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Weekly Newsletter

July, 28 2017

Index

INDEX

SU NEWS

Picturing Disability by Robert Bogdan Selected as CHOICE Outstanding Title for 2013!

SYRACUSE AND REGIONAL EVENTS

Upstate Medical University Lectures

No More Excuses! Rally

CALL FOR PAPERS, PARTICIPANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND CONFERENCES

Call for Research Participation- Parents with Children that have Chronic Illnesses

Call for Proposal EXTENDED-Take away the suit and what are you? “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON 2014

Call for Abstracts-University of Tennessee, Disability Issues and Advocacy Conference

Web Conference: Child Sexual Abuse and Disabilities

Call For Papers: Disability and Labor: A Contentious Relationship? 

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

WEBINAR: The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD)

Articles of Interest-Disabilities


SU News

Picturing Disability by Robert Bogdan Selected as CHOICE Outstanding Title for 2013!

 
The Syracuse University Press title Picturing Disability: Beggar, Freak, Citizen and other Photographic Rhetoric by Robert Bogdan has been chosen as a CHOICE Outstanding Title for 2013.
 
Read this fascinating book in one sitting, and follow the author's instructions to carefully examine the photographs before and after reading the text. Bogdan (Syracuse Univ.) has given readers the pictorial evidence of the social construction of disability, and he points out masterfully how it is the photographer's point of view that is revealed, and not the lived experience of people with disabilities who are the objects of these images. This point is complicated, however, by people with disabilities who used their own images to promote themselves as a method of earning a living. The book begs to be paired with other disability studies books such as Susan Burch and Hannah Joyner's Unspeakable: The Story of Junius Wilson (CH, May'08, 45-5276) or Susan Schweik's The Ugly Laws: Disability in Public (CH, Feb'10, 47-3516), which cover roughly the same time periods (from the Progressive Era to the early rise of the disability rights movement). Such a pairing would make for a rich, in-depth exploration of disability as a societal arrangement in modern society. In addition, the historical content helps readers understand and appreciate disability as it exists in the 21st century. Bogdan provides the pictorial evidence of the construction of disability. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries.
 
--P. A. Murphy, University of Toledo
 
Copyright 2013 American Library Association
 
 
 
 
 
Picturing Disability: Beggar, Freak, Citizen, and Other Photographic Rhetoric
 
Robert Bogdan with Martin Elks and James Knoll
 
Cloth $55.00s    |    978-0-8156-3302-0    |    2012
 
 
 
FOR BOOK ORDERS, Please Contact Longleaf Services Inc. at 800-848-6224.


Syracuse and Regional Events

Upstate Medical University Lectures

DATE:     February 6, 2014 TIME:  12:30 – 2:00 PM

TITLE:                    Veterans Crisis Line

DESCRIPTION: Victoria Bridges and Kimberley Mullen will review what happens with calls to the Veterans Crisis Line- What happens when someone calls? How is the call addressed? What are the resources provided?

SPEAKER:  Victoria E. Bridges, LCSW and Kimberley Mullen, PhD

TARGET AUDIENCE: Physicians, Psychologists, Psychiatric Nurse Specialists, Nurses, Social Workers, Residents & Fellows, Medical Students, Allied Mental Health Providers, and all other Healthcare providers.  Grand Rounds is open to all who wish to attend.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Following these activity participants should be able to:

  •  call or refer to the Veterans Crisis Line (VCL), and know what services will be provided
  • see current statistics on Veteran suicide to inform their practice
  • understand the process of Crisis Intervention calls to the VCL and resources available for Crisis Intervention for Veterans, their friends and families
  • find resources for Veterans in crisis on the internet.

Faculty Disclosures:  Victoria Bridges and Kimberley Mullen do not have financial relationships with commercial interests.

Commercial Support:  No commercial support was received for this educational activity. 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DATE:  February 13, 2014      TIME:  12:30 – 2:00 PM

TITLE: Games Psychiatrists Play      

DESCRIPTION: Professor Jeffrey A. Schaler will describe three strategies used today by institutional as compared to contractual psychiatrists to circumvent Constitutional protections against depriving innocent citizens of due process of law. He will teach members of the audience how mental illness is a myth the way Thomas Szasz asserted it was a myth.  And finally, he will show how mental illness is a form of legal fiction, the way black skin was once considered a form of legal fiction, drawing upon the work of Thomas Szasz and the legal scholar Lon Fuller.

SPEAKER: Jeffrey Schaler, PhD        

TARGET AUDIENCE: Physicians, Psychologists, Psychiatric Nurse Specialists, Nurses, Social Workers, Residents & Fellows, Medical Students, Allied Mental Health Providers, and all other Healthcare providers.  Grand Rounds is open to all who wish to attend.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Following this activity participants should be able to:

  • learn a simple, three-step model for deconstructing the idea of mental illness, developed by Dr. Schaler, and used successfully with thousands of undergraduate and graduate students over the years to understand Professor Thomas Szasz’s ideas about the difference between behavior and disease, and the medicalization of socially deviant behavior.
  • understand what Thomas Szasz meant by the therapeutic state, how it replaced the theocratic state, and the dangers the therapeutic state poses to liberty and responsibility in a free society.
  • understand the nature of legal fiction, and how mental illness is a contemporary legal fiction.

Faculty Disclosures: Dr. Schaler does not have financial relationships with commercial interests.

Commercial Support:  No commercial support was received for this educational activity.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DATE:     February 27, 2014      TIME:  12:30 – 2:00 PM

TITLE:   Teaching Physician communication skills in Pediatrics- The Pediatrics Communication Skills Guide

DESCRIPTION: An evidence‑based approach to communicating with kids ‑ the story of one approach to teaching the unteachable, what it attained and what it didn't.

SPEAKER:  Nicholas Bennett MA(Cantab), MBBChir, PhD, FAAP

TARGET AUDIENCE: Physicians, Psychologists, Psychiatric Nurse Specialists, Nurses, Social Workers, Residents & Fellows, Medical Students, Allied Mental Health Providers, and all other Healthcare providers.  Grand Rounds is open to all who wish to attend.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Following this activity participant should be able to:

  • explain the importance of effective physician/patient/parent communication.
  • appreciate what aspects of physician/patient communication are particularly difficult or important in pediatrics.
  • know the best methods for effectively teaching communication skills.

Faculty Disclosures:  Dr. Bennett does not have financial relationships with commercial interests.

Commercial Support:  No commercial support was received for this educational activity.

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No More Excuses! Rally


No More Excuses!  Educate Every Student!
Rally on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014

For too long the students of New York have seen their favorite classes eliminated, teachers cut, resources dwindle, and opportunities lost. It's time for NO MORE EXCUSES! Join us on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 in Albany to demand that New York lives up to its promise of providing every student with a "sound basic education." 

With the Governor's budget coming out in January, this is the moment to raise our voices! We are calling on Albany to fully fund New York's schools by investing $1.9 billion into education this year. This will not only get schools back on track with their Campaign for Fiscal Equity funding, but it is the starting point to ensuring all students have the resources, supports and opportunities that they need to succeed. For more information about the #NoMoreExcuses demands, follow #NoMoreExcuses on Twitter for real time updates about the campaign.

Register for bus transportation at: http://citizenactionny.org/syracusebus
Pick-up time: 8:20am
Pick up location: Price Chopper, 2515 Erie Blvd. East, Syracuse
Return time: 6pm


For more information, contact:
Lekia Hill
lhill@citizenactionny.org
315.435.2480 *101
Community Organizer
2013 E. Genesee Street 
Syracuse, NY 13210
 


Call for Papers, Participants, Scholarships, and Conferences

Call for Research Participation- Parents with Children that have Chronic Illnesses

*****This solicitation is for research purposes.*****


Parents!

Do you have a son or daughter in grades K-2 whose primary disability is a chronic illness (cancer, asthma, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, heart disease, etc.)?  If so, I would be interested in interviewing you and other adults who are involved in your child’s education!

I am a PhD student at Syracuse University, and am interested in learning more about what different adults involved in the educational lives of children with chronic illnesses feel is important in these children’s education.  This study will help improve the education of children with chronic illnesses by giving us a better idea of how to maintain and improve educational opportunities for them.

All interviews will be private (1:1) and in a location of your choosing, and all information in this study will be kept strictly confidential.  All interviews will take approximately one hour.

Please feel free to contact me if you are interested in participating, or have any questions.  Additionally, if you know anyone who may be interested in participating, please feel free to pass this email to them.

Alexander Umstead
Doctoral Student in Cultural Foundations of Education/Disability Studies
School of Education | Syracuse University
Mailboxes: 350 Huntington Hall and 101 Hoople Building
E-mail: aumstead@syr.edu
Cell: (315) 762-7351

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Call for Proposal EXTENDED-Take away the suit and what are you? “CRIPPING” THE COMIC CON 2014

 
April 9 and 10, 2014
Syracuse University
Syracuse, NY
 
DEADLINE for Proposals Extended to February 1, 2014
 
Announcing 2014 Keynote Speaker Naomi Grossman
Naomi Grossman is best known for her portrayal of the fan-favorite, 
“Pepper” on FX’s American Horror Story: Asylum.
 
 
Anyone can participate in “Cripping” the Comic Con.  Although some of the language in this Call for Proposals is decidedly “academic,” and some of the folks who participate may self-identify as “academics,” this symposium is really for everyone, and we mean it.  All are welcomed; please feel free to submit your ideas for consideration.  We seek to promote a culture of inclusion.
 
Michael Bérubé tells us that “every representation of disability has the potential to shape the way ‘disability’ is understood in general culture, and some of those representations can in fact do extraordinary powerful—or harmful—cultural and political work” (1997, p. B4).  These representations encourage audience members to come to an acceptance and understanding of the wide range of differences that exist among us.
 
The second annual symposium provides participants with the opportunity to engage in a broad array of reflective discussions about the representations of disability that exist “beneath the surface” and explicitly within mainstream popular cultures both nationally and internationally, particularly the popular culture phenomena that are comic books, graphic novels, and manga.
 
Submissions incorporating genres that do not typically receive sustained attention in mainstream scholarly spaces are encouraged. These include but are not limited to the following:
 
·       comix, anime, motion comics
·       films, movies, videos, television shows (including reality TV, animated TV)
·       advertising, newspapers, magazines
·       comic cons, dragon cons, geek cons, movie cons, cosplay, cult fandom, the “geek syndrome”
·       visual arts, painting, photography, deviantART, alternative and alternate art forms
·       poetry, expressive arts, popular fiction, imagetext, fanfic, slash, alternative and alternate forms of literacies
·       material culture, multimedia, social media, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube
·       websites, blogs, memes, zines
·       games, gaming, toys, action figures
As was the case with the first annual symposium, and will remain the case each year, henceforth, one of our primary goals as symposium organizers is to create opportunities for all participants—particularly students and emerging scholars—to share their work. 
 
Another of our primary goals is to assure that all information associated with the symposium is accessible and equitable.  The symposium organizers and the proposal review committee strongly support the notion that “academics have a responsibility to make their work relevant for the society they exist within” (Jurgenson, 2012), and this of course includes making disability studies relevant and accessible to the disability community (Ne’eman, 2012). 
 
Since representations in popular culture are generally created outside of academic environments, it is especially important for the general public and not just “academics” to engage in conversations about popular culture and disability.  Representations have the potential to affect everyone.  We all benefit from discussing and learning about disability and popular culture in ways that include and welcome everyone’s participation. 
 
This event is meant not only to address often unmet needs in scholarly spaces and beyond, but also to address these vital areas/concerns:
 
1.     Popular culture studies and literature do not pay consistent or adequate attention to disability; when this attention is paid, it is often via “special issues” of journals, etc. 
2.     Further, “Popular culture is…the discursive terrain on which larger social issues are played out, often unobtrusively and masked as entertainment–and this is precisely why pop culture needs to be examined even more closely...” (Nayar, 2011, p. 172).  These issues include not only our understandings of diverse minds and bodies, but representations of various social identities, including but not limited to gender expression, race, class, ethnicity, size, age, etc.
3.     Popular culture studies and literature continue to have a mixed reception within certain mainstream academic spaces.  Because popular culture is still sometimes not taken seriously within some of these spaces (even among some disability studies scholars and practitioners), its status remains, for some, “discounted” (at times, popular culture studies may even be perceived as “deviant”).  Consequently, this symposium’s organizers aim to:
a.      critique what is often described as “deviant”
b.     question and disrupt what “counts” as academic, mainstream, and normative
4.     The symposium will be consistent with values that underscore the disability rights movement: we seek to make collective investments in disability pride, identity, and cultures.  In “cripping” the status quo, we assert, purposefully, “Nothing about us without us.”  For more information on what we mean by “cripping,” please visit this page on the “Cripping” the Comic Con website:http://crippingthecon.com/more-on-what-cripping-means/.
5.     We especially welcome submissions based upon the variety of issues and strategies that were identified during our 2013 post-symposium session, “Disability Activism and Fandom: A Roundtable Strategizing on Fandom as a Target of/Resource for Activism,” including but not limited to the following topics and questions:
·       The relationship between disability rights activism and fandom
·       Accessibility of cons and fan-related spaces
·       How to engage fandom communities further in the disability rights movement
·       Have there been opportunities for change in how fandom communities approach disability? If so, how?
·       What are the discourses that are produced when “reboots” happen with comic characters?
·       How might we all participate most fully at events during which disability is or is not prevalent, especially when the events involve and in some cases privilege popular culture?
·       How and in what ways might cosplay choices be perceived and harnessed as forms of activism, from a disability cultural standpoint?
·       How might we take advantage of “teachable moments” in the context of addressing the intersections of disability, fandom, and popular culture?
·       The transformative potential of art, and considering ways for “creating representations on our own terms”
·       Being aware of the ways in which gatekeepers to traditional media and large independent media may prohibit access to disenfranchised populations, including people with disabilities
·       There are many ways to be Deaf, Blind, Autistic, etc., and diverse experiences need to be articulated and addressed by creators of comics, etc. What are some strategies that can be used to politicize the comics industry?
Submission Guidelines and Instructions
 
Proposal types and formats may include, among others:
1.     Individual presentation
2.     Panel presentation
3.     Discussion/workshop/roundtable
4.     Performance/video/film/art entry
5.     Poster session
Please note that other forms of proposals are fully welcomed, and the above list is not exhaustive.  If you have something particular in mind, please explain the details and parameters of what you imagine, via your proposal submission(s). You are also welcomed and encouraged to submit more than one proposal.
 
If your submission is a performance/video/film/art entry, you are responsible for securing permissions and rights for public viewing.  Videos and films should be open captioned and descriptions of any artwork will be required.  Audio descriptions of videos and films may also be required, depending upon the nature and style of the videos/films being submitted.
 
PROPOSAL SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO February 1, 2014
 
Each proposal must include:
1.     Name
2.     Affiliation (if applicable)
3.     Contact information (including email and phone/video phone)
a.      if there is more than one presenter, please indicate the main contact and lead presenter (if these are two different individuals, please indicate this information)
4.     Title of presentation/activity/etc. (15 words or less)
5.     Short description (50 words or less)
6.     Full description (1000 words or less)
How to submit your proposal(s) -- please choose one of the following options:
1.     Via email to cripcon@gmail.com.  Submissions can be sent as an attachment (Word, Word Perfect, Text, Rich Text Format or PDF) or with text pasted/embedded in the body of your message.  Please put CRIPCON SUBMISSION in the subject line.
2.     Via Fax: 315-443-4338.  Please indicate CRIPCON SUBMISSION on Fax cover sheet.
3.     Via regular mail:
“Cripping” the Comic Con 2014
c/o SU Disability Cultural Center
805 S Crouse Ave, 105 Hoople Bldg.
Syracuse, NY 13244-2280
Additional Information
 
Information and content produced as a result of this symposium will be published, with participant and presenter consent, via Beneath the SURFACE (BtS), an open source digital repository on disability and popular culture.  BtS is available to the academic community as well as to the general public, and includes an array of resources regarding disability and popular culture.
 
Each day of the symposium, there will be a designated time slot during which poster sessions will be offered concurrently with “open space.” 
 
Open space will be an opportunity for participants to create spontaneous and/or planned topical interactions with other participants—in other words, open space will be a venue for you to create your own symposium “sessions,” during specific times and in specific locations.  There will also be tables, art stations, and other opportunities for networking, gaming, etc. that will follow the thematic tracks of the symposium.  The particular tracks will be identified once all submissions have been reviewed by the proposal review committee.
 
All confirmed participants (whether presenting or not) will receive information on:
1.     Completing registration
2.     Requesting disability accommodations
3.     Expressing dietary preferences (some but not all meals will be included with registration)
All participants will be responsible for the cost of their own lodging and travel.
 
To keep informed, please visit us online!
 
Website for “Cripping” the Comic Con:  http://crippingthecon.com
 
“Cripping” the Comic Con on Twitter:  @cripcon
 
“Cripping” the Comic Con on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CrippingTheCon
 
References
 
Bérubé, M. (1997, May 30).  The cultural representation of people with disabilities affects us all.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, B4-B5.
 
Jurgenson, N. (2012, May 11).  Making our ideas more accessible. Washington, DC: Inside Higher Ed.  Retrieved September 19, 2012 from:http://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2012/05/11/scholars-must-make-their-work-more-available-and-accessible-essay
 
Nayar, P. K. (2011). Haunted knights in spandex: Self and othering in the superhero mythos. Mediterranean Journal of Humanities, 1/2, 171-183.
 
Ne’eman, A. (2012, May 14). Making Disability Studies accessible.  Washington, DC: Autistic Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN). Retrieved September 19, 2012 fromhttp://autisticadvocacy.org/2012/05/making-disability-studies-accessible/.

Call for Abstracts-University of Tennessee, Disability Issues and Advocacy Conference

The University of Tennessee’s student organization Campus Disability Advocates is now accepting abstracts for the upcoming Disability Issues and Advocacy Conference, which will take place April 4-5 in Knoxville, TN.

We are calling for abstracts for 25-minute talks on disability theory, policy and practice.

The purpose of this conference is to bring together local and national disability theorists and policy-makers to discuss issues of respect, justice, equality, and policy for people with disabilities. Campus Disability Advocates seeks to bring these issues to the students and faculty at the University of Tennessee, to the citizens of the greater Knoxville area, and to the broader national community. We want the ideas fostered at this conference to have tangible effects in our city and across the nation.

To submit an abstract, please use the form on our conference website:

http://utkcda.com/events/conference2014/

We welcome abstracts from people in a variety of positions: professors, students, government officials, and beyond. Please keep your abstracts between 200-300 words.

Registration to attend is required for everyone. The cost of registration is $25. The fee will be waived for UTK-affiliated attendees. If you are not UTK-affiliated and the registration fee causes you financial difficulties, email us at cda@utk.edu explaining your situation. You can register to attend at utkcda.eventbrite.com or at the event. We are unable to provide financial assistance with travel at this time, though we can provide advice about area hotels and travel.

Important dates:

February 10, 2014 – deadline to submit an abstract

February 24, 2014 – date by which you will be notified of acceptance

March 10, 2014 – deadline for invited presenters to confirm attendance

April 4-5, 2014 – conference dates

Location:

Howard H. Baker Center for Public Policy


University of Tennessee

1640 Cumberland Avenue


Knoxville, TN 379

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Web Conference: Child Sexual Abuse and Disabilities

Web Conference:
Child Sexual Abuse and Disabilities
Thursday, January 16, 2014
11am Pacific Time, 2pm Eastern Time
Although children with disabilities are three times more likely to be sexually abused, these children have not garnered the same attention of policy makers, the media or community organization. There is also an alarming lack of primary prevention programs available to this population. In this important web conference, the speakers will provide insights into this emerging issue as well as some innovative programs and collaborations.
 
Hosts: Joan Tabachnick and Cordelia Anderson
Cost: Free
Learning Objectives:
  • Increase understanding of the impact that disabilities may have in increasing the risk for sexual abuse.
  • Identify three barriers to implementing policies to enhance a child’s safety within an organization.
  • Articulate three actions you can take to ensure a child’s safety if she or he has a disability.
Presenters:
  • Meg Stone, Executive Director, IMPACT Boston and Project Director IMPACT:Ability
What is a Web Conference?
A web conference is an opportunity to attend an online workshop by watching a presentation on your computer screen (using your internet connection) and hearing presenters through your telephone. PreventConnect web conferences feature an opportunity to participate in online question & answer sessions and live text chat between participants. If for some reason you are unable to join on your computer, you can download the presentation slides from our website and listen on your phone.
Real-Time Captioning Available:
Instructions for accessing captioning during this web conference will be provided with your registration confirmation.
Compatibility:
The iLinc web conference software used by Prevent Connect is compatible with both Microsoft® Windows® and Apple® Macintosh® computers. Click here for detailed system requirements.
Conference registrants will receive important information by email about how to access the web conference session. To try to avoid this important message from being blocked by your SPAM filter, please add emailservice@ilinc.com to your email address book or allowed-senders list. If you have access to your network firewall, you can also add ilinc.com and calcasa.org to your allowed-domains list.


 
Ending Child Sexual Abuse Web Conference Series is collaborative project of the Ms. Foundation for Women and PreventConnect (a national project of the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault [CALCASA]). The views and information provided in in this web conference do not necessarily represent the official views of the Ms. Foundation or CALCASA.


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Call For Papers: Disability and Labor: A Contentious Relationship? 

National Women’s Studies Association 
Disability Studies Interest Group 
The Americans with Disabilities Act has been essential in providing protection against discrimination in the work place. Thus, constructions of disability are hinged on an understanding of wage labor and, in the language of the ADA, “reasonable accommodation.” But what is considered reasonable? With the increase of technology, what is considered assisted technology? What is considered an accommodation? This is only one historical moment when disability and labor have been in a contentious relationship. As disability historian Kim Nielsen tells us, those with physical and cognitive impairments were able to labor in small communities, where accommodations over the course of one’s life were expected; with industrialization, the standardization of the workforce made such impairments disabling. As factory work became more prominent and veterans returned from wars and conflicts, the 20th century saw an increase in physical disability. This also lead to an increase in the need for long-term care workers, many of whom are immigrant women or women of color, surviving and supporting families on sparse economic resources. What does it mean to participate in feminist care work? How can we use disability as an epistemology to radicalize care work? In the Global South, as feminist disability theorist Nirmala Ervelles tells us, the World Bank “prioritizes health interventions by calculating their relative cost-effectiveness […] where the cost of each intervention is weighed against a person’s potential productivity (i.e. contribution to economic growth)” (Erevelles 2009 139). Thus, labor persists as a key measurement for disability, healthcare intervention, and citizenship. What does it mean for feminist disability scholars in the Global North to address the World Bank’s health interventions? What does it mean to think of disability outside of potential labor? What does it mean for feminist disability theorists to promote a queer feminist crip ethic of labor? How can this ethic address citizenship for all bodies at the intersection of gender, race, class, and religion? This panel seeks to explore the themes of disability and labor from a variety of angles. 
Possible paper topics include: Adaptive Technology and the Workplace; The Racial and Economic Politics of Care Work; “Reasonable” Accommodation?; Compulsory Rehabilitation and Crip Resistance; Compulsory Productivity vs “Unproductivity”; Labor, Disability, and Citizenship; Returning Veterans, Labor, and Family; Reproductive Labor and Disability; Disability, Labor, and the Global South 
Please send your paper proposal to nwsadisabilitycaucus@gmail.com by February 8th 2014. We will let you know about your submission by February 18th


News and Announcements

WEBINAR: The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD)

 
We are excited to announce our first monthly webinar, coming up on January 30 at 12:30 CST, 1:30 EST.  We hope you can attend and feel free to invite anyone that might be interested in NCCJD’s work.  Please see below for the official announcement and link to register.  
 
Introduction to New National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability Slated
The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability welcomes you to attend its first webinar on January 30 at 12:30 CST, 1:30 EST. This is the first in a series of 20 plus webinars taking place over the next two years as part of the Department of Justice-funded project. Learn about The Center’s mission, goals, partners, products and services, and find out how you can get involved and become better equipped to provide equal access to justice for individuals with I/DD in your own community and within your profession. The webinar’s target audience is purposefully broad to set the stage for more meaningful dialogue and deeper networking between the criminal justice and disability worlds.  Law enforcement and other first responders, legal professionals, forensic interviewers, victim advocates, disability advocates and other allied professionals are encouraged to attend this free session.  Register now.  Contact Kathryn Walker atkwalker@thearc.org with any questions.

Articles of Interest-Disabilities

The following are recent news stories of interest to people with disabilities and those supporting and working with and for people with disabilities.
Dr. Nora's Top Articles: (4 out of 36)
1.   “Tips: Identifying Types of Mistreatment of Adults” --- The role of Morgan County Department of Human Services' Adult Protective Services program is to stop and prevent the ... --- Fort Morgan Times --- December 30, 2013  (COLORADO)  http://is.gd/WQBvTj
2.   “Therapist Charged with Abusing Autistic Boy” --- Jacobs was reportedly one of four therapists from a Wauwatosa practice to give the severely autistic boy treatments at his Waterford home. --- Journal Times --- December 31, 2013   (CONNECTICUT)  http://is.gd/r9uzuE 
3.   “2013 Look Back: Wyoming Disability Center Faces Intense Scrutiny” --- This fall, a disability advocacy group released two damning reports that criticized the facility for allowing dangerous conditions and hiding the use of ... --- Casper Star-Tribune Online --- December 26, 2013  (WYOMING)  http://is.gd/dlh4qQ
4.   “Police Violence Against People with Disabilities on the Rise?” --- Last summer in Oregon, an 11-year-old girl on the Autism spectrum was tasered after failing to respond to an officer. The officer claimed that the ... --- Bay Area Indymedia --- December 28, 2013  (U.S. – NATIONAL) http://is.gd/vsehnV
 
 


Disability Cultural Center
105 Hoople Building
805 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244

Email: sudcc@syr.edu
Phone: (315) 443-4486
Fax: (315) 443-0193

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