3507 Setnor Academic Building
766 Irving Ave

Disability: A Complex Interaction in a Global Context

Mujde Koca-Atabey, PhD

Disability is defined differently in different parts of world, and the experiences of disabled people are largely shaped by these definitions. This talk explores how disability can lead to anxiety or growth, depending on personal, social and cultural circumstances.

Mujde Koca-Atabey, PhD, is a social psychologist holding a visiting scholar position at the Syracuse University’s Center on Human Policy, Law and Disability Studies. She had a postdoctoral position at the University of Leeds’ Centre for Disability Studies. She is also an assistant professor at the Department of Psychology, Ipek University, Ankara, Turkey.

Free and open to the public

Access: Wheelchair accessible; ASL interpreter provided upon request (contact Lois Dorschel at dorschel@upstate.edu).

Information: For information, contact Consortium Coordinator Lois Dorschel at dorschel@upstate.edu or Executive Director Rebecca Garden, PhD, at gardenr@upstate.edu or 315-464-8451.

Consortium for Culture and Medicine Faculty Seminars The Consortium for Culture and Medicine is collaboration among Le Moyne College, Syracuse University, and Upstate Medical University that brings together faculty and students from disparate fields to teach and conduct research on social, ethical, and cultural aspects of health care.  The Consortium’s Seminar Series encourages faculty, students, and interested community members to speak across disciplinary boundaries on urgent topics that interweave discourses and professional and social perspectives.

Location: The Setnor Academic Building is an extension on the north side of Weiskotten Hall, 766 Irving Ave., at the intersection of Waverly and Irving, on the west side of Irving, just north of Waverly. 

Parking: There is limited metered parking on Elizabeth Blackwell Street near University Hospital, and along Irving Avenue near Weiskotten and Silverman Halls and the Health Sciences Library. Visitors may wish to park at one of two public garages on Irving Avenue. (Take Adams Street to Irving Avenue. Turn right. The garages are on the left side of the street between Adams Street and Waverly Avenue.)



Call for Papers, Conferences, Research Participants, and Submissions

 

Call for Participants

Project ETHICS

Colleen Gibbons, PhD

Do you have an adult family member or friend

Project Manager

Katie McDonald, PhD

Principal Investigator

who has an intellectual disability?

Do you want to share your opinions in a research study?

We are looking for people who have provided support or assistance to an adult family member or friend with an intellectual disability. We have conducted focus groups with adults with intellectual disability and professionals who provide services and supports to adults with intellectual disability.

Now we want to talk to YOU!

We are asking you to participate in a

group interview and share your opinion

on how adults with intellectual disability should be treated when participating in research. We are interested in topics such as:

 Finding out about and making decisions about research studies

 Good and bad things that can happen from being in research

Participants will receive

$40

and transportation costs.

The group interviews will be at

Syracuse University and will last about two (2) hours

Want to find out more?

(315) 443 – 5981

cmgibbon@syr.edu

http://bbi.syr.edu/projects/ethics/


Call for Proposals

 
The Association on Higher Education And Disability and pepnet2 are pleased to announce the Call for Proposals for “Access Always, in All Ways” the 37th Conference of the Association on Higher Education And Disability and the pepnet2 Postsecondary Training Institute to be held 
 
July 14 - 19, 2014
The Sacramento Convention Center

Sacramento, California, USA
 
Access Always In All Ways
 
 
Call for Proposals
Submission Deadline: November 12, 2013
 
AHEAD is the premiere professional association committed to full participation of persons with disabilities in postsecondary education.
 

The annual conference is the Association’s hallmark event and draws 2,000+ participants and exhibitors from around the world who represent education, government, legal, research, and technology fields, and more. Attendees come together for an exciting mix of learning, policy development and face-to-face networking.

 

For 2014 we seek proposals in a wide range of formats that build professional competencies, challenge perspectives on disability, and influence practices in all learning environments.

 
***
 
The mission of
pepnet 2 is to increase the education, career and lifetime choices available to individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.  Pn2 provides professional development opportunities that highlight usable, sustainable and inclusive higher education environments for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.      
 

Proposals that support “Access Always, in All Ways” for students who are deaf or hard of hearing related to research, technology, personnel development, media production, and technical assistance are being sought for the 2014 Training Institute, held in conjunction with the AHEAD 2014 Conference.

  
Submit your pepnet 2 proposals here: http://www.pepnet.org/event/2014-pepnet-2-training-institute
 

Proposal instructions are included on the pn2 proposal site.
 
Call for Proposals
Submission Deadline: November 12, 2013



Connect with us.
We work with those who work with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Call for Abstracts

Call for Abstracts
 
Exploring Gender, Mental Health, and Wellness
 
The Women and Gender Research Collaborative at Texas State University is soliciting proposals from scholars who would like to participate in its upcoming symposium, Exploring Gender, Mental Health, and Wellness. This event will provide a forum for diverse perspectives on issues of gender, mental health, and wellness in the U.S. and around the globe. The symposium will take place on Friday, March 28, 2014, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the LBJ Student Center on the Texas State University campus in San Scholars from Texas, the United States, and the world are invited to present papers discussing various issues related to the conference theme. The symposium will also include poster sessions and discussion panels. Persons interested in participating should submit by November 19, 2013 the following: abstract of no more than
250 words and one-page curriculum vitae. Please indicate whether you are interested in making a paper presentation, a poster presentation, or organizing a discussion panel. These may be sent as email attachments to wgrc@txstate.edu or mailed to the address below.
 
Student participation is encouraged. Limited travel grants, based on demonstrated need, are available on a first come, first serve basis.
 
After the symposium, presenters are invited to submit their papers to the peer reviewed online Journal of Research on Women and Gender for a special issue based on the symposium. The deadline for submission of the paper to the journal is June 30, 2014. For submission guidelines, go to:
 
 
Women and Gender Research Collaborative
 
Center for Multicultural and Gender Studies
 
Texas State University
 
601 University Drive
 
San Marcos, TX 78666-4616

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE FROM STUDENT ACTIVISTS AND LEADERS

 
Hello All,
 
I am emailing you on behalf of my community organizing team in CFE/SWK 400/600, People, Power, & Change.  Our team has been tasked with finding 15-20 SU students who are dedicated to making a difference in the Syracuse community.  We have partnered with Syeisha Byrd and the SU Office of Engagement Programs to offer our assistance to as many places as possible.

The primary location we are requesting assistance for is the Boys and Girls Club of America, down over by BBB.  Committed student volunteers are needed on Monday nights (6 PM-8 PM) to tutor urban youth in the Syracuse community.  This tutoring will occur on a weekly basis.  We are looking for students who are particularly strong in the fields of math and English, but are open to enlisting any volunteers who are dedicated and able to meet the time requirements of the program.  If this is something that may interest you, feel free to contact any of the team members below for more information.  This will help us get you connected with Syeisha, and the Boys and Girls Club of America, for your chance to make a difference.

Alex Umstead: aumstead@syr.edu
Ayinde Emers: asemersg@syr.edu
Josh Berman: jpberm01@syr.edu
Rick Martin: rjmart01@syr.edu

- Alex

Symposium: Enabling Disability and Processes of Learning

  
*Invitation Symposium
 
Enabling Disability and Processes of Learning*
 
*25th – 26th October 2013*
 
*University of Zurich, Kollegiengebäude/Main Building, Rämistrasse 71, Room
 
KO2-F-175*
 
*Languages: English, International Sign, Ugandan Sign Language*
 
While the understanding of disability in the social sciences and humanities
 
has profoundly changed from biomedical perspectives regarding disability as
 
a physical impairment to socio-cultural approaches, in which disability is
 
perceived as a socially constructed barrier, the notion of bodily otherness
 
still exists. This is not only the case for the understanding of people who
 
are not involved in this debate, but also for many experts in applied
 
sciences and people with disabilities themselves. Neither the so called
 
social model nor the biomedical concepts offer a theoretical approach which
 
allows for a deeper understanding of the complexity of disability as well
 
as of the human experience of people with disabilities.
 
Recent approaches point to the fact that thinking about disability and the
 
body in general is still locked in the Cartesian dualism. Instead of
 
separating the bodily and the social, human beings should be seen as
 
holistic beings, thus the bodily and the social as well as the political
 
are inseparably linked.
 
“Anthropologists can show that the line dividing the social and the
 
physiological is arbitrary, that no human action or morphological trait
 
exists in a vacuum, and that human history is the conjunctural and emergent
 
product of social, physiological, morphological, symbolic, and historical
 
interactivities” (Fuentes, Agustin [2010]: Introduction. In: American
 
Anthropologist, Vol. 112 [4], p. 512).
 
This approach demands a radical rethinking not only of the concepts of
 
disability but also of the assumptions, believes, and ways researchers
 
think, talk and write about disability.
 
Starting with the researcher’s understanding of human beings – as social as
 
well as biological beings interacting in their environments – we will
 
discuss perspectives of disability. Which insights can this paradigm
 
provide for further research? In what ways can we talk about disability?
 
And what implications do these new perspectives entail regarding
 
methodological approaches?
 
In adopting a holistic understanding of processes of learning we focus on
 
so called people with disabilities for two reasons: First, people with
 
disabilities – however the categories are defined – are considered to be
 
different, as not having the same capabilities people have in general. This
 
idea focuses on the knowledge and skills an individual has but not on the
 
processes of learning them. Secondly, people with disabilities are part of
 
every society – the 1st World Report on Disability (2011) states that
 
nearly every human being will become disabled at one point during their
 
life. Thus, disability cannot be seen as an exceptional condition but must
 
be perceived as part of becoming human. Keeping disability in mind, we
 
would like to discuss approaches and ideas regarding lifelong learning and
 
appropriation of skills and/or knowledge as major processes of becoming
 
human.
 
*In case of questions regarding the symposium please contact Gitte Beckmann
 

Seeking Book Contributors:

An important new book, Racial Battle Fatigue: Insights from the Front Lines of Social Justice Advocacy, will contain personal stories of the repercussions of doing social justice work in the field and in the university.  Activists and scholars will share experiences of microaggressions, racial battle fatigue, and retaliation because of who they are, who they advocate for, or what they study.
This book, commissioned by Praeger Publishers, will feature 12 chapters authored by multidisciplinary and multicultural educators who have experience teaching multicultural education or doing social justice work.
Because Praeger’s primary market consists of public libraries, this book will be accessible and geared toward general readers looking to expand their knowledge and understanding of these topics.  Secondary markets, such as academic libraries, feminist activists, scholars, students, and researchers will also be drawn to the array of topics covered.
The term racial battle fatigue (RBF) is used to describe three major stress responses: physiological, psychological, and behavioral and involves the energy expended on coping with and fighting racism which is exacted on racially marginalized and stigmatized groups, such as dealing with daily micro-aggressions (Smith, 2008).  Although often difficult to broach, it is important for educators to address inequities in the school, classroom, and curriculum; otherwise, only “majoritarian” discourses will be perpetuated, and students with counter-narratives to share may be marginalized.  As Chaisson (2004) states, “Subverting discourses on race functions to perpetuate the racial system that advantages Whites for being white and oppresses racial minorities” (p. 346).  Initially, the dismantling and problematizing of white privilege can cause anger and defensiveness in majority populations, which speaks to the necessity of such an undertaking, especially in predominantly white schools (Chaisson, 2004).  Counter-stories are an important aspect of this conversation.  Counter-narratives problematize and/or cast doubt on the validity of hegemonic discourse or “accepted wisdom” perpetuated by the majority that also can communicate racial (and other) stereotypes, and represent the telling of lesser-known tales and also critiquing commonly told ones (Solorzano & Yosso, 2001).  Without them, hegemonic, Eurocentric, “majoritarian” discourses will prevail (DeCuir & Dixson, 2004). 
Dr. Jennifer Martin, professor of education and editor, is seeking proposals for the book chapters.  Contact Jennifer Martin: martinjl@mountunion.edu re: submission content.


News and Announcements

Need Help Selecting a Major?

Major Dilemma Drop-Ins

October 28-31st  2:00PM-4:30PM

SU Career Services 235 Schine

Questions?  email:  ttillapa@syr.edu


Book Release

Literature, Speech Disorders, and Disability: Talking Normal
Examining representations of speech disorders in works of literature, this first collection of its kind founds a new multidisciplinary subfield related but not limited to the emerging fields of disability studies and medical humanities. The scope is wide-ranging both in terms of national literatures and historical periods considered, engaging with theoretical discussions in poststructuralism, disability studies, cultural studies, new historicism, gender studies, sociolinguistics, trauma studies, and medical humanities. The book’s main focus is on the development of an awareness of speech pathology in the literary imaginary from the late-eighteenth century to the present, studying the novel, drama, epic poetry, lyric poetry, autobiography and autopathography, and clinical case studies and guidebooks on speech therapy. The volume addresses a growing interest, both in popular culture and the humanities, regarding the portrayal of conditions such as stuttering, aphasia and mutism, along with the status of the self in relation to those conditions. Since speech pathologies are neither illnesses nor outwardly physical disabilities, critical studies of their representation have tended to occupy a liminal position in relation to other discourses such as literary and cultural theory, and even disability studies. One of the primary aims of this collection is to address this marginalization, and to position a cultural criticism of speech pathology within literary studies.
 
 

CRPD: What you can do

 
RE: Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) Ratification  what you can do to help
Sign and distribute the petition for ratification.  Every individual can sign this and share the link with your friends, colleagues and communities.  www.handicap-international.us/support_the_disability_treaty  
Increase and spread your social media. TWEET DAILY!   Direct Tweets of support to your Senators by placing their name after the @ symbol (@jerrymoran for example).  Use the following hashtags: #isupportcrpd, #crpd, #disabilitiestreaty.  Consider following other great advocates like @USICD, @ashettle @RhondaNeuhaus @IntDisability @auntpip.
 

Blog post of interest by activist Tina Minkowitz, on Mad in America:

Stories of Interest

 
The following are recent news stories of interest to people with disabilities and those supporting and working with and for people with disabilities.
 
Dr. Nora's Top Articles (7 of  120 news articles) 
 
1.   “Ala. Man Sentenced in Abuse of Special Needs Teen” --- A 72-year-old man accused of sexually abusing a special needs teenager has been sentenced to 10 years in prison. William Frank Maddox, who pleaded guilty ... --- Times Daily --- October 3, 2013  (ALABAMA)   http://is.gd/PS25Ck  
 
2.   “Chandler Couple Accused of Keeping Disabled Son in Locked Room Plead Guilty to Attempted Abuse” --- A Chandler couple accused of keeping their severely disabled 8-year-old son locked in a bathroom have pleaded guilty to attempted ... --- The Republic --- October 7, 2013  (ARIZONA)  http://is.gd/avip9o  
 
3.   “Owner of North Florida Nursing Home Arrested” --- Authorities say she handcuffed a disabled adult, causing wounds on the woman's wrists that weren't treated. They say Johnson didn't provide beds for residents ... --- San Francisco Chronicle --- October 4, 2013  (FLORIDA)   http://is.gd/zhOSHk  
 
4.   “Horrors at School for Disabled Hold Lessons for Us All” --- By now, the horrors inflicted on students at the Hawaii School for the Deaf and Blind have been well reported. The state Department of Education last ... --- Honolulu Star-Advertiser --- October 1, 2013  (HAWAII)   http://is.gd/SvmwLB  
 
5.   “Richmond Woman Charged with Abusing Disabled Adult, Her Baby” --- A Richmond woman was formally charged Wednesday with two counts of battery for allegedly abusing a mentally disabled adult and the adult's baby, both of ... --- Indianapolis Star --- October 3, 2013  (INDIANA)  http://is.gd/pHX4EZ  
 
6.   “Data from Schools Show Widespread Use of Restraint and Seclusion ...” --- New data on the number of students who have been restrained or secluded in Maine schools show wide variances in the use of those techniques ... --- The Forecaster --- September 27, 2013  (MAINE)   http://is.gd/z48pBo  
 
7.   “Mom Accused of Stealing $349 Son Raised for Boy Scouts” --- A Massachusetts woman accused of embezzling from a nonprofit for special needs children is now facing allegations of stealing about $350 her son had ... --- KOMO News --- October 2, 2013  (MASSCHUSETTS)  http://is.gd/mPOUvm
 
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The other 113 stories for this week, as well as newsfeeds from prior weeks, can be found at: http://www.disabilityandabuse.org/newsfeed/contents.htm
 
The Disability and Abuse Project of Spectrum Institute provides this newsfeed. These are articles involving people with disabilities across the life span, any type of disability and any type of maltreatment, abuse, crime or, articles regarding law enforcement issues and individuals with disabilities. We have a particular focus on individuals with developmental disabilities. We welcome your input and feedback regarding this feature of our CANDO List. Please note that the articles are listed in alphabetical order by state, so you can easily scan through the articles for those within your state or other states in which you have a particular interest.

UN Study Results

UN SURVEY SHOWS NEEDS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES LARGELY IGNORED DURING DISASTERS New York, Oct 10 2013 2:00PM A high proportion of persons with disabilities die or suffer injuries during disasters because they are rarely consulted about their needs and Governments lack adequate measures to address them, according to a United Nations survey released today ahead of the International Day for Disaster Reduction.

The online survey, produced by the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) and partners, consulted nearly 6,000 persons with disabilities in 126 countries on how they cope and prepare for disasters.

The results show that people living with disabilities across the world are rarely consulted about their needs in times of disasters. In cases where they need to evacuate such as during floods or earthquakes, only 20 per cent of respondents said they could evacuate immediately without difficulty, 6 per cent said they would not be able to evacuate at all and the remainder said they would be able to evacuate with a degree of difficulty.

“The results of this survey are shocking. It clearly reveals that the key reason why a disproportionate number of disabled persons suffer and die in disasters is because their needs are ignored and neglected by the official planning process in the majority of situations,” <"http://www.unisdr.org/archive/35032">said the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Disaster Risk Reduction, Margareta Wahlström.

Released ahead of the International Day for Disaster Reduction, commemorated on annually on 13 October and which this year recognizes the critical role of persons with disabilities in fostering disaster resilience, the survey shows that inclusion of disability must be a central concern in all emergency communications.

It notes that the challenges of evacuation ranged from having a degree of difficulty of hearing, seeing, walking or climbing steps and having difficulty communicating.

If given sufficient time, the percentage of those who could evacuate with no difficulty almost double, rising from 20 per cent to 38 per cent, which underlined the importance of early warning systems and ensuring that warnings reach all members of the community.

In addition, many respondents said that if they an early warning they would take measures that would better prepare them for disasters. For example, one respondent said that if he had prior knowledge of bad weather overnight, he would sleep in his wheelchair to be able to take cover quickly. Another respondent said an early warning on bad weather would allow him to stock up on medicines, and another one expressed concern of being unable to receive alerts because he cannot hear sirens.

The 22-question survey also shows that 71 per cent of respondents have no personal preparedness plan for disasters and only 31 per cent always have someone to help them evacuate while 13 per cent never have anyone to help them.
Persons with disabilities also face difficulties after disasters have struck, as emergency and care systems are poorly designed for people depending on help or having disabilities, said Ms. Wahlström, briefing the press in New York as part of the activities under way at Headquarters to mark the 2013 International Day.

“Lack of inclusion of persons with disabilities in the planning system leads to systems being inadequate,” she said. “The survey shows that people largely depend on friends and family for safety and it shows that even when they are early warning systems they are not necessarily adjusted to people who don’t hear, or people who are colour blind for example.

She added that countries run the risk of “bundling” what disabilities entail and said this highlights the importance of incorporating multiple perspectives from persons with disabilities.

The top five hazards or disaster risks faced by survey respondents were floods, extreme weather, tornados, drought, and earthquakes. UNISDR said it has decided to continue the survey until the end of the year to expand the sample.

“UNISDR will ensure that [respondents’] knowledge and experiences are taken fully into consideration at the 2015 World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction when UN Member States meeting in Japan will adopt a new global framework for disaster risk reduction to replace the current Hyogo Framework for Action,” Ms. Wahlström said.
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